30 Burst results for "Rumi"

Former Speaker of House Newt Gingrich on the Democrats' Midterm Plan

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:49 min | 5 months ago

Former Speaker of House Newt Gingrich on the Democrats' Midterm Plan

"That I'm a little paranoid about though, mister speaker, and I talk about this openly on the program, is that the Democrats have some sort of plan for the midterms that we might not yet be gaming out correctly because I have so much respect for our opposition and how Machiavelli and they are and how they're able to use tragedy for their own purposes. What do you think their midterm plan is? Because up until recently, you know, as per your example of the Saudi Arabian visit, it seems as if they are enthusiastically accelerating over a cliff. Political consequences be damned, I suppose, what's your thoughts? Well, I think first of all, I help publish papers in the 1980s called the Grenada papers. When we liberated the island of Grenada, which spoke English, this was an island occupied largely by Africans living in the Caribbean with agriculture and tourism as there are two biggest incomes. And the communists took it over. And as the communists tried to impose communism, everything fell apart. It was a disaster. So we now know because this is how we got to the Grenada papers. Because everything they wrote was in English. So we didn't need to translate the State Department couldn't screw it up. And it turns out that the leadership of the Communist Party of Grenada, when everything was failing, would meet every Tuesday afternoon for a study group. And what they were studying was not supply side economics. It wasn't Milton Friedman. It wasn't Adam Smith. What they were studying was Stalin's writing. Now, you have a Georgian bank robber who becomes dictator of a country that covers 13 time zones, living in Moscow and really bad cold winter, being studied by African descended, Caribbean native native folks were looking around going, what should we do next? Well, what does Stalin think we should do? The reason I tell you this story is, when AOC gets in a room, she doesn't have any point of reference. But I mean, Biden's different. Biden doesn't have a point of reference because he's not sure what rumi said. But I guarantee you that Newsom Kamala Harris, barriers, other people, senator Warren, Bernie Sanders, who remember honeymooned in the Soviet Union. I mean, just ask yourself, a guy who is born who lives born in Brooklyn, but a guy who was living in the forest of Vermont. Besides to go on a honeymoon, does he go to the Caribbean? Does he go to the beach now? He goes to the motherland to the great forest of Russia from the forest of Vermont. I mean, this isn't true believer.

Grenada Communist Party Of Grenada Caribbean Stalin Milton Friedman State Department Adam Smith Biden Newsom Kamala Harris Senator Warren Moscow Rumi Bernie Sanders Soviet Union Brooklyn Vermont Russia
"rumi" Discussed on Daily Whispers

Daily Whispers

02:37 min | 5 months ago

"rumi" Discussed on Daily Whispers

"The opposite? May be it letting things get messy or being clumsy instead of always being so perfect and put together. This is just for you. For fun. To color outside the lines, what if you stopped being so predictable? What if you, as rumi says, live where you fear to live? Destroy your reputation if that's not going to. Lose your job or your business, of course. What if you did the opposite of what you usually do? This is just to shake it up, my friend especially these last couple of years, you know, our lives while there's so much uncertainty out there for sure. You know, our lives in many ways have gotten so much smaller because of COVID and restrictions and quarantine and what's closed and what doesn't happen anymore. So I think it's a really, really important because radical novelty being doing things differently seeing things differently. Is a flow trigger. It trips us into our more optimal experiences where we become deeply present in the moment where time stands still. Where we tap into our senses in high definition, where we feel most alive. And so I think that being less predictable is a practice. For me, anyway, 'cause I am, I get very, very fixed in my routines. So I'd love to hear from you what you came up with. And I am going to do a review of all of these of what if I stopped. Episodes to let you know what I have experienced. So remember, just for the week, what if I stopped fixing? Forcing what if I stopped caring what other people think and stop judging? And what if I stop being so predictable? What? What happened? Um. I love this. I love these inquiries.

rumi
"rumi" Discussed on The One You Feed

The One You Feed

03:53 min | 6 months ago

"rumi" Discussed on The One You Feed

"Talk about and reference sort of life purpose. Can you share a little bit about what that means to you and sort of where you go in your work on that area? When I do write in is a central interest of mine, I like where you're leading. But I'd like to jump back just for a moment first because we started out with a parable of the two wolves, the good wolf and the bad wolf. And I'd like to offer it maybe a little more original perspective than the example I gave. I think it's an important one about sorting for blessings or what happened negatively. But there is another more original approach the idea of that there's no actually good or bad. You know, rumi said, out beyond wrongdoing and right doing, there is a field. I'll meet you there. And of course, what he meant was, there's a way to look at life not from a moralistic view of good or bad, but of action and consequences. So we don't make moral judgments. That was a bad thing. People make the best choice they can, they see at the time. Their friends may say, how can you make this choice, but to them, it's the only choice they have are the best one they have available. So I've stopped really judging whether someone's good or bad right or wrong, more or not. But I do point out that certain actions may be more likely to lead to certain consequences. And that's one definition of wisdom, being able to get some sight into the potential consequences of our actions. And that's more likely to guide our lives. And by the way, the brain with two sides of the brain, they're not just two wolves inside of us. But there are also these polarized characters inside of us. We each of us have the puritan and the hedonist. Someone who's a practice is self self denial and someone who practices self indulgence. And a lot of our lives are balancing those two. And finding out when it's appropriate to celebrate and expand into life and be more of a hedonist and other times, maybe that puritan being maybe leaner and following the rules, that may be more useful as well. We have inside of us a callous person and a very sentimental person. And again, there are moments where each is useful. And then we also have inside of us, a peacock and a chicken. The peacock is very, very, they have a sense of self respect and dignity, whereas the chicken lacks self respect, but there are times even that is appropriate those different roles to play in life. So those wolves just represent one aspect of our being and I love the story and that's why I wanted to just relate to.

rumi
"rumi" Discussed on The Daily Boost

The Daily Boost

04:02 min | 8 months ago

"rumi" Discussed on The Daily Boost

"I got it. Happens. Okay. You always learn from that happens. Just make another change. That's all. Rumi said yesterday I was so clever, so I wanted to change the world. Today I'm wise, I'm changing myself. There's a somewhat of a somewhat on pattern going on here. I can't quite put my finger on it. What is that pattern that's happening? That's not change change change. Where does change begin? I want to become myself. I do that. Now let me go ahead. If tomorrow, you won't be better than yesterday or today, something has to change, right? That's something as you. If you want to make more money, serve more, be happier next year, something has to change well right now. That's something as you. If you want to live life that is well lived, something has to change today, and that's something as you. What can you change? Let's talk about this for a second. Let me really. I don't know that anybody ever stops and says that to you. I'm babbling on about changing and becoming the person you're meant to be. First off, I guess. Do you know the person you're meant to be? If not, just by simply saying, well, who am I meant to be? That starts the process. It might take you some time to figure it out. Usually does. In most cases, what I'm going to retire is that the very thing you're looking at. I'm starting to hear more of this out there these days. I've been saying it for years. When you want to find out the person you're meant to be, find your purpose in life, you're passionate in life, all that kind of stuff. It's not some mystical thing to go searching for. What you do is you explore everything out there. You explore the possibilities. You try stuff. Okay, I think I want to be this kind of person. Great, go try it on. See what happens. It doesn't fit. Try something else on. That's it. That's what happens. So if you really want to kind of dig down into this and make some change and you don't really even know where to start. That's where you start. You just go, okay, I don't know, Scott, I have no idea what to do, but okay, I've kind of been thinking that maybe I want to fly drones. But I don't know anything about drones. Go get a drone. I did. Want to buy it? Sitting in my closet. I haven't flown about 6 months now. Decided it wasn't my thing. Loved it when I had it, decided it wasn't my thing. I explored the possibility. So if you don't know who you're meant to be, but you have an inkling because most people do, most people say, I just want to leave a legacy or have an impact on the world. Cool. Start there, and then say, all right, what does that mean? What works for me? How do I get my message out? How do I impact people? Where are my best serving? At my best when I'm serving. Gotta start there. That's how you become the person that you're meant to be and you start today. And you can do it today. You can do it right now. You can turn off this podcast on the way home, and you maybe have a few more minutes before you get home if you're listening to the car or on the treadmill, whatever. It might be really wonderful time. To ponder to contemplate, to think, okay, wait a second. Who am I supposed to be? In this world is lifetime that is going to be so short at the end, I promise you that. What can I do today? On the way home maybe that will get me closer to that first and I think I'm supposed to be. And if I don't know, you know, where can I go to figure it out? Who can I talk to and what kind of read and how can I expose myself to other ideas and all that stuff? Well, all right, I need to go here. You know why? Because I showed up today and you saw I like to be funnier. I like to make you chuckle more and. But every now and then I get down to the serious side, so one thing about me if you listen to over time, I'm just going to be a transparent open book to you. Is that there's a lot between the lines. It's a ton between the lines. So when you hear what I say and you hear my presentation, listen between the lines because there's a lot of intuition that's coming out to you a lot of insight that flies out and it's all kind of mass sometimes between what I do. But it's who I am. And so if you're a real, smart, you might listen again between the lines this time and see what you hear, there will be a story, therefore you will be messaged for therefore you will be a lesson there for you. I promise you. All right, have a great weekend. Tomorrow, the husband wife talking life show. My wife joy joins me in the studio, get that show. It comes out probably first thing Saturday morning, usually, sometimes. Sometimes not, but we try..

Rumi Scott joy joins
"rumi" Discussed on Delicious Ways to Feel Better

Delicious Ways to Feel Better

03:46 min | 9 months ago

"rumi" Discussed on Delicious Ways to Feel Better

"To go into social media. But it's also less fulfilling. It's like white sugar. It's very good analogy. And so yeah, I think social media is the white sugar of our time, the more you use it the worse you feel. We need to connect with each other in real time, real space. Tell each other, we love each other on a regular basis. With eye contact. And also tell our loved ones. You matter. You are important. I don't know what I would do without you. I will always be here for you. You can count on me. You said you brought topic, but if there were three things that you wish everybody knew that you think would make a tangible impact to their lives, what would those three things be? Let's start with the breath number one, take on a breathing regimen that you do every day, even if it's just for a few minutes. You'll notice the difference. And then move it up to 20 or 30 minutes a day. It will be life-changing to you and everyone who loves you. That's number one. Number two, understand that you, your presence, is important. People don't love you because of what you do. They don't love you because of your money, your beauty, your career. They love you because of who you are in your heart. That's the most precious thing you have. And so when you go to a certain someone who is in crisis, just being with them is a treasure to them. You don't have to say anything like rumi, you don't need to do anything. You can't fix their problem. They don't expect you to fix their problem, but they want you with them when they're in crisis. And lastly, learn to ask for help. A great fear is if we reveal that we're in trouble, I do one to one sessions and a lot of CEOs come to me for one to one sessions because they have panic attacks. They don't want anybody to know the panic attack because it makes them seem weak. That's how they see it. And vulnerable to losing their position. And whether you're a CEO, a house mother or a father or anybody else. You have to learn to ask for help and to tell someone that you love when you're really not doing well. A friend of mine taught me how to do this through her action. She wanted to tell me something that she was very ashamed of when it happened to her in the past. Extremely difficult to say. Before she said it, we were sitting beside each other in a car. She put her hand on my shoulder and she said, I want to tell you something that's really hard for me. I said, go ahead. And she put her hand on my shoulder and she.

rumi
"rumi" Discussed on Tara Brach

Tara Brach

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"rumi" Discussed on Tara Brach

"Matter what. Wow. But I had a back door Mark. The back door is it didn't matter what practice it didn't matter how long it didn't matter where it didn't matter what time. So big back to all it meant was I had the intention to pause and be with myself for some period of time each day. And that's good. And beginning when he was an infant, sometimes at the end of the day, I'd sit down and just breathe for like two minutes and say may all the world be blessed and go to bed. But it's a bit of a trick because if you say every day, no matter what life loves rhythms is written and it just creates this habit of rumi says, do you make regular visits to yourself? Okay, so what's it like right now inside? And we become increasingly intimate and comfortable being with discomfort or being with beauty or goodness or whatever's there. We just have increasing ease. So every day, no matter what, but just start slow. Yeah, I love it even 30 seconds. It's like if you can't find 5 minutes to meditate and every day, then there's something wrong with your life. Yeah. And what you just said about 30 seconds, I think it's amazing if we're just quiet for 15 seconds. If we just take three long deep breaths or biochemistry changes, you know, there's a settling. There's a new perspective. So it counts. Yeah, so beautiful. And I want to talk about some of the challenges we faced. A lot of us have these negative and harmful stories. I'm definitely a victim of that. And there are stories that I tell myself that aren't necessarily true, but that keep me suffering. So how do we release those stories and the imprisonment that we have in our emotional states that we get from the thinking of these stories of repeating of these stories? And that's what happened is we have stories that come with feelings in our body that lead to behaviors and we get.

rumi Mark
"rumi" Discussed on Tara Brach

Tara Brach

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"rumi" Discussed on Tara Brach

"In these heart practices, we're really moving from this realm of thinking. Conceptual to the heart and keeping the heart in the body at the center of awareness as a way of homecoming. It has to be an aesthetic. This particular practice today will be really emphasizing goodness. Because of our negativity bias, we don't really immerse and take in and sense the feeling of what it's like to observe goodness in ourselves or others. And with ourselves we rarely acknowledge it, we're so organized around what's wrong. So that's where we'll pay attention today. Rumi says whenever some kindness comes to you, turn that way toward the source of kindness. So we'll be looking for the source of loving and turning in that direction. Finding a posture that allows you to be alert sitting upright and also at ease. This is a way of initially collecting your attention. You might take a nice full deep in breath. And then a slow out breath slow enough so you can feel the sensations leaving the nostrils. And then another nice long deep in breath. Slow out breath, letting go. Letting go. One more time, deep full in breath. And slow out, breath. Relaxing outward. Letting the breath resume, and it's natural rhythm. Noticing the quality of presence. It's right here. From that space of presence sensing your most sincere intention. For this practice. As a way of creating a receptivity and openness in the body, I'd like to do a classical pre meta practice in a way it's a body meta practice of the smile down. Begin by a great smile spreading through the sky. Just vast that great sky that's out there just spreading through it. The uplift of a smile. You can imagine the mind and the sky emerging so that the mind is filled with that uplift curve, openness of a smile. Letting the smile spread through the eyes, lifting the outer corners of the eyes. Softening the eyes. Letting the brow be smooth. Sensing the mouth, slight smile. Just directly helps to quiet the.

Rumi
"rumi" Discussed on Parenting for the Future

Parenting for the Future

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"rumi" Discussed on Parenting for the Future

"Show. I think these are the things that will help us bring change to the world. So we can be more or connected. We didn't get to touch on some aspects of your life as someone who has immigrated to another country, starting up a business as a woman and some of the challenges you might face in that space. But I want to end by giving you some space now to share with us something that guides you a principal a mantra a quote, something that guides and sustains you as a parent as a change agent because that's what I consider you to be. Something you think might inspire all of us to work to create a better world through our parenting. I'll give you space for that now. Rumi, speak a new language so that the world will be a new world. Yeah. I like that. I like that a lot. It's been a real pleasure to talk to you Michelle. I feel like we somehow did not cover all of the things that we could have covered in this conversation. So I think we need to have another one. We appreciate your time. And we wish you continued success. Just the beginning, be on the lookout. And they'll be checking in on what you're doing as well. Thank you for all the great stories you're bringing to us about. Thank you. Thank you very much. Thank you for listening. Please make sure to subscribe to the show wherever you get your podcasts. Help me bring the show to more parents by reading and reviewing it and following me on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. You can find me at pedal modest. Send me your suggestions and questions to parenting for the future podcast at Gmail dot com. Thank you again for listening..

Rumi Michelle Instagram Facebook Twitter
"rumi" Discussed on Tara Brach

Tara Brach

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"rumi" Discussed on Tara Brach

"The space between thoughts. Relaxing with what's right here. The poet rumi writes, the empty of worrying. Think of who created thought. Why do you stay in prison when the door is so wide open? Move outside the tangle of fear thinking. Live and silence. Flow down and down. And always widening rings of being. Able to..

rumi
"rumi" Discussed on 10 Bestest

10 Bestest

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"rumi" Discussed on 10 Bestest

"I really wanna do it someday. Maybe and it was kind of similar ish a little bit different themes so i love it so i'm like extra connected to this radio yes i cannot wait to check it out but it was kind of my take on it because we were all going to produce like different segments. My segment was kind of deep diving on movies and characters taking philosophies and things to it. I'm and maybe this is already happening in a similar or a little bit different way. I can't wait. I can't wait to check it out as say this is proof that people love it because yeah i don't remember how many he has but it's in the hundreds of thousands. Yeah and and people love it. I discovered it. Because you know pretty good suggesting things. Uh and i kept watching these different videos and at some point i put it together. They're all coming from the same channel. That takes a while so finally click. And you're like oh yeah that would yes. Yes because i kept saying l. s. of. Yeah oh out. Whatever and then i was like wait a minute. This is a really good gel ikea kind of love it when those moments happened. Because it's just like all of a sudden. The light bulb goes off. And the like whoa. Yeah oh that's everywhere kind of frequency illusion again. Yes but you know that happened with me. Ever tell you the story having me with ted people kept sending me these talks. And i'm like oh. These talks are so amazing. Like oh again. Like i didn't know what ted who's ted everybody kind of the joke and of course it's funny. Because then i became a headaches. Curator organizer had events. It became like my life for years and years years and still is a big part of my life but even back then i was like what What what is this. This is ted. Then why do they keep. Why do these different people exciting either all from the same place. That's interesting yeah. I should check that out. So i'm glad i check that out. I'm glad you check out. It's going to be really really cool. You'll like it. i'm gonna love it. I'm sure don't forget show notes. Ten besson's dot com slash. Food can take you to that channel and all the other things that we've talked about today and all this week and thank you so much for listening. Forget to subscribe to our podcast share with a friend rates. Even if you want we appreciate you so much. And i'm brian hart i'm karen mcfarlane hohmann and.

ted headaches besson brian hart karen mcfarlane hohmann
"rumi" Discussed on 10 Bestest

10 Bestest

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"rumi" Discussed on 10 Bestest

"And. Check it out for yourself excellent. thank you so much. I can't wait to watch that. you're gonna love it anyway. Well michael sheets. I'm going to be talking about the youtube channel and this channel. I love this channel. It is called like stories of old if you love stories if you love the meaning behind stories and characters and analysis such as we learn and things like the hero's journey this channel is for you the channel creator gushes about how stories have always had a strong impact on him and it truly shows on this channel. I think we'd all agree with him that story's affect how we look at the world how they help make us better people and that we can better understand the impact of stores have on us if we not only joy the stories themselves for whatever fun that were that they give us at the time but if we do spend some time analyzing them considering underlying themes and archetypes and things like that. That's where this channel comes in. He select some stories that are well known such as lord of the rings and some that are lesser known and then discusses themes that appear in them. He also loves philosophy clearly and there are several videos. He created that points out where for example stoicism appears in movies such as the shawshank redemption. He talks about the meta physics of the movie inception he also brings in tv shows such as one of my favorites which is a former sheet. The good place and he talks about ethics by talking about that. Tv show. i've also seen him on occasion. Talk about gaming where he discusses the unfulfilled potential of minecraft where assuming a different perspective on the world can help us. He also covers some filmmakers such as talking about humanistic cinema with akira kurosawa. As the case study. I love channel like stories of old men finally going to love. You are and in fact. I actually talked with a friend of mine jason. We were gonna start another youtube channel. Which is probably insane. It is insane. But.

michael sheets youtube akira kurosawa jason
"rumi" Discussed on 10 Bestest

10 Bestest

07:58 min | 1 year ago

"rumi" Discussed on 10 Bestest

"Is a homeless anymore. They're in college and got a job or they get a. You know it's so cool to see i love definitely a really really endearing youtube channel and it does it shows that there's the youtube is a powerful platform now. They're going to be a lot of good things coming out of this. I am definitely going to dive into that. I watch and check them out on her show. Knows tempests com slash food. And you can go right to it. Yes michael seat. I am going to be talking about an artist an illustrator. I love this person. This is edward gorey and it is not a coincidence that i waited till october to talk about him. Edward gorey was a prolific illustrator. And he was also a writer and i just found this out when i was doing research on him. He is a tony award winning costume designer but he is most famous for his illustrated books. He has this characteristic penny drawing style and he is often depicting vaguely unsettling narrative scenes and in this victorian and at warden settings and that kind of vibe in one thousand nine hundred sixty three he published an alphabet book was so grim and it had this premise of this genre of making children. Feel comfortable or uncomfortable and inspiring them to learn this genre. Was this macabre humor and he really brought into a whole new level he. So here's his alphabet. Book as for amy who fell down the stairs and the name of this alpha book was the gash lee krum tiny so all these this idea of the chinese were where these little characters and just that name ghastly crime. You get you get the vibe there so be is for basil assaulted by bears. And of course he has these pictures to go along with it. This is a children's book sees for clara. Who wasted away for desmond. Thrown out of a sleigh. Wow yes so. This is like part. Tim burton long before. There's tim. Burton part edgar allan poe long after ed grill impo and this book just exudes his all of this this mastery of how he draws and then just sharing this love of macabre that he has so he was born in nineteen twenty five and he died fairly recently and two thousand. I am fascinated by his work. And a you should definitely check him out. Edward gorey short sean. Perfect last name to for his style. He had to do it exactly. It was truly his last name wild. He personified yeah. He embraced. It took it to the next level so another person. I love this show. I haven't heard of them. And i can't wait to check them out. It's it is quite scary. That these were children's books I know they look like it'd be perfect for me especially right now at halloween time. Yes learning this. And i would say definitely older children so my friend. Kelly kelly hagen is the one who told me introduce me to gory and i would say when kelly's kids were like eleven ten or eleven and you start getting into that sort of creepy stuff and they loved edward gorey to and so yeah. It's not as it to redo your six year old in the middle to go to bed right. Go to go into bed now. But i i went to with. Kelly went to edwardian ball in san francisco and they had the stairs going up that these little vignettes and they had little edward gorey like pictures and it was really like just. You've got dark vibe. So yeah yeah. I can't wait to dive in and check that out. Yes fun and in time for halloween. Yes so absolutely. It's perfect. Those of you were listening watching as soon as we released this happy halloween. Of course you might be listening later. Edward gorey's still fun. No matter what absolutely. I mean there's a lot of people like to look at the scary stuff year-round. They wish. halloween was happening every month. And i love those people. Yeah all right michael. She is going to be a short film and this is called. Let things rot. So this is in partnership with a fantastic fungi which is a former call sheet in so but it's a standalone short film. That just came out. And i had to talk about it strengthened by matteo. I'm going to put that up on the graphics. Because i can't say it so you have to watch youtube. Check out that name and it's in collaboration. With our founders sh- juliana for ferchichi and this is a seven and a half minute short duck so you can get pretty quickly. The cinematography of course stunning music is moving. Starts with the question. Have you ever seen a fallen tree in the forest. Have you ever stopped to observe it. If everyone did everything would be different and everything would be better. I love the way it started just like that when the leaves fall off the tree into the ground so many see this as an end but really it's just the beginning talks about the life cycle of everything around us and it's not just trees and plants and everything and it says. Have you ever stop to think that the maybe the noblest part of the trees life is once it hits the ground. It's just so beautiful. It really got me quite emotional. When i started watching it. Because she goes into the forest and she's looking at this fallen tree and she puts her hands into the dirt that it's just creating this really rich soil and mushrooms are growing and it feeds more nourishing so other plants can grow. It really is. It's a talk about the cycle of life but to see in these beautiful imagery images is just it's really breathtaking and shows the importance of the ecosystem while delving into the significance of decomposition. And what it means for the world through fungi we can learn and importance of cycle. And it's just it's so beautiful. I don't wanna go too much further in because i'm running out of time and you just need to check out the short once again. That is let things rut. I agree no seriously. I think when you when you learn about decomposition and rotting. You'd do appreciate it when when he walked through the forest and you're like oh the beautiful trees of that's just a rotting piece of wood like you actually appreciate it. Notice the ferns coming out of it and you notice the other things. Yeah it's just. That's amazing i will love that It's beautiful and again at the time perfectly attemp recording the the release during fall Seeing a lot of believes there's and that'll make you see in a new way. But i love that idea. That death is not the end. It's the beginning that is such a beautiful thing and it is true if we started thinking that way everybody would be better i. It's just it's so beautiful but when you see it firsthand what it's doing for the environment and the world just breathtaking. Yeah so yeah it. It's imperative yeah so you can check that out on our show tempests dot com slash food.

edward gorey youtube lee krum ed grill Kelly kelly hagen tony award michael edgar allan poe Tim burton desmond basil clara Burton amy bears sean tim matteo kelly juliana
"rumi" Discussed on 10 Bestest

10 Bestest

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"rumi" Discussed on 10 Bestest

"I'm going to see an all the time and go like. Oh yeah so you know what. I always wonder about the frequency illusion though is like when if this is always happening all the time like what is what do i look like when people say baba soapstone and i'm just like glossy like like i know them right right because i'm sure there's so it was like oh yeah made his subsidize like cool and i'm genuinely like they made that that school is what's the stuff that we're right right. Okay so if you wanna learn more about it and it'll be lane. Yes check other showed ten buses dot com slash food will way more about soapstone and maybe even carve out of your own stuff. Yeah who thank you. you're all right. I'm going to be talking about a youtube channel and this youtube channel is called invisible people. This channel shows the amazing potential of youtube. So it's more than cavities. I know i hate say that. I love cavity. Assume that doesn't mean. I don't like them but this is really the power of youtube. It's five a one. C three nonprofit organization it was founded in november two thousand eight by activists and former television executive mark horvath. So they describe it as they want. Imagine a world where everyone has a place to call home each day. We work to fight homelessness and give face while educating individuals about systematic issues that contribute to its existence through storytelling education news activism. We're changing the narrative on homelessness. So the way they're doing this. They interview people on the streets homeless people on the streets all over the united states and other countries as well now horvath worked as a television distribution executive like i mentioned but he had an addiction to drugs and alcohol and it resulted in him becoming homeless in nineteen ninety five after eight years he finally got rehabilitation and was doing better but then in the great recession he lost his job again so he returned los angeles again was facing homelessness he recorded interviews with other homeless people on a flip cam and posted them on youtube and twitter and invisible people was born it launched it immediately resonated with so many people he's like i said he's interviewed people over one hundred cities across the united states canada and the united kingdom the kingdom he gives homeless a face anna voice which is often the hence the name invisible people because a lot of the times when you're walking by you kinda pretend that they don't exist maybe you don't want to hear their story but a lot of times. These people are not homeless by choice. There been meth heads or whatever they have stories a real people need help and want to do better checkout invisible people. I love that taking the group. That's not seen a lot and when you put the stories to them. Stories are so powerful and to their faces and it just brings so much empathy and understanding. That is so needed. Yeah absolutely. I mean even for someone that tries to be. Empathetic compassionate is very easy to either make appearance story. Somebody that's homeless especially when you and homelessness is just a growing problem all around the united states but here in our hometown and up in portland. It's getting really bad. And people get frustrated and i get it but and it's easy to make excuses. Oh they're all addicted to drugs or they got mental health problems and some people want to help but they're still a little like they will say they come up with the story but when you hear the story from that person's mouth right totally they're human changes everything and what i really like. He'll do follow ups so maybe interview somebody and then say oh here. They are ten years later. Or it's maybe now ten years a couple years they some them sort of their own youtube channel the clubs and giving updates. Yeah it's so heartwarming. That this person.

youtube mark horvath horvath united states los angeles united kingdom twitter canada portland
"rumi" Discussed on 10 Bestest

10 Bestest

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"rumi" Discussed on 10 Bestest

"At tempests com slash. Food michael. She'd has to do with two pretty awesome. Things kitchen and science. And i will be talking about soapstone. Soapstone is composed primarily of talq and shares many of the physical properties with that mineral. Talk if you don't know is hydro which means there's water in there. Magnesium silicate mineral so it's got a chemical composition that includes magnesium silicon oxygen and hydrogen and sometimes aluminum is incorporated into the structure. And naturally the physical properties of soapstone make it valuable for many different uses and these useful physical properties include. That it is soft. It is very easy to carve. You could just carpet with your own hands. It is non-porous so it's not going to absorb a lot of things and it has low electrical conductivity. It is heat resistance. And it has highest pacific heat capacity so that means it can absorb out of heat and then hold it once. It's there. It is also resistant to changing its composition. If there's a really acidic environment or a strong basic environment since soapstone is a naturally occurring rockets mineral composition can vary and its composition depends on the parent rock material and the temperature and pressure conditions of around that environment and as a result the physical properties and subsume can vary a little bit between locations but overall it has all those properties i just talked about and given that. It's soft and easy to carve and resistant. You can imagine how it was used over. History people have quarried soapstone for thousands of years. Native americans in eastern north america used the soft rock to make bulls and cooking slabs and smoking pipes and ornaments starting five thousand years ago. Native americans the west coast of the united states of present day southern california. They felt it was so important to get the soapstone that they would travel in canoes from mainland all the way over sixty miles offshore just to get it and is still used today it is beautiful it is so nice to the touch soapstone sean. Okay how have i never heard of. So p- stone well. I don't have any of that like in my house. That i don't even know. Raises is a very specific. So it's possible that you don't and the reason would be that it is so soft that like you'll never have services like we get granite because you can cut onto a similar properties and you can cut and then not slice it up. He's everyone wants it to stay nice so the thing soon. That's so lovely is that you can actually carve it so you can make things yourself so i would say it's more for people wanna make their own things and if they don't care if they get a little bit cut yeah exactly so it sounds fascinating yes. I know my way around the kitchen pretty well but i had no idea what any of that was. I kept thinking like the moment was gonna come and go. Oh yeah and that's what everybody's cast iron skills made out or something right. Obviously in the name but i was like waiting for that like oh yeah and i have five of those. I never knew i know. So this is something a little little more specific. Yes and i would say so where you want it. You can just order on amazon. Like yeah right i mean you can either just buy it. Yeah and i've had friends who've just like made out. That are beautiful. And i've been like i so much want to just try doing. I'm because it's amazing. How smoothie just so it's so satisfying you so cool now of course because of a former cool sheet the frequency illusion..

michael west coast north america sean california united states amazon
"rumi" Discussed on 10 Bestest

10 Bestest

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"rumi" Discussed on 10 Bestest

"Real thing. Because they started making those planned obsolescence where the super fast. Yeah yeah yeah sounds amazing. Under many different other links they have blogs. They had a podcast. It was short only eighteen episodes but still checking on their blog. They they're still put now movies. They have so many different resources. So definitely worth checking out this website. Love it. I will thank you very welcome all right. Don't forget you can check all of this show notes out. I should say on tempests dot com slash food excellent. Yeah michael sheet. I am going to be talking about a poet and this is a roomy in episode one hundred and eighty guest. Mickey trowbridge shared a beautiful poem by the world. Renowned much loved poet rumi. She talked about the poem and how its meaning and how she uses a meditation but she did not talk about roomy himself and so i wanted to share him because he so amazing his full name melena gelatin. Roomy probably out pronouncing that correctly but we will call him rumi which is how he is known. He was a thirteenth century. Persian poet and islamic dervish and a sufi mystic. He is regarded as one of the greatest spiritual masters and poets his most famous for his lyrics and for his epoch. Work whose name translates to spiritual couplets. This piece was especially influential thought and literature throughout the middle east. He was born in twelve o seven ad and he belonged to a family of highly educated theologians but he created accessible teachings that touched so many different kinds of people because he made use of everyday life circumstances to describe the spiritual world. Roomies poets poems have acquired immense popularity especially among persian speakers of afghanistan iran and tajikistan but rooms popularity has gone beyond national and ethnic borders. He is considered to be one of the major classical poets worldwide ramiz works have been translated to many languages across the world. Russian german or turkish arabic french italian english and spanish roomie was a disciple of one of his father's students. And under his guidance he practiced sufism and acquired a lot of knowledge about spiritual matters and secrets of the spiritual world roomy inherited his father's spiritual leader position and became a prominent religious leader. And by the time he was twenty four years old proven himself as a well informed scholar in the field of religious science and he wrote absolutely gorgeous poetry ruining shawn. Thank you so much sharing that. Can you believe that. How lucy yet. I mean i can. I can tie well. And it's funny. Because when i saw this show now it's like oh. Are we sure we ever talked about that. I do. I was like oh yeah. Monkey talked about that. And i loved her approach to because she takes one meditation specific kind of makes it her almost mantra.

michael sheet Mickey trowbridge poet rumi ramiz tajikistan middle east afghanistan iran shawn lucy
"rumi" Discussed on 10 Bestest

10 Bestest

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"rumi" Discussed on 10 Bestest

"Like the sat because they thought it measured pure intelligence regardless of the quality of the takers high school education. So in that sense it was it was a good idea but in nine hundred thirty eight. They talked to members of the college board and they talked him into using the sat as a uniform exam but only scholarship applicants however furious later became the nor forever when applying for college and in nineteen forty four after world war two under contract to the army and the navy. The sat was administered to more than three hundred thousand people all over the country in a single day and it goes from here that we have. What's very interesting. Is that if you look at the original. Sat and the current sat. It is not that different. And we're going to have a link where you can actually go in and compare the two the. Sat is not only a racist. It is also classiest and it is sexist and it should be ditched and guess what it is being ditched by over a thousand colleges nationwide ditch the sat. woo. I'm super like the super joie. Yeah did step thing. that's good. Oh my gosh. So i threw my high school career. I always have testing anxiety yet. Really bad takeouts issues so when you come to this like the mother of all task the whole entire college career depends on. I ended up. Well i wouldn't say that. This is the only reason. But i never took it. I was too freaked out. Because i was like well. If my route then we'll be community college. I house zulu do that. And that i mean my life could be totally different. I have no regrets. I'm super happy. That actually turned out this way. But i probably didn't go to a four year college because of over the so i'm super glad.

navy army
"rumi" Discussed on 10 Bestest

10 Bestest

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"rumi" Discussed on 10 Bestest

"Anything goes hello friend. Welcome to best this where we sift through the noise. So you don't have to. I'm brian hart. I'm carrying mcfarland home and here. We go with another podcast episode. I'm excited i'm excited to. I got some good ones. Who can't wait but i go i so i have to wait a little bit longer and michael. She is going to be a movement. And this is called the food waste fiasco. So last week i talked about rob greenfield and he started this food waste fiasco but i wanted to really hone in on this so as you might or might not know we throw away one hundred and sixty five billion dollars worth of food per year in the united states. That's more than the budgets of the united states national parks public libraries federal prisons veterans healthcare and fbi hand the fda combine about fifty million of our three hundred twenty million. Americans are food insecure yet. We produce enough food to feed over five hundred million americans so almost twice as many as we even have to create. Just the amount of food that ends up in landfills. We waste enough water to meet them. Domestic water needs of every american citizen. So there is a huge problem so on one of rob's rides across the united states. He decided to get all of his food by dumpster so he went dumpster diving and all of his food from there and he decided to then display all of the food that he found on the ground in park in each town so people can see the real impact and how much food is thrown away so he had way more than he could eat. You have to see it to believe it. So i do encourage you to check out the show notes for this now. The food was displayed by groups in patterns and then he started to give away to people that needed it. They raised over. They save ten thousand dollars worth of food and fed over five hundred people law rob learned that he can roll up to nearly any city across the united states and collect enough food to feed hundreds of people in a matter of one night. This is a really cool thing. I've already ran out of time. I have so many links that are going to be on the show notes for the food. Waste fiasco okay. I can't wait to see the photos to see what this looks like. Yes and and just to be able to comprehend. So what are the show notes with the link. Oh yes thank you so much. Ten best this dot com slash food. That'll take you rated this episode. So you can get all the links. I have a bunch of resources on food. Waste that i've read. American wasteland is one of the books a really good book. There's just eat it. I believe or eat it or something like that A couple of good docs. So yeah. Definitely tons of resources and what i really like. Is he encourages. People that the pictures are amazing to the worth a million words or whatever that saying goes but he says you know what the next time you go grocery shopping. He's like why don't you go to the back. Check out the dumpster and when you see how much food is in there that's when it will sink in east like you don't have to go dumpster diving. You'll have to bring the food home or did use like but just seeing it will change your life. I believe he says sometimes. Amd or they're locked so you might have to go to a couple of different places but he goes pretty much. The once you see at one time your life will be changed forever. That's amazing and i know you know. I worked at the grocery industry for thirteen fifteen years. Something like that a really long time and yeah we throughout all the time. We're doing pros department but everywhere we threw out stuff and you almost have to because if it's after the date or if it's just doesn't look perfect you can actually get in trouble if you sell it and it's not quite good. That's why imperfect produce and improve the turned an imperfect foods has been mentioned. Actually twice on the show was so powerful. Because i messed up but so important and it's just really cool so i have tons of links like i said on our show nuts of different things you can do to get more knowledgeable. Oh that's fantastic. I know that. I need a reminder of that. Yeah i know. And i think about it. It's one of my biggest like it's really weighs on me all the time. Speedway's i hate. I only buy what i need for fresh food. Especially since i live by myself. It's very little like my fridge is empty a lot of the times. Because it's like. I can't like just makes me so bad if you've grown way. Yeah so anyway. thank you. So my lord sharing that. It's really important my cool sheet. I'm gonna be talking about something. Education related and this is ditching the s. a. t. I want to give a little vignette or story of the history of the sat. And this is really going to then lead towards this idea of ditching it. So let's go back to the first world war. Rubber york's leading member of the new iq testing movement another test. That has major problems with it. Persuaded the us army to let him test all recruits for intelligence. This test was called. the army. alpha was the first mass administered. Iq test one of your assistance was a young psychologist named carl bringham who taught at princeton and after the war bringham became began adopting or adapting changing the army alpha mainly by making it more difficult for us as a college..

brian hart rob greenfield united states rob mcfarland fbi fda michael Amd Rubber york Speedway us army carl bringham bringham army princeton
"rumi" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"rumi" Discussed on Throughline

"The last forty years in afghanistan have been perhaps some of the most difficult in its history. The continual waves of war and tragedy have battered. it's soul and spread. Its people around the world but of a sun has always been the center of the world. It has always balanced newcomers with tradition fierce independence with extreme hospitality and that has resulted in one of the most richly layered and diverse cultures. On earth are honest on like all countries including our own is defined by its complexity the beauty and ugliness that can come from the same source. The taliban rose out of this complexity just as poets like rumi. Or nadia angie did. It is with a true appreciation for that depth and history that we can't as non athens.

afghanistan nadia angie taliban rumi athens
It's Not: What's the Best Software? It's: What's Best for You

The Digital Story

01:45 min | 1 year ago

It's Not: What's the Best Software? It's: What's Best for You

"Most of you the same to this podcast. The have your software right but there's always a little something a little voice in the back of your head especially after you see an article like what was on dp review with the capture one pro versus like rumi going well. Maybe i don't have the best. Maybe i should take a look at capture when pro or maybe i should take a look at affinity photo or maybe i should just stay with what i have and just know that is probably not the best but i'm too lazy to make a change. It could be any number of those things. So let's let's focus on five questions to start out with. And then i'll show you how those five answers may work for you or may work against you the see the see what. I'm talking about here all right first question. How important is overall speed for you. And we're talking about image processing software. If that's the case if overall processing speed is important to us high on your list will then you should be looking at capturing pro or photos for mac os because they are tops in that category and we know this for the moment. Especially if you're using one of the new m one max that captured one pro as really y- fine tuned for that particular hardware in certain areas. It really screams. Photos has always been fast. People never talk about. How fast photos is. But it's actually quite fast. Guess what the people that make the hardware also make that software. Do the math there.

Transforming Two Fears, FOF And FOMO

Tara Brach

02:39 min | 1 year ago

Transforming Two Fears, FOF And FOMO

"Readings and welcome to start with a poem from the poet. Rumi this is how a human being can change. There's a worm addicted to eating grape. Leaves suddenly he wakes up colored grace. Whatever something him and he's no longer worm houston the entire vineyard and the orchard to the fruit the trunk growing wisdom and joy that doesn't need to devour. This is how human being can change. This is a verse or poem about really the evolution of consciousness and this shifting from a separate self out of fear and grasping is kind of addicted habitual and to that realization of connection and oneness allows us to really live from a place of love and wisdom with. I'd like to do during this class. Is i ask you the question. Really what is between me and that sense of that whole mess. Growing wisdom enjoy just a sense what is between me and that experience and then to really look at two areas that many of us land on that seemed to run interference to areas of a fear where we might say. We're stuck as that worm. That's kind of addicted to the to the grape leaves. And then just to explore how meditation can be this evolutionary strategy that allows for grace that allows us to wake up and to begin with just to say. It's totally natural that we go through a phase of being the worm eating graves. I mean that's just part of evolution to and i don't know how many of you either had the hungry caterpillar. Read to you a ready to your children are reading your grandchildren. How many hungry caterpillar. so that's a good ninety percent of us which is a story of a hungry caterpillar that each day is getting more and more food and the foods beautiful like all these different kinds of fruits and vegetation and there's nothing wrong with it and at some point he gets really big and full and he creates a cocoon and there's a kind of stillness and then boom you know he's transformed. There's the

Rumi Houston
interview With Tara Brach

Good Life Project

04:39 min | 2 years ago

interview With Tara Brach

"So i heard la monroe in conversation with dan harris and he mentioned this interesting question to lead with and that was. How's your heart and not long ago. I heard you in conversation with your friend. Dan gottlieb which was beautiful conversation. And we'll touch on that a bit and you led into that conversation with that very same question so i thought maybe it would be an interesting way for us to lead into our conversation by simply inviting you to share. Your heart is right now jonathan. I'm glad you're opening that way. I i heard it when you heard it. That opening with murad and i started with him that way. And there's nothing better than a check into the heart so right now. I'm just feeling kind of gladness in just gratitude. I often think of rumi sang. Do you make regular visits to yoursel and it just always feels like such a gift when you know. There's that invitation to say okay. What's right here in this heart right now. So in this moment a gladness to talking to you Feeling a lot of have a lot of blessings in my life and the contrast of that and the degree of suffering pandemonium in our world is just so big that that's the ever present backdrop so there's kind of the mix of sorrow and worry and concern and Also feeling of gratitude both from for what from my personal blessings but also sense of hopefulness. Actually right now dan. It's interesting to that balance of Acknowledging the fairly call it may that's tends to be swirling around so many of us right now at the same time touching down into this place of gratitude. Gratitude interesting where you know if we actually circle back to that conversation where i i heard. You share that question with dan gottlieb. I mean his story alone blew my mind as she wasn't familiar with him Until you introduce me to him and would you share a little bit about about him. Because i think his story and the way that he sort of found his way back to this sense of present gratitude is is is really beautiful compelling yeah so dan gottlieb Probably early thirties. He was a psychologist. Clinical psychologist married children and he got into an accident that he he ended up paraplegic and he talks about his first converted the beginning and intensive care and how everything just felt like. Life's not going to be worth living. I don't think i can do this. And he shared with me. how one night and intensive care nurse was with them and she was really down she had a relationship falling apart and so on and she talked him for hours about it and the next morning she came by and said you know it just made a world of difference to talk to you and when she left he said you know i can live if if i can be engaged in feel a sense of that giving and receiving life's worth it and he's he's talked about how he's had dinner just countless ups and downs but there's something in him that is so cherishing life that he's probably the most grateful person i know and the something about that jonathan. This person who's been confined to a wheelchair for decades and soon after his accident. Actually his wife died. And you know he's gone through every so many losses and for him to have the basic lead into live. Being one of cherishing and savoring is just such a model at such a model so yeah. Dan got leave. He was a radio host in philly for years for anyone. That's interested in following a story and he has grandson on the spectrum and he's written some beautiful books including something to do a sam in the title so yes he's a he's a notable.

Dan Gottlieb La Monroe Rumi Sang Dan Harris Murad Jonathan DAN Philly
Healing from the root cause with mindset work, with Lana Shlafer

Real Talk with Dana | Nutrition, Health

04:49 min | 2 years ago

Healing from the root cause with mindset work, with Lana Shlafer

"Tell the audience a little bit more about you and your personal story. And i know you mentioned you've had a difficult past with your relationship with food in your body so talk about that so i mean i think that for a lot of people You know their health. Their eating their exercise their self-identity really stumps from things they experienced in childhood. Because that's where we learn how you know what is appropriate quote unquote way to behave. And how we form our priorities and ways of looking at the world so for me. I grew up in russia. And i came to the us when i was twelve. And so for me the big like shift and the pain point was that i was sort of ripped off from everything i knew in all my relatives and came even though life in russia was very difficult. It's what i knew. And i had friends and i was great at school. And you know all the things. And i get plopped in a country where i don't speak the language where i'm just here with my mom dad and brother and that's all the people i know and this entire site of the world and as i sort of tried to adjust to life here it was also middle school and a lot of teenage and body changes and troll norms and so for me and ended up manifesting that i started controlling food as the way i think to just feel like i've some control over my life and it was subtle at first where i just had a lot of emotions looking back. I didn't know that. At the time. I didn't know what to do with them. I obviously had hormonal. Thanks happening as well and a starting in high school. Where i just found that if i just eat less and i'm thinner i would get more attention and i also felt like i was more charge of my life and then it progressed through college way turned into binge eating and it got really bad when my parents got divorced so that my little world which was already not very stable totally apart even though was a great thing overall it was a challenging time. Being in a school a lot of pressure. I went to one of the top universities uc berkeley. I was taking a full load of classic. It was a lot of pressure. And so i feel like the eating and exercising was. It's always a double edged sword. And i talk about that in my books so and my philosophy often that it was the thing that was the weakest link that was sort of showing me the cracks. But it's also what brought in so much light. Rumi has great quote that it's through the cracks of the light enters and for me. It was this thing that i wanted to get rid of a body that i didn't like try to control the anxiety that i had the controlling be having my day in fifteen minute increments and everything that i need to eat to be planned out and it was so painful. I realized that it was a problem. I told my parents i should get checked into a like a facility. Because i'm not doing okay. And then being the the kind of russian culture. They're like you're fine. Just get through school. You know i. It led me to start therapy to learn about intuitive eating. Just start yoga to like it. Took me in the direction that now. I've been moving in for the rest of my life. But at the time i couldn't see the whole picture so was very painful. And it's one of my greatest accomplishments to this day and i have a lot of things that i described as miracles. My book is called manifest miracle. Because i literally could not imagine that at the time which is that i have not only completely healed whatever that means quote unquote my eating disorder. I have such a loving supportive relationship with my body. I eat what i want. When i want i move how i want. It's all about taking care of myself. And having had the pregnancy that a twin pregnancy on the single pregnancy all of that has taken deeper into honoring myself and creating a relationship with my reality. That really feels like it is based on love and support and understanding so the fact that i can say that from where i was seemed like a miracle like i thought that for the rest of my life. I'm going to have these issues. And i'm just going to try to manage them and it's really easy to feel that way when you're in it right so when you were in it. What were some of the things that you either experienced or you saw like. What were your on. The one hand motivating factors to get you out of that cycle. And then how did you start to get out of it. I mean honestly. I feel like all the emotional work was by far. What got me to the root of it more than even the intuitive books that i was reading and doing a lot of mindfulness practices. It all started really in college for me. I felt like they all got

Russia Rumi Berkeley United States
Finding Your Free Heart

On The Verge

06:52 min | 2 years ago

Finding Your Free Heart

"Boy oh boy do. I have my work. Cut out for me today. free heart. How can we possibly conquer and talk about freeing our emotional burdens in six minutes or less. It's not possible. But what i want to do for you today. In any way that i can the any way possible is to offer you my own experience and that is nobody can do this work for you my friend. No one can unburden your heart. You must go in on your own. Investigate check it all out become familiar with the blocks. The obstacles the baggage that you're holding onto and to unburden yourself. So this week is freedom week. We are talking about free. Mind free body so often a the root of our disturbances as we're learning from new science is deep deep deeply seated in our microbial in the microbe by oda in the balance of bacteria in our body. This is phenomenal. Phenomenal new science coming out. Make sure you grab my mental fitness protocol. To at least get you started on understanding this all but when it comes to the level of the heart we must approach it approach our heart and the the armor around our heart from different angles and very very tenderly so we can approach it from the gut brain access absolutely and we must and we can approach it from our mind and the patterns of our mind and we can open also approach it directly by just asking asking ourselves questions all day long. What what's gripping my heart today. What is gripping me. What is holding me down. What is disconnecting me from being fully available to others in my life the first step is just naming it naming your burdens writing down. If you're a writer naming it out loud if that helps what what am i birdied with. Is it resentment of something in the from. The past is it. Judgment of others is a comparison. Oh gosh that's been tough point for me. Is it worry. Constant worry about others kids parents money yourself. Your health just naming your burdens will start to help you crack open name. It become familiar with it. It's that rumi quote about the guest house. Invite them all in for tea here. we are. Okay let's have a discussion so firstly. It's it's it's becoming aware aware of the burdens. The bondage that is keeping you in suffering that hold you back from feeling that free heart that open heart and then two is. That is blanketing yourself with self love with kindness and compassion. They're they're sweetheart. Go back find those episodes. They're they're sweetheart. The loving kindness. May i be free. May i have joy. May i have kindness in my heart. May i feel safe. Those practices do it every single day over and over again and it starts to melt away the armor heart. It happened for me years ago. It wasn't easy and it hurt but it is so worth it. Because i'll tell you what on the other side opening your heart you become available to life you become available to others in an intimate way you become available to love life love others give freely feel more generous in your spirit in your heart so to be free in. Your heart is to melt the armor and in pem show dron one of my absolutely favorite teachers of all time out there talks about about putting down the the steel armor around your heart and soft opening your heart so that your heart becomes more porous. I'm a crier cry. Probably every day. There's something that touches me pokes me so deeply that it that it makes me cry and the cry is can be from the beauty around me the tenderness of another human being exposing him or herself. I cry because of grief you know those moments of grief on goodness it. It's bubbling up right now. In the crying. I enjoy it honestly because it. It's a reminder that that my heart is opening my heart is i'm exposing myself to the to the wonder of life to the to humanity but it takes constant work so to free. Our heart to really meet ourselves at that level is to admit where you're burdened to offer yourself self love compassion and then to open heart into be available to life to be available to being touched in many ways so there it is my friend. We start at the body. We touched the brain. We go to the heart. And and we circle ourselves with this deep deep Wish for wellbeing.

ODA Rumi
Mary Oliver Is Listening to the World

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:20 min | 2 years ago

Mary Oliver Is Listening to the World

"The question I always start with whether I'm interviewing physicist or poet is I'd like to hear whether there was a spiritual background here life early life your childhood however, you would define it now. Well I would defied it very differently from what I was a child. I was said to Sunday school as many kids are. And then I had trouble with the resurrection. So I would not join the church but I was still probably more interested than many of the kids did at enter the church it's been one of the most important interests of my life. And continues to be. And it doesn't have to be Christianity I'm very much taken with the poet. Rumi who is a Muslim Sufi poet. And read him every day. and. Have no answers but have some suggestions I know that a life is much richer with spiritual. Part. To it. And I also think nothing is more interesting. So I, cling to it right and then. You I mean you talk about growing up in a sad depressed place a difficult place I mean in another you don't you don't Belabor this I mean in another place there's a place you talk about. Your one of many thousands who've had insufficient childhoods. But that you spend a lot of your time walking around the woods. Yes Ohio I did and and I think it saved my life. I to this day I, don't care for the enclosure of buildings. It was a very bad childhood. For everybody, every member of the household, not just myself I. Think. And I escape did. Barely with years of. Trouble. But I did find that the entire world. In looking for something. But. I got saved by poetry and I got saved by the beauty of the world. Yeah and and there's such a convergence of those things. Yeah. It seems all the way through in your life as a poet. It is it is a convergence and. Have a little difficulty now having lived for fifty years in small town in the north. I'm trying very hard to love the mangroves. Well I know it takes a while I have to say you and your poetry. For. Me are so closely identified with province town this and that part of the world and. And that kind of dramatic weather. Yes. Kind of shore. Yes. and so when I you know and I had this amazing opportunity to come visit you and I and I look and great, we're going to Cape Cod. To Florida. Well, I just sold by Condo to a very dear. this summer. And I bought a little house start here, which is needs very serious reconstruction. So I'm not yet. But sometimes, it's time for the age. Though for all those years for decades of your writing. This picture was there view this pleasure of walking and writing and? I don't know standing with your notebook. Yes and actually writing while you're walking. Yes. I did it and it is, and it seems like such a gift that you've found that way to be a writer and have that daily. Have Well I. Don't as I say I don't like buildings. Yeah. So I was I the only the only record I broken in school was truancy. I went to the woods a lot with with books right Whitman in the. Knapsack. But I also liked motion. So I just began with these little notebooks and scribbled things as I they came to me and then work them into poems later. And always I wanted the I many of the poems I did this I did this. I saw this I I wanted them the I to be the possible reader. rather than about myself it was about an experience that happened to be mind but could well have been anybody else's and that was my feeling about the I. I have been criticized by one editor who felt that the I would be felt as ego. And I thought well I'm going to risk it and see. And I think it worked. It adjoined. The reader into the experience of the poem. I became the kind of person who did the walking in the scribbling yeah. But shared it. Yeah. If if they wanted it, yes. You also use this word. You know there's this place where you're talking about. Writing while walking listening deeply and I love this listening listening conviviality. Yes. Yeah and listening really to the world the stick to the world. Well, I I did that I still do it. I still

Rumi Physicist Cape Cod Florida Ohio Whitman Writer Editor
Pilgrimage to Sacred Activism

Hay House Meditations

05:40 min | 2 years ago

Pilgrimage to Sacred Activism

"Hi Andrew and welcome on to the hey house meditations podcast how wonderful to be with you and how wonderful to have the opportunity to speak to whoever's listening from my heart. Out wonderful wonderful. I'd like to talk to you today about the Fifteenth Century Poet Mystic Kabeer. Who you've been doing so much work on and and perhaps have you read a few of his lines. That articulate a meditative experience that is at once transcendent but also completely grounded I really appreciate that in computer But before we get there, there's a pilgrimage that I like to ask you to take us on a pilgrimage to the ark of of your own spiritual journey. An ARC that is has taken pauses with a variety of traditions, teachers, and Gurus and especially that are of the internal pilgrimage of the heart. So I wonder if you'd take us on that pilgrimage and then we'll sort of maybe conclude with Kabira. Does that sound all right with you? That sounds wonderful. Today and your little remission it it's. Never ends. I remember when I was with father bid when he was dying and. The thing that struck me most and move me most about him here. He was the greatest living Christian mystic but even on his deathbed when he was eighty seven, he was still striving for deeper and deeper realize. So he gave me a permanent image of what this really is journey of endless expansion. Shems of Tabriz said to Rumi. The world of God is wealth of endless expansion. We don't ever arrive. We just go Diba and DEEPA and Deepa went blasted where wild enough were brave enough into a mystery that always keeps opening onto wilder and holy vistas. This is my experience. Yes, and you're well I must say your your life has demonstrated that but I'm not exactly certain if you knew that when you were born. In mother India right you are. You're born in south India early in your life. You earlier in life you're surrounded by multiple religious by religious face including your your parents Protestant faith. And among the Hindus and Muslims. So how did that early on your life? How did that shape your outlook on the nature of humans on the nature of people and the nature of the divine? India is too big bomb in a well the distill known that live as cred experience. And that mock me forever I feel that I have an Indian. So a European mind and an American mission. So my deepest deepest ground is always in there especially in south India. When I was born. Nineteen fifty two was the twilight of the Rosh. So this. Was the atmosphere of an. Empire would still. Diffused itself through everything but India itself although it had been dominated by the British in never lost its passionate spirituality and that's what I met in the earliest and most impressionable years of my life. I loved going to temples with my Hindu coke. I loved learning the hail. Mary from my Catholic nanny and I loved it when the driver that we had to as a Muslim stopped the car in the middle of traffic and put his. Prem Don and chunk to Allah. In very early on. I met a saint and this is an extraordinary story because I had white Russian. Godmother. who used to smoke cigarettes out of black along black cigarette holder in Lyon dressed in gold she fall she looked like a Russian Melena dietrich and I was crazy about her she's. and. Every day off to school I would go running up the stairs of her flag. And jumped into bed between her and have great friend who is huge Rowley poterie Indian woman Shanti. Of course as a child I didn't know. Shanti Shanti, later revealed to me it was India's greatest living Quila and she is the child had been. A welcome to previous incarnation and a gunman, a group of journalists to the village that she'd been born in. As, a nine year old recognized absolutely everybody and Meta previous husband and said the money looking for is under a break in the back. So he went and found the money that he'd been looking for. Any. gave. Me a lot of profound simple instruction. She told me two things that have not my whole life. She said God is one. God is the sea and all religions alike rivers that run into the sea. So. Don't get hung up on anyone religion realized that they're all different expressions of the same unity, the different expressions of the same reality

India Shanti Shanti Andrew Tabriz Deepa Kabira Prem Don Melena Dietrich Mary Lyon Quila
Loneliness as a Portal to Sacred Presence

Tara Brach

09:35 min | 2 years ago

Loneliness as a Portal to Sacred Presence

"Amnesty and welcome. This is the sixth of a series. And I have no idea how long it'll go on called sheltering in love and last week and this week the focus is on really facing the pain of separation and loneliness the vet Murthy was our recent surgeon general in the United States up until twenty seventeen I also a physician and he did a road trip across the United States. Talking to people. All different types of people now is written a book called together and I mentioned him because he's a key figure and bringing into our societal awareness. The huge huge suffering really. How loneliness is a major public health concern. And he talks about how for so many that he encountered whether it was drug addiction or poverty are arena fiscal diseases that the root suffering was a sense of isolation being stuck in struggle and all by oneself. He shared a number stories but one that struck me. He met with a man several years after this guy had won the lottery and this man told Murthy that the day he won the lottery was the worst day of his life and when Murthy said well explain please. He described how he had been working in a bakery and he had know he was needed there and appreciated for what he did. He had friends in his neighborhood and after winning he stopped working. He moved into a gated community. He got really really lonely. He developed diabetes. He felt pretty continuously angry at what he perceived snobbery of other people. That live there for many of you listening that this isn't hard to understand or imagine and what strikes so much is that loneliness is a disease that hits all classes people in all sorts of life circumstances. There's a really well known teaching story that I love were student asks a spiritual teacher. What's the difference between illness and wellness? The teacher writes those words up on a board any circles the eye of illness and the we of wellness. And we know it that we're not happy when the world is centering around I. Those are not the moments that were happy. The trajectory of the spiritual path is shifting from an identity and a self concern and focus where our fears and our thoughts and all our intentions and motivations really around furthering and defending a self. It's a shift from that. To really recognizing in a cellular way that were connected and then the experience of that is a caring. That's all inclusive. That's one of the definitions. I have of radical compassion. That it's that awake sense that we belong and of course we care for each other. We belong to each other. What's so interesting to me. Is that many evolutionary psychologists and philosophers. Also consider this the trajectory for our species that there's an increasing movement and capacity for collaboration and for compassion with the understanding that we belong to this web of life. What happens in this web affects? All of us sensing were part of Earth. Were part of what's described as guy at this whole system that's synchronized and self organizing on the same boat. So we claverie. 'cause the truth is we belong now of course as I say this you may be instead of thinking of the the long arc. Maybe more focused on a short stretch of time that we've been having recently and it certainly doesn't appear claver to give and embracing and caring of each other which is why this week and last week Really relooking at the suffering of separation and loneliness that many are calling an epidemic and we talked last week about how loneliness surely forgetting our belonging quite literally makes us sick it shortens our our life expectancy and that given where such a social species we have a longing to belong and very real pain of loneliness and it's in our DNA to feel that because for most of human history it was really dangerous to be separate or outside of the group not a member not feeling our membership So it's easy to see how in current days loneliness is exacerbated by this global crisis by the pandemic there's so much anxiety so much fear around health and economy. We see each other. Were afraid of of getting this. Potentially deadly virus from each other. So there's distancing and many are living alone it's a real setup one person Couple of days ago from our DC. Meditation Community who lives alone told me she said. I'm afraid I've had the last hug in my life and I wasn't even aware of it at the time and that really struck me just that sense of really. What if I never feel held again? There's so much suffering the comes with feeling lonely. It often appears as depression. You might not even be in touch with the loneliness. It appears as depression which is a pushing down that rawness. 'cause loneliness is so painful. I'm it appears as anxiety because the more separate we feel the more we feel vulnerable. The more we feel threatened. It's not as appears as anger blame because when we feel lonely really we feel rejected in some way and threatened by others that makes us angry and bottom line core. We feel shame we feel shame because to not belong translates to most of us as something's wrong with me lot of pain. Statistically it's shown that the loneliest age group is eighteen to twenty but it's really all ages now I heard a story that I love It's about this gentleman who knocks on his son's door and he says Jamie he says Jamie. Wake up and Jamie answers. I don't WANNA get up. Papa father shouts get up. You have to go to school and Jamie says I don't want to go to school. Why not ask the father three reasons this Jamie I? It's because it's so dull second. The kids tease me and third. I hate school and the father says well. I'm GonNa tell you three reasons you have to go to school and I because it's your duty second because you're forty five years old and third because you're the headmaster not everyone goes around like on lonely but we all have this existential tendency to feel separate. This is this is deep in us. I find that Rumi says the best on this. He says that everything that comes into being gets lost in being drunkenly forgetting its way home and what he means by lost in being is that we lose the sense of our belonging to the hall and we identified with a separate self this I and all of our thoughts and activities just circle around what I want what I need. I'm afraid of this furthering and protecting ourselves. Now what's kind of important to understand? Is that if in growing up. Our basic needs for safety and love and understanding are Matt. Then that self-focused is there. But it's a wholesome one. It's not exclusive versus sticky. So we can still remember in a very fundamental way are belonging but when our personal lives when in our personal lives. Sir Spin stress and trauma and very little healthy bonding healthy attachment bonding with caretakers by nature. We become more self fixated more self protective more aggressive in kind of defending. And that's where we get really imprisoned in the I That separate lonely feeling with so much suffering

Jamie I Murthy United States Depression Papa Father Rumi Meditation Community DC Matt
Illusion

Daily Breath with Deepak Chopra

03:42 min | 3 years ago

Illusion

"What is the cause of suffering? Here it is in one word illusion the cause of oil suffering his illusion or unreality so. Let's discuss this one point. First thing I want to say is that pain. Physical pain is not the same as suffering. Physical pain is actually a very important experience. It tells us that something is wrong. So if you didn't have been in your doors and you had nowhere her seek medical advice. If you didn't have indigestion you'd never corrects the cause of the indigestion if you never experienced heartburn. You'd never know that you have acid reflux and that needs to be corrected. In fact people lose the ability to experience pain as a result of neuropathy for example. Neuropathy on your rightous which happens with diabetes for example or other diseases neurological diseases. People who do not experience physical pain their limbs atrophy. They lose their toys and they get burns and they get all kinds of problems and then they begin to suffer so pain is not the same as suffering. Pain is a useful symptom to remind you that something is wrong. And you need to correct that you need to go back to self-regulation what is suffering suffering is being that we hold onto so a pain like resentment like like anger like hostelry like the desire to get even that causes long-term suffering and then there's another kind of existential suffering the feeling of old age the fear of infirmity the fear of death. This is what spirituality addresses it addresses suffering and the pain that we hold onto the fears that we hold onto. I'm reminded of a BOOM BY RUMI. Way says the way to not suffer from the fire is to go through the fire. The only way out of the fire is going through it. And how do you go through it by getting in touch with your own self and you get in touch with their own? Self that becomes your internal reference point then you realize that it takes force of mind to create. Suffering suffering is a blend of belief and perception that the person thinks he or she has no control over. Well you have control over your suffering because you have control over over writing the illusion of the separate off the secret cause of all suffering is unreality itself the illusion that you are a physical body with the mind and that you are in this theater of space diamond causality which we call the world. None of that is true. It might be a human construct but your soul your spirit having an experience and you can choose the expenses you want

Pain Indigestion Neuropathy Heartburn
The Root of the Addictive Process with Alex Katehakis

The Addicted Mind Podcast

09:40 min | 3 years ago

The Root of the Addictive Process with Alex Katehakis

"All right. Today's guest is Alex. Cata Haughey's somebody who I've wanted to have on the podcast for quite some time and I'm so excited. She decided to come on. She is a clinical sexologist and the clinical director of the Center for healthy sex in Los Angeles California and she's written several awesome books. One of my favorite is sex addiction as affect dysregulation and also erotic intelligence and Mir of intimacy. We have a great conversation about some of the root causes of the addictive process. Really looking at that early developmental trauma and how that affects our ability to regulate our affect. And how we use addictive substances or processes to escape from that feeling. It's great conversation. I really enjoyed having Alex on. I think we could have talked easily for an hour or two or three about these topics. She's so knowledgeable and just really shares a lot of great wisdom and insight about recovery. So with that. Let's go ahead and start this episode. Hello everyone welcome to the addicted. Mind my guest today. Is Alex Kata Hakkas and she is a clinical sexologist and clinical director of the Center for healthy sex in Los Angeles California. And she's GonNa come on and we're GONNA talk about sex addiction. Sex Addiction has affect this regulation. And we'RE GONNA go into a little bit of what that means but Alex introduce yourself. I yeah thank you. Good Morning Dwayne yes as you stated I am clinical sexologist which means I have a doctorate in human sexuality and I've been fascinated with human sexuality for the last twenty five thirty years or longer to save my life and so after practicing as a licensed marriage family therapist for twenty five years. It made sense for me to dive deeper into human sexuality instead of psychology which Swipe chose that particular course of study as you stated I am be clinical director of Center for healthy sex which has been around now for about fifteen years and we treat all manner of sex and love addiction issues of sexual desire dysfunction public pain disorders erectile dysfunction. I mean you name at sexual we treat it. So that's in general. What my the lenses through which I look and just in addition to human sexuality I have been studying with Dr Alan Shore for the past twelve years specifically looking at developmental neuroscience and how the early formation of the infant meaning from the third trimester on Rumi impacts developing brain nervous system and therefore mind. Right definitely and. That's one of the reasons I wanted to have you on is to kind of do a little bit of a deeper dive into some of these issues around addiction specifically sex addiction. And when you say affect dysregulation going into that a little bit and being able to talk about okay when we talk about affect we're really talking about emotions and emotions live deep in the body in fact right now if you're listening to this or you have a policy or having emotions in the body which aren't necessarily registering up high meeting up in your brain until they come forward to what we call feelings and so when a person is regulated meaning. They don't have good heart rate variability. They're not able to rest in digest and play and laugh and be at ease if they are stressed out than their affect is quote this regulated. So when you're regulated you are in a a steady state if you will where you're able to socially engage with people in a way where you don't feel but as soon as threat comes on. The scene with a child has apparent. That's alcoholic or raging or but mother who is cold or shutdown or mean that child's affect is always going to be quote this regulated and here. She is always going to be looking for something to make them feel better. Because the parental connection the parental soothing is not reliable. Or it's just not there so tell me a little bit about how that because that's a lot to digest what you just said. I thought I made it simple. No I mean I get it but like if you're talking to someone who is struggling with addiction. Let's say or Struggling with sex addiction. And you're talking about this affect. What might that look like? In an event that they have in their own life now in the present. Well there may not. There's not even an event in their general waking life you're gonNA feel anxious depressed dead internally dull. There's a general lack of feeling vitality in the body. People say they don't feel joy states or they're super anxious so they have to drink to make the anxiety go away or they use sex to make themselves feel powerful or good about themselves. Anything that we're doing outside of ourselves to make ourselves feel quote right internally speaks to affect regulation so someone who is securely attached. Who's got a good heart rate? Variability in general doesn't have to reach for anything to change their internal state or their mood. Is that clear? Yeah no that makes a Lotta sense and I think what I hear you saying is so someone who if you've had this history of trauma like you said an alcoholic parent that's raging and you're young and you're growing up in that environment. You get your living with this uncomfortable state and you can't get out of that state and so then you'll reach for something that will change it so alcohol sex or for young child that can be something like fantasy. You know what we see. A lot of Labatt annex or some sex addicts too. Is that very early on? They learned that they had to get their needs. Met By themselves and fantasy is a form of mild to moderate dissociation. Where it's you know what your calls an escape when there's no escape where they go into their own little world and they live in their own little world and as adults. It makes it difficult to connect with another person to have intimacy and closeness instead. The person is in fantasy about other people because it's very difficult to be in reality because reality was so painful along time ago and this sets up for very bad relationship sometimes because they're falling in love with an ideal not an actual person right and I think for a lot of people this is can be subtle in some ways so it can be hard to actually see that uncomfortable state. Is it that people are used to it? Like they've lived in this state that is basic discomfort that it's hard to actually see it. And then they don't even know that they're regulating it by using a substance or an addiction or something. Yeah I think people don't now until their lives become unmanageable. They start to have messes in their lives and their primary relationship is with e behavior or the substance and that's typically when addicts get help when they're in pain. They know that their life isn't working anymore and so they're going to stuck. Yeah they're stuck in these tatters because we are nothing but automated and habituated. I mean we have all of these adaptive strategies in the brain and the nervous system. Start working in a particular way to compensate for difficulty that is an adaptation and Rican adapt to just about anything or highly adaptable creatures. So we'll adapt to something that's dysfunctional. Because it's better than the problem we were living in. And then we've got this long standing pattern that can be very challenging to change so for example of somebody stops drinking or using or they stop acting out with their sex addiction. It doesn't mean that they've changed their personality. Which is why the program topics about character issues and you can be a quote dry drunk because you stop the thing. The behavior substance. But you haven't fundamentally changed the way that you relate to other people and that's really the challenge and the beauty. I think the twelve step program is that it really arms and forges new. People that we can change our strategies. And it's hard. It's like if you walked your whole life pigeon toed and your toes were turned in and your hips were adapted to walking that way and somebody came along and said Hey. You don't have to walk that way. You're kind of grinding the bones of your hips in your knees. If you point your host all of a sudden your knees hips are in alignment and you try it. And you're like wow that feels better but the natural tendency of the body is going to be to move towards being pigeon toed unless the person is highly mindful of it and vigilant about it until they can change that adaptive pattern to rocking straight

Alex Kata Hakkas Clinical Director Los Angeles California Cata Haughey Labatt California Dwayne Rumi Swipe Dr Alan Shore Rican
The radical experimenters: a rapper, a poet, and a biological artist

Science Friction

09:21 min | 3 years ago

The radical experimenters: a rapper, a poet, and a biological artist

"The first three minutes of the universe doesn't expansion simultaneously Teini Asli everywhere not zero second but close the first hundred of a second hotter than the hottest star blew hot bruting rooting halt. The nor Smith Says Earth was not found or heaven above but in a yawning gap. That was grasp but no way there were no vikings kings. No Vanilla no lampshades but there was Lego like for life in the first three minutes of the universe everything started added to come together. ferment began to develop lips to form the word poem. one-star dreamed of turning away and now they're just so it could have time. I'm to shape clay. The universe became a rogue gallery of Jigsaw fighting for space and in quiet moments. Mango juice squeezed from the heavens and sparkled like Shaq suits. There was the first spoonful of the CARTWHEEL GALAXY N G C one. Three six five with its. Jim Like bots spiraled wills sentence hyperion Jupiter's moons pulsars born cramping the styles of the middle. I molecules began collecting just so that the wood Po Quaid could be part of this missing in the first three minutes of the universe. Atoms rose dancing and just like the poet. Rumi said they were dancing like madmen. Happy on miserable and they just kept on dancing lover. Melvin poet and performer Alicia. Sometimes there with her pace the first three minutes of the universe and Tesha Mitchell joining you for science friction. We're at this end of the universe you are about to in Canada. I eight poetry cosmos a biological artist who grows organisms as living artworks and a rat performer. Whose lyrics ricks pulse site with? Science Professor Oren Katz is co-founder of the Tissue Culture and art project and director of the University of Western. Australia's influential art. Science lab symbiotic. Baba Brinkman is a new york-based rep performer and playwright whose awesome Rep God's to science audits range from climate change to consciousness and Alicia sometimes is most recent show. Particle wave gathered audiences under planetarium dimes times. These three creative experiment is pushing the elastic boundaries of both at n science and shared a stage at the quantum words festival in Perth. Recently cently he's Aleisha reflecting on those first three minutes. What we want to do when we passion about and scientists connect with an audience? And I I have that problem I'm full of hyperbole and scientists aren't and I love that about them and they care about the mess they care about the facts and I hear all that and I read all that and then I'm just like oh his blitz. He's some poetry so I remember Reading Steven Weinberg's book the first three minutes of the universe and it's full of great fact so this was my interpretation mango juice squeezing from the heavens technically correct Richt by the way the physicists would disagree in that universe buddies taking a obviously a poetic license. But that's what I as a poet what I can never find the right words and the reason the movie dirty dancing connected so well with me. Is that moment. That one of the main characters is carrying a watermelon win and she goes up to Patrick swayze who she likes and says. I carried a watermelon. And that's all she can say and that is what I am like so often. I can't find the exact words and I love that about science that they can find words really matter and in a scientific communication or scientific paper hyper words mean everything but I love as a poet. I can sort of pie around with that and Taika Pot. Isn't it interesting that you draw contrast because as I often think when I'm reading your work that infect poetry and science scherer conciseness and brevity of language precision each word gets placed with intent. And yet your thinking of the relationship is quite contrasted. I totally understand what you're saying. And Brevity is so true and as a poet and I'm sure poets in the audience. They can understand this. Every word matters this and carries it's white but the thing is how do you communicate dark matter. Or how do you communicate Nebula something in biology or does I mean I can never find the right words. I love in contact. A film inspired by. Carl Sagan's book by the same. I'm Nice Cellular pinup boy. I'm so glad it was there. I didn't know you were gonNA talk about him. When demon haunted world is such an important political inspiring because well the Jodi foster character Elliott Airway says when she's thrust into space they should have center poet and finally why Korea I get to go in space so maybe on Amazon or something? I'll get to go just to ago. Mango juice everywhere. Do you feel like you could take sides. Or is that that's not your raisin for you all the Wanda I'm about to wonder in storytelling. I do understand that sometimes the failure of can you just beautifying science and that is somehow not enough and and that's why I love what so many people do is they take it apart in question and what aren was hanging is just so incredible what they do but I yes yeah so just like the storytelling and I really need to communicate it to audiences so they can just take away a little bit of wondering their pocket full of wonder. Hey John Adams Americans said you never learn if you have a poet in your pocket. I just loved that I said what are you trying to do with. I've seen your show particle wave. which takes you inside a planetarium? Describe it for people but also what you're hoping to do with that piece it's musical visual Poetic Extravaganza yes. I loved canvas of the Planetarium Dome and from when I was young and a lot of you would feel feel the Siamese diaby lie back. And you've got this gorgeous. Almost three sixty canvas above you and so I wanted to use that canvas to sell tell held. The story of gravitational waves got to work with a lot of scientists and I recorded a lot of scientists and I want the general public to coming and have a sense of awe four so it mixes poetry music visuals just to tell the story from general relativity some black holes look lookit to kill an and just sort of pint pitcher and I want people to come out and say well I might go read up on that but I had a science instinct come in an eighteen year old. He said that she walked in wanting to do chemistry and came out wanting to do gravitational wave astronomy. And I'm like my works done. That's enough poet delicious. Sometimes there when you think about rap song lyrics what comes to mind politics. Maybe six drugs love last year. American crime and punishment. Absolutely what about science though not really well here as Baba Brinkman canadian-born and and married to a neuroscientist at some point these graduate in comparatively chat court the science bug big time and he's now a renowned science communicate through he's rap gods to things like climate change evolution human nature religion and culture my first rap theater popularisation project CHAUCER's Canterbury Tales and a An evolutionary biologists in England saw that and he said good job. Now do you think you could do for Darwin. What you did for Chaucer and the first time I was introduced to do a performance which was at the Darwin Bicentennial Mark Pailin? The biologist introduced me by saying. Don't worry I checked his lyrics. You're about to witness the first ever rap performance. That's peer reviewed house like peer reviewed rap. That's the best idea ever confession. Spend my whole life perplexed. By Religiousness Front doorstep debating with Jehovah Witnesses I was a teenaged empirical thinker a spiritual seeker obsessed with rap. I considered it liberal research. This was the medium the Daca thinking speaking flipping ridiculous speech over beats like every weekend weekend my CD collection became my personal gospel. I wasn't apostle I think part of it was an unexpected side effect of doing science. This communication rap projects and that side effect was that I became way more gangster rapper

Baba Brinkman Alicia Vikings Teini Asli Shaq Rumi Smith Patrick Swayze Steven Weinberg Po Quaid Planetarium Dome Carl Sagan Canada Australia Tesha Mitchell Taika Pot Perth JIM
Terror leader who claimed responsibility for Florida attack killed

America's First News

00:30 sec | 3 years ago

Terror leader who claimed responsibility for Florida attack killed

"President trump says the US has conducted a counterterrorism strike in Yemen that killed custom al Rumi he was then now Qaeda leader already claiming responsibility for last year's deadly shooting at a Naval Air Station it in Pensacola Florida that's where a Saudi aviation trainee killed three American sailors al Roumi the founder of the al Qaeda in the Arabian peninsula has long been considered the most dangerous branch because of its attempts to carry attacks out on the mainland here in the

Donald Trump United States Yemen Naval Air Station Pensacola Florida Trainee Al Roumi Founder President Trump Qaeda