20 Burst results for "Rudyard Kipling"

"rudyard kipling" Discussed on LIFE IS MAGIC - Healing

LIFE IS MAGIC - Healing

04:20 min | 3 months ago

"rudyard kipling" Discussed on LIFE IS MAGIC - Healing

"It as you go be satisfied with your infants where all always doing the best that we can so practice progress wherever you can rather than perfection and then take time to think outside of the box at least once a month or every fortnight take some time with pen and paper to sit and think outside the box use contemporary of intelligence by dropping your entire story at least once a month and then going outside of the paradigm you've created for for yourself you know so you take an hour use pen and paper to think really really big and drop the wolves that you've created for yourself creativity at the very least. I wanna share a pun with you by rudyard kipling which is entitled if really loved the poem and a speaks about imposter syndrome. Well self doubts and it goes like this entitled if if you can keep your head when all about you losing these and blaming it on you if you can trust yourself when all men daochi but make allowance for their doubting too if you can wait and not be tired by waiting or being lied about. Don't deal in lies or being hated. Don't give way to hating and yet done look too good nor talk to us. If you can dream not make dreams your master if you can think and not make thoughts your aim if you can meet with triumph and disaster and treat. Those two imposters just the same. If you can ban to hear the truth you've spoken twisted by knaves to make a trip for fools. Watch the things you've given your lefty broken and stoop and build them up with worn out tools if you can make one heap of oleo winnings and risk it on one turn of pitching toss and lose and started kane at you'll beginnings and never breathe a word about your loss if you can your heart nerve and send you to serve your turn long after their gun and so hold on when there is nothing in new except the will which says hold on if you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue awoke with kings nor lose the common touch if neither foes no loving friends can hurt you if all men count with you but none too much if you can full the giving minute with sixty seconds worth of distance ryan yours is the earth and everything that is in it and which is more you'll be a man my son and so isn't that poem lovely and just teaches us to is human to doubt his natural and commonplace. So don't worry too much about the little things and focus on your potential. Always say you should start each and every project even if it's a day At work or whatever it is you're gonna be doing start with a good intention. What intention do a have to succeed in this project today. Stick to your intentions. Make sure that that is why you are doing the work you do. So even when you waiver and this crests and troughs highs and lows get through them sticking to your intention before i ever do it project today. I ask myself. Dt in ms. Does this nourish myself. If it doesn't i don't do it. Dt enemies write it down. Stick it to your steering wheel and always act through intention. Does this nourish my soul. Don't do it otherwise. And from this vantage point he can really focus on where you're going don run around in the dock. We need light to guide us. We need to think feel and act before we do anything even though we might feel like an imposter or fraud sometimes keep going and be true to you intentions and the truth will always set you free..

rudyard kipling kane ryan
"rudyard kipling" Discussed on You Can Heal Your Life

You Can Heal Your Life

02:18 min | 5 months ago

"rudyard kipling" Discussed on You Can Heal Your Life

"The aleve and moan about being a football failure or you say throw it again until ultimately you're catching footballs failures. Judgment is just an opinion. It comes from your fears which can be eliminated by love. Love for yourself love for what you do love for others love for your planet when you have love within you. Fear cannot survive. Think the message. In this ancient wisdom fear knocked at the door love answered and no one was there that music that you hear inside of you urging you to take risks and follow. Your dreams is your intuitive connection to that purpose in your heart since birth. The enthusiastic about all that you do have that passion with the awareness that the word enthusiasm literally means the god and theo's within diazepam the god within the passion that you feel is got inside of you beckoning you to take the risk and be your own person. I've found perceived risks are not risk at all once you transcend your fears and let love and self respect in when you produce a result that others laugh at your also stirred to laughter when you respect yourself stumbling allows you to laugh at yourself as an occasional tumbler when you love and respect yourself. Someone's disapproval is not something you fear. Avoid the poet rudyard kipling declared if you can meet triumph and disaster and treat. Those two imposters just the same yours is the earth and everything. That's in it. The keyword here is imposters. They're not real. They exist only in the minds of people value. Right brain listening to how you feel and play your own unique brand of music. You won't have to fear anything or anyone and you'll never experience that terror of lying on your deathbed someday saying what if my whole life has been wrong you invisible companion on your right shoulder pride you each and every time.

football theo rudyard kipling
"rudyard kipling" Discussed on Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

04:48 min | 5 months ago

"rudyard kipling" Discussed on Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

"It's inevitable that many of us have grown up to be like our parents are mannerisms are ways of speech even our taste in movies and music are because of the people who raised us heck. Every time i laugh. I hear my father's voice as if he's in the very same room as me but how much of who we are is based on how we were raised. And how much is. Based on our dna it's the old nature versus nurture debate. Well dina santa. hr may hold the answers in eighteen. Sixty seven a group of hunters were prowling through the jungle of utah pradesh india. When they came to a clearing some distance away they noticed the entrance to a cave the hunters approached the cave carefully anticipating what they might find inside it. Could after all be a ferocious animal a creature did emerge. It ignored them at first unbothered by their presence the hunters though did not raise their guns. They couldn't bring themselves to kill something. So unique what they had countered was neither a bear nor a wolf. But something completely unexpected. They had found a boy probably no more than six years old and knowing they couldn't leave him in the jungle the hunters gathered him up and brought him to an orphanage. In the nearby town of agra. It was there that he was given the name. Dinah senate sanchaar was a hindi word. Meaning saturday the day. They had found him. He was considered a feral child because he couldn't walk upright or know how to conduct himself around other people. He couldn't even speak but he did understand his new guardians. To some extent he had been raised by wolves and his behavior reflected that he ate raw meat and walked on all fours chewed on bones which in turn had sharpened his teeth and he couldn't form words so he communicated with grunts like an animal. You found it difficult to stand on two legs like everyone else. He also had trouble following simple. Directions for example pointing at an object or a plate of food was a foreign gesture to him. As wolves didn't use their paws to indicate things of importance and he never learned to speak the language of his caretakers. although the effects of living around other human beings did eventually rub off on him. Senator learned how to stand on two legs and it was said that he figured out how to put on his clothes later in life. Surprisingly one human habit came quite naturally to him smoking. He found the practice so enjoyable. He became a chain smoker before his death at the age of thirty four it's been theorized that sandwich or may have been the inspiration for the young man. Cub moberly in rudyard kipling's the jungle book series in those novels. Ugly is an abandoned child raised by wolves in the jungles of india. Yet he was not the first nor would he be. The last child raised by wolves that the orphanage would take in three more. Children were welcomed after him including a girl and two boys all who had been classified as feral. In fact over the years more than fifty children have been discovered living with animals in the jungles of india. One boy was found in nineteen fifty seven crawling out of a cave. He had been stolen from his home by a wolf when he was only eighteen months old other children though were often abandoned by their parents for being born with intellectual disabilities and india wasn't the only place where children were being raised in the wild either in the mid nineteen eighties. Young ukrainian girl named oxana malaya was taken in by stray dogs when she was just three years old. Her alcoholic father left her outside one night so she crawled into a structure with the dogs to stay warm. She ended up living on the streets for five years eating scraps of food and crawling on all fours until social workers found her. Got her the help. she needed. Enrolling her in various therapies to help improve her speech and control her feral urges and she eventually learned to speak fluent russian and got a job on a farm but she was never the same. Who knows how she or santa char or any of the other. Children neglected by society might have turned out. Had they been given the tools to thrive instead they were cast aside and left defend for themselves. It makes one wonder in this story. Who are the real animals. I hope you've enjoyed today's guided tour of the cabinet of curiosities. Subscribe for free on apple podcasts or learn more about the show by visiting curiosities. Podcast dot com. The show was created by me erin. Monkey in partnership with how stuff works. I make another award. Winning show called lor which is a podcast book series and television show and you can learn all about it over at the world of lor dot com and until next time.

dina santa utah pradesh Dinah senate sanchaar india Cub moberly agra oxana malaya rudyard kipling Senator santa char cabinet apple erin
"rudyard kipling" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"rudyard kipling" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Time happy father's day thank you I've been a member with my dad and my grandfather I grow that kind of player and now they're both working they'll go trucking company they always wait for me and the big trucks that they have winner loser there was always a lot of great and by one great but is always even keeled and I'd get emotional they would get emotional backing everything level that really taught me a lot on how to deal with adversity and how to win well and lose well so without that I don't think I would have gotten the chance to play in college division one channel so definitely role models coming forward is really helps that that mental state stay calm no matter what thank you alignment and thank you for that I mean the lessons that we take from our parents I know that you shared a story earlier just about the mental toughness and when you're running past someone else in a race to you know breed then something your father taught you at these tracks that's correct your coach is that right yep he also told me loose lips sink ships which I think was actually an anti espionage during World War two but it still is pretty good advice right it's that idea of like sometimes you say too much and you're your own worst enemy in that space I think that's good advice yeah I think I was trying to think back I'll show about like what's the best piece of advice my dad's given me and I think about this one line they he he printed out this poem called if by Rudyard Kipling for a great one and I actually have two copies because he forgot he gave me one when I was a child and gave me what Easter last year so one in my office one of my bedroom I'm in and I just think back about that poem it just kind of what it stands for and you know being able to hold your head high when everything else around you and people around you are crumbling and it kind of being able to carry yourself with persistence it look past all of the the petty things that might be going on and be a leader throughout it all so I mean for me and it's hard it's like I'm I'm getting emotional talking about that when I talk about my dad just like some of our callers so trying to pull together here at the show on a high note love you dad thank you for everything Janet great show today thank you so much for joining me here on.

Rudyard Kipling Janet
"rudyard kipling" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"rudyard kipling" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Will affect you is a house you won't be able to sell your house because your house will be worth fifty percent less when your house is worth fifty percent less can the bank repossess I don't even know when your bet when your house is not worth what you paid for it and you own you owe a lot of money you better not miss a single payment and you can't get out of it so everybody else around you they if they don't own a house they can go and buy a house at fifty percent less but you can't because you'll have to cough up all of that money when you try to sell it there's plenty of money but nothing our money can buy that's a line from Rudyard Kipling and that poem has become more and more accurate every single day there's plenty of money but what are you buying and when deflation is over then you hit hyper inflation it goes from the opposite all of a sudden everything becomes wildly expensive because like in Venezuela when you debase the money that's when it's worthless it becomes worth less and less until it becomes worth less that is the end of this cycle but don't worry they have a plan for all of this and I'm actually going to show you some I think disturbing video only because I disagree with what they believe is the solution but the people who really have been planning this for a long time not planning but have not planning the virus but planning for any kind of pandemic what do we do what we do with our banks what do we do with the media what we do with our government how do we solve these things it's called events to all one and it happened last November when a group of global elites got together out in the open and they said lets wargame this along with our CDC and banks and everybody else and they got together and they came up with some conclusions on what to do it's what we're doing right now you wanna know how they came up with that what we're doing now you want to know what they believe because I don't think it's what you believe you will see it tomorrow and we usually carry on Facebook and you too but I think this things if it's not banned during the show you will never see this thing again unless you're a blaze subscriber they're going to call is this a conspiracy theory everything else it is not it is not it's fact we'll show you the videos of it and point to you where you.

Rudyard Kipling Venezuela Facebook
"rudyard kipling" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

03:19 min | 1 year ago

"rudyard kipling" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"That's a line from Rudyard Kipling and that poll has become more and more accurate every single day there's plenty of money but what are you buying and when deflation is over then you hit hyper inflation it goes from the opposite all of a sudden everything becomes wildly expensive because like in Venezuela when you debase the money that's when it's worthless it becomes worth less and less until it becomes worth less that is the end of this cycle but don't worry they have a plan for all of this and I'm actually going to show you some I think disturbing video only because I disagree with what they believe is the solution but the people who really have been planning this for a long time not planning the not planning the virus but planning for any kind of pandemic what do we do what we do with our banks what do we do with the media what we do with our government how do we solve these things it's called events to all one and it happened last November when a group of global elites got together out in the open and they said lets wargame this along with our CDC and banks and everybody else and they got together and they came up with some conclusions on what to do it's what we're doing right now you want to know how they came up with the what we're doing now you want to know what they believe because I don't think it's what you believe you will see it tomorrow and we usually carry on Facebook and you too but I think this things if it's not banned during the show you will never see this thing again unless you're a blaze subscriber they're going to call is this a conspiracy theory everything else it is not it is not it's fact we'll show you the videos of it and point to you where you can find all this information on your own our biggest discount ever right now thirty dollars off if you're a yearlong subscriber to blaze TV dot com do it now blaze TV dot com more in just a second because I want to kind of describe the rest of the world and Cheryl Atkinson is coming up in just a minute first are are the spotlight sponsor here is hustler turf I will tell you that there is no better lawn mower built I I always wanted to have one of those who love riding lawn mowers my grandfather had one as a kid he would never let me draw your touch your foot off knowing grandpa not if I'm sitting on it but if I'm chasing you after maybe those things are a thing of the past if you haven't seen a zero turn lawn mower man you are spending way too much time mowing your lawn right now if you've got I don't know three quarters or more of an acre please look into a hustler turf if you are looking for a new lawn mower by things once by the right thing once and make sure it's quality and is it that I'm.

Rudyard Kipling
"rudyard kipling" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"rudyard kipling" Discussed on KTOK

"The number to call if you want to join in the conversation okay I'm gonna say this one more time there is reason to be concerned there is not reason to be hysterical there is a reason to take certain steps and there is reason to not panic there is reasons to wash your hands and the services of your desk as much as you can and there is a reason to not lock yourself up in your house for the next five weeks three weeks whatever in fact I may have a very good alternative for you this weekend since just about everything else seems to be canceled now I'm not saying they shouldn't cancel it I'm saying they should let people be their own judge I'm saying that if you are not in the risk group chances are you're not gonna get it and if you do it's going to be not nearly the catastrophic plague it's being made out to be not in so many words but by the deeds of media and the deeds of people panicking and expensed I don't think we should have called off the NC double a tournament I just don't think we should have limit who goes in okay I'm I'm down with that let people be their own judge let people manage their own risk well we've got a responsibility to the public that responsibility to close everything now your responsibility is to not get sued and that's coming next in fact it's probably already started I am Lee Matthews on news radio one thousand Katie okay that's what a lot of this is all about liability so instead of being frustrated by it I tend to be the more observant type I'm gonna sit back and I'm going to cautiously carefully watch what happens and I'm going to assess the situation I'm going to as Rudyard Kipling said keep my head while all about me are losing theirs wasn't Roger Kipling I'm not quite sure correct me if I'm wrong on news radio.

NC Lee Matthews Rudyard Kipling Roger Kipling Katie
Adaptation of Rudyard Kipling's "If" for Planning Section Chiefs

People, Process, Progress

03:43 min | 2 years ago

Adaptation of Rudyard Kipling's "If" for Planning Section Chiefs

"Again let the juices flow. A little bit continued the inspiration from kipling's poem if I had adapted adapt that for project managers please check that out I've also adapted that for my brother and sister or hazards planning section chiefs. This is Kevin Fennell. The host of the people process progress. podcast thank you for listening subscribing leaving reviews if you like this if you enjoy episode or the series even the backlogs from the between the slides. Please share them with your friends. Family whomever here is my insight adapted in the format of kipling's if for all hazards planning inning checks and chiefs if you can guide the team through the process while about you are unsure what to do if you believe in the method when others want to go askew but adapt and adjust to help them through if you can facilitate discussion but not jump in or try try to dictate tactics. Because you're not ops or fill out forms before objectives are complete and do all this through objective is if you can plan but not make documents your master if you can help but not have to be in charge if you can prepare contingencies. As for the worst disaster and be ready if the worst comes to bare if you can check folks in account for them all but not depend on preprinted rosters or be ready at the last minute to change the plan and start again tomorrow in a brand new cycle if you can empower your units leaders and let them lead somewhat hands off and fail and have the crucial conversations and take doc ownership because your the boss if you can push yourself for the late night printings to prepare a finished product addict when all are asleep and lean on your section. When you've almost nothing left except the resolve in you that says we must if you can brief the crowds and speak with confidence or talk to mayors but not talk too much if neither naysayers nor armchair planners can upset that you. If you're units can rely on you but not depend too much if you can work through the critical incident with poise as an confidence and trust yours is to help the special event or disaster. And which is more. You'll be a plan chief. My friend hope you enjoy this reading as I wrote this. I thought about F- as I looked at them side to side in want verse for verse. I pulled through all the various emotions that come with being a planning section chief in working a special event in the longtime you have and the politics and the egos is in the silos. You have to break through and contrast that with a critical incident where you try and find someone and it doesn't work out or you show up to help get pizza and Porta Johns at a fire are and I think this this poem this writing this captures the sentiment of being a hall hazards planning section chief. Where everyone's GonNa look to you and depend on you and that is a great thing but you have to be strong in your resolve and your knowledge in your skill set and understand that that things will change that the process could be messy but that you are going to be there and you were going to be strong and you were going to rely on your teammates and that you can step back and not have to dictate the plan but also keep people on track and communicate.

Section Chief Kevin Fennell Kipling Porta Johns
Why Can a Mongoose Take on a Cobra?

BrainStuff

03:29 min | 2 years ago

Why Can a Mongoose Take on a Cobra?

"Now available on the iheartradio APP. Or wherever you listen to podcasts. It will come to brainstorm a production of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff lauren. Vogel bomb here. There aren't very many animals out there that could could fight a King Cobra and eat it for dinner but a mongoose is one of them before we go any further. Let's talk about Mongoose. In general have you ever seen among us. There are twenty nine species of them and not all of them. Look the same but they are all long bodied short eared. SORTA weasley looking animals. They they aren't very closely related to weasels. Though if you're an animal in the order Carnivora which is the order of mammals are mostly carnivorous and have teeth adapted for flesh-eating you can either be on team dog or team cat. Weasels are related to dogs. And however much mongooses look like weasels they. We are firmly on team cat fact. A mere cat is a type of Mongoose and cat is right there in its name. Mungo says live in colonies and most species. He's live in Africa. Although one species the job and Mongoose has been introduced to Europe and is also wreaked havoc and ecosystems all of the world especially on islands like Hawaii. Puerto Rico and Jamaica although mongooses are small. They're bright feisty and what scientists call non-discriminatory predators. That is if they can catch or kill it. They'll eat it up to and including venomous snakes and an animal like that can do a lot of damage on an island. But how can it be. That Skinny Mongoose can take on one of the most venomous snakes in the world. Like the Hulking King Cobra whose venom can kill an adult human. And around thirty minutes the grudge match was popularized in Rudyard kipling's eighteen ninety four short story Rikki Tiki Tavee. But that's not the only time among us has contributed to popular popular culture a Hindu fable about among us in a snake dates back to at least three hundred. B C E in the nineteen thirties. A family on the Isle of Man claimed claimed talking Mongoose named Jeff Spelled. GEF by the way lived in their walls by turns threatening them protecting them. Killing rabbits for their dinner and telling jokes in the story became a tabloid sensation and the paranormal investigation. That resulted is the subject of a recent book called Jeff The strange tale of an extra special talking Mongoose News in the real world a few specialized traits have allowed Mongooses to add venomous snakes to their list of entrees for starters mongooses uses are quick and agile and have strong jaws and thick

Mongooses Mungo Jeff Spelled Rudyard Kipling Lauren Carnivora Rikki Tiki Tavee Vogel Puerto Rico Europe Africa Hawaii Jamaica
"rudyard kipling" Discussed on South Of Richardson

South Of Richardson

09:04 min | 2 years ago

"rudyard kipling" Discussed on South Of Richardson

"Good morning it's another addition of south abridged. Thank you so much for tuning lacking and all that good stuff this morning. We're going to be talking about how to understand the meaning over the gods of the copybook headings without falling prey to the wind-borne God's the marketplace workplace. Now if you've never heard of gods of the copybook heading it is a poem. By a man named regard kipling. We'll be getting into who exactly he is here in a minute. We'll be getting into what a copybook. Heading news what he really is into as a marketplace place. And then we'll get into how that fits into today's world and then there's is really cool reading of this guy who reads the poem. I'm not going and read it. I'm GONNA posted on the post so that you can read it but I'm not gonNA rated not going to bore you with that horrible rendition of it. So this guy that I found he reads it very very well. And he's got a really cool idea of how it all fits into so I'm just GonNa leave that up there and you guys get check it out so all right without any further third to do I'm GonNa go ahead and jump into the world has seen this before and they have in fact. This poem Gods of the copybook headings was written actually a hundred years ago. It was written in Nineteen nineteen earliest published in nineteen ninety so the world got to hear about a hundred years ago. This is twenty nine thing and we are here again in this same exact situation for Mr Kipling. It wasn't the progressives here in the United Stages Ages Progressives for him it was the Fabian Socialist. Fabian Socialists are the European version of progressivism. So what really cover today. Is who is regarded kipling. What is copybook heading at what he is referring to as a marketplace and log in a lot more so who who is rumoured kid lean? He is the man and legend. He's a journalist. Poet Short Story Writer He was He wrote while he wrote the jungle book. Kim before he wrote Gods of the copybook headings he was very popular in the late. Nineteenth Century and the early twentieth century was really really popular in England. And he's not not like that now all know he's in fact it's because of this poem The world was moving towards Kinsey. Ism All these nasty nasty progressive ideas. Fabian Socialist ideas and the this poem is totally against all of that and that put him in a very bad light. I'm he on wars. And everything is writing. And then he started writing this type of stuff who no longer have none of that now. If George Orwell called him a Jingo imperialist imperialist and a disgusting individual. Yeah so I mean that everybody knows or will was a devout communists if not just socialist but I think it was pretty much a devout oh communist and now all this started in World War One. Killing in the beginning of World War One was a huge supporter of the war. US support he wrote Pro War pamphlets pass them out all the streets. He was very very his writings for the pro war. Effort was very very popular so as the war progressed that the government asked to become a propagandist for him and he was right on board with it. Unfortunately for kipling that it didn't last all that long he realized when he got on board as a propagandist and seen on the inside he realized. Holy cow this is not working is not working well and he. Seeing the you'll these young kids are getting sent to the solder and no one at the top seemed to really give a shit they didn't care at all and he really did not you. It really really turned his stomach and was not into that at all so now let's go ahead. Let's let's get into what this poll gods of the copybook. Headings what what it means. So a Lotta people always ask. What is a copybook heading in? I like to call it the book a truce. The reason is that a copybook. Book I off a copybook is something that Kids in nineteenth century Europe would carry with them and it was just a notebook and at the top of it. It would have headings and those were the copybook headings and it dull. The heading toward were age old wisdom virtues. Y'All like water will let you fire will burn. And then what they do is in those books it would teach them how to write out. It would teach them how to write basically they just over and over and over again repeat writing water wet you water will wet water. Wet You on the next page fire. Fire will burn. Fire will burn and taught the kids how to write longhand in nets what it was basically four and they would just do that down the entire page and it helped him memorize well a truth. Water will watch you and fire literally will burn you and if you have never heard the poem you'll understand what that means in a bit. Now we're going to jump into what he meant by the marketplace. And we call that snakeskin snakeskin and what is the marketplace well this is the place it's ruled by dishonesty in morality it's everything it just represents selfishness. Reckless doc was progress and overindulgence at the end the perfect example of this would be Washington. DC after the two thousand eight crash. And I say this because every city in the United States was pretty much devastated. The only one that was pumping in and was they were just skyscraper scraper being built buildings going up everywhere. Roads being fixed in the only place that was happening Washington. DC wonder why that was it because that's a little snakes. Morality pieces of crap patrol. The money was being funneled to that. They stole. That's exactly what all that was. And and like I said nowhere else in the country was any that happening only in DC. kind of kind of weird. That works on now. Now he kipling is a man who did pay his pits after after he seeing what was going on and how no one really seem to care about war he sees at screw all at and quit all that and he literally spent the rest the remainder of his life after he fell out of the good graces of every the remainder of his life. He spent cleaning soldiers graveyards. That's that's his penance. That's the way. He felt that he had to repay those people that went to slaughter that he sent that he felt that he sent there because of his propaganda his pro writings add ad eight. He felt horribly horribly guilty about all that and to pay his penance for that he just decided that for the rest of his life he would clean. The soldiers graveyards all across Europe. And that's what he did pretty amazing pretty pretty pretty the Beijing individual. If you've never read the The poem I'm GonNa I'M GONNA put it in the post read. It definitely read it. If you don't feel really go check out this youtube video of glennbeck reading it is outstanding. And he's got a really cool version of what he thinks. It means to fascinating just fascinating so mixed up. I think you should read or have your kids. Listen to this poem. Then explain to them why it is important that we learn from people like because he's lived this he knows exactly what is what was going on if he was alive. He'd be like Shit people when you do. Oh It's right here dude I wrote it. You just need to read that in. Follow that you know Air Force. Follow your tech data. There's intact data. You need to follow when you devote that. So it's clear to reading and listening to this amazing piece of history. That Mr Kipling Watts is society. He was living in uprooted itself from common sense and I decided that everything. That glittered was gold. A century has gone by. We find ourselves again doing battle with the gods of the marketplace. Will this time be the last time the evil and immorality claims the last foothold of freedom. Let's hope not and I hope you guys enjoyed. It was a lot of fun to do Now if you like I said you gotta go check out this this. This poem is just outstanding. So please go check it out like share. Those with your friends vig never heard it it. It's it's enlightening gene. All right you guys have great. Whatever today is Tuesday? We'll see how by..

Europe US DC Mr Kipling Washington Mr Kipling Watts Fabian George Orwell Writer Kinsey Beijing Kim vig England DC. hundred years
Explainer 178: The curious case of President Berdymukhamedov

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:06 min | 2 years ago

Explainer 178: The curious case of President Berdymukhamedov

"The opportunity to read one's own obituary is a privilege accorded to few perhaps unsurprisingly it can be a transformative formative experience alfred. Nobel inventor of dynamite was mortified to see himself memorialized a merchant of death. It may have been this. It's premature a review of his life's work that inspired him to bequeath the nobel prizes including one for peace marcus garvey the prominent jamaican activist activists was so enraged by his errand early obituaries that he suffered the stroke which actually killed him rudyard kipling mistakenly reported dead by one sloppy journal contented himself with writing in to cancel his subscription so we should sympathize somewhat impossibly for the last time with president gurban guli berdymukhamedov of turkmenistan who earlier this week was proved conclusively alive after some while of doubt about whether or not he was still with us act president berdymukhamedov office since two thousand and seven was photographed indisputably above ground the caspian economic forum in nevada a resort on turkmenistan's caspian sea coast the era of might and happiness as president berdymukhamedov rule is officially known precedes seeds the greatly exaggerated demise of president berdymukhamedov allegedly from kidney failure seems to have become popular currency last month. A russian news agency reported the story apparently via a eurasian affairs blog who claimed to have heard it from a source in business circles in the turkmen capital of ashkhabad who may or may not have been tipped off by a spook working for turkmenistan's intelligence services though any any journalist who pitched the editor story with this level of sourcing would find themselves retreating beneath a barrage of coffee mugs and explosives no such fact checking protocols inhibits social media which was briefly ablaze with elegies to president berdymukhamedov few of them. It has to be said especially sorrowful from turkmenistan's government. There was tantalizing silence. The last confirmed sighting of the president had been in mid-july when he was shown on state television writing a book. He is believed to be working on a history of the central asian shepherd dog and beaming at a video of one.

Turkmenistan President Trump Berdymukhamedov Marcus Garvey Caspian Rudyard Kipling Eurasian Affairs Nevada Editor
"rudyard kipling" Discussed on Folklore on the Rocks

Folklore on the Rocks

08:51 min | 2 years ago

"rudyard kipling" Discussed on Folklore on the Rocks

"It wasn't really recorded until after a lot of the changes that <hes> Western civilization put in place and I I'm not really sure what else there is on that one they did. They did whether the storm of cultural appro appropriation pretty well but I feel like because there's no drive to find the mouth of <hes> of this particular river. Maybe there's. There's no <hes> drive to exploit. What's their show <hes> I I do know that you know of course India has been exploited over the years very much so <hes> but this particular region <hes> maybe just didn't have as as much that was desirable at the time <hes> there wasn't some random Dutch hunter wanting to hunt down the Bru- yeah these I I wouldn't be at all surprised if you know some <hes> Rudyard kipling type hype person her heard stories about the boo grew shower and decided that that's that that would be their quarry for the week and I'm sure that did happen and those people maybe never came back so then that just adds even more credence credence to the fact that it's dangerous when monster hunting please try to come back alive so you can write things down? We would appreciate it. Thank you yeah so yeah. That's that's kind of the Guru <hes>. I wish it was more magical but part of me loves that it's not <hes> it's it does what it do. You know that could easily be real you know did it has properties the fact that like no one knows exactly what it is and it's been said to be many different things <hes> yeah but I have not heard anything on here <hes> that lets me think that the Buru is implausible yeah. No I agree I mean everything about it seems like easily just be creature that nobody's figured out what it is or has looked like yet or maybe we've discovered it and we just we don't know that yet where were just lying in wait waiting for some super awesome scientists to go find it and who knows yeah and so it it really could be a little bit of anything <hes> but I hope that it's something I hope that it's not just a not just a story I would really love it at this. One turned out to be great. That's really satisfying from a cryptic perspective. I mean like what the AARDWOLF rate. That's a creature that had like the yard was crip did and in has since been fully discovered and is a real concern now is just an animal and it's something that is worth protecting and something that fits in the natural world and lends credence fueled of cryptos zoology too yeah exactly it also implies that our science is capable of growing and advancing which it should science. That's how it works yeah. It's it's as much as we know for now <hes> and sometimes that's easy to forget until we discover something new and that kind of turns everything else on its head exactly yeah so yeah. That's that's pretty much. That's pretty much what I've got on the Buro. We've been thinking alignment ways. Oh alignment. I would say I would say probably true neutral <hes>. It doesn't seem like it. It doesn't ravage villages for fun. It doesn't <hes> steal gems or anything like that. It just kinda anywhere else in the world. You'd just say Oh. It's it's the big lizard that lives in the water or the big amphibian that lives in the lake buber. Don't care boo don't care I it is it's turnage attacked attacks. If it needs to attack if you come around but otherwise otherwise man yeah it just it lives in its own little spot and as long as you're not there you're good fair enough yeah and so that's kind of where I put it. I put it just right on the same level as animals and things that are part of part of the natural world yeah. Maybe say like neutral evil just incase. It needs to be a monster in your campaign or something like that. Oh Yeah we're like. It's something sinister has happened in. Some sort of magic is involved in that regard if I were to if I were to use it as an antagonistic <hes> creature <hes> I would go the usual route of it lives in the water and some some pollutant or some some corruption has gotten into the water and corral. It's become whatever yeah and it has become something far more terrible <hes> that yeah I also am reminded and Pamela jackals the third jungle book which is a compilation and continuation of stories stories that kipling wrote it was it was less popular but still very good and one of the characters in it was Jakala tyrant of the Marsh <music> Jakala was crocodile who was just ruler over the muck and all that Jakala could survey from the low hill on which he sat belonged to him and his jaws meted out justice to any who would fall between like a lawful evil kind of thing lawfully. Maybe I could definitely see like Baru fitting into that five really easily. Yes ask <hes> cool all right so <hes> any any other things on Baru or should we move or a promo. Oh ooh think yeah. Let's just go go for the PRU. Let's shed the share the load so our promo this week is for the show kills and chills and these two have a show about death true crime the paranormal we're in general so there is very good chance since you like our show because you're still listening that you'll love the show as well so here is.

Rudyard kipling Jakala Buro India lake buber Pamela jackals
"rudyard kipling" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"rudyard kipling" Discussed on KQED Radio

"What author Rudyard Kipling. No less wrote about the peace. Go punch turns out that's special. Something might have been van Mariani a fortified wine from board. Joe the principal ingredient in that was coca leaves from Peru in essence cocaine nineteenth century, California. Specifically Sanchez go riding you at twain and Kipling and all these guys and there's a lot of energy in their pros. So I'm not surprised that these. Guys had a few piece. Go punches with their cocoa then. But as with all crazes things come to an end. And in the case of the peace. Go punch that was prohibition in one thousand nine hundred nineteen like so many bar owners Duncan nickel closed his Bank exchange saloon and not long after he took his mystery piece. Go punch recipe to his grave and San Francisco's hottest cocktail became forgotten legend. Until fifty years later in the nineteen seventies. One version of the bank's original recipe was. Places like the Comstock saloon began bringing it back and here just down the street from weather. Thank once stood. That's still serving up several peace. Go punches a night. And as my bartender tells me like Duncan nickel over a century ago. They still can't resist including a mystery ingredients of their own. You can tell me what you think it is. But I guess right. Sounds like a challenge. Right. Just though easy. I'm Kelly seven Dini's. You're listening to morning edition on. I'm Brian watt. Cheers, eight twenty nine is the time..

Duncan nickel Rudyard Kipling Comstock saloon van Mariani Brian watt Joe Bank exchange Sanchez San Francisco cocaine Peru California principal twain fifty years
"rudyard kipling" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

10:27 min | 3 years ago

"rudyard kipling" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"I'm your host Marija Franko. And you are listening to us on WBZ. Boston's News Radio. Okay. Let's get right back to its sixteen year old MAURICE de bringing you the critique Anjar JR. Orwell's animal farm. I continue and I'm gonna get to your calls in a moment. Just want to give you some more of my young self material. Or will simply narrates the story and doesn't try to weigh down the reader with sermons and values in addition to simple style or well, also employs foreshadowing with expertise. He begins the book with a strong intriguing tone that wills the reader to pursue the book and find out what's going to happen. And here I'm quoting directly from the book. Mr. Jones of the manor farm had locked the hen houses for the night, but was too drunk to remember to shut the potholes. He lurched across the yard kicked off his boots at the back door drew himself. A last glass of beer and made his way up to bed as soon as the light in the bedroom. Went out there was a stirring and a fluttering all through the farm buildings. That's the. End of that excerpt Orwell uses this mysterious foreshadowing to pique the curiosity of the readers. So he absolutely has to know what is about to take place in the barn. Also or will give so many hints that the reader knows the sequence of events before they happen. The reader literally tears through the book in order to devour Orwell's great description of the outcome. Orwell's succeeds immensely in creating a very realistic picture for the reader where he becomes a part of the story. See that's the thing about me that you might not know I am a very good complimentary. When I like your stuff, so wow, I really full superlatives. But I actually mean it when I say it, not just, you know, massaging egos, six seven two five four ten thirty triple eight nine two nine ten thirty going to Wayne in New Hampshire. Hello, wayne. You're on the air. I how about this. I haven't read all those books, but I will. But. Favorite characters in literature, are Robert Jordan and whom the bell tolls and Holden Caulfield and catcher in the rye. Oh, boy, that's a whole other night. And I love it. No. That's a good old. Boy. Oh boy. Yeah. Yeah. I'm I'm like, your I didn't go to Vietnam. But I was drafted the bad soccer need. So they wouldn't accept me. So that's that's where I'm out. So no, thank you for sharing. But I I go to Holden Caulfield. So it's funny. You bring that up because I look I I still have my notes from back in school. And when I I read that book, actually. And ninth grade. It was so yes, quite yet. And you know, still I mean, I'm still an optimist, but I was like a super optimist at that age. Right. And I actually I hated Caulfield when I I read that book physical again like revulsion, I thought he was just a Wigner in insufferable. And he just everything he was I was not. What I mean? I was a fourteen year old girl after all. So and when I had a little more life experience, and I reread it when I was in law school had the opposite reaction, Wayne. Yeah. The famous quote about a phony, the phonies, phony and and. All right. Well. You like what do you like it? Tell me. I think he I was in the same state that he was. And I think what I read the books read the book. And I think he he gave me a grip on a lifeboat. And I think he really saved in a way great, you know. And then Robert Jordan was just was was just just out inspire to my what I needed to do. So you so that isn't that. That's why reading is and books. I mean, long love affair with books for me. Is that you said, you know, you were in a spot in that, really? And that's great that a book could do that for. It's amazing. Yeah. And I I can tell you just to go on like like, Robin, Jordan, Robert, Jordan, he succeeded in the mission. And I think the best two jobs. I've had in my life waiter in a bartender. That was the rank and file competition. But one you tried to do the best job to get the dust tips. Not got back to the owner and manager is never seen in. You went. You went up. You're at the top. So you know capitalism. Yeah. Listen, I always will be and I worked with the government. I worked in all sectors. And. I think that you know, like, you say really can take you places watching a movie takes you places that you can't to and it's a great ball of wax that you know, that you have is you can do these things related to your own mind. Exactly. And so I just want to say about your when you that's a great to hear when you say because I I was a waitress and a server, and like you said like what you when you were explaining it, Wayne like into my head came what I what exactly what I said like that's a form of pure capitalism where you succeeded up the ladder through your sheer work ethic. It right. And that's again, like this is the total opposite of communism in this idea of getting paid, even if you're unwilling to work in this complete and total garbage. Out. There are still there are still pockets of true capitalism in this country. And what you just as you just said in the tipping industry is one of them and also being self employed where you, you know. What did he say the fishing industry? No, the the the the the service at tipping tipping the tipping. Okay, come in. So those are just too. I mean, there's others in. So I just love to hear your your example of how you succeeded in that fashion. Can I give you just one more quick example sheriff's lily? Okay. 'cause I thought you said the fishing industry. Well, I worked on a fishing boat. And it was just a captain. And I. Yeah. Sometimes we were at odds. And and one day we a problem we have what's called the hookup and you had the boat. Sometimes almost forty five degrees with the water corn, the suppers couldn't get off the hook up, you know. And I I just gave him a example as a fisherman like let the let the wires let the let the ring stay down back in the direction, you came then all in the rig slides under the hookup, and and that worked, and I'll tell you what he said to me if you know Rudyard Kipling, and I'm sure you do he says looked at me he said, you're a better man than I am And was like. that was like the summation of a fisherman. His response. I'll let you that's all that's all from numerous those are three amazing literary references. I really appreciate it Wayne and thank you for the stories too. I'm glad to hear of your success. Take care. Thank you for being on the air. You're welcome. Take care. All right. Okay, next. We're gonna go to Eddie in east Boston. Hello, eddie. You're on the air. And well, thanks, how're you. Eddie. Good. Thanks. I wanna see his your work is. Thanks. Okay. Next thing. I want to say his. Going to history. History. Pretty well. Twice your age. Okay. Which means nothing. We'll go to Julius Caesar. I know you're not that. But but listen, Gordon, Julius Caesar. He wanted to the walk right in. I read up on Stalin whole meant I read up all these. Carwyn is an attitude or I guess it's not that bad. Because they the people that take care of the people, they do whatever they go. But wouldn't they suppression came on? The American presidents. Because they stopped. What was going on in those countries? Right. It's say that again when who came along when the American presidents came along and learn that. Was not ready for the people. Oh, yes. Well, no. Well, the ones that they didn't slaughter. It was great that the fed the people the ones that they didn't purge right? It was all it was all good until the United States realized. Hey, these people are getting. Bolo rice -oday or whatever they will get back back like sixty years ago fifty years ago. You know? But. It's funny. It's march. To the world. Yeah. Right. Exactly, eddie. Fortunately, I'm going to have to cut it. We're tight on time. But. You'll have a rule the world episode coming soon. So stay tuned. Thank you, Eddie daycare. All right. We're going to continue taking your call six one seven two five four ten thirty. The news is up next. I'm Marie de Franko. So DAS news special report. More than a dozen people are dead in the deep south at least fourteen.

Wayne Eddie daycare Robert Jordan Orwell Holden Caulfield Boston Marija Franko Anjar JR soccer Mr. Jones New Hampshire Rudyard Kipling Julius Caesar Marie de Franko self employed Vietnam United States Stalin Carwyn
"rudyard kipling" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

14:45 min | 3 years ago

"rudyard kipling" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"I was be hey, I'm interviewing. Because I because I know you because I bought your product, you know, so I was like, wow. And the funny thing is is that I remember the day of walking in there like it was yesterday, but it was more than twenty years ago. And it's funny. How that impression was made on me? And then all these years later meeting. It's fascinating because I've been to a million places shot. But I don't remember them. I understand. Yeah. I find that interesting. So one of the things that you you kinda goes through the book is kind of the theme of military, strategists or leaders, and it starts with you as a as a young boy at military academy. So I really liked that part. And I want you to speak a little bit about that. Maybe you're experienced military academy, and how that had served you in what you've done in your life. Well, you know, it's amazing. How a few short years can make such a strong impression on someone's life. However, I was very very fortunate in the academy that I had attended. It was one of the most unique military schools around. Is it local no it was in New Jersey was a naval school, and they still have a campus in Florida. But the one that was in New Jersey. They only we're only about thirty forty people a year that would graduate from that school. And yet two of the twelve men that walked on the moon were graduates of this swaggie Adamy. And and they had the really. It really was a shaping molding experience. And sometimes it bothers me that I always seem to default to use a a a military type expression or a military. Scenario to try to explain things to relate to things. But it's just the way it is. And my sons were always woken up very loudly in the morning. They brought that up the other day. Nonetheless, you know, but. It was a real good experience. So real good experience. It was it was a it was a very taxing experience for young young boy, but it was was very valuable. And you know, there's so many things that you can derive from military leadership that it's really there's there's no leadership scenario that you can't reach back into history and find a military situation that teaches the right way and the wrong way of how things should be handled. And it's it's an interesting way of looking at things like he showed some stories. Small story short stories about things, but they really had me thinking obvious repeating to a friend of mine about some of the stories like this was so interesting about what happened and what it all meant. And I was thinking God, I need to tell Westbury just on the military things because it's so interesting how you described things because you're not getting into like where you're going bleary eyed, you give us enough to think about and then the take on it, and what we can learn as entrepreneurs or anybody from it. And I was like I can't believe me of all people like I'm finding this fascinating and wanting more, although I do like military kinds of things, you know. But still it was like God. This is great and one of the things you talked about and I'd love to explore a little bit with you is something called a message to Garcia, right? I wonder if you could talk a little bit about what that is. I mean, I know we only have so much time. But it's so that the ending part of the book, but for that. That alone. I mean, it's such an amazing story. And I believe that it still on the list on the reading list in the military and military. You're supposed to read so many books every year. Okay. I believe that it's still on there. I'm not sure. But I know it's been on it for a long long time. And a message to Garcia was written in the eighteen hundreds by a newspaper man, just as a little article in the paper kept getting reorders for it. And it sounding thousands of orders for this this millions and millions of them printed. This little story about about reliability and accountability for somebody was distributed in large quantities in first of all to the railroad systems in the United States because it taught people that were in the railroad business, and this was a big deal back then about how dependable things had to be and everything, but then it became something that was used in the. Military in the United States. And what would happen is one country would see another country using it. And then they would adapt in fact during the during the Sino Russian or the Japanese Russian war, the Japanese captured these Russians took these papers off them read it and found it so valuable that they translated into Japanese and passed out. All right. Is that in there any more? Literally wound up being circulated around the world because this short little story. I think it's maybe two thousand words or less. Fifteen hundred words. Tells how important it is. And how simple it is to be a real leader and a real reliable person and without without taking up. All of the time and getting into it in detail. It's simple. And it's simply that someone is giving an order to someone and instead of asking how should I do it or wind should I do it or how much should I spent he gets it done right away? And and it makes a huge difference. And it's a it's a great story by thing. But I explained how I used it in business and how we tore it apart to us to really qualify people. My mind is racing in a million miles an hour thinking, oh my gosh. I have to send this to other people. This is so mazing that was the most powerful short piece I ever. Red and I loved how you debrief did after and actually gave some really practical things because how we can use it in our hiring in our just in everything even in looking at ourselves in how we approach things and in our own self, reliance belief in herself and. It's amazing every HR person should read that I agree every hiring manager should read it because the value in. It was like I couldn't believe what I was like gosh, I didn't want the book to end. Near the end might not ready for that actually texted somebody who like this is so good. I have some clients I'm working within. This is exactly what they need to be reading. This exactly what they need to be reading. Because this is where they're making excuses for other people's behavior. Right. And that was shared with me when I was in military school. A long time ago so powerful. Yeah. Really? And look how it served you and your business hiring people and making all the difference because you know. And they helped to set the my temperament from the beginning. Almost in terms of how I looked at things. It's one of the things that that starts the book and ends the book is the very old narrative about for the one of the nail. And if you don't if you haven't heard that, and it's amazing. Says amazing to me how many people have heard that. And it's something that I don't even remember when I first heard it, you know, but it's, you know, for the one of the nail shoe has lost her shoe for the one of a shoe the horses loss for the one of the horse. The writer is lost for the one of the writer. A battle is lost all for the want of a nail. And there's different versions of it. But that's the easiest one, you know, and it's hard sometimes to realize how important that details are little pieces are, but that's one of the things that's in the introduction of the book. Not quite as clear as it is at the end. I give you the real little quote. Yeah. But that's. Really helps to sum it up. And I've got a couple of other good ones in there too. I don't know if you're familiar with Rudyard Kipling's, if there I read that I had not I think I read it long time ago, but I reread it with new eyes franchise. I'm telling you for especially for young person or any person. But. You know, when you when you read those things when you're younger you can enjoy them longer. So those sort of little things are very very important to have the exposure to. And it's not something that's on the curriculum in our education system. And it's and it really is important. You know, I love you know, because this book is about big things have small beginnings and so much of your journey even building up the company and just little things like even having the courage to go making yourself. Introducing yourself to somebody and the mentoring and this and that just these tiny little things or making this phone calls that opened the doors after six months, and like catapulted, you're the business from sixty thousand six hundred thousand you know, just in the short six months. Yikes. Talk about having to like scale like bass. When you have little you have to sometimes people think that mentors have to be somebody that you see every week at two o'clock or mentors or someone that you spend years with that they can be dead. But they can also be someone you meet just a couple of times. And they give you the right inclinations or switch in a new direction. And you know, what I honestly believe that. If you read enough books enough things about people in history that were successful. And and and they're not always successful the whole time. Everybody has setbacks Henry Ford first company went bankrupt. You know, I didn't know that. Yeah. That any lost it. So it's it's really important to open up. What you think of as being a mentor, and even if it's somebody who's been dead for a thousand years, if if you can read their thoughts, you're really able to connect with them. You know that Elbert Hubbard growth, right? I felt he became my mentor. The minute I read that. I was like oh my gosh. Yeah. Yeah. It was it was so moving and even the there's some other historical things in there in a painting. And it was like I went, and I I took the time to actually look up the artists the artists, and you know, I don't usually do that. Because I don't make the time. But this book gave me more pause and thoughtfulness, and you know, maybe it's where I am in my own life in my own business. I don't know. But it just it just struck me in a different way. I guess it was just the thoughtfulness and just seeing into your life and invite having that invitation in. It really makes people think like gosh, you know, we all have problems we all can find solutions, and you had to find some solutions some very tough things like not being able to spend any money, but you have to like grow the business. New innovated right innovation. Well, that's that's why you have to the one big takeaway that people really have to have that just for business, but for in life is that a coin life is every experience is just like a coin has two sides and one side's gonna be a positive was going to be a negative, and it's up to us to find the positive and the thing about life in this country. Is you get to keep flipping that coin as much as you want? So if you flip the coin, and it doesn't show you the right side, flip it again. Because no matter what you think it is even if. In that you were referring to my father said, you can do whatever you want with the business as long as it doesn't cost any money. That sounds like like. Took me a little while to stop spinning. But you know, I was able to actually do that and make that big leap that big initially from from sixty thousand to six hundred thousand and then eventually to six million sixty million. Yeah. I mean, it's just amazing. You know, we only have one minute left to the end of their first talk here. What would you say? If you could just pick one thing, what would be your advice to entrepreneurs, maybe vis-a-vis the book or maybe something else. But what would you one piece of advice be well? If it's my book. Go and get some books and do your research on things before you get started. And when I say research on it doesn't have to be on on the industry just on. The underlining facets of what you're going to attempt, and if that's an enterprise that's going to have marketing involved in it. Then read some marketing books before the internet. I would take a book and find a subject that I liked I go to the Bank, and I'd buy every book that was in the bibliography. So that I would then read all of those a little library on it. So I would say my best advice is to read about the subjects and don't be afraid of reading off subject. Sometimes not sometimes always if you're going to innovate you have to look outside of your industry. So if you're going to innovate in industry, a studying all those other ones around it. That's where you're going to pick up little gems that aren't necessarily being applied in yours. Well said I really appreciate all your wisdom. And speaking about your book and just sharing about.

Garcia military academy New Jersey United States writer Rudyard Kipling Elbert Hubbard Florida Henry Ford six months thousand years twenty years one minute
"rudyard kipling" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

04:56 min | 3 years ago

"rudyard kipling" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Producer Larry Butler. He co-wrote BJ Thomas. Hey won't you play. Another somebody done. Somebody wrong song. Won a Grammy for that. Produced albums for Willie. Gary Stewart, Tammy Wynette, Ronnie Millsap and patroller Clark. Wow. What a life. For those of you who studied poetry? And most of us did when we were growing up, and you think that the great poets died in the era of Shakespeare to the extent that Shakespeare as a single man as we'd say today even existed. But whoever that big John done Lord. Byron Ben Johnson. Christopher marlowe. The era of the great poets did not pass. It's just that the great poets of our day. Or call songwriters. There's still some amazing poetry out there. There's still some incredible words set to rhyme or meter arranged. It's just that. Now, we put them to music. I love to hear these stories of the songwriters back. I think the great sadness is. We don't celebrate our songwriters today. The way we celebrated poets of the past. In poetry has become something this taken over by the weird and the wax. It has to be this pretentious. Alternative reality community. Of artists better than their subjects are artists. Not mindful of their subjects there is nothing wrong with commercializing an art. Rudyard Kipling was paid by the piece for what he wrote as was Samuel Clemens Mark Twain as was oh Henry as was Craig Joyce. James Joyce, not Craigslist. Craig Joyce was my wife's law, professor. There's nothing wrong with commercializing. Eric. And it is not the case as I think history is told us that artists have to starve our that artists. Cannot be commercially successful Ramon. I'm not gonna do it. Now. I'm gonna give you a moment to think about it. Now, I'm not gonna do a lightning round right now. But I was thinking about this this weekend. And I was thinking about an artist who because. He was commercially successful. I think he does not get his due for how good he was as an artist. And I was going to offer him and Billy Joel as an example. Now, I can't remember who it was. It was. It was. It's a show is CNN. Did this thing on the nineties? Tom Hanks produced it co-produced him. There were three of them. And they do each by the decade. And it was about TV shows. I wish I could remember who it was because I was thinking to myself. That there are certain musicians for whom commercial success on on a big scale has tended to limit their critical success and the critical success is often what leads to the the long term monument building. But because someone sells a lot of records or does big shows they're perceived not to be that good. I'll give you an example. I don't think that Alabama. And it a whole lot to country music. I don't. But they made more money than most anybody in country music. They were a highly commercial the first and really most major other than Garth, but they were before Garth sort of stadium country music artists. But I don't think either music holes up to time. I do think there are some artists who had incredible commercial success. And yet there is artistic success. She's.

Craig Joyce Tom Hanks Larry Butler Rudyard Kipling Garth Grammy Shakespeare Christopher marlowe James Joyce BJ Thomas Willie Byron Ben Johnson Gary Stewart Producer Billy Joel Craigslist Tammy Wynette CNN Ronnie Millsap John
"rudyard kipling" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

05:06 min | 3 years ago

"rudyard kipling" Discussed on KTRH

"He co-wrote BJ Thomas. Hey won't you play. Another somebody done. Somebody wrong song. Won a Grammy for that. Produced albums for Willie. Gary Stewart, Tammy Wynette, Ronnie Millsap Patillo Clark. Wow. What a life. For those of you who studied poetry? And most of us did. Growing up. And you think that the great poets died in the Arab of Shakespeare to the extent that Shakespeare as a single man as we'd say today. Even existed. But whoever that be John done or. Lord. Byron Ben Johnson. Christopher Marlowe the era of the great poets did not pass. It's just that the great poets of our day. Or called songwriters. Are still some amazing poetry out there. There's still some incredible words set to rhyme or meter. Arranged. It's just that. Now, we put them to music. I love to hear these stories of the songwriters back. I think the great sadness is we don't celebrate our songwriters today. The way we celebrated poets of the past. In poetry has become something this taken over by the weird and the wax. It has to be this pretentious. Alternative reality community. Of artists better than their subjects are artists. Not mindful of their subjects there is nothing wrong with commercializing an art. Rudyard Kipling was paid by the piece for what he wrote as was Samuel Clemens Mark Twain as was oh Henry as was Craig Joyce. James Joyce, not Craigslist. Craig Joyce was my wife's law, professor. There's nothing wrong with commercializing art. And it is not the case as I think history has told us that artists have to starve our that artists. Cannot be commercially successful Ramona. I'm not gonna do it. Now. I'm gonna give you a moment to think about it. Now, I'm not gonna do a lightning round right now. But I was thinking about this this weekend. And I was thinking about an artist who because he was commercially successful. I think he does not get his due for how good he was as an artist. And I was going to offer him and Billy Joel as an example. Now, I can't remember who it was. It was. It was. It's a show CNN. Did this thing on the nineties? Tom Hanks produced it co-produced him there were three of them. And they do each by the decade, and it was about TV shows. I wish I could remember who it was because I was thinking to myself. That there are certain musicians for whom commercial success on on a big scale. Has tended to limit their critical success. And the critical success is often what leads to the the long term monument building. But because someone sells a lot of records or does big shows they're perceived knocked to be that good. I'll give you an example. I don't think that Alabama. And in a whole lot to country music. I don't, but they made more money than most anybody in country music. They were highly commercial. The first and really most major other than Garth, but they were before Garth sort of stadium country music artists. But I don't think either musicals up to time. I do think there are some artists who had incredible commercial success. And yet there is artistic success. She's not coming to me right now. So I can't.

Craig Joyce Tom Hanks Rudyard Kipling BJ Thomas Garth Grammy Shakespeare Christopher Marlowe Gary Stewart James Joyce Willie Byron Ben Johnson Tammy Wynette Billy Joel Craigslist Patillo Clark Ronnie Millsap CNN John Alabama
"rudyard kipling" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"rudyard kipling" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"It's still good. Yeah. Pretty cool. Make one last point on education here so alluded to this earlier, but we might as well just do this here. So this is seventh grade reading list from a school in Minnesota in one thousand nine eight and the seventh grade reading list from the Minneapolis school district today. Go comparison your hundred years ago now you would think with all the money. We're now spending is in relation. We talked about the teacher striker, you would think with all the money we're spending now with all the new methods of teaching over one hundred years, you'd think we're we're wiser and smarter with our modern ways, we've the internet for the love of Pete. We've all the world's information at our fingertips. You would think we'd be illiterate hundred years ago, and we'd be all geniuses today. When did we wouldn't you objectively thing that that would be the case about a hundred years ago, they probably don't even know how to read it all? But today, we're so smart, it seems like opposite. So this is an eighth grade. Seventh grade reading from one hundred years ago and seventh-grader twelve or thirteen years old. He got some books by Henry Wadsworth longfellow. Some Edgar Allan Poe. Charles Dickens, Rudyard Kipling, Oliver Wendell, Holmes poems. Some James damore Cooper, some Washington Irving twelve year olds reading hill. Washington irving. Now, I'm going to be honest. I'll stop here. I've never read any of these books. I'm just listing. The names of people I've heard of. It's going to be totally honest with you not try to be. Oh, my this is my favorite James federal Cooper book Wadsworth book..

Washington irving James damore Cooper Pete Edgar Allan Poe Henry Wadsworth Minneapolis school district Charles Dickens Rudyard Kipling Oliver Wendell Minnesota hundred years one hundred years thirteen years twelve year
"rudyard kipling" Discussed on Under the Skin with Russell Brand

Under the Skin with Russell Brand

04:15 min | 3 years ago

"rudyard kipling" Discussed on Under the Skin with Russell Brand

"Can you? Find me fine. I I'm not sure. Seventy two it's not even a proper sorry. I say. Cable. There was like a sheet blackberry all cable, but these Tony two buttons. And yeah, they cleared desk phobia, and let me go work off their big fancy offices on the strand. Another. All right. We kinda I weighed so walks probable myself some nice shots to wear. So I could have something nice to wear to the big fancy office rather than working me dressing gown and a went up and it took note. But with me the to all up from the notebook. And that's how I still write my books today are right. The rule I in the notebook, and then transcribe it if this is something rotted, especially when we get to that stage where they we just need these and I go well Utah. Oh, jesus. His five. Once you frost that buddy notebook. Someone foot of bits of paper falling out of it and menus of stolen and stuff. Like that. It's just like what is this? This is a physical representation of my brain. Stuffed full of absolute bona monarchs five percent of which is useful. Good luck. We've you know. Sarah palin. So I suppose you the night trivial trajectory where it seems that even the point of conception. It was about politics and cooking saw survive in, and I suppose that connection between politics and survivors. So I could really think about because spouse for me for longtime politics has been primarily fear echo as opposed to notice things happening in die for that deal with it. So I suppose it's inevitable given the the your journey. I was inaugurated in that manner that eventually you would come up against K Hopkins Valois of the ROY on like. Before an sorry about now. Inevitability to I suppose. Yeah. More. So what happened deny terrain? She moved out of it. Affair. I take that as a victory. See something. Post. Suing. Yes. Like what happened there? She didn't. She sort of accuse you of being disrespectful to the military or. Sweet the. Was saying too heavily employ somebody who suddenly my brain's kicked in a gun, legally legal courses. So it's that basic knee heavily employed. The I vandalized or condoned the vandalisation of war memorial. My dad was in the folk Len's Moi as in the war. Not just for Jolie. My brothers in the RIF of what family of military service people. Now, my I've I've I read told me by Rudyard Kipling, send us off. What here, you know? I've I've go- family would like military service firstly, I would not vandalize warmer Morial eve numb ideologically opposed to war as a concept and various a real thing. I wouldn't vandalize memorial because I also have respect for people who've given their lawyers for our country. But Secondly, my gold wife, my dad reads that believes it like hit all any of his friends or any of his friends at the naval military club or any of my brother's, friends and think I'm responsible for that. So I had a very emotive response to that because of my own military connections. And I was just site tight that down route C you 'cause I was so furious. And I didn't I was doing. I didn't never no way to know..

Hopkins Valois naval military club Sarah palin war memorial Rudyard Kipling Utah Tony Len Jolie five percent
"rudyard kipling" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"rudyard kipling" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

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