17 Burst results for "Ruby Gibson"

"ruby gibson" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

08:01 min | 2 d ago

"ruby gibson" Discussed on Native America Calling

"The community? I'm one of the instructors at the grade school in the high school here. And we covered that a little bit, but we're not really concerned with that because a lot of that culture that spearfishing culture comes to your family. And in many cases, in many cultures, there's coming of age ceremonies. And so when a man or a lady gets to be a certain age, is the first kill the first year, their first rabbit. The first part is the first fish. They're all part of that coming of age ceremony. So when you get to things, you have a little ceremony in your elders and your community members, your relatives all come and they support you. And they'll give you stories, they'll give you knowledge, how to take care of that fiction. And so on and so forth, they'll give you maybe a spear or a gun or a bullet or whatever you know, a knife. And so it's really important to carry tradition towards and when you occupy your life with these traditional style of harvesting and living up the land, like again, I said food sovereignty comes all the way back. We take care of ourselves. We don't need to eat fish sticks. Then that's the best food for us in our children. And Greg, are we thinking of, what is the best way to prepare and eat sturgeon? Well, like Marvin said earlier, you know what we do is we're big on smoking fish in our community. We smoke white fish, musky, northern, even wildlife sometimes, but that surgeon. That stopped here, that's the best stuff. They said that you can smoke that. There's different ways different types of brines you can use. We also make one from maple sugar that we use. And it is phenomenal. So yeah. That's the other part of our two, and we always tease people to people from electrifying more other nations we tease non native culture because some people say, why would you guys eat a sturgeon or a musky, they taste fishy in really? Yes, that's what fish are supposed to. Like Chris. And if you don't know how to cook it, then if you don't, if you don't like it, you probably never cooked it right. So interesting, interesting. Well, Doug Cox, how about down in menominee country? How do you folks eat sturgeon? Yeah, I'm similar. We've had that past down just like they have, you know, it's passed down from some not only in physically learning how to cook it, but our stories in our legends and our ceremonies, the nominee of the ceremony every spring and that's been going on for thousands of years. It is called a sturgeon ceremony. Now we've sort of modernized it because of those dams, but in April, we have a huge gathering, a huge polo in a massive feast. We take some of those fish that are donated from DNR in an MOU. And we'll smoke those and we serve them at the feast and we invite everybody and anybody that wants to come and free come celebrate with us. There's a historic dance. Nominee have called fish dance in that dance as part of our own to the sturgeon on their return and it's been practiced again for thousands of years. It's a sacred dance. Part of our stories we prepare those sturgeons to get smoked and feeds hundreds of people, they get to taste how we prepare those sturgeon and it's a really important cultural event for us every year. Young little ones all the way up to our elders, participate in this event. Well, Doug earlier, we heard these stories of 7 foot long sturgeons weighing up to 300 pounds. Nowadays, what is the average sized sturgeon that you see? Yeah, you know, the average drop in some is a number of factors. It's climate. It's fishing pressure. At least in our populations that we're talking about, not like Winnebago, those ones that Greg talked about in those non natives that are spearing that resource down there. Do you know how does monitor it? But they're trying to balance it. The average fish isn't that big anymore. I mean, in fish standards, 50 inches probably you're talking about plenty average of a healthy sturgeon population. But again, there's those ones in there that are 6 and 7 feet long. I've seen them also. So they're in there, but on the average that they're not huge. In the lifespan, I mean, how many of them can live 70, 80, 90 years? Is that are those outliers or is that kind of the norm that they live that long? There's a portion of that population that are involved when it's just like there's a portion that are young ones so that balance is there, but those older ones, those 7 footers and again shown all at that dam and wolf river, the DNR does collect them every year. They collected one there that was 200 and 250 pounds. Over 70 long, that fish is estimated to be a 125, 130 years old. And when they collected that, I commented to the DNR folks in our meeting that's like, do you guys understand that this fish one when he was young? He was seen in this system without these dams. Think about that. This fish was swimming in the system without using them that are stopping him today and he comes back now at a 125 years old and getting experiences these blockages and not being able to come home anymore. So yeah, I mean that age they lived out long and there's an important message in every one of them. Well, unfortunately, we are going to have to wrap up our show now. We're out of time, but before we do, I want to thank our three guests today, Marvin defoe, Greg Johnson, and Douglas Cox for sharing native insights about the cultural significance of sturgeon, along with risks, facing sturgeon populations. Join us on native America calling again tomorrow as we cover what you should be thinking about as you prepare your income taxes. Until then, I'm Shawn spruce. As people seek to know diverse cultures, tribal museums and cultural centers grow more popular, so the institute of American Indian arts who support this show now provides a master of fine arts in cultural administration, focused on social equity and support of cultural community growth this program combines administrative tools and techniques with socially engaged leadership, blending institutional skills and community outreach programming. Deadline to apply is February 15th at dot EDU slash MFA CA. Are you a Native American healthcare provider, recovery counselor, social worker, domestic and sexual abuse advocate or traditional healer working in Native American communities, doctor ruby Gibson, will begin a 6 month advanced immersion in healing historical trauma. This online masterclass looks through the lens of a 7 generational recovery approach to provide powerful proven modalities and has offered tuition free to tribal members. Registration deadline is march 24th, 2023, info at freedom lodged dot org who support this show. Native America calling is produced in the annenberg national native voice studios in Albuquerque, New Mexico, by chronic broadcast corporation, a native nonprofit media organization. Funding is provided by the corporation for public broadcasting, with support from the public radio satellite service. Music is by Brent Michael Davis. Native voice one, the Native American radio network

Doug Cox Greg menominee Marvin Winnebago Marvin defoe Douglas Cox wolf river Chris Doug Shawn spruce DNR institute of American Indian a Greg Johnson swimming
"ruby gibson" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

04:55 min | 5 d ago

"ruby gibson" Discussed on Native America Calling

"I think there are very highly intelligent animal, highly aware of their surroundings and are going to do what it takes to protect their cups and their families. But we do see evidence of them losing that fight in we find a full skulls of full entire skeletons and vertebra and of younger cubs that didn't make it. Yeah, so. Okay. And Mary, you mentioned, you know, how healthy many polar bears are, how strong they are, but are you worried about changing climate conditions in the future polar bears? You know, what I see, I'm really blessed to say that I rarely see skinny polar bears. It's been many years since I've seen one. And I live really close to the beach, or on the beach of summer long, and if there's a polar bear and somebody posts on social media, we'll go see the distance and it's really been awesome to that's the first thing I look for when I see a polar bear. Is it healthy? Is it skinny? Has it been eating? Menthol is a relief to see big ones rarely ever do I see skinny ones and if I do it would probably be in the summer when they're swimming too far. When currents change in the ice goes in a different direction or dumps them somewhere. I've been really blessed to not see a lot of skinny polar bears. I see a lot of the commercials are promoting donate to this save the polar bears. We don't see those people around here saving polar bears. We don't really see a lot of skinny polar bears, but Allison is right. These bears are adapting. There is less ocean eyes. We see that during spring whaling and Hermann can talk about that too. But yeah, there's our adapting. Well, it's good news. Good to hear for sure. And we got to wrap up the show here in just a few moments. But Herman just a quick question about how far south do you do polar bear lived? Do you know that information? I don't know if they live there, but I've heard one being caught in which is about 70 miles inland. 70 million. Sometimes when they get lost. Okay. Well, folks, that is all the time we have for show day I want to thank our guests for what's been a really fascinating conversation about polar bears in New York. Join us next week for another lineup of discussions about indigenous issues and topics. Our executive producer is art Hughes. Our producers are Andy Murphy and soul traverso. Merino Spencer is the engineer. Show McFarland is the digital producer, Noah Dave's Moses, is the distribution director. Bob Peterson is the network manager for native voice one. Clifton Chadwick is our national underwriting sales director. Antonia Gonzalez is the anchor for national native news, Charles saver is our chief operations officer. The president and CEO of colonic broadcast corporation is Jacqueline seli. As if weekend, I'm Sean spruce. As people seek to know diverse cultures, tribal museums and cultural centers grow more popular, so the institute of American Indian arts who support this show now provides a master of fine arts in cultural administration, focused on social equity and support of cultural community growth this program combines administrative tools and techniques with socially engaged leadership, blending institutional skills and community outreach programming. Deadline to apply is February 15th at dot EDU slash MFA CA. Are you a Native American healthcare provider, recovery counselor, social worker, domestic and sexual abuse advocate or traditional healer working in Native American communities, doctor ruby Gibson, will begin a 6 month advanced immersion in healing historical trauma. This online masterclass looks through the lens of a 7 generational recovery approach to provide powerful proven modalities and is offered tuition free to tribal members. Registration deadline is march 24th, 2023, info at freedom lodge dot org, who support this show. Native America calling is produced in the annenberg national native voice studios in Albuquerque, New Mexico, by chronic broadcast corporation, a native nonprofit media organization. Funding is provided by the corporation for public broadcasting, with support from the public radio satellite service. Music is by Brent Michael Davis. Native voice one, the Native American radio network

Andy Murphy soul traverso Merino Spencer Noah Dave Clifton Chadwick cubs Antonia Gonzalez Charles saver colonic broadcast corporation Jacqueline seli Sean spruce Hermann institute of American Indian a Mary Bob Peterson Allison Herman swimming McFarland
"ruby gibson" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

02:48 min | 2 weeks ago

"ruby gibson" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Are you a Native American healthcare provider, recovery counselor, social worker, domestic and sexual abuse advocate or traditional healer working in Native American communities, doctor ruby Gibson, will begin a 6 month advanced immersion in healing historical trauma. This online masterclass looks through the lens of a 7 generational recovery approach to provide powerful proven modalities and is offered tuition free to tribal members. Registration deadline is march 24th, 2023, info at freedom lodge dot org, who support this show. You've got to tune to native America calling. I'm Sean spruce. Plenty of time to join this conversation about rising incarceration rates among Native Americans, and how tribal justice systems have a role in solving the high rates of incarceration for Native Americans. We're at one 809 9 6 two 8 four 8. How do you see tribal justice systems working to help those in your community? Give us a call, one 809 9 6 two 8 four 8. That's also one 809 9 native. Let's go back to the phones. And in fact, let's go back to bethel Alaska, where we have M listening on station KY UK. M you're on the air. Hello, so I think it is entirely way too soon to be giving such intense power to travel courts in the Alaska due to the fact that there is so much culture shock from becoming westernized. We're so remote in Alaska that a majority of our issues are handled with outside third party health. And it may be quite premature to give full and entire powers to the tribes due to the lack of know how or assistance in setting up a court system. Am I appreciate that call and I know Nicki spoke to that earlier. It's quite a bit different there in Alaska and M sites, perhaps the inexperience of some tribal communities in developing robust tribal justice systems. So M, your call is noted and perhaps further along in this discussion, we can revisit that topic again, but let me go ahead and pivot back to amber now, our guest. And we're just curious. We have heard some criticism today regarding tribal courts and do you face that as well there at yurok? You know, there are always politics. I think in smaller communities, but overall, I mean, we have developed some pretty good policies procedures to try to ensure fairness and equal application. Of opportunities, you know, unfortunately we are grant driven and so it really depends on what we have available at any given time, what types of resources we can provide. But overall, I don't think that's been a huge

ruby Gibson Sean spruce Alaska KY America Nicki UK
"ruby gibson" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

08:03 min | 3 weeks ago

"ruby gibson" Discussed on Native America Calling

"National native news is produced by colonic broadcast corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting. Support by sinofsky chambers law, championing tribal sovereignty and Native American rights since 1976 from opioids litigation to treaty rights to tribal self governance, with offices in Washington, D.C., New Mexico, California, and Alaska. Sanofi chambers law. A historical master trauma class taught by doctor ruby Gibson and staff provides tuition free online training to tribal members who are therapists, counselors, social workers and traditional healers enrollment deadline is march 24th, 2023 at freedom lodge dot org, who support this show. Native voice one the Native American radio network. This is native America calling. I'm Sean spruce. In a notable college essay, Martin Luther King Jr. wrote that the purpose of education is to prepare one's mind for absorbing knowledge with an immoral framework. Schools across the country have spent time leading up to today's federal holiday named in his honor to teach facts about king and instill his legacy in American history. Native educators have an opportunity to also include additional intersections among king, the civil rights struggle, and the parallel drive for Native American equity. There is a shared oppression between blacks and Native Americans and both suffer ongoing racism. But there are many significant differences as well. Differences that remain on a bridge. On today's show, we'll get an idea of what native students might encounter in a lesson plan about Martin Luther King and the civil rights struggle. If you'd like to add to our conversation, you can do so by calling in the number one 809 9 6 two 8 four 8. That's one 809 9 native. Joining us first from lacy Washington is Jared KIPP. He's a native student program specialist and the 2022 Washington state teacher of the year. He's chumney. Jared, welcome back to the show. Thanks for having me, Sean. It's great to be back. Jared, we certainly don't need a holiday to teach Martin Luther King in this civil rights movement, but does today present an opportunity for a heightened understanding of that history? Absolutely. Doctor king provides such a wealth of opportunity to connect not only more to black history in America, but also how our communities have been inextricably linked to the legacy and ongoing structures of settler colonialism. Well, do native students have a different take on MLK than students of other races? Well, I think in most of most education, everyone kind of gets a similar version of doctor king's history. But I think when we have opportunities to tie in these connections, then what native students can get out of it is how because we're so tied through these settler systems of oppression, we can see how we've been able to intersect how we've been able to collaborate and co conspire for social justice. Doctor king spoke early on about militarism, capitalism, and racism, effectively speaking early to these ideas of the impacts of settler colonialism. And he spoke quite often about native people in at a really pivotal time in Native American history and resistance. The times he was speaking were at peak terminate termination and relocation, the birth of the American Indian movement, the rise of the taking of Alcatraz that led to so much of the red power movement. So when we take doctor king's story and we see just how much intersection that all oppressed peoples have, then we can find the richness and the connection that we need to keep that work moving forward. Well, you really highlight the significance of Martin Luther King's teachings and how they correlate with what Native American students might find within their perspectives. But I'm also curious, some of the other aspects of Martin Luther King's teachings, his legacy, when he was very, very closely aligned with his Southern Baptist roots and how do you address some of those spiritual issues in the classroom working with native students? Well, spiritualism is a big part of his life and a lot of people that worked with him. I think maintaining spiritual strength is really important in social justice movements. And I think that's something that has native people has always sort of led the way that whatever movement we've engaged in, we have our spiritual leaders brought into the circles. We have our women, our sisters, brought into the circles. And we have our two spirits bringing in for that spiritual strength because that's what we need for strong social justice to make sure that we have that balance that an inclusion, but we also resist how much of that traditional spirituality has been institutionally taken from us or has been attempted to be taken from us. So I think there's a lot of opportunities to have those conversations, but I think if we're looking in a more sort of critical indigenous studies lens, then we can get into some more complex conversations about how Christianity can often play such a really complicated role and impactful role in native oppression. Well, Jared, are there any aspects of Martin Luther King that are problematic or that you specifically maybe stay away from, especially when working with native students in particular? Well, I think one of the things that's important and one of the things that I've always taken away from our leaders is that no person is perfect, right? That we are all fundamentally human. And we can look at any great leader and find fault. But I think the vision in the hope and the actions of social justice teach us a lot. But also not shying away from the areas that are problematic, can help inform us to realize that as we speak for a more dust and equitable society that the work starts inside first and that we try to live up to our ideals as best as possible. What about the timeline? Because so often when we think of historical figures, we think, you know, many years ago, we might be thinking about somebody like an Abraham Lincoln or a sitting bull, but yet MLK, I mean, as we shared in the show, if you were alive today, he would be 94. It's very likely if he hadn't been assassinated. He might still be alive today. And there are many people alive that remember when he was still alive. And is that something that you have to approach differently with native students for somebody who's in some ways still a contemporary of some people that are alive today? Well, yeah. We see that a lot. America has a really short attention span. As people who face the ongoing struggle in public education of being persistently historicized or made episodic, doctor king's story

Martin Luther King sinofsky chambers Washington, D.C. ruby Gibson Sean spruce Jared lacy Washington Jared KIPP chumney corporation for public broadca Sanofi America New Mexico Alaska American Indian movement king California Sean Washington The times
"ruby gibson" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

08:05 min | Last month

"ruby gibson" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Just because things get twisted up so much there's so much hostility and it's really just not a productive arena to have anything quality come out of that exchange. So that's the first thing. You don't have to respond. You don't have to be friends. Unfriend them, but you don't have to respond either and sometimes just the choice to not engage. That's really exercising our own personal agency. We don't have to be involved in everything. We don't have to watch. We don't have to listen. If something isn't sitting right in our in our core, we don't have to agree with it. And we don't have to engage with it. Okay. So just ignore just put the mute button on and just nothing here, just keep going, keep moving on with your day. And DJ, how about just throughout the year? Like I said earlier, everybody kind of starts off new year's with a bang, they're kind of fired up. They've got these resolutions in place, but as the months roll by, it's easier to lose focus. So what kind of tips can you offer for just staying positive and keeping that right frame of mind throughout the whole year? Yeah, great question. That's the big challenge, isn't it? I mean, every time new year's rolls around, you know, we get these great ideas about how we want this year to be our best year yet. We want to be the best version of ourselves. We want to make improvements. And the thing that I found over the years is, you know, I've always heard these great conversations about resolutions. And some of them are so extreme that you just know that's not going to be sustainable. And we want to create things that are sustainable. Where we can take one step every day in the direction that we're choosing, not try to make that big leap in one day. Do everything in a day or a week. I had a guy a few years ago. He said, yeah, I got this. I got this new diet. I'm going to lose that last 15 pounds. I've been trying to lose. I got a new diet. I'm going to eat lettuce and oranges. And that was it. That was the whole list. That's going to last. Two to three hours before they go back to the way it was. And so a big part of it is setting realistic goals. Doesn't mean small goals. It means realistic in the fact that you're willing to set up timelines. You're willing to do the work. You really are willing to take those small steps every day. So that you can make it sustainable. Be impatient. Patient with yourself. This is one of the things I know you were talking about with James as well. On the resolutions is be patient and know that there's going to be ups and downs in the journey. That's just part of the process. You're going to have setbacks. You're going to have moments of doubt. But be patient. When people are trying to go back and get in the shape, I did this a few years ago with one of my friends. I wanted to hit the gym. And I said, okay, well, let's go. And I'm usually in there for 45 minutes max and I'm out. And we're in there for over an hour and a half. And he's like working out. And he's like, I'm back. I'm back. You know, the next morning you can't get out of bed. He's like, my back, my back. It was life as mad at me. He's trying to be Superman in one day. And it's like it's the small things that we do consistently over time. That have the biggest impact in our development and in our contribution. It's not that knockout punch that lightning strike. I know we watched that so much on media. That's going to be that one thing that changes everything. It's the opposite. Yeah, exactly. In my experience, it's like what Peter was talking about. This is a journey. This is a long journey and it's not an emergency and if you are heading the right direction, you can want from wherever you are in the country to Miami, Florida. You're not going to get there tomorrow. You're not going to get there next week. But if you're heading right direction, you'll get there eventually. And that's what we're talking about that patient style. And then the other thing is being underachiever. You know, don't try to come up with 28 different goals for the year. Come up with a handful that you're really passionate about that you're really committed to that you really feel not just in your head, but in your gut, that this is the right move for you this year. Less is more. We're listening to. Eagle bear Venice. He's a motivational storyteller. We also have James Anderson. Also a motivational speaker on the show today. And of course, feed a new breast, AKA anti Priscilla from season two of reservation dogs. We come back from the break. I want to talk with anti Priscilla a theater new breast a little bit about reservation dogs, and maybe there's some insights there for how to have a great. Are you a Native American healthcare provider, recovery counselor, social worker, domestic and sexual abuse advocate or traditional healer working in Native American communities? Doctor ruby Gibson will begin a 6 month advanced immersion in healing historical trauma. This online masterclass looks through the lens of a 7 generational recovery approach to provide powerful, proven modalities and is offered tuition free to tribal members, registration deadline is march 24th, 2023, info at freedom lodge dot org, who support this show. This is native America calling. I'm Sean spruce. We're speaking with experts on how to prevent divisions and make healthier choices in the new year, still time if you'd like to share some strategies and better choices you want to make. Join our conversation by calling one 809 9 native, our phone lines are open now, so go ahead, give us a call. We'd love to hear from some listeners on the show today. And let's go back to our first guest theta new breast AKA anti Priscilla from reservation dogs. And I want to ask you if you could do us a favor, just get into character if you will for a moment. And anti Priscilla, what do you think her advice would be to help listeners start 2023 off with a positive momentum? Okay, this is anti Priscilla. We want you to get up off the couch. We want you to turn off the TV. We want you to put down your phone and we want you to start moving out into the real world. The good thing about the blood quantum of reservation dogs is everyone's native. I was anti Priscilla get to wear her own clothes, speak her own language, her chauffeur was a native, her, she got to go first class, and when I got there, there was Indian food indigenous food. So anti Priscilla's advice is the positive productive and proactive. So when you're on social media, just say, God, you're brilliant. Oh, you're worthy. Oh, I love your opinions. Oh gosh, you're just stunning. You're just majestic. Just put that on social media. Don't do the other stuff positive, productive, and proactive. And then anti Priscilla doesn't have to pay you a visit. Oh, there we go. We don't want that to happen for sure. I like to the three ps, be positive, productive, and proactive. Otherwise, anti Priscilla might come knocking on your door and you don't want that happening. Sure. Yeah. James. You know, when you're anti walks in the room, just your anti walks in the room and you sit up straight. Just remember your antis there all the time, sit up straight and do the right thing. Yeah, yeah. No, it's on at that point. When she comes knocking, yeah, for sure. Let me ask James Anderson our other guest in James, I want to ask you because you are in addition to being a motivational speaker and a trainer, you're also a very, very successful business person you come from a successful business family and what have you learned through the restaurant, business overall these years. In terms of what we're talking about today, being positive, also like conflict resolution because workplace is so much of the divisiveness that we come across can

Priscilla Eagle bear Venice ruby Gibson Sean spruce James Anderson James Miami Peter Florida America
"ruby gibson" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

03:22 min | Last month

"ruby gibson" Discussed on Native America Calling

"So this is serious stuff here. This information data there in New Zealand here in the states and it's obviously imperative that as native people, we protect that data in regards to its sovereignty. And how do you do that? Man, how do you protect some of this data that is so easily used in ways that don't necessarily benefit indigenous people? What's the process there for protecting that and ensuring that we have data sovereignty? Yeah, incredibly complicated and so the parts that are administered by the state and certainly in the New Zealand context we have quite a lot of leader managed the governance there. So administrative data collected by the state. We can have Marty governance or advisory boards in place to manage the use of that data. There's also a lot of should we say social and cultural license here. So we're the state gets it wrong. There can be a lot of very strong pushback both in the media and through, especially social media and the population. So I'm reasonably confident that we are making the right steps and the administrative space. We're it becomes a little bit more complicated for us as we have a data held by companies you have facebooks and googles about Marty or even some of the DNA companies. And lots of I don't know how we're going to overcome governance issues there. We've certainly talk of trying to put cultural cultural, what's the word for it? Like plant variety rights. So you can see where the part of Mahdi and the knowledge or the information has come from this sort of tags put on data. So it may not protect and provide data governance, but it provides an identifier for where Mario data is being used. And that once that identifier is more widely used that can potentially help us move to a better governance space. But it's incredibly difficult once it gets data that's in the private sector. Certainly, certainly, and you mentioned Facebook and the whole social media angle as well. And that's on the top of everybody's concerns right now with regard to privacy and data collection with regard to technology. So just a really, really interesting discussion. I want to thank our three guests today. Casey lozar, Alicia Murphy and Matt Ross Scrooge for what's been a really insightful conversation on information and data collection as it pertains to indigenous populations. Join us on native America calling in tomorrow as we talk about new music from native artists. Until then, I'm Sean spruce. Are you a Native American healthcare provider, recovery counselor, social worker, domestic and sexual abuse advocate or traditional healer working in Native American communities, doctor ruby Gibson will begin a 6 month advanced immersion in healing historical trauma. This online masterclass looks through the lens of a 7 generational recovery

New Zealand Marty Mahdi Casey lozar Alicia Murphy Matt Ross Mario Sean spruce Facebook ruby Gibson America
"ruby gibson" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:42 min | 2 months ago

"ruby gibson" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Probably is. Okay. Too good to be true, probably is. Good information from Emily. We've got another call. My new listening on Casey Xu in San Jose. My new welcome to native America calling. Thank you. Sean. Hi, Brian. A radio, a community radio station in downtown San Jose. And your show all who native voice shows are aired from 6 to 11 Monday to Friday. And luckily, the corporation from Alaska paid or airing these shows. That's a shout out to the people to that having the show on. Well, in terms of Twitter, it's just a platform and a person is allowed to voice and I think even if you don't like what they're having to say. It doesn't mean that you have to believe it. It does not mean that you agree with it. But they have a voice. So, and I'm looking at the stats of the Twitter in terms of the revenue that is produced in 2020, it was under 4 million 4 $1 billion. $1 million sorry. And in 2021, it was 5 million dollars. So you wonder why must bought it and too bad the people. Scrubbing down and a lot of people are losing their jobs, but look around you. The tech industry is changing and that's life. Right. But there's gain for people who are on Twitter and there are people that are just browsing, we use Twitter specifically to reach out just like on Facebook and all the other social media because we have a radio station. Community is not profit radio station. My new I'm sorry, we're running low on time here for the show. But I do appreciate your comments. And again, just reminding us that ultimately, it's up to us as users to read responsibly and to think critically and pay attention. First and foremost, when we're using Twitter or any other social media platform. And let's go back to our guest, Emily, and Emily, I want to get your thought again. What can we do in addition to paying attention to some of these bots and making sure that information that we're receiving through Twitter is legitimate, any other tips or best practices to help us be more responsible social media users? Absolutely. If there's something that you see, you can go ahead and Google it and see if there's somewhere else where it's also printed just to confirm because they're often our claims that are made on Twitter. And if you just do triangulation, if you look for it someplace else, if it's there, there's a better chance that it's actually happening or it's present. You know, you can go to Twitter and find the most recent information, but that doesn't mean it's the only place you're going to find it. You need to confirm, you know, trust but verify. Okay. And how about you, Emily? Are you staying on Twitter for now? I am because it's not just for me a good resource, but it's also a place where I can read voices that don't otherwise have a voice that's a place where I can find other native folks, but also people who have chronic illness. It's really one of the only places for people who have chronic illness to actually have a place to talk freely. And I respect that and I want to be able to see and hear those voices. Yeah, it's interesting to think of all these communities that are there on Twitter and healthcare needs, elders, people that are in distress and do you meet, do you have a lot of people just reach out to you just for questions specifically, directed at you or for resources Emily through Twitter and other channels? Not as often as I'd like. I always like to be a resource, but sometimes that happens or other times I'll see somebody and I'll reach out to them because I'll have an answer to the question that they have. Or I'll connect them or I'll retweet them so that you can amplify their voice and they can find their resources they need. And do you think you'll try any of these new platforms we've been talking like Mastodon or some of these other ones? I don't have the energy right now. I mean, it starts to emerge as a place I need to go. I'll go there. But right now there's enough people on Twitter that I'm going to stay there and hope that we can write out this storm. Okay. And the verified blue check accounts, are you paying attention to those? I never paid attention to that. I mean, the people that I pay attention to are they don't need the blue check anyway. They've already got the credibility, right? For certain for certain, yeah, so really interesting discussion today with all of our guests and talking about Twitter and the future of Twitter. What does it mean? What does it mean for you? What does it mean for me? What does it mean for native communities and especially native Twitter? This is a very ongoing story, so I'm sure we're going to be hearing a lot more about Twitter in the months to come. And I'm sure we're all going to be influenced either directly as users or as followers. So unfortunately, we are going to have to wrap up our discussion now. I'd like to thank our guests, Tracy sorrel, doctor twyla baker, doctor Emily hazus, and aylan coochie for a riveting conversation about native Twitter. Join us on any sea again tomorrow for discussion about the ins and outs of forensic science. Until then, I'm Sean spruce. Thanks for listening. Are you a Native American healthcare provider, recovery counselor, social worker, domestic and sexual abuse advocate or traditional healer working in Native American communities? Doctor ruby Gibson will begin a 6 month advanced immersion in healing historical trauma. This online masterclass looks through the lens of a 7 generational recovery approach to provide powerful, proven modalities and is offered tuition free to tribal members, registration deadline is march 24th, 2023, info at freedom lodge dot org, who support this show. This month and every month, remember one in three Native American adults have high blood pressure. Check it at your nearest community health center. If the numbers are above one 20 over 80, talk to a healthcare professional. Native community well-being is very important. You can take action by visiting heart dot org slash HBP control. This support provided in partnership

Twitter Emily Casey Xu San Jose Sean Alaska Brian America Facebook Tracy sorrel twyla baker Emily hazus Google aylan coochie Sean spruce ruby Gibson
"ruby gibson" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

01:58 min | 11 months ago

"ruby gibson" Discussed on Native America Calling

"And until then I'm Sean spruce. Thank you for listening. Are you a Native American healthcare provider? Recovery counselor, social worker, domestic and sexual abuse advocate or traditional healer working in Native American communities, doctor ruby Gibson, will begin a 7 month advanced immersion in healing historical trauma. This online masterclass looks through the lens of a 7 generational recovery approach to provide powerful proven modalities and is offered tuition free to tribal members, registration deadline is February 21st, info at freedom lodge dot org, who support this show..

"ruby gibson" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:12 min | 1 year ago

"ruby gibson" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Are you a Native American healthcare provider, recovery counselor, social worker, domestic and sexual abuse advocate or traditional healer working in Native American communities, doctor ruby Gibson, will begin a 7 month advanced immersion in healing historical trauma. This online masterclass looks through the lens of a 7 generational recovery approach to provide powerful proven modalities and is offered tuition free to tribal members. Registration deadline is February 21st info at freedom lodge dot org, who support this show. Thank you for tuning in to native America calling. I'm Sean spruce. We're talking about dating etiquette by commiserating about worst dates. What lessons did you learn by going on a horribly bad date? Or were you the one that made the data bad experience? Don't be shy. There's still time to join the conversation. One 809 9 6 two 8 four 8. That's also one 809 9 native. Stacy earlier, you told us this story about, let's call him bodily function guy for lack of a better term, but do you have any other stories of bad dates? Not so much bad dates. I guess just odd odd behaviors, I guess? Or kick? Well, tell us about tell us about one of those odd behavior dates. Well, I mean, I guess we could call this guy meat cutting guy. Yeah. Okay. Guy and you seem, you know, normal. And we were out for a stay, going to a steakhouse and he I was, you know, we're just discussing, and he played came out and everything and he started cutting up his steak or whatever. He grabbed my plate, switched it out. And I'm like, what are you doing? And he started cutting my steak and I can cut it myself, thanks. I thought that was, I don't know, that was different. And I mean, I kind of laugh about it now and I mean is it possible that he was just trying to be courteous? Maybe? I mean, I just kind of took it with grain of salt, I guess. And I was like, thanks. You know? I don't think I've had somebody cut a steak for me since I was like maybe 6 years old when I go out to with my parents. Yeah, I know. I would be a little awkward. Did you reach across the table? Yeah, he did. It was like plates in front of us. And, you know, I am a native mama and I like my food. So anyone who puts their hand in front of my mouth when I'm trying to eat, it's like, no. So yeah, he just switched the plates out. And start cutting. I mean, there's no warning. So maybe if there was a warning, I would have been more like, sure. I guess. But or no. I don't know. Tough one. Tough one to call, yeah, and I can just seems weird, yeah, definitely kind of odd. And especially like if you didn't say anything, just reaches across the table. Okay. In the conversation was great. So. Well, that's good. That's a plus. Okay, so we've got meat cutter guy and we have bodily function guy. All right. Folks, we have a caller on the line annalise. She's calling in from Santa Fe, New Mexico, where she's listening online and at least you're on the air. Hi, yeah, I'd like to comment on something that Rogers said earlier on this call. That is given us from somebody on a dating app that like say and thank you, but best of luck. If you're not interested, I really think this statement actually is rather ignorant of the experience of women on dating app no sense to roger, but you know many times when they get bombarded with messages on dating apps and then. And responding to all of them is, first of all, just not practical. The furthermore a lot of men on dating apps just don't take time we do know. And they may respond callously, lash out with burglar abuse and, you know, frankly, a lot of women that I know don't want to bother dealing with that. So and the other thing is I personally think if the guy thinks he's entitled to the response from each and every woman that he messages, but it's red flag and data. So that's my opinion. Finally, thanks for calling in and that's really interesting. And I can see that. I mean, definitely some women really do get bombarded with IMs and different posts and things like that. So anneliese, are you still on the line? Yes. I'm curious, what do you think is the best way to end a bad date? We've been talking about that today. The best way to end a bad date is leave. If you don't want to be there, go. Just walk out, no explanation, just hit the door. Sure. Yeah. Move on. I hear you. I hear you. And Elise, thanks for calling today. Roger, I've got a question. Where can people get better informed about dating? In the 21st century and all these different aspects that folks are dealing with now, social media, online dating apps, things like that. Sure. Well, first, I also want to comment just to thank Anna lease for actually that perspective, which I think is incredibly incredibly important as well. Is that there are certain classes of people who get who get this end of these DMs and some messages much more worse than others. So I actually agree with that that is not necessarily for everyone. That perspective, in particular, if you are somebody that is constantly being bombarded by these things, you have to have your boundary up that way as well. So a really appreciated that comment. And you know, to answer your question, it's like, what kind of information are you looking for? Are we talking about like dating advice? Are we talking about sex advice? Are we talking about dating and sex advice? That there is so much information out there. One of the ways that I think are really great is not necessarily learning from professionals or experts like myself because even though we may have a lot of training in school and stuff like that, you know, sometimes it's like best to hear it from people like your callers today. And I think a great source for that can be TikTok, Instagram, learning from a folks who are just like you who have had these experiences who are sharing their stories. Because otherwise, you know, you're going to be in bombarded if you go to the relationship section of a physical bookstore or an online bookstore because there are literally hundreds.

ruby Gibson Sean spruce Stacy America Santa Fe Anna lease anneliese New Mexico Rogers roger IMs Elise Roger
"ruby gibson" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:43 min | 1 year ago

"ruby gibson" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Are you a Native American healthcare provider, recovery counselor, social worker, domestic and sexual abuse advocate or traditional healer working in Native American communities, doctor ruby Gibson, will begin a 7 month advanced immersion in healing historical trauma. This online masterclass looks through the lens of a 7 generational recovery approach to provide powerful proven modalities and is offered tuition free to tribal members. Registration deadline is February 21st info at freedom lodge dot org, who support this show. Thank you for tuning in to native America calling. I'm Sean spruce. We are revisiting weight clean Nebraska. We haven't heard much about the town since the liquor stores were shut down in 2017, but there are promising development plans. If you live in the area of white clay in the pine ridge reservation, tell us, how's your community changed in the last few years? Still time to join the conversation where at one 809 9 6 two 8 four 8 or one 809 9 native. Today we I'm curious to know, you know, obviously the changes here in weight clay, not everybody was thrilled about this. There were some people that were making a lot of money for better or worse from these liquor stores. These beer stores has there been pushback on these revitalization efforts. Not so far. I think that the state of Nebraska citizens of Nebraska for those that we're aware of what was happening in 2017 and have continued to follow what's been happening. I think there's a sense of like what's next, right? And so it's an opportune time to tap into that. Like I said, this could be an amazing story. The potential when you said, what's the legacy of white clay? I think the potential is that it can be an amazing story of what reparations in real time can look like. There's a lot of conversation that happens nationally internationally around reparations. A lot of time indigenous reparations are not a part of that conversation. But here's a specific real world real-time example of how a state, a state government and citizens of a state can provide reparations to an indigenous community in a really real and tangible way. If we know as indigenous people as indigenous communities, we have the answers, we have the solutions for all of these challenges that we are facing. You've heard examples of things going on right now. And I think it's a multi pronged approach that we're taking. There are some immediate interventionist things that have to happen because there's a present need. And then the long-term plan of how do we really change the trajectory of our community when it comes to addressing substance abuse and healing? And that's where Thunder Valley comes into the picture. This healing community, 48 acres to have an open canvas of what we want to see and develop and imagine. That's a tremendous opportunity for our community and our stakeholders to be a part of, right? To envision what could this healing community involve include? And that's a beautiful thing that a lot of times our communities are left out of. Things are designed for us, they're imposed on us. But this is really a grassroots effort to bring healing to those that need it most. But that's a long-term plan. To see it come to fruition will be around four to 5 years before we're able to do that in a tremendous amount of fundraising. So this is an opportunity for the citizens of Nebraska and the state government and other entities in Nebraska that reap the benefits of the profits and the despair. To give back. To our communities to the solutions that we are putting in place on the ground. So I think the potential is there. The story isn't completely written yet. But that's what we're actively working on. Today, we Thunder Valley, you have an economic mission, but you also have a social mission and I would imagine you come at it from a little bit different angle and say a nonprofit or a community nonprofit that's focused solely on say education or healthcare. So can you talk a little bit about Thunder Valley in how your overall vision kind of fits into this long-term plan for white clay? Absolutely. So Thunder Valley and vision is a liberated look with the nation. And this word liberation is also trending in the social justice world right now. People talk about black liberation, bipoc communities, liberation and very much indigenous people are a part of that effort. And we have been have been from the point of colonization. And what we've come to know here at Thunder Valley is liberation begins with healing. You can't be a you can be liberated, right? To be free from those chains of colonization from those vestiges of colonization that bind our people that continue to hold on to the traumas, the historical traumas, the current traumas. We can't be free from those things from that mindset until we have healing. And that takes efforts a collective effort from multitude of ways our spiritual connectedness first to our way of life. So relearning and reconnecting to who we are as a people and reclaiming that spiritual identity because it was ripped away from us. And then also incorporating more modern modalities of healing through substance abuse treatment, mental health services. Those types of things so that people have an opportunity to choose their healing pathway. Again, nothing paternalistic or imposing ideals on people, but allowing people that liberated thought process to find their own healing. And so we take a whole community approach. We have 8 initiatives. Everything is rooted in our life ways, though. We know that that reconnection to who we are, reclaiming our language, our spirituality and our life ways. Is the route. It's pathway. So this falls right in line with that. One of our biggest challenges at Thunder Valley is has been, how do we reach those most vulnerable in our communities? How do we reach those on the periphery? And when I was attorney general, that was a lot of the population, we see go in and out of the system. The recidivism rate is high because people can't stop using alcohol and drugs. Over 98% of our crimes are committed by people under the influence of alcohol, alcohol is still a primary enemy here on the pioneer reservation. People commit crimes that they normally would not even dream of doing when they're under the influence of alcohol. It was used as a tool of colonization and have continued to use as a tool of colonization. So in order to reach our relatives at our struggling in that way, that don't have a safe place that may want to be sober, but that don't have a place to go to. How do we reach them while this is an answer? This is a answer. To that, to that problem. Okay. And I do want to bring back into the conversation as well as Abram and talk a little bit more about these healing efforts, which are so vital to this whole mission. But I have one more question for you today. And I know that at one point the alcohol store owners they had an attorney and they sought to appeal. Have they had any success or is there any possibility that at some point.

Thunder Valley Nebraska ruby Gibson Sean spruce pine ridge America Abram
"ruby gibson" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:26 min | 1 year ago

"ruby gibson" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Are you a Native American healthcare provider, recovery counselor, social worker, domestic and sexual abuse advocate or traditional healer working in Native American communities, doctor ruby Gibson, will begin a 7 month advanced immersion in healing historical trauma. This online masterclass looks through the lens of a 7 generational recovery approach to provide powerful proven modalities and is offered tuition free to tribal members. Registration deadline is February 21st info at freedom lodge dot org, who support this show. Thank you for tuning in to native America calling. I'm Sean spruce. Today we're talking about reauthorization of the violence against women act. Once it's reauthorized, some tribes in Alaska will have additional power to hold non native perpetrators accountable. This is part of a pilot project included in the vawa reauthorization. What are your thoughts on vaa? There's still time to share your comments and questions. We're at one 800 9 9 6 two 8 four 8. And before we went to break Michelle, you were talking about some of the opposition to and I'm curious to know where the opposition comes from. You speak highly of senator Murkowski's leadership. So obviously, this issue doesn't get cut right down the middle on party line. So where do you see the opposition coming from specifically? Well, I mean, it's really hard to say. As I said before, to me, it's like a lack of education or understanding that Native American communities are sophisticated. We're confident we understand due process and so it's really about educating those individuals who may not have had any contact with Native American communities or don't understand us. And so I'm a licensed attorney in Washington state and I always joke that when I hear these types of comments about Native American communities that oh, I must have taken their remedial bar exam. I took the same bar exam as everyone else passed at the first time. You know, and I guess there's just that stereotype that maybe we don't learn the same way. I'm not sure. It's just really care ignorance and we just need to change the education on that. Yeah, for sure, really, really, really important. Michelle, can you describe the enforcement process now in Alaska and how can it be enhanced under vaa? So right now, if I am in my family from cloak and actually we do have law enforcement there, but on Prince of Wales island, if I was in a different community where there is not law enforcement, I would call in the state troopers would have to either be flown in or on my island where I'm from. There is a road system, but it's hundreds of miles. So the island is. So it's a huge island. And so in typical rural Alaska, you call and if there's no law enforcement in your community, they come from a hub community. And they might even take a little bit of time to figure out whether or not it's worth their time to come out. So as you know, domestic violence situations can often be a he said she said type of situation. And if they call, instead of actually come to the village, sometimes they'll decide not to come out at all. Because of the resources that is what their explanation is or higher priorities, things like that. But again, every crime should be should be investigated. And the victims should be heard and the perpetrators should be held accountable. So in the best case scenario, if it does happen, they come out and investigate. And then they go back to the hub community and the prosecutor decides whether or not there is a case and whether there's going to be a charge. And meanwhile, you know, it's just not a very perfect system because of all the travel involved, all that evidence that could be lost back and forth. Just these are local issues and that's where we should focus our attention is local responses to local problems so that the community can heal in a timely manner rather than all of this back and forth. And uncertainty. Michelle, you mentioned these local issues limited resources. The rural nature of many of these communities, the long distances that law enforcement has to travel to reach these communities. And obviously wawa is not the perfect solution. So I mean, obviously, it's a great, great chance to move things forward, but there's always going to be other issues as well. So I'm curious, how can we strengthen accountability for violent abusers in Alaska? In addition to wawa yeah, that's a really great question. And the resources really need to be provided. Oftentimes, the resources that are available focus on victims issues and of course that's primary importance, but once we get the victims safe and we are working on healing that individual, we really also need to focus on the perpetrator, a lot of these individuals have trauma in their past and that has gone untreated. And so often there are few resources for him or her and there's certainly very few grant programs that actually address this issue. So we're just sort of addressing the issue on a limited basis more in crisis mode rather than sort of comprehensive plan. Michelle, thank you so much for all this information all this background, all these details and especially with regard to what's going on going on up in Alaska really, really appreciate all of your insights. Folks, we have another guest on our show today joining us from Albuquerque, New Mexico. We have angel Charlie, she's executive director of the coalition to stop violence against native women, and she is laguna Pueblo. Angel, welcome to the show. Hi, good morning. Thanks for having me. Absolutely. Angel, what are the provisions for tribes in the latest version of vow we've been mostly talking about up in Alaska. But down here in the lower 48, what can tribes expect with regard to tuva in the future?.

ruby Gibson Sean spruce Alaska senator Murkowski Michelle Prince of Wales island America Washington angel Charlie laguna Pueblo Albuquerque Angel New Mexico
"ruby gibson" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:48 min | 1 year ago

"ruby gibson" Discussed on Native America Calling

"You're right, Sean. It's evolving and it's evolving on a state by state basis. So wherever stay the tribe is in if they're seeking sports betting, they're going to have to either amend their existing compacts with the state or figure out something that works for them in their region. And so you take a state like Michigan and the tribes there, they decided to compete as commercial actors when it comes to sports betting because that was a tough decision that they had to make in order not to let the commercial guys get too far out in front of them within the state of Michigan. Also, the tribes in Michigan have very favorable compacts and they didn't want to take a chance of having to renegotiate those or open them up. But then you look at Arizona and they just signed a amendment for opening sports betting. So everyone in Arizona now can place bets on the Super Bowl. And it's falling like that across the country. Two of the bigger states with large Indian populations, Oklahoma and California have yet to sort their direction out on sports betting. But once they once they get that option, it is going to be you're going to look at basically 80% of the country is able to make sports sports wagers legally for the first time in history. So here's the thing though Sean, it's important for everyone to remember sports betting is probably one of the few games that a casino where the customer has a chance to win money. And you can sit at a blackjack table all day. The odds are never going to change beyond one or 2% in the casino's favor. That's about as low as you could get them. But with sports betting, we all know it would just talk into this roundtable today of Native American calling. So everyone has our inside knowledge. Everyone has some take on what they think might happen. And that's where the advantage lies and sports books do not always turn a profit. There's been numerous Jason where they lost money. Jason I'm sorry I'm going to have to go ahead and interrupt you, but I'm going to let you continue those thoughts after we get back from break, but holy cow folks, you just heard it on native America calling the executive director of niya says the odds on gaming are against you, holy cow. I appreciate the honesty. Folks, we're going to be back right after break. I'm Sean spruce. Are you a Native American healthcare provider, recovery counselor, social worker, domestic and sexual abuse advocate or traditional healer working in Native American communities, doctor ruby Gibson, will begin a 7 month advanced immersion in healing historical trauma. This online masterclass looks through the lens of a 7 generational recovery approach to provide powerful proven modalities and is offered tuition free to tribal members. Registration deadline is February 21st info at freedom lodge dot org, who support this show. This is native America calling. I'm Sean spruce. We're hearing about the big sports events going on right now from a native perspective. Sports fans, you're invited to call in with fresh takes, football, hockey, basketball, curling, anything sports related, the number one 809 9 6 two 8 four 8 before we went to break, we're listening to Jason Giles executive director of the national Indian gaming association and he was being real on gambling odds. Jason please finish your thoughts. Hey, I don't think I'm breaking any ground that the slot machines might not be tilted in your favor. But the point being on sports betting, they can just throw a number out there. Rams minus four and a half. I bet a lot of Bengals fans are just like, you know, we've been underdogs all year. Giving us four and a half points is a gift and you could really bet the bangles up if you think that they've got a solid chance to win the game outright. You can get some pretty good money just by betting them to win without a point spread. So that's why sports betting when the casinos it's not their number one priority because it's not a money maker. In fact, like I said, there's been instances throughout history, famous days and gambling when Mike Tyson lost and there's been some super bowls that were close and that weren't supposed to be closed. So the sportsbooks can actually lose money. And that's why at the same time you want those customers coming in to watch a game and spend the day at a casino watching a game putting in some bets here and there. And we have just scratched the surface for sports betting in this country, Europe's had sports betting for a long time and they've perfected the in game sports betting or literally you could bet play by play, quarter by quarter, a half by half. Once we get a little bit more mature market, those betters will start coming in, they present additional problems to a casino. You don't want to get wiped out on a Saturday afternoon because someone just sat there and they know the University of Washington football team intimately and they can just sort of know how that team reacts to certain situations. So that's your advantage as a fan when it comes to sports betting. That's interesting. I remember that movie casino and that guy was an expert sports better and he knew if the quarterbacks girlfriend had broken up with him and he just he had all the goods and he could make all the bets. So Jason, I'm interested. We hear about these big sports book companies, FanDuel, DraftKings, the big players in the market. How are tribes holding up or how will they hold up against that kind of competition? Well, certain tribes have brought them in to just run their sportsbook and that's fine. And they brought in some European countries to run their sports book. And then some tribes want to go do it on their own and just hire folks from either New Jersey or Nevada that come in and do it. It really depends again on your situation or you're more rural tribe and you don't have the population base where you're going to get a ton of bets coming in on both teams. So you need to allow for that. Maybe you don't offer as many betting choices because you just don't have that volume of betters. It really is win win DraftKings and FanDuel have actually been so far very good about reaching out to Indian country, understanding sovereignty, understanding they're in a different jurisdiction. At the same time, just because sand due on DraftKings are so prominent, I don't know how many people know that they're losing money hand over fist right now, largely due to their marketing efforts. They're trying to entice everybody to come open an account and put in a bet. And so they're running a loss right now, but they're willing to take a loss in the short run to gain customers over the betting life of that person. So again, this market is really a mature except for places like Nevada and to a limited extent, New Jersey and Delaware who have had it for a while. And tribes can take this as far as they want to go and let's not forget tribal casinos reinvented the gambling industry in this country. It's a fact the fact that you don't have quarters falling out of the front machines anymore. That's because of tribes. All these sort of technological innovations were because of tribes and mostly because of the restrictions that states and the federal government tried to put on their casinos and tribal governments worked around them and made our gaming some of the safest in the world and our tribal gaming regulators are some of the best in the world. So the limit here. And like I said, we're waiting on Oklahoma and California it's eventually get sports betting and those are two huge sports dates and.

Sean spruce Michigan Jason niya Sean ruby Gibson Arizona Jason Giles national Indian gaming associa America Super Bowl Oklahoma football Mike Tyson Bengals California Rams hockey
"ruby gibson" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:48 min | 1 year ago

"ruby gibson" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Young folks for the native and non native folks alike. Sure, yeah. And you mentioned, you know, the humor and the entertainment aspect. And my late father in law, he would do a lot of cultural education programs in east always use this phrase. Edutainment. You got to give him a show. You got to make it. You got to engage and especially nowadays with so many we're being pulled in so many different directions at once. There's so much stuff on YouTube and social media. In order to get people turned down to these ideas in these topics, you need that approach. You need to make it fun. You need to make it humorous, entertaining. And Anthony and Lee have certainly done that in grand fashion. So folks again, we're having a really, really interesting conversation. Please call in with any questions or comments, one 809 9 6 two 8 four 8. You're listening to native America calling. I'm Sean spruce, and we'll be right back after this break. Are you a Native American healthcare provider, recovery counselor, social worker, domestic and sexual abuse advocate or traditional healer working in Native American communities? Doctor ruby Gibson will begin a 7 month advanced immersion in healing historical trauma. This online masterclass looks through the lens of a 7 generational recovery approach to provide powerful proven modalities and is offered tuition free to tribal members. Registration deadline is February 21st. Info at freedom lodge dot org who support this show. Thank you for tuning in to Native American calling. I'm Sean spruce. We're focusing on a new TV show called indigenous on New Mexico, PBS. The show takes viewers into the fascinating science and technology of indigenous knowledge and culture, and they're still time to comment, make a suggestion or ask a question for the creators of this native version of Bill Nye the science guy. That number to call one 809 9 6 two 8 four 8. Lee and Anthony, I gotta tell you guys, you inspired me after watching the clips of indigenous. I created a top ten signs. A list top ten signs that you are an indigene Lee, what do you think you want to hear it? Yes, please. That's awesome. Anthony, how about you? Yeah, sounds great. I love the coin term and we're going to love using it this year. Okay, here we go. Top ten signs that you are an indigene. Number ten, you have a Mayan calendar hanging on your wall. Number 9, all of your pets have native language names. 8. You refer to a tepee as the world's first recreational vehicle. Number 7, you baked digiorno pizza and hot wings and an outdoor Adobe oven. Number 6, you've ditched your Under Armour moisture wicking sportswear for a gut skin parka. You wear snowshoes in July. Number four, you're disappointed because there are never any Native American words when you're playing whirl. Number three, you're listening to native America calling right now when you could be playing wurtele instead. Number two. You've taught your children to count down the days until Christmas by untying knots on a rope. And the number one sign, you're an indigene. You're planning an indigenous premier party at your house in your serving blue corn popcorn and in a totally punch bowl. Oh my gosh. We and Anthony, you guys have started a revolution. You know what, we've got a collar on the line. We've got lanny, he's listening on KM, HA in fort berthold. Lanny, you're on the air. Oh, gentlemen, I admire the efforts that you have for bringing across some of the really important information regarding some of our knowledge and I just wanted to say that sometimes some of that knowledge might cross into a ceremonial or medicine lines that have people have a certain license to or rights to suggestion that you might have an advisory board of some elders that can help you balance some of that knowledge. So it doesn't offend some of the people who have those rights in those bundles and ceremonies. So you can continue on with some backup and support and I just wanted to say that because you might be mentioned in something about blue corn and there might be somebody that has a medicine ritual and to kind of humor it or to kind of put it kind of a nostalgic place offending some people. So if you have an console, maybe a console that buys or help you balance that as you communicate that information, I think you would make your make your entity a little bit stronger. So that's all I wanted to say and I just look forward to looking at your information. Thank you. Well, Annie, thank you so much for that suggestion, really good point. And I'd like to go ahead and ask Lee have you have an advisory board like Atlantis suggest elders who chime in on some of these topics and the best way to approach them? We do. And that was one of the first things that we set up originally, we vetted through the scripts. We made sure that even the topics that we were covering were things that we very much were clear or as much as we tried to as possible as we could to not veer into the ceremonial territory, right? Some of the protocol territories. Anthony and the team really did a good job of making sure that we had elders and native science folks. So it wasn't just us sort of barreling through being like, we're going to make this great show to the natives kind of thing. It was that we recognize and all the work that I've done has been within that frame of understanding. How do we get the widest array of folks to kind of take a look at the work as much as we can in terms of time frames and et cetera? We can't talk to every native person in the United States and in the world around this, but we try to get really value to judgments and folks that can look at it from elders to culture keepers to journalists folks, to scientists, to give us their takes on the scripts that we ran with. And a lot of them, again, trying to really using this just as a touch point, right? So in some ways, this is not even going to deep knowledge. We talk about ancestral knowledge, but we're not going into really deep cultural pieces. We're talking about some of the innovations on almost like a one O one level..

Sean spruce Anthony ruby Gibson Lee fort berthold Bill Nye United States PBS YouTube New Mexico lanny Lanny Adobe Atlantis Annie
"ruby gibson" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"ruby gibson" Discussed on Native America Calling

"To get the vaccination. Folks will be back right after break. Are you a Native American healthcare provider, recovery counselor, social worker, domestic and sexual abuse advocate or traditional healer working in Native American communities? Doctor ruby Gibson will begin a 7 month advanced immersion in healing historical trauma. This online masterclass looks through the lens of a 7 generational recovery approach to provide powerful proven modalities and is offered tuition free to tribal members. Registration deadline is February 21st. Info at freedom lodge dot org who support this show. Thanks for listening. This is Native American calling. I'm Sean spruce. Are you confused about everything you're hearing about the pandemic? Have you relaxed your own safety precautions to try and avoid infection? We're getting updates from a medical standpoint today and there's still time to get in on the conversation. So please give us a call one 809 9 6 two 8 four 8. Before we went to break, we were listening to hope he chairman, Timothy Newman Yama. And he was explaining the highly successful vaccination efforts there at hopi. Chairman, please continue your thoughts. As I was saying earlier before the break, I'm pretty happy about the success we've had. But again, there's been a lot of work. It's been a concerted effort and an aggressive communications effort between not only tribal government, but our hopey healthcare center as well as community, community has really played a big role in us in coming together what we call some meat and coming together for the betterment of all people and that attributes to some of the successes we've had. Of course, just like many other communities, other communities in India and country. We still have those that are refusing to get the vaccination for their own reasons, but I think some of these personal experiences that they've encountered with their loved ones, Friends, close someone close to them, having to see some of the suffering. Some have actually made the hard decision to go and get their first shot, which is really helpful. I've just heard that over the week and also that we had someone that just recently went in, decided to get their first shot. So we continue with the messaging campaign and hopefully we'll improve on these numbers. Okay. Well, another question I have chairman is, you know, we see all of this constant back and forth with regard to safety measures. And I'm interested in learning have you as a tribal leader learned anything that could help with other health issues. For example, how to better communicate with citizens, what measures seem to work and what don't or just ways to stay connected with your community. Any thoughts on that chairman? I think that's a super great question, Sean. This is really opened up our eyes to our health situation out here on hopi. I mean, we are still played with diabetes, hypertension, high blood pressure, cardio issues, and obesity, which leads to a lot of this. And from the COVID pandemic, it's really highlighted a lot of the health disparities that we deal with out here on hopi and it's probably safe to say with a lot of other tribal communities as well. So we are looked at trying to create a more robust healthcare scene out here for hoping to address a lot of these multiple areas. We do have some programs who are doing a great job doing that. But I think a little bit more focus on that to try to offset some of the effects such as COVID that they really exacerbated is something that we're now focusing on a lot more and do want to pay a little bit more attention to that. I do have to say though that we're hoping well, it could have been a lot worse, but overall, in general, I want to say that population out here was fairly healthy, but some of these underlying health disparities still plague us and we want to be able to address some of those issues and make sure that we are providing the proper services that tribal government should be providing in connection with our healthcare center as well. Well, thank you, chairman van Yama, and it's really enlightening to consider these issues from the perspective of a tribal leader such as yourself. Folks, we have a caller listening in anchorage, Alaska on knb a cat again. You're on the air. Hi, good morning. Thank you so much. So my question is, people that are getting the vaccine are still getting sick when in fact these vaccines are supposed to protect us, then why are we still getting sick if the vaccines are safe and to protect against the delta, the Omar Khan and whatever.

ruby Gibson Sean spruce Timothy Newman Yama India hypertension Sean obesity diabetes van Yama anchorage Alaska Omar Khan
"ruby gibson" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"ruby gibson" Discussed on Native America Calling

"So join us. Okay. Okay. Well, thank you for sharing those resources. And I would also Jeanne, could you as well share how can folks learn more about the native wellness institute? Oh, yes, sure. Our website is native wellness dot com. And then you can also find us on social media. And then I just want to point out, I think it's super awesome that we have two mother daughter teams on this panel right now. And I think that's an example of historical and intergenerational wisdom, right? This is like the next generation is picking up and trying to help our people to heal, not trying, but we are. So I think that's awesome. Also, the native wellness institute, we know during this pandemic time that an already traumatized people would be retraumatized in this pandemic and another thing that people knew that experienced trauma is frequency and duration and consistency and predictability. So on, we started doing what we call them our native wellness power hours. They're just kind of one hour workshops just to help uplift our people and those are another resource we've done over 400 of them. And they can be found on our YouTube channel. And then we do now we do them once a week. Every Wednesday at noon Pacific and we go live on our Facebook so our social media, we try to provide the uplifting messaging for people and we're still doing our trainings online as well. So native wellness dot com is our website. Okay, you heard it here on native America calling great resources for dealing with generational trauma. In deline, yeah, I think we're all about these mother daughter teams today. And in that spirit, I do want to ask enough time for about one more question before we wrap the show. Jillian. And I want to go to you. I want to give you the last word on this conversation. And I think of how long these issues have been going on in our communities. And as we're learning today, the causes deep rooted all encompassing. But I'm wondering, are you hopeful for a day when his native people, we won't have issues like generational trauma amongst our families and communities? Yes, I'm a cheerleader of hope. And I always, even in the pandemic, right? Like there's been blessings in the pandemic and we have to look for those blessings that helps us to find the balance of all of the heartache and loss, right? We always have to look for that flip side. Even in our families time of grief, like when my children's dad passed away and I told my kids, okay, this is a very sad and sorrowful time. But one of our teachings is we also have to look for the joy, like that's our job, right? And we think about in our kinds of funeral, those joyful times, people are telling stories and lacking and coming together. So that helps to find that balance. The other thing is I tell people about the history like we have already seen positive change in our communities. And we have to celebrate that as well. So for example, I am a power person and was raised in that. I raised my children in that. Way back in the 70s, you know, you went to a polo and you know, honestly, there was drunk and it's all over the place, right? You don't see that today. But because that's an example of the change of the healing work that has happened, right? When I was in my teens, going to, I remember going to my first national Indian conferences. I won't say which ones, but the only thing I don't remember one speaker are one workshop. What I remember is like drunk natives all over the place. Like, I'm 18 years old. That's what I remember. You don't see that today. You go to national native conferences today. You don't see that. That's another example of how positive change is happening, right? So there's tons. We could have a whole hour talking about the positive things that are happening. And I'm thank you for calling that out because we need to have that hope. We need to see where the positive change has already happened. Julie and I totally agree with you that the evidence of native healing is everywhere. Folks, that's all the time we have for today's discussion. I want to thank my guests, doctor ruby Gibson, Keanu big crow. Underwood, jolene Joseph and shailene Joseph for sharing their expertise and experience in the long-standing battle against generational trauma. We're back again live tomorrow for a show about the devastating effect COVID is having on native restaurants and we'll get updates on food sovereignty..

native wellness institute Jeanne Jillian YouTube Facebook America ruby Gibson jolene Joseph shailene Joseph Julie Underwood
"ruby gibson" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:56 min | 1 year ago

"ruby gibson" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Of those rules to make healing more accessible for our people. Yeah, the three rules don't talk, don't trust, don't feel. It seems like communication or maybe lack thereof is that the root of a lot of these issues and I'm curious. Should native families be talking about this stuff? And if so, how? Yeah. We can talk about it in this normalized like it's okay. Like I always say, if you defend from a native person, well, I always say, I descend from miracle survivors of genocide, right? Like that's how that's how amazing the people were that I descend from. And that amazingness is still inside of me, right? So if we descend from miracle survivors of genocide, like 100% of us have historical trauma in our histories, right? 100% because of everything that has happened. So that means that all of us are impacted by it, right? So that kind of like, oh wow, I'm not alone, right? So that's super important to realize that we're not alone. And then the conversation is about providing opportunities for healing even in our own families. So like my family right now, we had a really rough year and my children's dad passed away in May, and then my mom passed away in September of last year. So we're doing our own collective healing and collective grieving, right, and making it okay if we don't want to celebrate the holidays. It's okay. You know, if we don't want to do something like, it's okay, and we're sticking together as a family and we're doing things together as a family cooking for my dad and being together physically spending weekends going away camping on a weekend or whatever things like that. So we're not perfect. We're not doing that perfect because each generation we learn how to do things a little bit better, right? And that's one of our teachings as well is every day we try to be a better person than we were the day before. So really also having that grace with our own selves about not beating ourselves up when we don't do something right or we do something wrong is this we take that deep breath and we just keep moving forward, right? Like that is one of the tribal communities in urban communities that I have been to one of the foundational teachings is that we keep moving forward. Yeah, yeah. Condolences to the losses in your family over the last year. Again, I'm starting to hear that. Let's bring shailene into the conversation now. Shailene, how important is it for young people to have leaders who are about their same age when dealing with these generational trauma issues? Yeah, great question. I think it's really important because generationally, we have access to whether it's different mentors or different tools that we have learned. We have the Internet. We're in a generation of social media. And so so much is being thrown at us at all times. And it's different than generations prior to us. And so when we have a group of people who can understand similar things that we're going through, it kind of creates a better space of understanding. We have like minded experiences maybe. But it's important to really understand the importance of the spaces that we create for one another. As well as the energy that we bring to a space, right? I love what doctor Gibson and Keanu and Savannah have been talking about they're all very important tools. And no matter the generation that we come from or the similarities or differences when it comes to our trauma, that there's always time and space that we can create ourselves to have these conversations to bring about our own awareness and also share the tools that we've learned. So many of us have gained different tools of healing from our own lived experiences. And that's a part of our work is that these are not rules that I have been very thankful to learn and privilege to learn. It's now my opportunity to share those things and give those things away. So I think when it comes to generational healing, we all have our own historical and intergenerational trauma that could differ depending on where we're located and the different histories. But also the compounding contemporary trauma. What are the things that we're going through now and how can we continue to heal those historical traumas, but also the contemporary ones and build a foundation together to move forward in abundance and with the support system that we have the power to create. Thanks for sharing those thoughts, shailene. Folks, do you have a question or comment? Please give us a call. You know the number, one 809 9 6 two 8 four 8 I'll repeat it just in case you forgot. We'll be back right after the break. Are you a Native American healthcare provider, recovery counselor, social worker, domestic and sexual abuse advocate or traditional healer working in Native American communities? Doctor ruby Gibson will begin a 7 month advanced immersion in healing historical trauma. This online masterclass looks through the lens of a 7 generational recovery approach to provide powerful proven modalities and is offered tuition free to tribal members. Registration deadline is February 21st. Info at freedom lodge dot org who support this show. Thanks for listening to Native American calling. I'm Sean spruce. There is still time to chime in on today's discussion about generational trauma. What would you like to add? Join the conversation by calling one 809 9 6 two 8 four 8. Before we went to break, we're listening to shailene Joseph with the native wellness institute. Shailene, I have another question for you. I think that in the United States for a long time there has been a stigma if you will, that's associated with mental health. However, I believe that's changing. And I'm curious if you feel that young people today are better positioned when dealing with generational trauma as opposed to maybe previous generations. What's your thought on that? Yeah, definitely. I think the. Stigma of mental health, right? Nobody wants to be the person who, like, something is wrong with them. But I think the shift is happening in that mental health is just like anything else. If we want to take care of our physical health or our emotional health or the things that we're eating, our bodies, whatever it may be, mental health is just another aspect of that. And you kind of see this transition of it's more accessible to talk about. It's a little bit more okay. I'm watching these young youth that I'm working with. Truly check in. And really talk about.

Shailene Keanu ruby Gibson Savannah Gibson Sean spruce shailene Joseph native wellness institute United States
"ruby gibson" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

08:03 min | 1 year ago

"ruby gibson" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Are you a Native American healthcare provider, recovery counselor, social worker, domestic and sexual abuse advocate or traditional healer working in Native American communities? Doctor ruby Gibson will begin a 7 month advanced immersion in healing historical trauma. This online masterclass looks through the lens of a 7 generational recovery approach to provide powerful proven modalities and is offered tuition free to tribal members, registration deadline is February 21st. Info at freedom lodge dot org who support this show. Your two did Native American calling. I'm Sean spruce. What do you remember from your trip to Hawaii? Do you think it was in tune with native Hawaiians wishes for their home? That's the question that Hawaiian tourism officials are now asking as they draft a new direction for tourism. You can join our conversation by calling one 809 9 6 two 8 four 8. One of our guests, Kai Noah, our kajo. A cultural consultant. I know I'd like to ask you more about the role of the pandemic on these rebranding efforts with Hawaii tourism. And I think that back in 2020 when the pandemic shut down Hawaii's tourism economy, I think a lot of people their first thoughts were probably, oh my gosh, this is going to be a disaster. However, a silver lining to this financial setback was that local Hawaiian communities and the environment actually thrived. Can you talk about that? I can, I can. And sometimes easiest way to think about it is that feeling when you wake up on a Saturday morning, if you work Monday through Friday or whatever your schedule is and you don't have to go to work. And you get up and you get out and you start driving and you realize there's no work traffic. There's no school traffic. The roads are empty. And there's just a weight off your shoulders. That is, despite the financial hardship and that a lot of people experienced and a lot of people did have that unemployment coming in, there was this sense of relief from sort of the crushing weight of just everything being overcrowded. Our beaches our hikes, the grocery store. And a lot of people, you know, myself included thought, wow, this is what it was like growing up. It was a throwback to those days when there were much less people on the islands. And you drive around and growing up in Maui, we would remember being very young and watching my dad sort of just wave two people as he was driving down the street. And I realized that it's because in Maui in those days, almost everyone knew each other. You knew families. You recognized cars on the street. You know? And have we lost some of that? Yes. Did was some of that already lost in the time that I was a child from 50, 70, a hundred years before that, absolutely. But the feeling of a little bit of a release like a pressure release valve was amazing and yes, we saw water quality being cleaned up less sunscreen in the water we saw fish and marine life returning into the near shore environment and it was really a beautiful thing for some time. I love that expression don't feel like you have to go to work and you know listening talking to you and John and I'm feeling some mixed emotions here I know because my family and I we actually took a vacation to Hawaii in 2019 that record year for tourism and you know we were part of that ten and a half million people onslaught under your beautiful islands and yeah, so it could definitely understand how nice that must be just to get a respite from so many, many people. Let's go ahead and go to the phones. We have Jennifer. She is listening in on KU and M and algodones, New Mexico, Jennifer, you're on the air. Hi, thanks for taking my call. You bet. Yeah. I just, I just wanted to say, I actually I was listening to you had a show on a different thing on Hawaii late November and I called in. So I'm going to say pretty much the same thing. I went for the very first time in my life to coy in early November. And I was mesmerized. I was blown away, of course. But I found myself embarrassed by, you know, as a mainlander, seeing all these mainlanders, mostly pretty wealthy looking. Just using it as a playground. It was just I was very aware that it was kind of an exploitative unconscious thing going on and was not giving that much of anything other than money to the community and I didn't like that. So I really as soon as I saw this topic this week, I thought, oh, yeah. I'm here. I'm going to call in again because yeah, I would love to, I want to come back probably in another two or three years. And yes, I'm going to have to relax the first couple of days because they'll be tired. But I would love to do some something to contribute back or to learn more about the real communities and the real land. And I'm a little bit disabled I'm older, but I can certainly handle a half day a couple of days in a row of doing some work. I would love to do that. It would make me feel useful and it would satisfy my ethics a whole lot better. So I just want to say this is great. I really delighted to hear this because I didn't like what I felt that I was part of at all. And also, yeah, I went to we went to a commercial luau and it was great. You know, but again, it's kind of uneasy feeling. Yeah, this is cultural education as a great show. But it was also kind of like probably a mistrial show. And I didn't like that feeling either. I wanted it to be I wanted us as an audience to be getting more educated. And to really see the traditional value of it and not just be a show. So there's nothing I can do to change the attitudes of my other of all of us mainlanders. I can do this change my own. But I want to do that. And I love that. And you know, I want to give back. Actually, anywhere I go, I'd like to give back. And I also love the idea of learning a language. So that's all I can say. And I have a question. Let's global branding. I don't know what that means. Thank you. Thank you so much for taking my call. Well, Jennifer, thank you as well for tuning in and sharing those thoughts. And I would imagine that kanoa and his people would definitely be able to find a job for you for an afternoon or maybe a whole day helping out with some of these initiatives. Jennifer asked about global branding, can you talk about that in more specifics? A little bit. But let me speak to Jennifer on her thought and her reference to her limitations because of being elderly and a little disabled and I think one of the core values of us of Hawaii is the understanding. We.

Hawaii ruby Gibson Sean spruce Kai Noah Maui Jennifer New Mexico John kanoa