36 Burst results for "Ruby"

Fresh update on "ruby" discussed on Snap Judgment

Snap Judgment

03:10 min | 13 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ruby" discussed on Snap Judgment

"I came to Kenya, which went to this hotel and I just felt so, Yeah, saved, they felt nothing felt like that straight ago. I never felt like that. From there. They applied for resettlement. And not long after they were on a flight to Australia to get away. Go somewhere where you can eat you feel of your belly. You sleep peaceful. You're not gonna hear weapon. You're not gonna run. You know, I felt like this is it This is a near life was they're awful. Now as a grown man back in his apartment in Brisbane after the wedding, I think was pacing around his living room. To May I fell like this is crazy. So why? Why him? Where I am Some of my best friend live in America. Canada? Why No one of them Why bring my enemy next to me? I thought of that. Thought of ever so many time. Even though I look was living this new life in a new country apiece, these thoughts about on young and all the pain he inflicted on him. They kept coming up in flashbacks. It was like this movie rolling in front of his eyes that he just couldn't press pause on sometime when I was in the kitchen because there were three of us in my family there. I used to cook for everyone. Me and my sister and my cousin. Sometime when I was in the kitchen, I'll have a look at these try sitting in front of me of mate. My mom was time thinking, Okay, if you cut into them a TV like you're cutting into your nephew and nieces. All these thing crazy thought coming to my mind sometime. I'll just take the knife in this steak and Go to the park. And then come back and my sister was how come you didn't do that? Said, because I don't want to. I don't want to tell her what I was going through. I don't want to tell us that thing. Remind me off the wall when I was a soldier. My ex life in Australia had not gone, how it planned, he couldn't hold down jobs. He got a taste for drugs and booze and eventually became a low level drug dealer. I went through in Australia going to prison, having a fight with a girlfriend, having fired with the police having fired with people in the pub. Was diagnosis post traumatic stress disorder. Sorry, Ruby. He says. For almost a year, he couldn't stop thinking about on young. So we have to keep reminding himself. He's not 13 anymore. He's not a child soldier on young can't hurt him any more. And then I.

Brisbane Australia America Ruby Kenya Canada Three 13 Almost A Year
Basecamp Bans Societal and Political Discussions at Work

WSJ Tech News Briefing

02:16 min | 5 d ago

Basecamp Bans Societal and Political Discussions at Work

"The startup base camp is well known intact circles. It makes product management and communication software for business teams. It developed the ruby on rails software development framework. It's quite influential in silicon valley but last week it got a lot of unexpected attention nationwide when it announced its employees would no longer be allowed to have quote societal and political discussions on the company's internal base camp account leaders at the companies said. The conversations had become too much of a distraction from work. The move sparked a ton of conversation base camp and beyond and it's indicative of a broader debate happening in silicon valley for more on this we turn to our tech reporter catherine bentley. Hey thanks for being here. Thanks for having me. So tell us about the reaction. We saw base camps announcement. Here are both inside the company and publicly yeah I mean this was all over twitter. Oliver lincoln effectively. What you had was kind of two camps if people you had people who said you know i some people especially underrepresented groups. They can't always sort of divorce politics from their identity. For example i saw someone tweet Someone who's non binary. Say if i introduce myself with my preferred pronouns at a work meeting some people might view that as a political move but to me. This is part of my identity. So there's this overlap between diversity and inclusion and quote politics and so you had some people really taking issue with this and thinking that it was that such a ban was effectively away to silence uncomfortable conversations about diversity and inclusion as opposed to quote political debates on the flip side. you had people One example would be the ceo of coin based brian armstrong saying he thought it was a courageous move and point base actually made a similar move this past fall and people who are sort of on the other side of this debate. Say that you know work should be about work that this has become a distraction that you know. It's it's just become too much of a focus in office culture and that people shouldn't be bringing their political opinions into the

Silicon Valley Catherine Bentley Oliver Lincoln Twitter Brian Armstrong
Episode 138: The Fame Monster - burst 13

The Swearwolves

00:56 sec | Last week

Episode 138: The Fame Monster - burst 13

"Shrimp you. Think top gun. I aimed ice. Do that movie was on tv like a week ago. The fucking movie do you top gun. So here's the thing. I hadn't seen it since i was a kid. I always talk it up to my wife. And i was like god. We need to watch top gunston. Because she's never seen it so it was on tv and we're watching this and everything involving all of the airplanes awesome. Everything else about timorese awful. What it's started slow motion and say okay and also got highway to the danger zone. That's okay and then you got playing with the scene obviously xing yeah checking the tax free anthony edwards on a little

Gunston Anthony Edwards
Why Skateboarding Is About to Be Bigger Than Ever

Marketplace

01:54 min | 2 weeks ago

Why Skateboarding Is About to Be Bigger Than Ever

"They're everywhere, even on social media like Instagram and Tic Tac. There's actually a whole side of Tic Tac refer to a skate talk, where users post clips of themselves cruising around town landing trips feeling absolutely free. Let Ruby Medina is a skateboarder who saw the trend and posted her own video picture, a giant empty pools, Medina skating, every curve and slope as smooth as butter. It has more than half a million views. Honestly, I was pretty shocked. I was like what? I didn't know My video could hit that much, but Medina is not just any tick talker. She works in to skate shops in Venice, California and her parents are the owners. They started the business about 22 years ago, but they've never seen demand like this. Turns out, the industry hasn't either skateboarding soul the growth and sales they could have seen in years. Jeff Kendall used to be a professional skater. Now he runs any chess as skateboard manufacturer and distributor. Companies like his have spent the last year scrambling to need a monstrous appetite for parts and boards. Kendall credits the rising popularity of skateboarding now to social media, plus a few other factors. The pandemic led people to rediscover the outdoors. More girls are getting into it than ever before to Full confession. I'm one of them and the Olympics are including it as a sport for the first time this summer. This is a global phenomenon. This is this is something we're seeing all around. You know, the 80 countries that we sell to the world. They're all seeing an increase. I think that's um By the end of 21, Don't be more skateboarders in the world than ever before. All these new skateboarders aren't just young

Ruby Medina Jeff Kendall Instagram Medina Venice Chess California Kendall Olympics
Lakers hold off NBA-leading Jazz 127-115 in OT

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 3 weeks ago

Lakers hold off NBA-leading Jazz 127-115 in OT

"Dennis Schroder hit the tying basket to force overtime and finished with twenty five points as the Lakers down the jazz one twenty seven one fifteen L. A. carried a fourteen point lead into the fourth quarter but needed triggers layup with three seconds remaining to extend the game cool you know I tried to you know come down have a good shot every single time sometimes it worked out sometimes it just did it but and then the day you know I think I'm part of the group I great drumming added twenty seven points and get TV's Caldwell pope had twenty five for the Lakers who continue to play with that Anthony Davis lebron James the NBA leading jazz were without injured starters Donovan Mitchell my calmly and ruby go there Jordan Clarkson led Utah with twenty seven points against his former team I'm Dave Ferrie

Dennis Schroder L. A. Lakers Caldwell Pope Anthony Davis Donovan Mitchell Lebron James Jordan Clarkson NBA Ruby Utah Dave Ferrie
"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

Ruby on Rails Podcast

05:55 min | Last month

"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

"And it's been my go-to framework Ever sense for when i am in the position to Pick a text to work with an opinion about whether or not folks should try something before they get to ruby or do you think actually rubies. A good language to start out with. Ruby is a really good. I programming language. Certainly there's other options and maybe these days. Javascript is the one that i think. A lot of people get into but the thing that is really great about ruby. Is that A lot of times. There's less of a barrier between translating a concept into code so writing if statements and functions and things like that. there's not a lot of ceremony or Extra work that you have to have to do if you compare it to you know. See or heaven forbid. You're you're trying to learn programming constant. Fortran like i was. I totally agree with you. So matt what is boring rails. Boring rails is a blog that i started I wanted to write more about the sort of boring practices that companies like basecamp and shopping. Get hub That they use when they're building rails application so the name is very tongue in cheek At this point rails is stable. Reliable kind of you know frankly a little bit more of a boring option compared to some of the other Text axial see online but it's super productive and a great way to build a lot of software products. So i wanted to place where i could write about things. I was learning and sort of right kind of articles that i was hoping to read when i was You know going through the the journey from you know beginner intermediate to advanced rails developer. What i want to ask you about as why it is so important that the members in our community put out content. That's not only read by our community members but outside of our community members to prove that this community is so vibrant. And so why do you think it's important that we continue really put out content about ruby think reading content is just really valuable on its own so even if we ignore the the community aspect for a second like there's a huge benefit i think to individuals to Writing down things you're learning. I mean it helps you solidify your own understanding You know they say that the best way to make sure that you learn something is to try to teach to somebody and writing a blog is just a pretty low low barrier way of of teaching somebody something but i think also writing content helps you meet. New people helps you find new opportunities. You've got sort of a demonstrable piece of evidence about your skills or how you approach things. You don't need anybody's permission. Nobody is going to give you permission to start a blog. You can just go star one. You can You know make a twitter account and start Chiming in on threads and conversations. You can you know..

twitter Ruby Javascript ruby think ruby rubies one basecamp Boring
Sterling Ruby on His Boundary-Bending Work in Art and Fashion

The Business of Fashion Podcast

02:00 min | Last month

Sterling Ruby on His Boundary-Bending Work in Art and Fashion

"Everybody. Welcome to be. Oh s live today. I'm very excited to be talking to sterling rudy. An artist whose work. I've loved for a time known to the fashion world because he worked closely with raf simmons on a collection of clothing. And then was very instrumental in shaping the identity that routes that wrath created full calvin klein and a months ago sterling did something quite unprecedented in the realms of and fashion. He launched a couture collection at the same time. As the show's happening in paris. At the invitation of the sean persson to call who are a very fussy Administrative body for french fashion and dunked invite outside is in very easily. So i'm very curious as to how the schommer cindy call invited you to show on the kutu schedule sterling. Welcome to be. Oh a fly thanks tim. Thank you it evening. Good morning I don't really know We we received the invitation through a mutual acquaintance You know we. We did this very small project in the season before which was just the ready to wear women's ready-to-wear season it was. It was a project flag vail and it was just one thing. It was a denim flag that had been sound in the studio is this addition and we partnered with the aclu. Which we've done in the past. And i did this project which was a very Minimum all of minutes where model had this draped over him and stood up.

Raf Simmons Sean Persson Rudy Calvin Klein Paris Cindy TIM Aclu
"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

Ruby on Rails Podcast

03:20 min | Last month

"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

"You just upped the ante for me. I think that's a great plan. And i can personally tell you. I have three people who are eager for the sign up link with since ready when it is ready. If the episode comes out ahead of time. I will go back and add that lincoln. There's way many people can be included as possible. I think you're going to have a big turn. What we really hope. So we've been looking at the different zoom pro levels and we're really unsure which one to get like how many people to expect but i hope a lot of people turn up i think zoom skills have now become a required skill set. So i'm sure you will be a pro. By by the time arch thirtieth rolls around. So i always like to wrap up the show by asking you for your thoughts on the future of the ruby and ruby on rails communities. So you've had many people on the podcast who have entered this question much more intelligently and eloquently than i can and i was thinking about what i could possibly add to that and the only thing i have to add is a real hope that we continue to push the diversity of the ruby community and and include more folks in the ruby community. I love the first question you asked about developer origin story because i think it's a great reminder that we all at one point where new programming and we all at one point we're new to ruby and ruby on rails communities and i think the community grows out of that fact and becomes stronger out of that fact. I'm hoping the women nonbinary meet up. We'll be one step to continuing to to increase diversity in increase our inclusion. I'm hoping we can keep reflecting on this From a racial lens to where we can do do better as a community in including more folks. I totally agree so aside from ruby. Weekly how can listeners. Follow you yes. I'm newly on twitter. At jemma is rough. It's a bit of a complicated lesson first. And last name. A lot of double letters in their J. e. m. m. a. i. s. s. r. o. f. s. and then i'm blogging at jemma dot dev dot dev their blog posts about ruby about other random side projects and then like we talked about the deep dive up post about the book in both of those places and also once we get more details available for the meet up Be posting on twitter. they're fantastic. Well thank you so much for coming on the show today. You have an open invitation once your book is published. I'd love to have you back on the show. Maybe we'll even have some sort of club vehicle Really fantastic thank you so much and i will see you. On march thirtieth. Yep thanks so much for having me and really looking forward to hear your talk. Then you've been listening to the ruby on rails podcasts on the five by five network. Subscribe to us on itunes. Google play or wherever fine. Podcasts are downloaded to stay in the loop on ruby on rails and over the source software. While you're at it please leave us a review and that you for listening..

itunes twitter first question Google play today three people both ruby jemma dot dev dot dev five first march thirtieth one point ruby on rails five network step lincoln double letters ruby on one
"QAnon Shaman" speaks out for the first time in "60 Minutes+" interview

Gaydos and Chad

00:32 sec | 2 months ago

"QAnon Shaman" speaks out for the first time in "60 Minutes+" interview

"Covered, bearded and horned Q and on shaman speaking from jail with 60 minutes Plus, he claims he was not just trying to bring God back to the Senate. Gato send Chad. We're not buying the Q and on shaman is resurfaced, and he's done an interview with 60 minutes, 60 minutes plus, but this guy in front of the camera, he doesn't look anything without his outfit on. He's more than balding. He looks like he's been one of those commercials for hair clip. He's like every country artists underneath the cowboy hat, a ball. That's right. I've got a problem Ruby she made

Chad Senate
"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

Ruby on Rails Podcast

05:40 min | 2 months ago

"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

"Love that you phrase it as if you are a sane person you know. I'm i'm bay of a like paranoid myself about security stuff and sometimes i think about how much open source do we run and we how much opus action although around especially if you use lennox and when i think about it it's just amazing that we have many more Security issues in the ruby community in general open source community because the amount of focus just tremendous. I agree with you. I think we hear a lot of scary stories coming out of the java script community and other communities so that makes total sense. I do have to ask you. The developer tool said market out there is pretty wide. There are a lot of people trying to sell important tools to developers. And there's definitely an art to it. So i have to ask. Why is this valuable service that you're providing free so you were going gonna ask why it's free well so they actually couple couple reasons to us defend and why it is free first of all. It's a way of of missing. Thank you to the community. I spent many years with ruby community. I love it. I of people that are the community and to be honest i just cannot imagine finding problems and vulnerabilities in open source supply chain and reporting them through gem security team. I wouldn't i wouldn't feel it would've you right for me And defenders and early stage research project. I'm not saying that at some point. There's not going to be some paid features to keep the plot from going. But at that point all i need is data data samples and more users the better understand the ecosystem. The better job. I can do in protecting it on top of all of that. It's anonymous i don't collect any data out like or credentials to private james repositories anything like that. It's being stripped away before it's being sent defense so if someone is worried about exposing anything to defend..

java script couple james repositories lennox ruby
"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

Ruby on Rails Podcast

01:45 min | 2 months ago

"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

"You're listening to the ruby on rails. Podcast on the five by five network. Listen episode three sixty nine year. Who sprinting martin. Check mansfield is a software architect. He's experiencing a wide variety of business. Applications built using multiple frameworks is particularly interested in code quality assurance and os s supply chain security. He an active os s contributor and maintain or various projects including karaka guy and defend. Welcome to the show but check. Hello everyone check. What is your developer origin story. I would say it's pretty much a tip because story of a young boy was just fascinated with electronics. Every single kid at that time had any s copy in poland called pegasus at home. But it wasn't until. I got my first when i was their own twelve. I think that things just clicked for me. I started learning and css and by saying learning. I mean making with microsoft from page and trying to understand what what is under the hood of it then still in middle school. I think i started making designs for Allegra allegra is an equivalent of mason in poland with dead iron enough money to buy.

An Expert's Guide To Curly Hair

You Beauty

04:33 min | 2 months ago

An Expert's Guide To Curly Hair

"Welcome to. I'm sharon hunt and this week's look dropped by. Guest is the incredible ruby aka the guru of curly and afro hair. Ruby is originally from zimbabwe but nowadays. She calls australia home. The originally self-taught stylist fell into hairdressing by accident. After witnessing friends and families struggle to find someone that understood this strands so she wound up doing it herself in her lounge room eventually she took up an apprenticeship began stalling out of multiple salons before finally opening up her own place. Rooming co in two thousand four room. Be thanks for dropping by. Thanks so much for having me sharing now. When i was a kid i distinctly remember being told if you ate all your crusts. Yo hey would go curly and i really badly wanted. Kelly has a you better believe i was gobbling down the crofton. I of course realize it was an old wives tale. That parents just tell you to eight year food. But i have to say. It's not the only myth that i've come across when it comes to curly hair. So why do you think there are. So many misconceptions about kohl's. I think something is misunderstood. There's a desire to want to make it a lot more palatable to each individual like answer for that very reason people come up with their own anecdotes around what this complex appendage actually is so people come up with so many things now yes i mean you told your cross for me. It was like eat your vegetables. And your hair is going to be straighter. You know what i mean like. Oh my gosh eating those so yeah. I think it's just because people really want to understand something that is complex and so yet this is where a lot of myths have come along and i hear them all the time. I've got lots of them to ask you about. Oh let's go. I guess to start with with. Kelly has to understand that. There's not just one type of co run us through just as an overview the different types of kohl's because you can tell by looking at someone calls not the same to the next. So why should you treat them the same one colleague on one hundred percent. So there's three curl types wavy curly in africa's how we sort of break down but then when you're looking at the typing system you've got type two which is wavy and that's lusa curls and there's three subcategories of that you've got to a to b to c and two c would be the tightest within that range and then you've got type three which is curly and within that again. Abc and c. And seeping tighter and then same thing for africa harrah's well after or coyly hair. Because i guess everyone who has coyly hair has an effort background. He is another curly myth. I've come across curly hair. Shampoos a marketing hype and normal shampoos worked. Fine let's start right there fact or fiction fact. They all marketing hive. Well okay no no no let me put it this way curly hair. People shouldn't shampoo their hair. That's a myth. Okay great stafa. Let's start there because that's actually. What's more commonly said trump who your hair. I've heard condition as well really. Yeah stop it. Maybe straight hair. How should you be carrying the curly hair. When it comes to washing its really simple. One of the things that i say to my clients often is you have to get rid of straight hair tendencies right. And how do you do that. It's just simplifying it. And which is part of what we do. We try and simplify everything for our clients. Because if you don't do that it's as though you're eating soup of the fork and that's gonna be very frustrating. And so how do you shampoo we take people through this whole process and it's like pretty much. Get the right shampoo first of all what you need to have the right product. Because not all sham periods would then be the same. Most shampoos actually stripped your hair. Which is why in some way. Yes don't shampoo your hair. I get with people. Come with that myth because it doesn't leave your hair as hydrated but then when you've got shampoo that is specifically designed for curly hair. It's supposed to cleanse but also hydrate to leave your hair feeling very moisturised. Soft supple and clean as well without streaky. Feel that you get when you get a deep cleansing shampoo

Sharon Hunt Kohl Kelly Zimbabwe Ruby Africa Australia Harrah ABC
How Cameo Blew Up During Quarantine

Business Wars Daily

03:04 min | 3 months ago

How Cameo Blew Up During Quarantine

"Remember in the old days when getting attention from famous person having to wait in line for hours with pan and autograph book or stand outside a stage door in the cold hoping to steal a glance of star. Well that was then now if you wanna personalized shout out from a celebrity. There's an app for that. Actually multiple apps on cameo users can choose from around thirty thousand celebrities movie stars professional athletes even social media influencers and pay anywhere from five to a thousand dollars for short video. Shoutouts want melissa ethridge to wish your mama happy birthday. That'll be two hundred dollars. If you're looking for more affordable option. You can pay fifty dollars for an anniversary. Shoutout from bridgeton actress. Ruby barker cameo keeps twenty five percent of the cost as a commission and boy do those commissions add up the at twenty five million in revenue last year that means customers spent a hundred million dollars for celebrity shouts ceo. Stephen galanos said demand for the app increased in march after the us implemented corona virus lockdowns. Because nothing makes being stuck at home sweeter than a message from nba legend kareem abdul-jabbar four. Five hundred dollars gladys told refinery twenty nine that during the pandemic the app became the to for folks who usually get their celebrity fixes through in-person events like meet and greets and fan conventions which of course were cancelled due to covid. And if you couldn't to zoo nope problem cincinnati's famous baby. Hippo fiona could send you a video for one hundred bucks proceeds from his cameos. We should say go back to the zoo. Of course it was only a matter of time before cameo started getting the attention of a sector that relies a lot on putting content directly into the eyes and ears of consumers branding promotional cameos which rolled out last july allow companies to pay celebrities to hype up their products on film without the huge price. Tag that comes with traditional celebrity endorsements. And it's working want proof. Recently tiger king star carole baskin made three hundred dollars for filming a one minute. Cameo promoting animal pharmaceutical company zametica since the video surfaced online a few weeks ago zone has penny stocks jumped two hundred and thirty percent with more than a billion shares traded. That's a lot of medicine for a lot of cats and kittens. Another app is looking to take a swipe at cameos revenue. My fan park began as a south african start up his saturated markets in india and across africa in europe the company recently announced its fourth market expansion into the us like cameo. My fan park allows users to connect with around twenty five hundred celebrities with the added option of extended one to one virtual meetings. Yes if you've ever wanted thirty minutes of executive coaching from moreau for example you can make that happen for two hundred fifty bucks. The gap between celebrities and fans just keeps getting narrower. And that's good news for cameo in my fan par now. If only i could find a way for my teenager to want to wish me a happy birthday for free. Come on parents. You know how that is

Melissa Ethridge Ruby Barker Stephen Galanos Kareem Abdul Hippo Fiona Bridgeton Jabbar Carole Baskin Gladys Zametica NBA Cincinnati United States Africa
Microsoft-owned Mojang Studios shutting down AR-powered ‘Minecraft Earth’ game in June

Daily Tech News Show

00:48 sec | 4 months ago

Microsoft-owned Mojang Studios shutting down AR-powered ‘Minecraft Earth’ game in June

"Hey minecraft players minecraft team announced a little bit of sad news. It will soon shutdown. It's a are mobile game. Minecraft earth may remember. This was a game that was positioned to compete with the likes of pokemon go and other augmented reality games The team said the game was originally created to encourage free movement and collaborative play two things that become near impossible in in the current global situation. the final update to the game. reduces the time needed to craft and the cost of materials to players. Enjoy the game while staying at home in app purchases have been disabled and paid. Ruby coins will be converted into mine coins that can be used on a wider minecraft marketplace. You can use it for actual minecraft to buying game stuff playing download or sorry. Playing downloads of minecraft will end on june thirtieth player. Data will be deleted promptly on july

Hampton Lintorn Catlin Co-Founder and CEO of Veue, 'It's So Much More Than Gaming'

Ruby on Rails Podcast

04:14 min | 4 months ago

Hampton Lintorn Catlin Co-Founder and CEO of Veue, 'It's So Much More Than Gaming'

"I'm curious. What are your ambitions with view view. Sorta it is a live video. Commerce company so sort of focusing on a lot of these companies are doing sort of like. Qvc from home kind of thing. We've actually sort of. It's turned into more of a say in art form so it's a live video platform so think twitch or something like that and trying to make it much more than gaming so you know my my ambition that people can connect around their interests around the world and feel like they are sharing something together even though their remote is the world becomes increasingly separated and i really want to sort of build a positive feeling. Yeah glue is. The word used to bring people together about the things that they love. And so that's what. I'm trying to do with view it's video streaming which is a the wild west to be honest partly cargo cult. I could talk about that for a long time. But on the other side of the product rate video streaming is coming in the maturation business rules around logging in or comments or test. I wanted to to make those as you know. The the risks should be on the things that are different about your business or your technology so obviously the rails app is not handling the video streaming. Because that's not what it's focused on. That's not one of the powers of rails but everything else all the business logic all the rules and moderation and all that all those things you have to build in with the platform. That's that's where. I think rails once again really shines. So what does the tech stack look like. So it's rails for the web sort of layer using stimulus. Which i sort of i've been doing a lot of people react for many years now and decided to give stimulus to try and have definitely more. I've really enjoyed it but it it is. It does have its quirks. I guess would say and you know really what we're trying to do is use. The power of web. Ep is so there's been an this. Were stimulus comes in. One of the strengths is that like react. Tends to have the opinion that it wants to isolate you from the browser as much as possible. Like even when you're writing. Html you're not writing html you're writing a representation of different down that gets you know computed and dipped in kind of trying to isolate you from from the browser. And i think it's interesting about stimulus and specifically take on. This stuff has been. The browser has good stuff in it and he kind of missed that whole train. Which i don't think this really good but coming out the other side like i think these things all come in swings almost like of fads. I usually browser no the browsers. Great come back to it. And i think we're definitely gonna swing back. I think i've been discovering just how much you can do in the browser web amazing audio context and you know even css these days horrible anymore or still a little bit. But you know it's much better than it's been in the past. I think there's just you know just even the video like web. Sorry the power of web components. The video tags and i just indian is filled with so many presents that the w3c's been regular for years and browser vendors have been working on all pretty stable. And if you if you want to target the ninety seven percents browsers that support all these things and you don't care about the three percent as much. There's just so much cool stuff to do there so honestly the stack is rails with post grads pretty straightforward these days. We're using a service called mucks to help with the actual video pipeline itself and then mostly stimulus controllers and a whole lot of cool stuff going in the browser.

QVC
Making Content Management A Smooth Experience With A Headless CMS

The Python Podcast.__init__

05:21 min | 4 months ago

Making Content Management A Smooth Experience With A Headless CMS

"For that as compared to traditional cms. Such as wordpress so the same is kind of a weird term admittedly certainly when i started butter. I didn't call it. The that he noted have seen as wise. I never heard about the concept. I thought of butter as what it is about the technical basis which is an api. I see mass meeting sort of api. I approach so there's really two parts to like have the same. Mass one is the api like so the content api which is what. The company's developer's will query content from is the contin api and they pull that content into their own native application built on any tech stack. They want and then the other piece is of course the content dashboard which is where the marketers go in and actually markers clients whoever you know they go in actually manage. The content says easy to use dashboard. You actually go create the actual blog posts or landing pages in that kind of thing upload images do stuff and you don't need to be able to do it so that's what i would have the. Cms is at a very high level. It's really the content api or api's as well as concentrating Itself yeah and so as far as the use case in user experience on how it compares to attract cms like wordpress so on the marketing side on the surface it is somewhat of a similar experience to wordpress in the sense that you know the goal really is to provide the marketer a really easy to use u. y you know they don't need to be able to use it to update continental do their jobs and we're pretty well generally speaking. Certainly that's why it's so popular on the website. Those where things change. It's really kind of a night and day difference so with a hennessy. Mess with butter. You get to work with any tech stack. You get to work with the one that you're most proficient with so you know if you prefer to work with django python you can start there and you build out your own application marketing website using using django and then you plug. Cms cape ability into that. So you plug you know like the company. Pi into your own of native stack with work on the debt side of course wordpress flips. This on you completely so you don't get to start with again assuming you're developer. Who prefers django in this example. If you wanna use wordpress you basically abandoned django got ready. You got a dive into the wordpress world so you start with word processing. Start with it as as sort of complete stack all need to master. Its terminology. how it works the internals of its code base database schema of course diving into php since that's what is built. And so you really go from there. And kinda start hacking slashing workers to customize it to do and behave the way you want it to so it's very different approaches different very different experiences on the development side. Another interesting way to think about the use cases headless masses as you mentioned. You're able to use your tech stack the prefer but if you're already using something like django than what is the benefit of headless versus integrating a framework such as django cms or wag tail into your existing site for being able to manage that content and have it very tightly integrated with the overall application. That you're building django cms wag tail these are. What's i kind of think of as traditional. Cms is every language or framework. Has these where the very often you know. Open source cms built in particular native language django ruby on rails etc and. They're very similar to wordpress. Press in the sense that you know. They are large pieces of software. Or maybe not large all the time but the pieces of software that you need to own so you need to install it you need to host run it. You need to maintain it so you need to patchett in ensure that it stays secure enough date. And you need to customize it in order to customize it if you need to customize beyond sort of its native capabilities native. api then you need to dive into the guts of of how it works. So those are some of the drawbacks with their traditional. See masses they are quite software heavy as opposed to have the cms where in terms of software to adopt this. It's very very light. Software buys so all you're really doing is acquiring the continent pi which returns just the raw content for. Let's say a blog post you. Queer the continent behind returns like the tax values in images for that piece of content for that blog post. You can think of it in a way is instead of queen your own database with a table of blog post. You're querying that same data from api. Basically it's a very lightweight. Approach to get fully functional. Cms capability in our case with butter. They're certainly open source. Had this message for those you'd needed host tame them and then all that kind of stuff comes into play again. If you go that approach with with butter we've decided to be sort of sassoon only and so we handle all the infrastructure security in updating that kind of thing so that's the Making what i'm describing this. Can you dig a bit more into what you've built it but see s and what motivated you to build a business around this particular problem. Area

Patchett
Why Is It So Hard to Remember What Day It Is?

BrainStuff

03:41 min | 5 months ago

Why Is It So Hard to Remember What Day It Is?

"In the early part of the twenty first century psychologist dr david. A ls performed possibly the shortest experiment in the history of the social sciences. He gathered sixty five randomly. Selected test subjects invited them into his office one by one and asked them this fateful question. What day is today. that's it thank you. Please sign the release form on the way out done so what could possibly learn from asking people the day of the week. A heck of a lot as it turns out using this simple experiment and others ellis was trying to decode the complex psychology of time. And even to help answer. The age-old question wait is wednesday or thursday because although each weekday is twenty four hours long they're far from equal from a psychological standpoint. We spoke with ls via phone back in two thousand fifteen from the university of lincoln in the uk. He said when you ask people about monday and friday they have a lot to tell you and those words evoke very strong emotions whereas when you ask them about the middling days people tend to draw a blank asked to free associate about monday. Ellison test subjects wrote strongly. Negative words like tired boring early and rubbish it being the uk after all and when asked to describe friday they came up with wildly positive. Words like fun friends party and someone unexpectedly bacon. When asked about the rest of the week people struggled to come up with anything at all. Tuesday for some is like a monday hangover long and busy topped the list but the description most people came up with for wednesday was simply middle there even a lot more pop songs about mondays and fridays and other days of the week considered new. Order's blue monday mamas. And papas monday monday. The bengals manic. Monday the cures friday. I'm in love. Katy perry's last friday night. Rascal flatts friday though. Of course let's not discount. The midweek brilliance of the rolling stones ruby tuesday but ellis pointed out that there can be serious unintended consequences to these strong and weak psychological associations with certain days of the week he explained. Suicide rates are higher at the start of the week for example and stocks. Perform better on friday. Mr medical appointments also peak at the start of the week in the united states. These can be a costly inconvenience for doctors and patients but they can be costly to the whole community for state run health systems like in the uk the better we understand the psychological biases toward different days of the week ellis says the better we can tailor interventions and then settled nudges. That might have significant societal. Pay off in a previous study for example l. Found that working. People are much more likely to miss monday. Doctors appointments than retirees. The health system could save loads money but retirees at the beginning of the week. And us working stiffs on fridays. Which brings us back to the original question what they is it today when alice asked that question. He timed each subject's response on mondays and fridays. He discovered people gave the correct answer twice as fast as people ask on tuesdays wednesdays and thursdays some mid week folks couldn't think of the day at all given the strong if opposing psychological associations with monday and friday. It's not surprising that people are more aware of those days. It seems the rest of the work week and get lost in the shuffle.

Dr David Ellis University Of Lincoln UK Ellison Rascal Flatts Katy Perry Bengals United States Alice
Scooby-Doo co-creator Ken Spears dies at 82

Radio From Hell

00:24 sec | 6 months ago

Scooby-Doo co-creator Ken Spears dies at 82

"After the death of his longtime creative partner, Joe Ruby. Ken Spears has died at the age of 82. Can Spears Spears, 00 Roll co creator of Scooby Doo, along with his longtime creative partner, Joe Ruby. The writer.

Joe Ruby Ken Spears Spears Spears
Arizona Might Be A Key Battleground State

Dr. Lee Yardley

03:39 min | 6 months ago

Arizona Might Be A Key Battleground State

"Of the elections, most pressing questions may be found in the new battleground state of Arizona. It has many of the key voting groups that will be pivotal and a host of close states and an early voting system that has been tested in the past and has been tabulating votes for two weeks. Meaning we'll know who the bulk of those voters picked by the end of the night. Joe Biden has enjoyed a small but consistent lead in Arizona since the summer thanks to suburban women, seniors and Latinos, which suggests the one time home of American conservatism could be changing in the same way the country is becoming more diverse and mohr educated. But Democrats thought that in 2016 to That long line of green envelopes who see marching together contains just some of the record number of completed mail in ballots from Arizona voters. First, their process through state of the art machine. Theun. They're sent to ballot tabulation centers for counting Arizonans of both parties have been voting safely and easily by mail since 1992. This election For the first time, state officials started tabulating ballots 14 days before the election. As of tonight, millions of early votes have been processed. The results sit in secure servers, those red and blue machines that are sealed, transparent and not connected to the Internet. And no one knows what those results are. We're allowed to post results an hour after polls close, so a PM on election night here in Arizona, Katie Hobbs is Arizona's secretary of state and chief election officer. On election night. How much will it be an advantage that you will have been able to start counting for 14 days. That's a huge advantage, particularly over states that are seeing a huge increase in the volume of voting by mail and statutorily aren't able to start processing ballots until that day. We're certainly going to be ahead of them. That anyone is holding their breath about the outcome of the race in Arizona is notable. It's a long time Republican state But it is changing. Seven million people now live in Arizona. Spurred by America's fastest growing county, Maricopa County, the home of Phoenix and Tempe. It's also known for its blooming suburbs. It accounts for 60% of Arizona's vote, and no Democrat has carried Maricopa County since 1948. Traditionally would we be in Ruby red part of Arizona. Maricopa County is the largest county of that. Trump won the last election. And so this is the center. Trump Bill in Arizona. If Arizona turns Blue will be in part because of voters like Yasir Sanchez and his wife, Emily, conservatives who live in the Maricopa County suburb of Gilbert in 2016, they never saw Hillary Clinton sign in their neighborhood. Now the streets by their house are dotted with Trump and Biden signs poking from the alternating beach towel sized front lawns. They've added a new entrant in the sign wars. Arizona Republicans for Biden, Yasir and Emily are voting for a Democrat for the first time. So how's that going over? I've noticed people coming out of the woodwork. But, interestingly enough silently they'll come and say, Hey, I see that you're supporting Biden. I am, too. But I can't really tell anyone or I can't tell my family so people talk about shy Trump voters are they're shy Biden voters, absolutely the

Arizona Maricopa County Katie Hobbs Joe Biden Mohr Yasir Sanchez Donald Trump Tempe Biden Emily Phoenix America Hillary Clinton Gilbert Bill Yasir
Creativity is a Choice and It's Important

Duct Tape Marketing

05:44 min | 6 months ago

Creativity is a Choice and It's Important

"Hello and welcome to another episode of Duct. Tape Marketing podcast. Is, John chance my guest today is Seth Godin. He is the author of Eighteen nineteen twenty who knows where we've stopped counting maybe he hasn't maybe as publisher has an avenue but these are books that have changed. The way people think about marketing about business they've been translated in thirty eight languages. You know the dip Lynch. Pin Purple Cow Permission Marketing. This is marketing is also the founder of the very innovative ult- NBA and the Akimbo podcast. One of the few podcasts me as a podcast actually listened to he's got a new book out called the practice ship creative work. So welcome back seth. John It's such a pleasure such a pleasure I've lost track, but this is at least a seventh or eighth appearance on the podcast for you. You're probably up there amongst the leaders in the Pantheon. And always one of my favorites so. Let's just to it is their way to do the work that you wanted to. There's always a way to do the work there might not be a way to get paid for it. And those are two different things. So I'm in favor of hobbies I'm in favor of doing things you're passionate about I. Think. As soon as you show up to sell it to somebody, you have to make a promise and you better be able to keep that promise and there's no guarantee that you are entitled to get paid for doing something you think you should get paid for it's based on the market not based on you. So your career. And, I know the answer, a spindle. Go. Let you share the volumes of this answer. Have you passed on opportunity to do what you? To stick to doing. US was. Right. To, stick what I thought was doing what's right right for you. So. I, think that we spend an enormous amount of time reverse engineering. The what we think we're passionate about right. Like you run into a twenty one year Oh. Yeah I I was born to program in Perl and I have to live deep into the ruby on rails thing because if you make me do something Lennox I'm just GonNa hate that that's not who I have. Well, wait a minute myrna the things you're talking about even existed where you were ten. When does it suddenly become who you are know what you did was you thought about what's the environment I would be in if I got picked for a thing and I'm not getting picture I'm sad but you know. You and I have talked about the summer camp that I helped drawn in nineteen ninety that I still go back to I believe for a very long time that the only thing that would make me happy was running that place and I adjusted significant portions of my life or around that goal, and once it became clear to me, I couldn't do that and the other things that I wanted to in life. I had to make a choice and I gotta tell you simulating those feelings in a different world has actually enabled me to teach more people 'cause more changed happen, and have a different sort of life. Is it the same? No, but it's Still works because what we want is a feeling we don't want specific we make up the specific 'cause we think it's going to get us the feeling. So in the subtitle is the creative and I think a lot of people of course have a their definition what that means. So what is creative work? Okay. So, because there's a conspiracy to get us not to do creative work. Creative work has been pigeonholed as something done by painters or maybe someone who right to symphony. That's ridiculous. Creative work is the human act of solving interesting problem. Doing, something generous that might not work. That's it. Those three things. So if you're an H. back person and you've got a client who is sweltering because everyone else is told him, there's no room in their addict for an AC unit and you figure out a clever way to use a different technology. That's creative work. Because it wasn't in the manual and no one did it before you got there. If, you come up with a way to adjust the pricing for client to really needs what you do, and they can't afford to pay you now and you both end up happy on the other end that's creative work as well. and. So I don't think we're running out of categories I think we're running out of guts. So you and I had a chat this weekend this past weekend and I want to bring up a couple of the things that we talked about the they obviously are in the book as well But there's some of my my greatest hits. How's it from someone talked about? Reassurance is futile. Yeah. This one really gets under people's skin began. It is so pleasant. I'd like reassurance as much as the next person, but it doesn't work, and the reason it doesn't work is reassurance is what happens when someone we trust tells us everything's GonNa be okay when they are predicting the future on our behalf and for five minutes when wow that's so great to hear and then we realized. No one knows and so we need to be reassured again all the way until we get to the future. And the problem with that mindset is number one. There isn't enough reassurance number two it implies that the outcome is all that matters. The alternative is to refuse reassurance to say I don't know and no one else does and it doesn't matter because I'm going to do anyway.

John It Seth Godin Publisher NBA United States Founder Myrna Lennox
Fearless Principles with Jason Taylor

Ruby on Rails Podcast

02:34 min | 7 months ago

Fearless Principles with Jason Taylor

"So one of the cool things at text us is that we have an integration into slack called donut and what it does every month is it will randomly pair you with someone within the companies that way you get to know someone new. So as the listeners are familiar with I've only been a text us for about ten weeks at this point, but my first doughnut matchup was Jason and you know in our short time together. I've learned that Jason is actually quite fearless, which is something that I have personally struggled with as a being a developer. I have experience in hosting. I've seen databases get dropped. I've seen assets, get whites. I've seen all kinds of things happen and the thing about Jason is that he's actually quite flea fearless and the things that he does and I think it's a really valuable lesson to share. So Jason, where did you develop this philosophy from? I think it's Mostly gained through experience Being at a bunch of small startups, teach you that like you get exposure to a lot of different parts of the system and so for me early on in my career I was really scared. I was scared of breaking production like everybody else's but I realize over time like there's only a few things that like are really scary to break like you don't want to drop your database or lose data and everything else can be fixed like and usually pretty quickly, and we do that all the time and we call the bugs. and. So just kind of came to the realization that like. Oh I can. I can break, but I also fix it and so if I understand really well how it runs in production and how I can get my code out to production quickly then I can fix it and there's nothing to be scared of. I can say that I have enough experience with rails now that I can remember win in rails five I think it was that they announced the ability will actually the feature that if you try to run your test suite against production, they would stop you because usually that involves a database cleaner of some sort where you could wipe out all your production data prior to that there was absolutely nothing stopping you from just hooking up production to your test suite. So I think we've seen a lot of tools come along they really try to nudge us in the right direction because the I think you'll agree with this we just have a lot going on and it's so easy to make mistakes. Right and that's why I think a good understanding of how all the parts of your production system wire together and what things effect what is like a great Piece of knowledge to have to to feel like you can change stuff without breaking it.

Jason Developer
Anchor and Spotify launch 'shows with music'

podnews

03:40 min | 7 months ago

Anchor and Spotify launch 'shows with music'

"Though. Here comes the music. Have you always wanted music in your show one now's your chance anchor and spotify have launched shows with music. A chance for proper full radio type shows with fold tracks however shows only pair spotify and your listeners only hear the songs in full with spotify premium bond musicians do get paid as they would with any other spotify played. If you're in the US you can earn with anchor sponsorships, but you can also upload your own adds to it's available. Now in six countries and episodes containing music will undergo a review process before being published to spotify. UK Radio Executive Matt Deegan notes that his show was rejected because he didn't talk enough and the ants that if anyone asks it definitely isn't radio and it doesn't mean that songs have come to podcasts. One example of how the spotify in can use might make things better for listeners is mine nineties playlist. It's a new show from Sony Music entertainment with the first episode featuring deep dive into TLC's no scrubs. It's a three minute thirty, four second song on a Sony Music Record Label. But on the podcast is played for less than two minutes and continually talked over by the hosts apart from one thousand, five seconds clip to hear the song in full on spotify least would surely be a good thing. Google spas speakers use Google podcasts as you guess. But what if you use podcasts are antenna potter even spotify new podcasts setting section has been spotted by android police, which will enable you to change the default podcast provider in Google assistant in the future. Congratulations to the founder of good pods. Jj Rambert who's been honored in INC magazine's female founders one hundred list. The social podcasting APP has users like Malcolm Plant well and Kim. Kardashian. British podcasts at to be translated into new languages. Something else shows to be translated into Spanish. Danish and German by Danish PODCAST PLATFORM PARTY MO and listener is new PODCAST APP for android. It promises now you couldn't remember everything you find interesting in podcast with listener you can tap one button save the time and convert what you just heard into text looks quite cold twitter a podcast conglomerate checked it out for us. Cost Movement virtual is less than a week away, and if you're a fan of Aloof British accents than you can join our Edison James Curtain that's me once reviewed as James Corden esque to my Ferrara Anyway I'll be leasing a conversation around emerging international markets in podcasting and why you should care. Spain's your net of lack telera music. Kenya's pulled Rogo of Africa pod fest and Malaysia as Norman Chennault Todd. Lovers. Asia. Are On the panel with me please join me. An 'cause News Ruby Jones the host of the seven am podcast in Australia is interviewed by media will link to that today pause play was released last month podcast about live music a global pandemic and walk comes next it's new from KT KT x studios looks at the live music scene in Austin Texas and beyond and crooked media's pod. Save America has possibly snagged their biggest guests yet former president of Barack Obama. He has things to say about the census birtherism misinformation and rage,

Spotify Sony Music Entertainment Google Barack Obama Norman Chennault Todd United States Kt Kt Matt Deegan Jj Rambert Sony Ruby Jones Twitter James Corden UK Inc Magazine Austin Texas Spain Malcolm Plant Asia
How to Connect to Your Humanity and Change the World

Untangle

06:12 min | 7 months ago

How to Connect to Your Humanity and Change the World

"Today. We're going inside the head of Young Pueblo Aka Diego Perez. He's a writer poet and activist who explores his own mind to create poems about the mind. His poems or meditations in themselves and often talk about meditation teachings directly. He's also instagram famous with three hundred, twenty, nine, thousand millennial followers who receive as simple visual poems about meditation daily in their feet. Welcome young blow. Thank you so much for having me Emmett set of the year. Yeah, it's wonderful conversation. Awesome. So let's just start in dive right in because most people probably curious about the first thing they heard young Pueblo like who is this young logo is noted to meet the Guy Behind Proba tell us about young Pueblo on how that came out. was. Name that came to me a bunch of years ago. I'd say back sometimes it's funny thirteen I think the name came to me, and then over time I really developed a meaning. Around honey or team twenty fifteen I realized that I wanted to take great seriously as it was around the time where I saw that. Betaine is having a real effect in my less democracy game meditation course back in. July of two thousand twelve and after doing a few silence and David Austin courses I realized that a lot of the burden that was sort of limiting my mind's in regards to. Zaidi sadness where. They weren't totally radical, but there were decreasing and I was noticing that. I, was really feeling better and I felt like I had more choices in my mind as I could see the world a little more clearly, and then I can navigate my own actions in a way that was much more productive to my personal happiness. So In, sort of pushed me into wanting to righty might people now that healing yourself was actually a real possibility has to be. I know that for myself. I kind of went into meditation has an experiment just as I was always curious about it and it felt like the right fit so I didn't really know that's what I was Gonna get out I. Think I knew that I was going to learn a bunch of things but I didn't know that I was actually going to feel better and it wasn't until after of delving deeper into the process into the actual practice I started seeing that I so lows better sort of into writing. and. The idea of young Bible kind of really warm related around it's my understanding of the world that we are all very young collectively. If you take all humanity were all very young you know it doesn't matter if you're ninety years old is you take us as a whole giant collective we have so much to learn. The bucs Amina's for. Up when we were little children. When we went to school, we were trying to simplest things are teachers were really. Trying to get us to not hurt each other to tell the truth to be kind to one another and to generally just you know it's even like clean up ask yourself things are seem so simple that we can do as individuals but as a human collective e don't know how to do these things at all. A. Me. got. Sort of a signal that. We have a lot of growing up to as humanity and a lot of I. Think a lot of that growing up center happened during the century. We have so many big challenges ahead of us that will hopefully help us row. That this sort of. A. Renaissance, I would call it. That's happening around the mind. Is GonNa be a big big part of humanity mature. SO THAT'S A. Really helpful perspective. So somebody who has a two year old myself I spent a lot of time teaching him some very, very basic things like heating is bad. I'm sorry in some days he's amazing at it in Sunday's he just gets brought by his own emotions, his own desires and hitting back at the window. In it's interesting to look at our humanity as being a very similar place lessons that we've learned over and over again, our childhood yet they're returning in the adult hood of the individual, but still the sort of childhood of the collective. Beautiful by. Where do you see our evolution going? What do you think the path down that road is I think it's interesting because people have very different aspirations. So I wouldn't want to try to say you know all human existence is in this direction but I would say that to get to a place where we're not arming one another where we. Are Mentally ill in ourselves. That army another as arguing when sell it doesn't take. Much Work Right. Having that understanding that you know is literally to my benefits and not you is very different from what sailing Total Liberation Enlightenment's. That's actually a very easier accomplish many think that's where we're really heading as a humanity in our evolution that we're trying to lift ourselves up into that understanding that Oh right? It's not. It's not to my benefit at all to harm you in any way it actually helps my personal life to support you in your freedom, your sixty etcetera. So forth, so me I like to think about it in. In the immediate. Immediate future being like next year is not like the whole seizure. SABA. But it really is trying to get ourselves to that point where or. Individuals in because that's an idea that we've had. Throughout, all of history. Having an idea intellectually is very different from being out experiences, experience Adiba yourself or deeply being able to you'll that you know that it's your benefits are mothers I think Ruby's different practices Asami different people are engaging. Different introspective medias including meditation. That that will help get. To that point where it's like Oh right now, of course, not only do I in my mind but I. Feel my body and now I'm GonNa find better solutions than our.

Young Pueblo Writer Emmett Diego Perez Zaidi Amina David Austin Adiba A. Renaissance Ruby Asami
"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

Ruby on Rails Podcast

08:16 min | 10 months ago

"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

"I, I think I've logo can go a long way blog posts. Even if they're short, little videos get other people to do them. Ask other people to do them I know there's plenty of people who in the community if you're like, hey, created this cool tool. Would you mind? Trying it out, or if you like it, could you blog about it or I don't know I. Don't be for anyone else, but you can definitely ask knew that I will definitely do that. I like doing little details like step by step like that. The other thing is like the docs have to be good, but documentations hard, so I like to hide. The fact that I'm not great at documenting by making it really look. Look good, so there's a project that I can't remember the name of, but it's from Evil Martians. The helps you generate documentations oppose on the get hub pages for the project. There's read the docks, which is really good, nate, what's the one we use for singles reflex? Get Book is another one and the and most of those will will offer. They'll give a free like give you the free access for an open source project. I would say documentation is really key. If you wanted option, you need documentation, so you read me as a little bit marketing a little bit documentation, and then I would host your documentation on one of those other services, and another piece of it is like video tutorials like the content around at that's propping showing up on Dev to, or or wherever even Youtube people walking through and doing tutorials, so for example on some of our libraries. We've been fortunate enough to have several of the the rails tutorial teachers drop in if show how to use the libraries and things like that and I've even produce some of those myself on on some of the libraries and. Every time one of those ships? There's like a whole new wave of interest. Awesome. You guys have so much work to do so. Thanks for giving me all fat I'm going to have a busy weekend ahead, but I would love to ask some specific questions so windy. You outgrow your read knee and are all the tools that you offered better than using it hub with. No. Simple answer I think whatever tool using you can get up bassin running with I To fill tools so I will tend to spend way longer. Fiddling with like a really really nice tool to like make it come out really really good and less time on the actual documentation, but that's my personality. So I don't think I think you could definitely use get hub wicky and be perfectly fine, but the one thing you don't get with that as much is Seo. If you're trying to grow the project than having that online presence urine website, you're into Maine or whatever you decide to do it will that you definitely will not get those with the the Wiki. I think my overall goal for the project is. This is not going to be some fancy amazingly used thing. I wanted to be useful I wanted to be the de facto solution. Should you want to implement Google pay for passes veered into your rails application just like passbook has become for apple, and you know if I were to get some sort of letter from Google, being like what is this that we consider that a cool? But yeah, I mean definitely modest schools to start off with, but I I I would be heartbroken to put out Erin then find out that someone had to reimplement all the code, not knowing that my project existed yet using your mediums as well like twitter. Your podcast, your blog about it on your person. Say DEB DOTS to I. Think we have fun. A lot of interest to soonest reflects specifically through dubbed dot to I. Will Say I was stoked. I was able to get Google pay as the gem name I think Jim names a lot of times. I think your library names can be everything. There are so many times I've passed up libraries having no idea what they were for. That's a good point that. We probably should highlight because whenever I'm trying to think of new gym name. I'm trying to get clever. Because all the really cool gems have clever names, and I wanNA clever name, but at the end of the day. You know Google page on his, probably like if you if you don't if you want people to find it unless you just start, you can use the gym. To add in a lot of Meta data for Ruby Gems, and that will make it definitely more searchable on Ruby Gems, dot com, but yet if having your library named like Bananas Snow Cream, and then you know, it's like a rapper around like the government Api just like it. It's fun, but it makes no sense. You Know I. Love This example and I'm definitely GONNA JUMP Nana's no cream. There's my analogies again. That's fantastic. Thank you all for this advice? I'm excited to ship it I've been really funny about so I have the first version on ruby gems. It's you. Don't WanNa, do domain squatting of course I. wanted to make sure that I got the jam so push up like version that I'm not thrilled about below one. Oh, I haven't made the repository itself public and I don't know why. That is such a saying that you switch it from private to public. It doesn't matter, but yeah, add something. I should be doing this week for sure. It's just gonNA. Be Running Kobe's because a lot of the code I ride. The trust is not open, and so it's good to get some more open source code out. There used to be a boot. Boot, camp instructor, and so the majority of my open source contributions was just opening blur cross seconds. My students repositories, so it's it's It's been a while since I've spent on something. That's entirely my own that I get to start from. The bottom has all the applications that manage the trust of all long term legacy projects now in terms of the example rails projects. I want to ship with the jam which it sounds like. We have consensus that that's a good idea. Should I say? We agree that it should be part of the itself. Do you think that should be a separate repository? It's totally up to you. Whatever's easiest you may find it easier to not have it in the gym. Just for referencing it I think it might be easier to be separate, but I need to find some examples of Ruby gems that you ship with another lake with an example project that they point zero. I'm sure they're out there. So if you guys happen to think of any place on my way, listeners see you as wealth young I have some or stimulus reflex. We actually ship another project called Expo, which is nothing but a series of demos of how to use the library. Nice you ship that. We deployed to Roku. So you can go look at the source code immediately. We point here from the stimulus reflex. Read me over to go. Look at the demos in those are intended to show some of the use cases that certainly is an exhaustive in. It eats a lot of time just to stay. Try to bring the library up to speed and and adnew. Show the usage of new features and the library, but we host that on her Oku can play with immediately you at the library does, and then from there link right back into the hub repo and look at the code that you're executing right in front of you, so it's proven really helpful in it's helped. eliminate I. THINK A lot of support type requests that might come in in the terms, in in the form of. Of issues or tickets yeah, speaking. Do you get a lot of issues in polar class that you end up rejecting or for the most part of they welcome and things that you actually want to do or contributions that you want the projects I would say the all contributions are welcomed, certainly, because even if even if we reject it at the end of the day, it makes expand thinking about the library, or at least will show us. We've failed to document something properly or make something clear with the Public Api or something like that, and so every contribution is very welcome and I'd say we're probably we probably accept about sixty to sixty five percent of the poll requests that.

Ruby Gems Google Youtube nate Maine twitter apple Erin instructor Kobe Jim
"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

Ruby on Rails Podcast

06:29 min | 10 months ago

"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

"Show. We have Britney Martin. WHO's going to be joining US Britney? Web Developer for the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust where she is part of a team that develops the nonprofits ticketing and festival web applications. She is also the host of the Ruby on rails podcasts on the five by five network. Under her ego enormous, Gates Brittany plays and referees Roller Derby for the Little Steel Derby girls welcome to the show. It is my pleasure to be here high all. Low. I've been I've been excited about this one. Because I I love talking to your one of my favorite people in the community to talk, too. Much Andrew because I feel that way about you. You'd field so well connected all three actually and I am always excited when I see you pop up on a podcast. I think you know spinning out review. Blend, and I love remember is so the more ruby content out there the better. Yeah definitely, and we may have to get you on remote. Ruby because I think Jason and Chris Little Jealous. So, we might have to share, but I think we wanted to talk a little bit about gem rappers. Today you to tell us what you're working on. Absolutely so at the for Cultural Trust, the way works. It's a multi tenant ruby on rails application that is on rail six, and I'm quite proud of that because I am the only ruby developer at the Pittsburgh. Cultural, trust and I maintained four different rails applications that are around. Or Festival management and Whatnot, our biggest arts festival just moved online, so that was a big feet, but right before head. We were working on mobile ticketing, so the idea that a patron could come to the theater, and instead of having to print out their ticket or wait for the you know male craziness. They could actually bring their phone able to scan in, so I had to do it. Both for apple and Google which I thought was going to be a pretty similar experience turns out. It was slightly different and I was very lucky in the sense that has. Has Book. The GEM is out there for apple of that implementation wasn't too difficult, but there was literally nothing out there for Google pay. The documentation was pretty broken and it was hard to follow, and so I ended up writing the implementation in the application itself, but I've been looking for excuse to write an open source library. You know I am so lucky to have so many people put out so many great libraries like yourselves, and so I figured this could be my opportunity to contribute back to the community, and so I've actually been spending some time in quarantine. That code into jam and kind of strategizing how I WANNA. put it out there, so I'd love to seek some counsel from all about the best ways to do that. You're you're on your off on the right foot here. That is building a something functional, Indie rap, and then working extract and work at backwards that way rather than trying to divine what what you may need in this library going forward, so you're already off on the right path here. That's great. I A big thing for me has been just documentation. The issue is it's not like a plug and play jams, so take for example she party. We've all used. They're probably and it's pretty easy to implement into an application tested and verified that it works the. The problem with my Google, gem is that it requires a lot of background structure around it in order to get it working. You need to apply for a certificate. You need to apply that certificate in your code base, and so I guess my question for you. All is what it makes sense to create like an almost fake rails application that I ship along with it or ship decided. That shows a user how to use it like. How would you approach that I have done both I think the only main consideration. Is that you in your gem SPEC? You make sure that that folder is not required. And it by default I think gems, becks by default on require files in Lib, but you would just WanNa. Make sure about that because you wouldn't want to ship. You know the them and an entire reveals ZAP when someone insults the gem. Yeah I saw a really great article appeared amazing article about the correct gems back, and so his article was really helpful in helping me. Put that together because there have been people who have shipped their tests as part of that John, bundle than their their bundles, just impossible to download. Yeah he's got some great content and I also would recommend I read his gems like all the time whenever I'm writing gem I'll go through and read his gems and I find that to be pretty helpful to at least get you in the because in my mind and this May or may not be true, but when I think of gem maintainers like someone who's out there writing gems writing content out writing gems. He's the first thing comes to my mind so I usually go read his code the other person. I read a lot of code from. Is I know his screening? It's Palca it's Vladimir. Oh, yes, I'm going to have him on the show. Pretty Sad. Yeah! I actually haven't scheduled next month to come onto the by five routes podcast. He's great keene. I know he has a lot of the opinions around rails, engines which I do a lot of rails engine work, so I have a lot of compassion for people who do that. Yeah, he's got some great gems to I I learn best by reading other people's code so I find people like Vladimir and pure door and I just scour. They're code. Will you raise a really good point because in this case when I? I was implementing the Google pay API. This is for event ticketing which is normally at proprietary functionality within the organization that something that you kind of keep close to the vest I think one thing that made it really difficult for me in order to implement it is that I could do my common saying which was going on to get hub reading. Other people's Code I was only able to find other organizations. They weren't even in Ruby, which is fine by it made it even more difficult, and so it just seemed even more needed. I needed a some sort of library out there. Yeah, I! I think that's awesome. Like whenever anyone has like that mindset of like. Oh, I did this really complicated thing. No one else is talking about it. I should share. It does just that's.

Google Britney Martin Pittsburgh Cultural Trust apple Little Steel Derby Gates Brittany Cultural Trust Web Developer WanNa Pittsburgh Andrew Vladimir Jason ZAP developer Chris Little keene
"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

Ruby on Rails Podcast

02:37 min | 10 months ago

"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

"You're listening to the ruby on rails podcast on the five by five network. Five,.

"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

Ruby on Rails Podcast

05:17 min | 11 months ago

"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

"It's very easy for that to be a weaker skill so I thought you know. What if I go into chef? It won't just be like not being the smartest person in the room. It'd be everybody else in the room. It'd be smarter than me, which is exactly where I want to be there so brilliant and particularly in the world of devops. There's about. It's almost feels like learning programming for the first time you know where every term is a new term, and every concept is a new concept, and it's been really fun. I love that attitude. You are willing to be the person in the room. Who needs to learn the most about what everyone's talking about? I think that's us very special personality skill and granted. You definitely have it. For me like I, enjoy being on servers I like that life, but I know very little about docker and very little about Cooper Nannies and that kind of world, and so the Mount of scale. That chef must deal with is just got to be really cool to watch. Yes, alike, I'll give an example from what I work on so I work on insect project, which just really. Really quickly if you work with compliance or auditing or security, it goes with the chef. compliances code you know something devops Code Mantra where you can automate everything, so you might have a situation where using CIS standards and manually running these commands thousands of them every three months, and it's horrible and keeping track of it, but inspect allows you to automatically do that, you know. Know, how however often you want and we're starting. You know we'll see you know cases because chef has some brand name customers I don't know if I'm allowed to say who they are, but just imagine about as big as it gets and problems I've never had in my life. You know where where you're saying. This is getting run. Tens of thousands of times hundreds of thousands of. Of Times the loops are can kill you whereas the other applications I've worked on. They were just as important, but they wouldn't get hit his heart right so being able to think about that with every line of Ruby right is really cool and then chef last year. I think I'm really start making the push towards open sourcing as much as possible which I love.

Cooper Nannies devops Ruby
"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

Ruby on Rails Podcast

05:24 min | 11 months ago

"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

"And puts degenerated documents. Into a program cody, elastic search! And enough to allows us to basically search. The Ruby Documentation, but then I put a tiny bit of of a surge worth behind it to make the such a lot more optimal. Sorry eats puts a low priority around searching the cool objects of the Ruby. and. Such as like a a raise strings inches, floyd's decimals at such. And so by doing that, we basically. Create like a Web site. That understands what the Rubicel Ruby. Documentation is an optimizes. What's all the people are looking for? and. We built the application around trying to make uses. Gets to what they're looking for as quickly as possible. What was the use case that you were solving for? Is this something where you were having problems? Looking documentation yourself or you heard this from the community and just decided. This was something that needed to exist. Yes so, Rubio. Born and my frustration. With the existing services that were out there. I'm in no. Means attacking. The existing documentation sought gentler, but I found it quite. Often. That's Google simply just doesn't understand. The Ruby Documentation. And if you search for particular things using Google you get really strange results. especially around like particularly like method names such. Google just simply does not understand what you're talking about. I agree with that with my experience I often. Will Get Sakho her flow answers above the actual documentation, which is really. One of the real cool things is ruby API. Is aware of what the Ruby Documentation is, and it can tell Google specifically what it should index. What shouldn't index and how to index particular things? And so we can optimize the SEO experience law using Ruby Hr. I WANNA. Thank you for your work on review. Api I have already bookmark, and it is my go-to resource for going forward, so I'd love to know Colby. What are your thoughts on the future of the Ruby on rails communities? I think Ruby, and riles has a very bright future I think there's a lot of people in the community that accompanies a ruby and rails of the time and very passionate about these projects. I. Attend conferences where. Half of the audience is attended the conference for the first time. And also the just saw that new job, and they're just come from university, and they're really interested in reviewing riles and Ruby. So I think this I. Think Really. I think the the idea that Rubio's dying is completely unsure. Rubi and rows up at very much alive. And a lot of people behind that A. Willing to take. Ruby rows of into the future show. I think they're going into the future we need to. Try and. Get people to contribute to a lot of these projects that people will depend on in Verbis. Around especially around just like. of Gyms River jumps.

Rubicel Ruby Google Rubio Verbis Gyms River floyd Rubi Colby
"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

Ruby on Rails Podcast

02:44 min | 11 months ago

"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

"The issues around what specifically happened and. It wasn't all just lay the. was around communication with the. Team and uses. And Some of the steps we could, we could have taken to help lessen the situation. Unfortunately! It wasn't something we could easily fix because. Ruby gems was much. religions ships told all the uses by default and there's no. Easy Way, to have old, upright rhythms. And so we ran into a lot of issues around like trying to communicate to our uses to say hey, you counsel this issue this particular issue in Ruby Gems. This is how you fix it. And also just trying to get uses upgrade ruby gems. Is a bit of a complex situation, because a lot of people just annoy in control of their rows and vomit, and so they just couldn't upgrade ruby gems. So interesting, so among the many reasons I asked you onto the show today I wanted to ask you about the origin and uses of your new project, Ruby Api so first of all, what is it? Sarabia Epeli is a couple of things. The first thing that most people will this is that it's basically the documentation that has a modern Heysham, all theme. That focuses on raid, ability and accessibility, so it focuses. Quarter Lot on being on making the documentation. -able documentation readable on. Desktop. And tablet devices. The second thing is that it's. A rouse application that concerns ruby souls card and puts the generated documentation into a service less search. And basically il-suk search. Makes the documentation. searchable and then I put a small search algorithm on top that optimizes. A lot of careers that. Uses typically searchable. So if you're searching for. A method to I for example. Ruby API is that you're probably looking for like the string class. And we'll put that at the very top, so the second thing about. Is it's Ribian rows application. That's consumes rubies souls card..

Ruby Gems Heysham Sarabia Epeli
"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

Ruby on Rails Podcast

03:53 min | 11 months ago

"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

"Yes so. BANGALA has a lot of scenario said it has to take into account when people use certain aspects of the bundle project. Sir. One of the really. Interesting bugs that I had to deal with was basically. A scenario, WHIP Uses were getting the bundle exotic command inside of the test weights? And so they were trying to Lloyd on low with inbound La. When Bunga ships with Ruby as a default gem back in two thousand eighteen. This caused a weird scenario where bundle was trying to lower itself in a place where it didn't exist. And essentially what was happening was. Buffalo was. Being told that it. The Bungalow Larvae itself was located in one part. Of these assistant by Ruby Jones, when in fact, it didn't ever exist there. And so that that issue took me I think about a month to fully understand it because those law of complexities between Bundler. Verbiage I'm trying to figure out which. Which? Had to be correctly. Yeah the. I think. The most interesting bug. I've come across. And then the other one. Obviously would probably have to be the Bundler to release, which is a bit of a situation of unfortunate circumstances. Which you can watch my. Presentation at Rubicon last year. And the basic gist of it was that. About two years ago, we. Saw The butler Cole team had this idea of having It's aren't versions. So if you re relish project that was easy to. And, then you had another project that was using the one. The, maybe in the future you had like another ribbon project that was using bond with right. And so this was that basically? Bundle which is managed self so that it would always lord the correct version whenever you did like a bundle install. But then the person those leading that work. kind of left the project a bit. Just due to circumstances Ryan, his work and that cord pretty much got left on maintained. But then a particular subset feature of that work. Go left. In Ruby Gems. And fortunately that got ships to use. And that's. was unfortunately enabled by default, and there wasn't really a was really a white to turn it off, Eva. and. Nobody really noticed because the feature only works when. There was multiple major versions of Bungalow. And time..

Ruby Jones Ruby Gems Ruby WHIP Uses Buffalo Rubicon Lloyd La Cole Ryan Eva.
"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

Ruby on Rails Podcast

05:18 min | 11 months ago

"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

"Listen so three twenty one I'm your host Britain Martin. Kobe's Mondale is Ruby engineer. Fato in Melbourne Australia outside of work he enjoys. Traveling speaking conferences and there's also a core contribute to the Bundler, Ruby gems and Ruby DOT ORG projects. Kobe recently started a new project called Ruby API to help improve finding and reading ruby documentation on the web. Kobe. Thank you so much for staying up late so to speak with me today. Nor is thank you so much for having on the show. This is actually my first podcast. Ever so. Very nervous I'm also on coal wells or heartbe. My find doesn't go off during the episode, but very excited. I have a feeling. Aren't listener base completely understand where you're coming from, so let's go ahead and go forward so Kobe. What is your developer origin story? So Maya tree is a programming was actually when I was in high school. Eagles fifteen or sixteen at the time. and. For some odd reason by art close actually had some. Technical lessons. Sorry revolved around like. Programming SHAMO sites. Like learning. ADOBE FLASH GOES MACADAMIA FLASH AT THE TIME. And using actress scripts to program like flush gains and animations and such. Yeah, and that was kind of my. You could call a gateway drug into programming. I think I fell prima striking laba with it. And I think afterwards I started going to condemn iron road. I did a lot of html at first and slowly picked up a PHP. Sort of mess around with. Then I found out about what press. And four, like really cool that you could just download this whole entire blogging platform. And pretty much customize anyway wanted. A So. I missed it with like PHP for a couple of years. And then I think. when I was in. in Australia, record senior college, but I think it's more I think in American or international terms it's. Still High School, but it's the equivalent to twelve. I picked up like my foreign, which turned out to actually be an eye fine. And so when I immediately got Hoya I started downloading. Echoed in southern, messing around with objective C. And then I think. I think it was playing around with justice for about a couple of months and then I found out. My local city council was running like a technology competition..

Kobe Melbourne Australia Britain Martin engineer High School Mondale Eagles developer Australia
"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

Ruby on Rails Podcast

13:47 min | 1 year ago

"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

"Technology. So there's something about the Ruby language that encourages people to think wider or too white or about their lifestyles or the things that they're thinking of the work that they're doing I think it comes somewhat from Nazi. He is meant to bring joy the language. So there's something about that in that we take that into other areas if you look at the derive languages just ironic given that revisit of a hotchpotch of lots of scripting languages from the Pasta bits. That Matt's liked Beagle things like Elixir and very much a sense of that community. Ti- has some ruby flavor to it. And if you look at even companies have mostly sprung from Ruby. So things like get hub or her Roku. There's there's like a intangible Ruby Shenice to them and that's something that I sort of the featuring of talk so the talks are an the talks are not exclusively about not about Ruby but they are wider than that and they encourage us to think about the job that we're doing and the place that we have in society ways that we attack the problems that we try to do every day. So you know you get talks about Ceremonies given several excellent talks. That we've got the video on the site where she talks about How how people structure teams or we might get something about how you find a job as a developer. We might get something as my experience as a junior coming into this community. So yeah we we try and cost a wider net. And I've done other stuff like we've had a game. There's a game show just a minute. Go carried over to the US Ruby conferences. And we've had live music performances and we've had stand up so I always try and like add something a little bit fun. It's a bit different. That's awesome I think. That's so great so I did WANNA get your opinion on this. How do you think the decisions coming from? Cova nineteen will affect conferences for the long haul. I mean I don't know because I am not a doctor Bought nothing can for me. Nothing can replace the the brilliant day we all have when people come to Brian. It's like deliberately have it in July. So it's nice and sunny. I'm Brian is a town is a great place to come and hang out and eat and meet people and to a certain extent when I started in Ruby was very much slowly. Selfish like I needed to allow Rubio's I wouldn't be out of work but the last few years like that's not an issue anymore. That was an issue the first couple move back to the UK. But now it's much more a I. I'm aware I have some sort of community role so I keep running it even though it's really hard so there is a point that put the so. There is a point to it. Happening in person conferences online. They don't work for me so much. I didn't have the same thing And more downloads folder. Definitely tells you that their conference talks. I want to watch. I haven't got to yet So yeah I don't know it's really tough. I'm super glad that a I try and do it very economically so I'm personally not too far in debt at the moment I am a bit but not too far and also the I. That's not my main job. Might my main job is as a working for engineer. Leading a small team coverage book so for event focused companies like the problems the the really central focus half they just an order of magnitude a more complicated and be more difficult than why have to deal with. I mean for me. It's several thousands of pounds. But it's not insurmountable because if the deliberate small-scale by operate on it's my side Gig for companies the all events focused. It's frankly it's really difficult and uncertain time. None of us really know. It's still way too early to see what's happening to Sicily. Italy let alone with getting lots of people in a room together. I completely agree. I was out for a run with my boss last week. And I posed the same question to him and he said because he's a father of four young boys he just cannot imagine a world where he could do a conference entirely online and be truly unplugged and be able to access that hallway track and it might be just a prompting the community that we can do better around that. But it's going to be certainly hard until we get to that you know maybe virtual reality situation or I'm really not sure but it's going to be hard to replicate that I think we're all GONNA be forced to learn like an expense and oculus rift or something then. I'm all for that otherwise I just don't well. I am excited to keep an eye on Brighton and see what how this solution comes out. And I do hope that maybe even come back onto the podcast and let us know how it went. Because I think it's great that you're not just cancelling it and leaving it at that. Kind of shrugging your shoulders. You are giving a platform for those speakers to be able to share the amazing content that they wanNA share. Frankly I don't really have the option to fully council. It's so I. The main reason on canceling now is partially a it. Seems like the right thing to do. Be It's my conference is far enough in the future for me. That cancelling now means I am ahead of a lot of my costs. So a lot of the costs were about to start to be impacted. Sit like booking people's travel hotels extrovert and like further cost on just the deposit for the venue but the you know the full full full costs of the venue. So it's there is a financial element to continuing to run it for me personally but it's also I just think it will be real shame if there's nothing and although we will miss each other You know it's very much become a place that the UK redick immunity common. Hang OUT FOR. A couple of days. Even the conference is only a day so yeah. There is a financial imperative for me. But it's I just want it to be something. I don't want it to be without Bryant Ruby. You know I said in the email I sent out to all the League as I don't want to cancel it on because I'm gonNA miss it although it's really hard work but like I will miss it so I want there to be something. And they're to be something tangible that people can take away hence the hence the swagger in an envelope as well as the videos in the post. That's awesome so while sitting between talks. Harris. Rv You cheered some thoughts with me on how you make. Your own conference talks interesting the listeners. Can you please share some of your advice for the audience? A D. my personal conflicts. That I give right okay so first of all I try to be brief and I encourage that in all of my speakers Typically twenty minute talk support and Ruby. The talks the US conferences tend to be sort of forty minute period and unless you saw really punchy and in it terrific deliver of talks forty minutes can be a long time like it can be a long time for the speaker so I keep it short as much as I can I also recently have been playing around with sound so I gave a talk Two Thousand Sixteen. I gave a talk. That was a always picked out the CFP to keynote Rubicon which was amazing and absolutely terrifying. They still sort of stood there in front of nine hundred people including mats and and you know all these people look up to in the Ruby community and they to say stuff. That's quite scary. But one of the things I didn't talk was included audio from outside so I had someone else read it. Maybe it was a quote from a person thankfully with this philosopher who recorded a bunch of stuff in the seventies so I was able to play him reading out his philosophy and that worked really well and not talk and so a subsequent talk live given. I got various friends of mine. Too recorded radio placed illustrate points that I was making And so for me. That's really good because I don't want to listen to myself. Talk for half an hour. Apologies to those of you. Who are currently listening to talk for half an hour and a podcast but I want to break it up. It gives me a chance to have a drink in a natural way without feeling quiet I really focus on my slides. But yeah it's it's a case of practicing and finding out something that works view like there are people like nick means who do an amazing job of sort of almost an NPR is documentary style. Storytelling thing And there are people who live code spectacularly or they don't code but they really unpack a problem like sandy mets or Katrina Owens but there's all sorts of different ways to attack it and in talking to people are often after Britain Ruby and sort of unpacking everyone's processes. Everyone's is completely different. Like if someone tells you this is how you give a conference talk. They are wrong because it's very very different for everybody. And if it has to reflect your personality you have to come through in your talk and deliver your story in your way and find an interesting way or just like the best thing you can do is practice so that you're confident in the material that you're delivering something that you know about and the crowd. We need to do well like in any sort of talk. Like people are willing to do well because it's quite a scary experience but the best thing you can do is practice have an opinion and then try and do something that keeps you engaged as you give it and the audience engaged. They're listening. That advice certainly comes across in your talks so this next question might be flavored based on the reaction that you got from all the future attendees of Brighton. But what are your thoughts on the future of the Ruby and rails communities oversee? Ruby's dad is now. I mean we all know this. We should be looking for other jokes. We should all be programming. Haskell I mean for me it's like Ruby is well established rails incredibly well established. They're all big companies using using rails and there are companies using ruby in places. You wouldn't expect often. All find people will come to the conference. W Yeah we do a bit Ruby. We mostly use it for devops. Oh okay cool. That's great Traditional Small Company base camp sized things like news coverage book here and Brian in various other stuff in the UK that similar relatively small teams trying to build something where having one big code base that does most of the staff and has great tooling. And he's always being approved is really useful. I think it's great. I think there's a sense in which the Ruby community also brings people back so I know people who don't do ruby anymore. Who COME TO RUBY will go to the local Ruby? Meet up because there's something about the community in the revisionists of us. All that makes a big difference. I've been to to the Java scrip- conferences and up into Alexa conference I just the different feel even like in language like Alexa. Which is Very Ruby. Comes get comes from the Ruby community to a certain extent..

Bryant Ruby Ruby community UK Brian ruby US Brighton Ti Alexa Matt developer Sicily Italy Cova Rubio engineer Traditional Small Company Harris
"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

Ruby on Rails Podcast

12:15 min | 1 year ago

"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

"You're listening to episode three ten. And I'm your host Britney Martin. I'm now starting to report on the series of wonderful people that I got to meet and Harris. Rb FIRST UP. Is Andy Crawl Antea? Cto At coverage book an answer the public he's a Rubio's conference organizer of Brighton. Ruby and author Speaker bootstrap and swim. Dad Thanks for joining me today. Andy thanks for having me absolutely Andy. What is your developer origin? Story overseeing story Roy so I have somewhat a classical nerd background Computers as a small child and then computer science at university and then I took a job. The I thought was technical but absolutely wasn't did four years of HR and communications for a big Tech Company. And then I was getting super frustrated with that all the time I sort of kept up making websites for various stuff. And I I quit that job to re skill into the website side of things and I started out in the front end of html CSS. And I discovered I discovered David Hammer. Hanson's make good fifteen minutes video and base count and thirty seventeen all around the same time in about two thousand seven and I've been doing re be rails ever since so you kind of touched upon it but what is your specific experience with. Ruby on rails. Well it's basically my entire career for the last decade and a bit which me and my niece feel old Yeah so was experience Bill. Various things like my own stuff Currently working with a team in Brighton in the UK on Coverage Book and onto the public which are two entirely separate SAS businesses. Run by technical team of three and a wider team of nine And we have two three thousand customers and we support the more with With two three mainly two or three rails APPs and lots of other stuff around the edges of the press. Cite JEKYLL Yeah so lots and lots of Ruby on rails pretty much. Have you ever deviated from Ruby and Ruby on rails? Have you tried other technical stacks or you pretty focused on rails? Have I strayed I have played a little bit with stuff. Of course all of us have to write Java scrip- whether we want to or not mostly not depending on whether I'm maintaining my own Java scrip- from Herman years ago. Yeah pretty much. I do a lot of fun work in our team as well so we a designer on team and he does some front end But I'm more focused on the performance and technical sides of those things I recently have built a wordpress blog for us for for marketing team re platforming from medium. An idea that was an entertaining exercise in the stuff I used to do was just doing front end. I just wanted to make websites and that was always the bt of Ruby handrails for me will very much finding a thing where I could make the compete to do what I wanted and then may have nice as well so yeah I. I've done a bit but mostly I try and work on problems that ruby on rails is a good fitful so I'm not building chat clones on building super high traffic Things that twitter or facebook scale so for that world any framework in larval in. Php or genuine python is great. I just happen to like Ruby. So that's where I've landed. That's fantastic and we're so lucky to have you in our community so not only. Are you ruby developer? You are also quite the conference organizer. And I'd love to hear the origin behind Brighton. Ruby Ross. Brian wins. It starts. It starts in two thousand nine. I lived in Singapore for six. My sort of initial ruby on rails stuff was in the Singapore community. I worked for a couple of startups out there including one where I raise money and travel startup up for myself and it was about two thousand and nine and we were having Christmas Ruby. Meet up and I was sort of at that time. There were loads of sort of regional conference in the US. Singapore's on the wrong side of the world to get to the US for a conference and so in Japan had guy. I'm always so I said to the set of the around. We should definitely do a conference. Rooms I yeah and do you. Totally should do a conference and I said well should we get to come and they will. He should invite Matt's. I mean Japan's not that far away and so emailed mats and then go back to me and said he would come and so it's his fault because then had to organize fronts. I told him this parable when I saw him again. And he said you used the word fault so that was great so I run that For two or three years and and then when I go back to the UK. I moved to Brighton. Sodium or live in London anymore. I moved to Brighton and decided a quick way to meet people doing the sort of work that I would be interested in getting a job in would be to Paula. White conference organizing inverted commas expertise into having an event in Brighton. So I put on something for one hundred something people the first year and And that was seven years ago and the sort of working out right I think. Wow that's amazing. So how many years is Brighton Ruby? Being going on then so I almost two thousand and fourteen just footing. Yes he doesn't fourteen. So yeah we're we're in the seventh year of Organisation of conferences. Although things have not exactly to plan the Yes yes. So speaking of a topic that cannot be avoided due to cove in nineteen. You had to cancel the in person experience for Brighton. Ruby twenty twenty. So could you please walk me through that decision so I may not really have been paying attention very much? I woke up a couple of weeks ago having sort of open the CFP about a month ago they papers have a proportion of invited speakers so Gemini. I invite the normal speakers the of this because I've seen speak elsewhere. Who would like to get over or repeats because we'd like to have back and then open a cough papers to have people to submit their talks and get new people into the into the speaking game as as it were well into that reviewing talks was my kids were sports thing on the on the Saturday morning and I woke up in the morning afterwards and went. Oh Oh I might have to deal with this. This is this is genuinely a thing. Isn't it And this is probably beginning of March time So yeah like it was suddenly. Oh I'm going to have to deal with this. What am I going to do And that was my first sort of paralyzing thought and I should have thought about that for bit And then I got in touch with the sponsors and the speakers and said just let you know I'm aware of this. I don't know I'm doing it. Let's see what happens as we know. Speaking today stuff has happened. Lots of stuff has been cancelled if the morning. I canceled Brian. Ruby rails also counseled and apple came out with ww DC being counseled so I was in good company that Friday But yeah all I did. I had sort of I sort of knew two or three days before and I turned ticket sales off a couple of days before that whilst I should've rounded the wagons and worked out what the hell it was always going to do because I didn't want to. Just go cancel it and not have a plan. I'd like to have a plan. I run Brighton Ruby. Entirely by myself. we'll see some help on the day the venue have always been really great But yeah it's it's very much a solo effort so I needed to sort of bounce ideas off the people who I normally bounce ideas off friends of mine like Tekken and Nadia and the and the sponsors work at what what it was. I was going to do. Yeah so what I'm GonNa do is I'm I'm having a a not a conference or a alternative conference or we'd conference I am not a fan of online events. Typically particularly the kind where I ended up having to run another massive slack or where you have to be in position at a certain time. So that's great. I personally don't like that. I feel like a big part of. Brian is the in person stuff in the hallway. Tracking was obviously the talks. Great there is an element of coming together and community spirit and see. That can't happen this year so I've focused a little bit more on the content side of things so I'm going to play this with all the speakers so they're going to do versions of their talks as videos which we will then sell and There's also the swag I was going to do was a so. I'm working with my friend. Who Works Works for Book Publishing Technology Company and we all reprinting a paperback of wise pointing to Ruby which for long-term Ruby s will fill the joy and for new. Rubio's to Maitland. Go what but it was so I'd like to do with my swagger for you. I'd like to have a surprise said lost. It was like a reusable coffee cups so I said I didn't. I ordered four hundred coffee cups and this year. I'm going to get hundreds of books printed so that's fine so we're going to print a copy of this book and sit down the Post and then so the the talks will come out. The book will be posted to you and then they'll be an opportunity for people to ask questions of the speakers and then I'm GonNa do what you're doing now? Which is politely. Be Quiet even though. You probably won't jumping all the time and listen to what the speakers have to say about questions from the audience or questions that life go about that talks about them. In general so yeah. I'm going to competition with Uber. And he's sorry. No that's great. I have so many follow ups on that number one. I absolutely want to one of those books so soon as those are available. I'm definitely purchasing one. Because you're right. You're going to delight the Ruby community over that one so quite clever second. I just wanted to make it clear. So essentially you're GONNA have the speakers record their talks you'll probably review them and make sure that they're all in a similar type format and then you know audience members will be able to purchase them and be able to interact with the speakers. Yeah so I mean three me. I'm I'm a benevolent dictator when it comes to my conference so we don't have any questions or Brian Ruby. Because there's always the person who puts the hand up stands up and says this is not really a question more common really which is not really the point so we've always had the speakers hanging around if you WanNa talk about the stuff they've talked about. Please feel free and sort of replace that Pau conference experience. I'M GONNA I'm gonNA release the videos ahead of time. So they'll be released probably early June his plan right now and then we will do the podcast starting to be released in July around the time that the conference would have been otherwise so they'll be like a month for people to watch some were at their leisure the videos. And then there'll be a sort of a private podcast where I do the interviews with the people and find out you know. Expand their thoughts or get into a particular area And hopefully that will replicate some of that feeling of interaction. Now that's all an excellent idea and absolutely I want more people to compete with me because the more ruby content out there the better though. I think you've touched upon this before. But Brighton Ruby is an all about ruby correct absolutely. It's it's it's it's Brian Ruby. Say Very much does what it says on the ten But it's I think this is the thing about ruby conferences in general and suddenly the The wider community. There was a lot of what I'm looking for. Ruby.

Brian Ruby Ruby Brighton Ruby Ross Ruby twenty twenty Andy Crawl developer Rubio UK Britney Martin US Japan Harris Singapore Cto Roy cough
"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

Ruby on Rails Podcast

11:26 min | 1 year ago

"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

"What is the one piece of advice that you can offer? And you're in the middle of an incident. The best thing you can do is is a massively massively over communicate so you I have managed like very very complicated like like multi multi system outages or data losses that required coordination of like say a half dozen dozen engineers rate spanning multiple engineering teams bias. I tend to see is people only communicating when n- state has changed. But the problem with that is it. Leaves you in a place where you don't know if the operator Rita is still there and that you may well find that if they were communicating someone may be able to jump in and help so. I have a general rule when I'm running an incident that I haven't heard something from someone who is actively involved in the last five minutes I will directly ping them To ask them what state is even if nothing has changed and that's not to try and pressure them to move foster that what is purely so that I as someone running or involved in the incident understand what everyone is walking on a real time sense because that confusing confusing and it generally in my experience has led to foster resolution in Tom's like organizational stuff if your entering an uncle rotation for the first time actively seek mentorship backups reverse shadowing like an insurance organization is set is going to set you up to succeed not set you up to fail. I'm one of the worst things that can possibly happen is putting someone who's new to being on coal or like near like the kind of engineering you're doing into an uncle rotation without a safety eighteen to fall back on and so you're like this is probably not so much for the new on Koa in your audience as it is for on like manages data leadership as well sort of clary on call to be like. Hey make sure your new new folks have as much support as possible because incidents a terrible and like anything you can do to help them. Succeed is really important. And they won't know what that is because they've probably never been in it before. Aw I guess on the flip side to the folks who are new to it. It's okay to not know what to do like Because when that pager goes off for the very the first time in your life you and the puzzle and hands off to you like. Here's what seems to be wrong. It was going to take you a little while to like get oriented oriented and that's okay like a bunch of being on on-call frankly is developing really good instincts over the systems you walk on and even really experienced on call is when they switched jobs. We'll switch teams. I will have a ramp up time right and so like if I were to parachute onto the new engineering team. I couldn't just immediately be on call for systems right. I could do it like foster than someone who's never been on in Col- before but like putting me into that rotation on day one and expecting me to be able to triage the most severe incidence just isn't going to happen. I don't know the golden metrics. I don't know what normal abnormal looks like. I don't know whether if we don't have enough signal I don't know who to talk to you. WHO The dependencies? He's like a bunch of stuff. You've just won't right and that's all okay right like it's treated as a learning experience and I guess. The other thing is hunt for like a blameless postmortem culture tech has gotten pretty good at this but it's still not perfect perfect and anything you can do to be like. Hey we're looking for people causes hair. Not like systems causes is really really powerful. That's excellent advice. I I really appreciate you sharing it. I especially resonate with the blameless part so this is a question that I plan on asking quite a lot this year on the podcasts so you who've invested so much into the community what are your thoughts on its overall future. Oh I have. I have a ton of thoughts about this. That's what I mean. Okay so I guess perhaps to come back to the earlier discussion about ruby central rate. It's literally my part time job to have thoughts. It's about this to think about the future of the community. As a whole I'm I I look a lot outside communities so like I always I think of Python as being sort of the nearest approximate programming community to us and then javascript is sort of like a close second to that. And if if you look at those is to ecosystems right. They both like much sort of culturally actually. I don't WanNA say culturally here. They births have much healthier communities than the Unity and like that. This is largely driven somewhat by just the unbelievably huge amounts of funding that sloshing around in those ecosystems so like huge huge corporate interests. Aw in Java script and in Python that just simply on in Ruby that money provides a certain degree of oxygen that enables them to breathe and operate in a way that we cont however like I do think the sort of flip side to that. Is that Ruby. Ruby people Some of the most excellent people I've ever met in my career like I genuinely think they'll like baseline membership of people in the community is like very very far ahead of nearly every other programming community. I moved through and the encounter and so when I like look look at the future of the Ruby community. I sort of break it down into a couple of things so I think fussily we have a lot of work to do on restoring And we mentioned this earlier sort of like the regional and local communities the beginning to fritter out of it and like part of that is like making sure that it's really easy to find great speakers really easy to run a conference without financial risk but also part of it. Frankly is just making sure. Those Ruby community is like all across. The world are really really healthy and strong as opposed to gathering centrally twice A. Yeah Yeah I think that we continue to see a incoming flood of Buchanan graduates. That are fundamentally changing What the community actually is so like Elliot? I sort of said to us at about forty percent of everyone that comes to a rubicon for rails. Cough breath it's their first conference in that only a few years into programming career. Well like most of these people. The overwhelming majority of them have graduated from a code school and so like we need to think about what it means for community to be able to service and adapt to those folks rate like you have. You tried to hire a senior redevelop recently like it's basically impossible but that's like five five to ten BOOTCAMP GRADS for every single one of the senior heads. Actually that numbers probably not high enough That's willing to come in and learn right around like what can you teach them. And how can you structure your company in such a way that your immutable to like that. newel talent I think an awful hello. I'm about what it means for like ribbing not just like ten years down the line but like a hundred years down the line right like are we going to become coble or are we going to be a programming language that like genuinely loss and people continue to want to build software in for relieve long time and like rails isn't cool anymore but Billion dollar companies. He is being built in it. And the next generation of billion dollar companies are probably already in existence. It's never been easier to launch a stop top with ruby on rails rate like rails is so good I think people actually underestimate how quickly you can go from zero to an application that throws off a thousand five thousand dollars a month with rails. You can do that much faster than you can. With nearly Lee any other programming language and framework. And so like this. I guess the state of the Ruby community to me is very. He's strong in. The future is very bright but from my position as someone who is like literally charged with stewarding the health of the Ruby community. I ac a decline in our ability to get together as people and that really worries me. I think if anything's GONNA kill us. It's going to be that and that's to me. The thing I most want to fix is the ability for folks to Gotha locally more frequently and have a really good time while doing it think that's a great call to arms to our listeners if you haven't considered going to Ruby conference this year go if if you haven't looked into your local meet ups consider going get out there. Meet people meet fellow Ruby S. It's really absolutely worth it. I could not agree with you. More for folks six in New York City and the New York City area. I will be speaking at the Ruby. Use a group In New York on Feb twelfth that is the perfect segue because I was about to ask Hugh how can a listeners follow up with you. Yeah so I mean for for to a local. That's that's that I'm penelope underscores zone on twitter which is like I tweet too much like dozens of times per day. It's not all computers. But like there's a decent chunk chunk of computers in there and then like in terms of like reformat. It's a get hub dot com slash penelope's on own would slash Ruby F. M. T. and like soon like really really soon I will be publishing a like prototype bill of what I heard before Matt will eventually eventually look like that actually is safe for folks to try the three places you can find me. I'll thank you so much for all your contributions our community and for your honest take on the future of the community. I just absolutely great listeners. We will be joining you again next.

Ruby community Ruby Ruby F. M. T. Rita New York City twitter Tom New York Gotha Elliot Buchanan coble Hugh Matt Lee
"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

Ruby on Rails Podcast

15:22 min | 1 year ago

"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

"Down in a simple clear and understandable way through very heavy use of diagrams and very little text in how modern computer actually executes assembly which was like really really enjoyable to give as just like I'm going to break down a bunch of complex technical detail in a way that is understandable to an average Ruby Ruby developer and the response from it was fantastic? Did it require a lot of research or is this stuff that you had already dug into. You already mentioned that you'd like to do these kinds of things things for fun so it wasn't something that you really had to dig into I. Yeah so the the answer. That question is no but only because it was basically the output put off one of my college classes like translated into a conference talk. So you're in college. I took a advanced computer architecture. The costs which went Actually a little bit beyond where I go in the talk And I went into basically like the first sort of like assignment. Of course which is building an assembly language and building a very very simple purser so like I have in my head just ambient only like the design of how those things work Because it's something I study in College College and so like I like it's convenient in the sense that I was just able to take like one third of a fourth year computer science science class and Tun into a forty five minute talk. That's fantastic. So how did you get involved in Ruby Central. I gave a Torque work at invite the I guess the easiest way to say this is I have spoken every Ruby Hav and every rails since twenty thirteen A pot from one where I was sick and that justin cells filled in for the talk I was supposed to give And basically eventually if you keep speaking over and and over again we invite folks to join the Program Committee for Conferences. So I did the Program Committee I think in Twenty fifteen and the and from that like I just sort of kept re. I really really enjoyed it and so I kept doing those. And then eventually Elliott this year Mossy who is one of the other directors of Ruby central asked me if I would like to also be director of Ruby Central I said yes. And that's how we got to where we are today So really it's just consistently showing up and then being interested in sort sort of doing the work like the reason I'm doing it. Is I really deeply care about the future of the Ruby community and so like like I want to be one hand on the wheel like steering the love that some put you on the spot for a second because common string string throughout this podcast is me encouraging listeners. To go out and apply to speak at different conferences so as someone who has read so many. CFP's for both rails is confident Rubicon. Is there any advice that you can give to those listeners. I have I have tons of really specific tactical tactical advice That I could give enumerated bullet points about what to include what not to include but sort of at a higher level. The biggest the biggest mistake I see in. CFP's is not the intended content of the talk. Usually the intended content of the talk is a perfect fit for conferences inferences. It's that the person writing the CFP can put themselves in the shoes of the audience and so it's very hard for me. As a reviewer reviewer to understand what the audience will get out of that talk as opposed to just what the person will talk about and that's like a fairly the subtle distinction so perhaps to make it clear. It's the difference really between showing that you sort of like know your content versus and why someone who is attending recon or rails should about that content and we see perfectly well written perfectly structured talks emissions. That don't tell me why it's a fit for the program why it makes sense for an audience member at Rubicon And so almost all the proposals I see that don't end up making it into the conference. Don't make it for that reason. One of the the things I should consider when they're submitting to recall is that more than forty percent of everyone who attends its first conference they've ever attended and and they usually like less than a year into that developed careers Certainly less than two and so many folks don't appreciate just how wide the spectrum of skill levels is. It's okay to give an expert level talk it absolutely is but we can't Except sixty expert-level talks right. We have to draw a line somewhere And so with reviewing the CFP CFP and not just reviewing right. We also do talk selection like we're not just looking at the individual schools. You may actually have by you perfectly. Well rated talk that we just con- fit into the program because the level is wrong because there's no way for us to make it fit it against the background of the folks who will be in the room and so like the other. I guess piece of Advice I would have for folks especially new of folks who get a a single rejection from a ruby central conference is don't take it as like a no forever. It's more like not right now. You know I love that and basically what happened for me is I applied to rails comfort. Three years didn't get in then. I got in then. I applied to rails confidant. Didn't get in but then I applied applied to Rubicon for the first time and got in. So you just never know but for me. I've always gone to these conference. Applying with at least three talks because inevitably one might spark an interest. And what's interesting too is that I applied to rails. Conflict three talks. Didn't get in but you don't assume that those talks are not good. And so then you turn turnaround and maybe go to the regional conferences or to your local meet up with the same content and see if that maybe strikes some gold there and possibly after the conference if someone is so kind to give you more feedback than that's possible as well. Yes so I will say going a little bit white other than you know the universe I control which is a Review from rails comp. I highly recommend Folks who are stopping find a local meet up and speak that or find a regional conference and and speak now one of the things. I have observed that I'm personally really really sad about is the sort of slow decline the regional Ruby Conference. It feels like there are many fewer of them today than that. Were three or four years ago I remember speaking something like Mike. twenty-six conferences in two thousand fifteen which was a lot but so like It's also like one of the things I puzzled. Sort of see as a mission for myself in Ruby central is working with the community to reestablish some regional. We'll conferences because right. Now if only get one congress again that coming to rubicon or rails comp and that's sort of crushing the space for like those local Conferences which I'll be honest with you. That's how I got my start. So the first Recoveri- I spoke at was ruby nation in in the DC metro area. And I cannot tell you how excited I was to be able to do that and like those those on like that conference as far as I'm aware that doesn't exist anymore. The regional in York doesn't exist anymore. There's not one in San Francisco. I think the one in Chicago Talgo is shutdown so like whip beginning to see like a trend of these conferences. Going away and it kind of makes me really sad. I agree with you. And that's wonderful advice while I am super super eager to get into Ruby format but we are going to take a quick break for our sponsor this episode of the five by five ruby on rails. PODCAST is brought to you by mere replacement. Hi this is Brian Mariani founder of Muir replacement the Ruby on rails focused recruiting firm. I was Brittany's guest on this podcast a few months ago in love hearing from so many of you following that appearance so I'm back to say hi because the New Year is often time developers start looking for new change or a fresh fresh start in that can often be a job change. So if you're open connecting I'd be happy to share the inside scoop on how the rails job market is shaping up for twenty twenty spoiler alert. It's looking very strong. And we have a lot of remote roles is well more than ever actually and I'm super excited about our role so if that fits your lifestyle. Well we we should definitely chat in. What even if you're not looking for a job right now or it's not a good time no worries at all? I'd still love to connect in learn more about you. So when the time is right in the Right Company does cross my desk we can send it your way in the future of always said you. Know recruiting is all about long term relationships and not pressuring people. So if you'd like to start a new conversation or rekindle an old one. I'd be thrilled to chat. Just shoot me an email at Brian at mirror. Placement Dot Com and we can set something. Hang up thanks for listening and happy holidays. Thank you to knee replacement for sponsoring the show so let's get into Ruby movie format first of all. What is it yeah? So Ruby. Format is essentially a re Oto for matter so You you input into it. A Ruby source code file and IT spits out a semantically equivalent Ruby source code file that has just been in reformatted to have a completely consistent. Layout so you can't miscellany data structures you have to drop like arrays onto multiple notable lines in a consistent way all of that stuff is decided by like an uncontrollable algorithm and not by a human brain late. So I'd I'd love to know is how did go influence the four matter. I guess to get to this. We need to talk a little bit about what I did. Side of the console swelled so I was working at digital ocean and digital like sort of has this hybrid rails monolith go micro services architecture. That's like actually very he. Cool these days and what super well and so I got the opportunities right like a pretty substantial amount of coat while I was working at ocean. And if you work on you will find that. That community is obsessed with developed tooling They have a tool could go format no matter which is actually pronounced go go. FM T- which does the same thing as reformat takes go code? Outputs formatted files but they also have like a tooling automatically manage imports. which is the same thing as requires in Ruby and a tool to automatically lint your for things may be sub optimal ways to write stuff and like naming conventions like they have a tool that will literally fail if you forget to capitalize acronyms Arnims in the correct way and so on and so on right? That community is obsessed with tooling and walking with source. Code incredibly bleep pleasant. It's like very very nice to actually build go programs. Because they've invested so much time in developing tooling and I sort live looked to the ruby walled and was like we look to the re- weld and was like we've really need something like this now. I'd actually been sort of threatening to build a ruby full matter for. I'll explain to you. Why she's that would for us and again just the second fill like many years before I started before I even actually ever programmed a line of go and it basically came out of sort of like a frustration of walking with Ruben cop in that Like there's just no way to quickly execute rebirth up in like a save file reload text kind of loop it takes too long to execute and and I wanna be clear this is not a dunk on cop like rubel copies doing other things with that time that I actually useful so like that was a gap in the space. Ace and I've wanted to invent this tool for really long time. Will that all makes a lot of sense. And I'm really excited that you're building this for our our community so listeners that you have piqued their interest how can they get started with Ruby format. Yeah so the best advice I can give them is. Don't It's it's not in any sense of production ready today. it does not Well okay so I guess talk about this. We need to talk about how I've been implementing it so like I basically implemented a functional version of reformat end to end in the ruby programming language edge. And it wasn't fast enough. Because Ruby is known for many things but like share execution speed is not one of them so I started rewriting chunks chunks of reformat in rust in order to get more performance and basically the state. It's in today a is that it does not actually valid reprograms in all cases And so like the idea of someone who is not willing to deal with experimental grade nonsense genuinely scabs me like people building edit plug ins for reform and like you can do that but like this will break all of your code today and so the answer is like staw the hub repository and I will show very loudly when it's ready for testing which I hope to get done soon but like walking reprisals code is actually really complicated and difficult and so. I'm not putting any time guarantee guarantees on that. Oh this is shocking developer. Not winning. I don't know I think that's very smart and I think that's great that you're basically going to have a call to action to the community to help you test it. I'm sure we ruby weekly and everyone will be shouting from the rooftops. Once it gets to that point I hope so you mentioned your time digital ocean and I know you have a lot of experience being on call and you have a lot of content out there about it so for developers Chrissy were new to being on an on call rotation..

Ruby Central Ruby Rubicon CFP Ruby community Ruby Conference developer Brian Mariani Program Committee College College Chicago Talgo Chrissy congress San Francisco
"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

Ruby on Rails Podcast

04:35 min | 2 years ago

"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

"You heard on your host Britney Martin AWS announced ruby has supported language for AWS Lambda Dernie. Werner Rogan's keynote at AWS reinvent. Now. It's possible to write Lambda functions as idiom attic, ruby code and rum them on AWS, the eight of ios SDK for ruby is included in the Lambda execution environment by default that makes it easy to interact with AWS resources directly from your functions. Joining me today is Alex would the software engineer working on the AWS SD K for ruby and author of the AWS Lambda, ruby Runtime. Welcome to the show. Alex. Thanks for having me. Excellent. Thank you so much for joining me. And I am excited to kick off with your developer origin story assure. So I think in a lot of ways I took the traditional path into being a programmer are then I start. Fid messing around with programming at an early age and decided to go to university in computer science degree. Although I guess might university path was a little bit less traditional because I originally started by going to Tulane university in New Orleans that lasted for the most part about three days before Hurricane Katrina rolled in. And then ended up going eventually to the university of Illinois at or banish, champagne, great, computer, science school and. Actually, Amazon was my first job after graduating. That's amazing. How did that come about? Just the, you know interview on campus interview in Seattle interviewed of the few companies. And then decided I wanted to get into inventory management. So back in my old days. Pre ruby it's possible that if you go on Amazon dot com and something's out of stock. It might be in some small way my fault. And I apologize in advance claim to fame. And then. After a few years in that role. I kind of wanted something different. And there is an opportunity to work in open source work in a dynamic language like ruby, and I jumped on that. And I've been working on the eight of his SEK for ruby for a little short of six years now. Was it your choice to work on ruby directly? Or was that a choice given to you was there, basically a job outlined for ruby? Or did you get to choose what you were going to do? Well, when it got to the point of internally transferring with Amazon, I had a lot of choices as far as what I wanted to work on. And we do have a number of SDK teams some of whom are still hiring to this day. But yeah. Yeah. I I was getting into ruby. And I wanted to actually start to make that my job in what I worked on. So it was a very interesting transition from doing a bunch of algorithms working side by side with PHD's and Java to doing open source software and ruby. It was a big change for me. But it's been a lot of fun. Whatever usually drew you to the ruby community. I think I really got into a Matt's his vision for what ruby programming would be like the idea of a language designed to maximize programmer happiness and especially moving away from Java. And a lot of the ceremony in boilerplate to that feeling that you could take something that would take you a few weeks before and do it in a weekend. And the ability to bring that productivity was really exciting. That's great. I I can definitely see that appeal. So what is the day in the life for you at AWS? I'd love to hear more specifically about your your work with ruby SE K. Absolutely. So I think that my emphasis and what I really how I approach my work. These days is as a sort of owner of the overall ruby experience on AWS. So. The ST K has been largely stable for a long time. We recently as in last year announced version three of the ruby decay where we brought things like modular dependencies. So you just require the services you actually, use or. You know, statically generated code which makes it easier to debugging gives better thread safety properties..

ruby AWS ruby community Amazon Alex programmer Werner Rogan Tulane university Britney Martin university of Illinois Seattle software engineer Hurricane Katrina New Orleans developer PHD