35 Burst results for "Ruby"

Election Worker Shaye Moss on Impact of Being Targeted by Trump

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

02:19 min | Last week

Election Worker Shaye Moss on Impact of Being Targeted by Trump

"Listening to shame us, bob. I mean, having all of us having just been through two and a half years pretty much of COVID lockdown. It's almost like they've been sentenced to lifetimes of COVID lockdown. It was heartbreaking to listen to her. Like, what a lot of us went through and walked down and gained 60 pounds. I don't feel safe going anywhere. I don't can't go out, but you know, that's what, I mean, do we have that her talking about, oh, but first of all, speaking of, give me 12, just speaking of racist threats, this one, oh my God. Yes, a lot of threats. Wishing death upon me, telling me that, you know, I'll be in jail with my mother and same things like be glad it's 2020 and not 1920. Where a lot of these threats and vile comments racist in nature. A lot of them were racist, a lot of them were just hateful, yes, sir. Right? I mean, just heartbreaking, the whole just talking about that she's afraid to go anywhere. So the supermarket with her mother is afraid to have her, you know, and how about her mother, ruby saying I don't wear the t-shirts anymore. I'm afraid to say my name anywhere. I mean, it's just this last one, shame off. Miss moss, how is this experience of being targeted by the former president and his allies affected your life? This tart my life. Upside down. I no longer give out my business card. I don't transfer calls. Don't want anyone knowing my name. I don't want to go anywhere with my mom 'cause she might yell my name out over the grocery hour or something. I don't go to the grocery store at all. I haven't been anywhere at all. I've gained about 60 pounds. I just don't do nothing anymore. I don't want to go anywhere. I second guess everything that I do is affect my life in a major way. Every way, all because of lies for me doing my job. I mean, bob, it does remind me of being sentenced to COVID lockdown for life, but with the extra threat of someone might also shoot you if you leave the

Miss Moss BOB Ruby
Bob Cesca Is Unsurprised by Enraging Day 4 of the Jan 6th Hearings

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

01:19 min | Last week

Bob Cesca Is Unsurprised by Enraging Day 4 of the Jan 6th Hearings

"Just give us your general impression of yesterday. Oh, well, not surprised at all. As much as I'm enraged by the stories that were told yesterday about the physical intimidation, shoving into people's homes and things like that, the phone calls, the obvious racism that was confronted by shame Austin and lady ruby. Just outrageous. And but at the same time, not surprising. The Republicans have been leading us down this road for years. I've been tracking the personal nature of Republican attack dogs for going back into the George W. Bush administration. I mean, if you look at how Jesse watters on Fox News channel, for example, made a name for himself on that network, was confronting what I consider to be non combatants, people who don't participate in the political debate who don't have media training and his whole shtick was to confront those people in their driveways or at their place of business or high school principals, teachers, educators, where he was stalking and confronting them on camera. One of the most atrocious examples of that is when he went around, I think it was union station in New York City, harassing homeless people

Lady Ruby Jesse Watters Fox News Channel Austin George W. Bush New York City
Andy Warhol's 'Marilyn' sells for $195 million, setting record for American art

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | Last month

Andy Warhol's 'Marilyn' sells for $195 million, setting record for American art

"I I I I know know know know I I I I kind kind kind kind of of of of painting painting painting painting has has has has set set set set a a a a record record record record for for for for the the the the most most most most expensive expensive expensive expensive piece piece piece piece of of of of art art art art by by by by an an an an American American American American ever ever ever ever sold sold sold sold at at at at auction auction auction auction it's it's it's it's a a a a piece piece piece piece of of of of artwork artwork artwork artwork you you you you have have have have probably probably probably probably seen seen seen seen many many many many times times times times before before before before Andy Andy Andy Andy Warhol's Warhol's Warhol's Warhol's portrait portrait portrait portrait of of of of Marilyn Marilyn Marilyn Marilyn Monroe Monroe Monroe Monroe the the the the nineteen nineteen nineteen nineteen sixty sixty sixty sixty four four four four so so so so screen screen screen screen features features features features the the the the actress actress actress actress in in in in a a a a vibrant vibrant vibrant vibrant close close close close up up up up yellow yellow yellow yellow hair hair hair hair blue blue blue blue eye eye eye eye shadow shadow shadow shadow ruby ruby ruby ruby red red red red lipstick lipstick lipstick lipstick on on on on a a a a blue blue blue blue background background background background yeah yeah yeah yeah that that that that one one one one well well well well it's it's it's it's officially officially officially officially known known known known as as as as shot shot shot shot sage sage sage sage blue blue blue blue marlin marlin marlin marlin and and and and it it it it has has has has sold sold sold sold four four four four hundred hundred hundred hundred and and and and ninety ninety ninety ninety five five five five million million million million dollars dollars dollars dollars Christie's Christie's Christie's Christie's of of of of New New New New York York York York says says says says not not not not only only only only is is is is it it it it the the the the most most most most expensive expensive expensive expensive piece piece piece piece done done done done by by by by an an an an American American American American artist artist artist artist ever ever ever ever sold sold sold sold it it it it is is is is also also also also the the the the most most most most expensive expensive expensive expensive piece piece piece piece from from from from the the the the twentieth twentieth twentieth twentieth century century century century ever ever ever ever auctioned auctioned auctioned auctioned off off off off the the the the buyer buyer buyer buyer was was was was not not not not identified identified identified identified I'm I'm I'm I'm Oscar Oscar Oscar Oscar wells wells wells wells Gabriel Gabriel Gabriel Gabriel

Times Times Times Times Andy Andy Andy Andy Warhol Warhol Marilyn Marilyn Marilyn Marily Ruby Ruby Christie's Christie's Christie New New New New York York York Christie Oscar Oscar Oscar Oscar Gabriel Gabriel Gabriel Gabrie
The first cruise ship in two years sails into Sydney harbour

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 2 months ago

The first cruise ship in two years sails into Sydney harbour

"The the the the first first first first cruise cruise cruise cruise ship ship ship ship to to to to dock dock dock dock in in in in Sydney Sydney Sydney Sydney Australia Australia Australia Australia in in in in two two two two years years years years sailed sailed sailed sailed into into into into the the the the city's city's city's city's harbor harbor harbor harbor uhhuh uhhuh uhhuh explore explore explore all all all by by by piano piano piano Australia Australia Australia arrive arrive arrive carrying carrying carrying just just just crew crew crew it it it could could could welcome welcome welcome close close close to to to two two two thousand thousand thousand passengers passengers passengers and and and is is is operated operated operated by by by nine nine nine hundred hundred hundred twenty twenty twenty four four four staff staff staff members members members at at at full full full capacity capacity capacity there there there were were were plenty plenty plenty of of of potential potential potential passengers passengers passengers like like like Cory Cory Cory Martin Martin Martin at at at the the the harbor harbor harbor I've I've I've grown grown grown up up up with with with cruising cruising cruising not not not really really really love love love them them them it's it's it's actually actually actually great great great to to to have have have him him him back back back and and and I'm I'm I'm extremely extremely extremely keen keen keen to to to get get get on on on them them them again again again so so so today today today is is is really really really just just just a a a day day day of of of celebrating celebrating celebrating cruise cruise cruise ships ships ships have have have not not not been been been allowed allowed allowed to to to dock dock dock in in in Australia Australia Australia since since since thirty thirty thirty passengers passengers passengers died died died on on on the the the ruby ruby ruby princess princess princess two two two years years years ago ago ago at at at the the the start start start of of of the the the corona corona corona virus virus virus pandemic pandemic pandemic travel travel travel agent agent agent Dianne Dianne Dianne Martin Martin Martin is is is ready ready ready to to to get get get to to to work work work the the the last last last two two two years years years I I I have have have been been been doing doing doing refunds refunds refunds and and and cancellations cancellations cancellations and and and all all all those those those sort sort sort of of of things things things so so so it it it is is is just just just so so so nice nice nice they they they have have have to to to be be be talking talking talking about about about creating creating creating a a a strikeout strikeout strikeout the the the Pacific Pacific Pacific explores explores explores first first first cruise cruise cruise is is is scheduled scheduled scheduled for for for may may may thirty thirty thirty first first first I I I bet bet bet Donahue Donahue Donahue

Australia Sydney Dock Dock Dock Dock Harbor Harbor Harbor Harbor Cory Cory Cory Martin Martin M Harbor Harbor Harbor Virus Virus Pandemic Pandemic Dianne Dianne Dianne Martin Ma Princess Princess Pacific Pacific Pacific Donahue Donahue Donahue
Wedgewood wins debut as Stars top Hurricanes 4-3 in shootout

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 3 months ago

Wedgewood wins debut as Stars top Hurricanes 4-3 in shootout

"Tyler Seguin provided the lone shootout tally is the stars down the hurricanes forty three ruby hands forced overtime with his second goal of the night beating Frederick Anderson with eight thirty seven left in regulation sometimes it's just I'm going on now it's been going on so everyone slack everyone likes it when it's like that so let's give it that way Jamie Benn also scored and Scott Wedgewood stopped forty four shots in his debut for Dallas the stars retain their hold on the second wild card berth in the Western Conference Nino Niederreiter had two goals for the hurricanes who now lead the metropolitan division by three points over the penguins I'm the ferry

Frederick Anderson Tyler Seguin Scott Wedgewood Ruby Jamie Benn Nino Niederreiter Dallas Hurricanes Penguins
Caller: Sen. Marco Rubio Is a 'Coward' for His No Fly Zone Definition

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:29 min | 3 months ago

Caller: Sen. Marco Rubio Is a 'Coward' for His No Fly Zone Definition

"Feel very strongly here that we should do the best we can to the Ukraine. We have an agreement to say by the security and when they gave up their news, they trusted us and we owe it to them. Right. And to see these citizens being butchered really makes us sick and we feel that Rubio is a coward to make everyone frighten it as World War three if we use our military to do anything. So you think you think you don't think Putin would use any nuclear option? If he's such a man man, he'll use it at some point because wait a minute, so why is Rubio a coward to point that out? Ruby always a coward because he is saying that it will be World War three. If we Putin starts nuking the United States, what would you call that, James? Military at any time. I'm sorry. We can't use my military because I'll always be World War three. And if we had stopped Hitler early, millions of people would have been I'll tell you. I appreciate all your talking points. James, and hey, James, will you take a breath, please, and let's talk to each other instead of at each other. Helping Ukraine. For God's sakes, there's going to be a bloodbath in Taiwan if we don't step up to the

Rubio Putin Ukraine James Ruby United States Hitler Taiwan
Robertson, Stars beat Predators 4-3 in return from break

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 5 months ago

Robertson, Stars beat Predators 4-3 in return from break

"Jason Roberson Tipton shot from John Klingberg twice on power plays before Luke Glendening scored the go ahead goal early in the third period of the stars four three win over the predators ruby has had his team leading twenty first goal in helping Dallas won for the sixth time in eight games Robertson now has nineteen goals and Klingberg has twenty four CEST Matt Duchene scores twenty second for the predators who are raced one goal deficits with each of their goals all star Roman Yossi had two assists in Nashville second loss in six games I'm Dave very

Jason Roberson Tipton John Klingberg Luke Glendening Klingberg Ruby Matt Duchene Robertson Dallas Roman Yossi Nashville Dave
Bennett scores 3 goals as Panthers hammer Stars 7-1

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 6 months ago

Bennett scores 3 goals as Panthers hammer Stars 7-1

"Sam Sam Bennett Bennett second second hat hat trick trick of of the the season season highlighted highlighted the the Panthers Panthers blowout blowout over over the the stars stars seven seven a a one one it it was was a a lot lot of of fun fun yeah yeah we we our our whole whole team team was was was was on on our our game game tonight tonight right right from from the the start start and and we're we're playing playing well well we're we're playing playing with with energy energy were were having having fun fun all all night night and and that's that's what what our our teams teams are are best best Bennett Bennett finished finished with with four four points points and and Jonathan Jonathan Hoover Hoover added added a a goal goal and and three three assists assists giving giving him him fifty fifty one one points points Anthony Anthony Duclair Duclair got got into into the the act act with with a a goal goal and and two two assists assists for for the the cats cats who who are are seven seven oh oh one one one one since since the the covert covert nineteen nineteen pause pause and and nineteen nineteen three three and and overall overall at at home home J. J. gotten gotten Jr Jr was was pulled pulled after after allowing allowing four four goals goals on on seventeen seventeen shots shots ruby ruby had had scored scored the the lone lone goal goal for for Dallas Dallas which which is is for for eleven eleven and and one one on on the the road road this this season season I'm I'm Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie

Sam Sam Bennett Bennett Panthers Bennett Bennett Jonathan Jonathan Hoover Hoove Anthony Anthony Duclair Duclai J. J. Jr Jr Ruby Ruby Dallas Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie
Eric Explains Why Atheism Is So Popular Today

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:14 min | 9 months ago

Eric Explains Why Atheism Is So Popular Today

"Why do you think that atheism is so popular today? Well, atheism kind of didn't seriously exist until what? The 17th century. I mean, it's something that if you are looking for utopia, you're looking to solve the world's problems, but there are things about faith that ruby the wrong way. You really have to tack hard in the other direction. And I think that people have bought the idea and again, I deal with this. This is the heart of the book is this idea that rationality or science is not at odds with faith that that is a deep lie in our culture. And so the idea that people have bought into is that faith is all hocus pocus. I want to believe in reason and rationality. And so they really believe that you can be an intellectually fulfilled atheist. I am convinced you absolutely can not. So atheism is popular because of this misconception. And if we can disabuse people of this profound misconception, which I think we can, if they're open minded, it will not be popular.

Author Joel Rosenberg Describes His Latest Book 'Enemies and Allies'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:01 min | 10 months ago

Author Joel Rosenberg Describes His Latest Book 'Enemies and Allies'

"Rosenberg. Welcome to the program. Thanks bob it's great to be with you. Oh eric trish. I even heard of you. I've heard of you in fact i've had you on the program many times. You have so many new york times. Bestsellers that i. I laugh because to somebody who i don't know. I think i have five officially but i thought you have written so many books and your books do so well and you now have another book so before we get into current events. 'cause i wanna talk about the middle east. Sure i'm tell us about the new book. Because it's i know it's it's the new book. Well what's interesting about this book. Enemies and allies is. It's the first book. It's the only book that really takes you inside the middle east twenty years after the horrific events of nine eleven to to assess. Where are we today right. Who our enemies today. Because they've changed and who our allies today. They've also changed but what makes us book. Distinctive is not just that. I'm sort of analyzing it from my own vantage point. But i'm taking the readers inside the palaces and the presidential compounds in every major american ally in the middle east. You're sitting with prime minister. Benjamin netanyahu you're sitting with israeli president ruby. Rivlin you're sitting with. Israel's defense minster by you're also sitting as i take you with me into riyadh saudi arabia and you're meeting mohammed bin salman most consequential and i think the most controversial leader in the arab world and presidency in egypt and king of jordan and the leaders of the united arab emirates and bahrain. This there is no book. Might this that has allowed you to sit there and listen to these leaders. What are they think are the worst threats facing not only the united states but them how do they how are they changing their societies because there are massive changes. So that's what makes us book interesting and for me fascinating to live it over the last few

Eric Trish Middle East Rosenberg Rivlin New York Times BOB Mohammed Bin Salman Benjamin Netanyahu Riyadh Saudi Arabia Israel United Arab Emirates Bahrain Egypt Jordan United States
"ruby" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

Talk Is Jericho

06:59 min | 10 months ago

"ruby" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

"Because trains can't stop a little bit more about wb. How did you end up with the name of ruby riot. So i am. Actually the one who pitched that ruby was originally from ruby ruby so wasn't like pals with lars. That wasn't an option. So i call him the other lars fundraising. There's only you can't you can't be named lars and be rockstars you're the other lars Got ruby from that from that. And then i just was trying to figure out a last name that i felt like was to the point was kind of like that expressed my personality and that like really felt like i could just like let loose a little bit and that people could pronounce because some recent loveless bugs you for some years now. I know that's what i'm saying. That's what i'm saying and that's why you can tell a bunch of dudes gave me that name like but it just and it was like one of the first ones and it was super last minute. I don't think i my my entry into when i debuted with amex. I think it was a very last minute like okay. Let's just give her this name like this is what it was. And then when i got up to the main roster we added a t because they wanted to do the riot squad. But that i think was already in trademarks. Do that like riot squad. Kind of like the exact same. Rip off but really. I didn't know it until i started coming down. We were like looking at our our tron. And i and i was like my name right. And they're like oh no no by the way you got another team and i was like. Oh okay. cool. Sounds the same to me any other times when when they come up with some names. Did you have any other alternatives. Or was the. I think the only other one that i'd really like that i can remember. I had a list. But i honestly the only one i can remember was ramona. That was the only other one that i have is. Obviously from the raimondo. So also i did love the mona riot or ruby. Ramon both i had. I had all versions of as as because i didn't know what they would take. I had a listen. I can't remember some of the other ones but ramona was the other one For that reason in for scott pilgrim vs a world ramona flowers. That's a good call. Yeah so Fun movie yeah. Yeah then my first entrance music was black sheep by metric really song that was my first entrance music The movie went over a lot of people's heads. But yeah so. Those were. Those were the ones that But like it. Ruby was the first one that like stuck and then after getting called it for so many years like it just fit me a lot better when people would call me heidi. It just didn't connect but like ruby always did so. I definitely wanted to keep it and then we got to here. Where i'm i just get a call myself cool because rancid associates themselves with me so people don't know that donald rancid associated with you. Which which i i get tweets a lot. That are like i didn't really. I listened to rinse it a long time ago. But i found my love for him again. I've been listening to mow week. And i just wanna to be like as you're welcome because they're awesome since you talked to lars after your. Oh yeah he. He texted me immediately after and he was he was so like he was so great. Because you know thanks so much. I was honored to be able to. You know. be a part of that moment. I was like man like thank. You helped make that moment even more special than what it already was like. It was special from a wrestling perspective. But my love for punk rock and my love for pro wrestling which were two things that i hold probably the closest to my heart and things that built me as as a person came together in that moment and like i think you know people were excited to see me but they were also like wondering are issue going to get the song fling her name but she got to get the song right and then the song came on and i think that excitement was also because that song is so rad that like it helps even amplify that moment for me and like hearing that in the background feeling that was just just that people don't realize like even with fauzi judas just because i wave my magic wand or the banda's doesn't mean yeah so you can use it it's up to the record company the publishing so maybe lars owns that. But if he doesn't then he would have to go through whatever record. Company owns the publisher. Jeez music to get the app. Use it no so so much behind. There's so many other things involved that need approval and stuff. And that's why like to both rancid and tony with with them to come to an agreement to allow me to use we. We wanted to use back in black for when the inner circle return pinnacle. Acc didn't even call us back and then maximize before that wanted to use a running with the devil just lots and they came back and said okay one one us five hundred thousand dollars which is basically a nice way of saying you know but at least they came out. Cdc came back when we're not exactly we'll use it for applebee's but we're not energy and so the fact that you got it once again for listening it's not as easy as large frozen. Going go ahead. You have to get all the bells and whistles to do it. But i'm glad that you did. So how does it feel to like with so. I know just hearing a song i love and that i hold near and dear to my heart from a band that i love hearing the fans. Sing it for you. Your song has been continuously singing even after the music. Sound counselor feel well. The cool thing is the reason why started using it in the first place once again going back to japan. The tokyo dome with kenny. I couldn't use break the walls down. Obviously it's wbz sawn. Because i wouldn't want to do that anyway. So what can i use. We've been trying to get to japan for years the fosse. Maybe if i use judas for the tokyo dome with fifty thousand people hearing it maybe somebody out we go. Hey we should these guys. Japan hasn't works yet but it became a perfect song for grooves for attitude for feeling and then when i had my cruise last year we tape dynamite on the cruise and when i came to the ring that's what everyone started saying it started on the cruise which was really cool but then we have pandemic who had no crowds for ten months and it was like i hope people remember when they come back and they did so. That was cool. Because i was scared. Like what if they just forget and they don't do it anymore. But you want people in this another thing with ruby. Soho your song. You want people to organically get engaged..

lars ruby ruby ruby ramona rancid associates donald rancid wb scott pilgrim wrestling fauzi judas Ramon heidi Ruby rancid wbz applebee Acc Japan Cdc
"ruby" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

Talk Is Jericho

06:46 min | 10 months ago

"ruby" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

"Jericho. So one of the biggest stars in w right now. And you're bastardly filing ruby. Soho and i love stories like this in this happened quite a few times here in our company and that somebody comes in and right out of the gate is bigger ever been in the business just from appearing on our show. Now you're obviously very humble. And i can tell that but just out of the gate. How's it feel to be a w from it's only been two weeks in the. Yeah yeah it's Is like a song. It's a dream. Honestly it's i don't even know if i have words to describe it it just it feels like i'm i'm living a completely different life but you know it's so let's on true because the lives that i've lived previously have just led me to this point and i'm so unbelievably grateful and this place is so special like this place is so special. And i i wanted to see like this just seems too good to be true. Honestly like the people are super nice. Tony's amazing like everybody's been super responsive and the crowds are unbelievable. Not just in chicago but you know when we were in cincinnati. They were amazing. And so i know that it wasn't just a one time thing and i'm just so happy to be a part of it and i'm so excited to fall back in love with wrestling again. That's a great quote fall back in love with rusty and even for myself to like when i went to new japan back to eighteen. I started realizing holy. Smokes wrestling's actually really fun and creative and and there's there's a passion and and kind of a whole world out there that you kind of didn't remember and then of course that translated to a w as well and so It's interesting because when a bunch of people got released from wb. As tony's or any that you're interested in your name was right at the top of the list and that was three months ago six months ago a little a little over three months. Yeah so what kind of lead you to coming here. It wasn't a difficult decision by any means. It wasn't even necessarily like will i decide to go to. Aws was like. Can i get into aws. Like i think that it is kinda silly for people to just be like. Oh i don't work at this one place anymore. i'll just go to like we're becoming like the place right now and i love that. I get to say we. Because i glove to be a part of the team. I didn't expect to just be here because this place was so amazing. And i was just really hoping that i could get here. I was really hoping. I could be a part of the team and be able to help. Create these amazing things and tell these amazing stories and I was just i honestly. I've always said like just in the right place at the right time. But i was just grateful that i was able to do that. And it wasn't a a difficult decision. It wasn't even really a It was it was when i was offered. The opportunity was an immediate. Yes it is interesting to me though because it's like i asked this before we moved to that i didn't have we met before you and i we've met briefly briefly i wasn't i wasn't with. Ww with the dog. I was an extra. Josh was doing the rosebud. Yeah when you. And i i was doing the rosebud thing we men passing right and they're somebody wants to be a part of the interview to begin and running all over the place so hello. It is a chaotic dog at the door. Oh let's see know what that's the only time you can't get mad. Pinson pinzon cop. That dog meant business. Dogs thankfully neither one of us are backing but yeah so we. We hadn't really matt so you're one of the few people. I have absolutely nothing about anything other than what i've seen on. Tv cedric cetera. But first of all. I wanna know the name ruby soho and obviously the song. Ruby soho by our our good friend lars frederiksen who is a huge wrestling fan to the point where he actually gave me a collection of. Dvd's pirated dvd's. Chris jericho's career that he found matches that and all that he gave them to me. Like cousteau's dvd's ten dvd's loves. Lars is a huge fan. But we obviously were you friends with him before. Tell us about how ruby so came to be. So i been a fan of rancid for a long time. There were one of like the first punk bands. I ever listened to I am from like a really small town in northern indiana. Like right about an hour and a half outside of chicago and i always looked at lars as somebody that i idolized because like when you looked at him like the way he carried himself like that was the confident dude like he was confident and like he embodied to me what punk was like. Just dewy want who cares. Oh anybody thinks about you. Like he just like he was somebody else got. He's just so cool and so at one point in time While i was on. Wwe what i wanted to do. A lot of my co workers were making their pay per view. Gears in inspiration from comic book characters and stuff like that and i wanted to do punk rockers idolized and the first one i wanted to do with lars so for my elimination chamber match i wanted to do. My gear was inspired by him. It was his inked magazine photo shoot and it was like he had like the sweater vest thing on with the plaid the plaid like t shirt or polo top underneath. And i was like okay. I don't know if this is weird. But i'm going to ask him like if it's cool if i do it. And so i- direct message seminars. Like hey i don't know this is weird. I don't even know if you know who i am but like is it cool if i he's like i'd be honored. That's so cool. I mean if you need absolutely anything will blah. And he was just so rad about it like he was so nice and i guess i didn't realize i knew he was friends with punk but i didn't know like the level of pro wrestling phantom and then at one point he just decided send me a bunch of like a bunch of random stuff. He sent it to my house and then i sent him for his kids and stuff. I sent him a bunch like anything..

wrestling Jericho Pinson pinzon ruby cedric cetera Ruby soho lars frederiksen wb rusty chicago cincinnati Tony tony japan lars Chris jericho cousteau Josh Lars matt
Wainwright Wins 5th Straight as Cards Deck Mets 7-0

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 10 months ago

Wainwright Wins 5th Straight as Cards Deck Mets 7-0

"Adam Wainwright tossed six innings and won his fifth straight starters the cardinals with the Mets seven nothing from top to bottom is a very good line up with a lot of very very dangerous batters there is just a lot of hitters over there can do some major damage so you have to you have to make pitches constable you can't get in for one second either got it through the forty year old Wainwright has sixteen wins this season and is ninety two with a two point oh two ERA in his last twelve starts a span in which he's gone at least six innings each time Paul Goldschmidt homered and finished with two RBIs for the cardinals Harrison Bader added three hits and a ruby for Saint Louis losing pitcher rich hill was reached for three runs over five innings as the Mets fell six games behind the NL east leading Braves on the ferry

Adam Wainwright Cardinals Mets Paul Goldschmidt Wainwright Harrison Bader Rich Hill Saint Louis NL Braves
Playing Jazz With Charlie Watts, on Nights off From the Rolling Stones

ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

01:09 min | 10 months ago

Playing Jazz With Charlie Watts, on Nights off From the Rolling Stones

"The rolling stones have often been described as the greatest rock and roll band in the history of rock and roll. We're talking over years about mick jagger. Brian jones keith. Richards bill wyman mick taylor and ronnie wood and the drummer charlie watts who was described in a recent new york times headline as the serene drummer who kept the stones rolling. That times article went on to say that while mr richards guitar. Riff defined the band's most famous single satisfaction. Mr watts drum pattern was just as essential. And that he charlie watts was quote relentless on painted black and supple on ruby tuesday and the master of funky groove on honky. Tonk woman not surprising since jazz was his. I love indeed stones guitarist. Keith richards road. The charlie watts has always been the bed that i lie on musically music including songs lyrics and performance. They are a powerful form of free speech protected by the first amendment and the rolling stones have helped us celebrate that freedom. Their drummer charlie. Watts gave us the satisfaction of music. That sustained us. He died in late august at the age of eighty

Charlie Watts Brian Jones Keith Richards Bill Wyman Mr Richards Mr Watts Mick Taylor Ronnie Wood Mick Jagger New York Times Keith Richards Watts Charlie
"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

Ruby on Rails Podcast

07:16 min | 10 months ago

"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

"Whenever that topic comes up the develops. I talked to usually try to emphasize how law of impression of magic in the field of magic. Come sometimes from not understanding the boundaries between ruby and reds and seeing king that things that belong to ruby actually implemented in rails and how it is important digest to know where the boundary is. I think it savvy experienced so building with bidding or the programs without rails that stocks giving your idea of old things that rails does for you that that everyone knows in a sense. Sometimes you don't know exactly how to point out where those differences are. And i think again just the idea of magic is a good way of exploring that because magic is such a. I don't know some people hate it. And hey to describe things as magic which is interesting that just makes it compensation. Even go for his nike. So as you wrap up the project will you submit your findings anywhere in different ways. I think i mentioned before that. I usually leave around ten fifteen minutes at the interview for participants to off me questions that they might have other such and it was interesting because one of these interviews by develop. Asked me how i would publish my findings and when i said that my idea was my little dream was to write a book at the end of it. He said that. I should wait. I should start coast publishing things right away. And that's what. I did site for the past three months or so. I've been writing short articles and posting them on the project website Cope dash dot anxiety. I've written about for example feeding barrett by language. Like you mentioned before about ruby magic and also about white white lucky stiff. I think the next few post will be about simple proc and i'm writing a profiled focuses on this. Oh slide story of one specific developer. So that's a way in which i can make it accessible from now. Even as i'm doing it some of the things that i been finding die sinker relevant to the community getting of getting some feedback other than i will send papers to apology journals which might be very accessible but like i said my dream is to write a book at the end of it and a book that he's not filled with anthropology jogging so that everyone bend the community can enjoy it. Hopefully t- you think you'll speak at conferences as well around the work that you found here i think so. That is something. I've been thinking about more and more been a few of this because the penalty has been mostly. Everything's been mostly online conferences. And it's been good. I mean there's definitely from what i see this death million openness in the conference wealth for talks a not necessarily the technical in the sense. So there's always room for non technical talks which this will be. And i think yeah. I think i'll try that as you go. try it. Well we certainly want to invite you back onto the podcast. When's the project is completed as well my pleasure so can list or anything to support your work. Currently say they can to courage fashions dot xyz and redick things. I've been writing. I debris keen on hearing any feedback on that. Like i said i want to make this research as much of a dialogue as possible. Site feedback is crucial to me. Importantly they can email me. They want to be interviewed for the project. Is they feel that they want to talk about this story as brubaker developers. That'd be amazing. It doesn't matter how long you've been in the community. It doesn't matter if you know. Any juicy details of some of that happened ten years ago. That would be a great. That'd be great actually but you don't have to like i said is important to get different. Perspectives i leave even interviewed. People who are not ruby developers kotla into developers and things like that just get different perspectives. So reading the Me some feedback. That'd be gray. And he mailing to be into through the project. I think would be the best ways to support the three such fantastic. We link all of that up in the show notes so question that i always ask and this might be one of the most educated answers. We've ever gotten a her. What are your thoughts on the future of the ruby and ruby on rails communities really. Hot one this is. I haven't i haven't seen part of the community for the long. But i'm going to guess one thing which is dot the review ecosystem. The community will become more and more diverse. Everyone is at the review committee. Wouldn't be what it is without rails but there are interesting so alternatives rams have grown in. We'll keep grubbing. It seems to me love to what that's been done outside of rails also being creeping into the language as well and maybe i think we might even venture out of web development and stop becoming a bit more prominent in environments so if changes in terms of the speed of language and things that have been the focus. Basically said if you think about uses full machine learning for example. They're interesting libraries out that or anti written in ruby for that just a case of getting the machine learning community to houston those libraries the other. But maybe that's another environment that release could explore. It seems to me that participation of people from diverse backgrounds will increase as well has not just in conference says but olsen creating for the ruby community and exploring day where they come from the different communities in the world that can contribute to. The revision is oh so aside from the project website. Is there other ways that listeners can follow you just they can follow me on twitter through language and yeah that's pretty much. It tweeden deogee social media. That i do and yes. That's the website project website and twitter. That is a really fantastic twitter handle for you. Yes well thank you so much for coming onto the show today you know. It was a pleasure being interviewed for the project. And i really wanted to make sure that listeners found out about it even though you're only halfway through i'm eager to see the results. I think you're doing really important work. And it's just really great to see someone taking a look at ruby community in a different way. So thank you for your work. Thank you thank you for having me here. Thank you for this might And input kasame thanks for participating in the project as well and i hope people are interested and then they can reach me at any point and be happy. Davick chat with them. You've been listening to the ruby on rails. Podcast follow us on apple podcast. Google play or wherever fine. Podcasts are downloaded to stay in the loop on ruby on rails and open source software. While you're at it please leave us a review and thank you for.

ruby barrett redick nike brubaker rams twitter olsen houston apple Google
"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

Ruby on Rails Podcast

07:57 min | 10 months ago

"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

"It's community. He lives in england where he works as a ruby back and developer at farm drop and also as an associate researcher at university college sundin. Welcome to the ruby on rails. Podcast sqi thank you very happy to be here. This is the time. I'm participating input costs. Yes really could be well. We promised to be kind. You and you'll be a veteran by the end of the show. I'm sure key. What is your developer origin story. I'm afraid that story's not too long. But i'll do. My best say programming is something that i've been interested in for a long time. Maybe even from when. I played with the logo and the church when i was little but when it was only about three years ago di really started learning out and i went to become here in london and the focus was on tv and agile the co languages that we took looked into reading jarvis. Krige played around a little bit with lou a little bit see shop as well hand by decided to focus on ruby soon after finished catholic. Sunday job is that can developer and platform drop and market two to scrape and so a new question for the show. Then for you specifically is. What is your anthropology origin story. So that goes back a bit further. And i apologize for about fifteen years. My main focus for a long time was working with indigenous communities in brazil. Where i'm from and i in the south of brazil and then Region i worked with ngos foreign judges within. Here's other public institution as well in indigenous rights focused but for a long time focus was on doing research about cultural practices of indigenous communities in brazil site for my phd d. I lived in our small amazonian community for a year and a half in two thousand thirteen in two thousand fourteen and i was basically following d effects dot the construction of a river dam was having doubts being built about hundred miles from visited looking at the effects. Stop was having on their lives. It's the bill monte down. It's the third largest dam in the world and these guys tickled out there and they're around seven hundred people steve in twenty three villages in the shingle river which is in the eastern part of the brazilian alison. Basically my focus was on their music. And how music reflected of historical changes how they cooperated for example for elements into the performances of songs. But i also can focus on specific linguistic aspects of those songs say for example how symbolism used in one. Musical genre is different than the way in which rhythm affects the lyrics in another genre. I guess the main idea was trying to understand how they get kinda confused world and how we can learn about that wills you through the songs that's amazing and so you know having that background in anthropology what led you to want to learn how to code. I think two things that me to having that that nancy apology one is that enter. Apology is a discipline whistle. Way of looking into the world that really focuses really emphasizes leading to do things and to participate as soft technique So that apologies. Not just about observing of social aspects of life of different political economic classes of will aspects of different societies it is that but by participating while learning so the whole idea of Apologies that go live somewhere else. For a long time and triton stand what people do by living doing what they're doing and that ties in very well. I think this programming with love. I guess mentality Wave sinking about seeing stickers around in programming. Which is keynote to understand something. You have to go and do it not just about progress reading books and trying to learn about programming languages. It's about giving building something him and building a little product making something then. That's how you learn suggests. That is something similar between poyton programming in a sense. And i wanted to explore like i said the programming was always at the back of my head for for years and i wanted to explore that both as an anthropologist but just for myself i guess blow let me to program. That's an incredibly insightful. Way to look at it so tell me about farm drop and its technical. Stack draft is a online. Supermarket has a very specific focus in trying to get products. That are no too distant from where you live turning variable hebrew in london and rams area of london so far but the idea is that you will be buying things that come from really far away and then have a greedy so of impact on the planet in terms of it of carbon emissions so this is so on ganic unethical products. The textile is basically a rails. One of these with different riviera's says attached to it and has android app and the web is react. Well you and i know each other because of your project code and which we talked about briefly in the intro. So what is the purpose of the project that you're working on announce was born out of desire to combines apology and programming like i said before and desired so learned program and to move my research focus into technology and development and a few months before i started to cap i read. The project proposal ended up being funded and as a project of curtains has two main directions. One is to explore the world of programming by looking into the cultural aspects of one specific programming communities the ruby community. It seems to me that quite often we get three general sessions or sentences or people just told him generally about programming in programs. And that's such a huge and big road that i wanted to find a way a trying to slice Containable area so i could try and understand it. And that's one very important and then the way i did that is through. Language said three focused on the ruby language Folks on the community but of course. What does that mean. What does it mean to like. Look at the cultural aspects of programming community to me a means that i'm not just looking at syntax of the ruby language or even the development of the language. I'm looking for example at. Why is meta programming soon voted to the community and what does the ideal of match programming represents culturally. Why was witnessed such an important part of the community. And how has that changed. In the past few years will all the different trajectories of ruby developers. How does migration gender clause. How does that affect and is affected by the.

brazil Krige river dam shingle river sundin university college london jarvis lou di ruby england steve nancy rams
Chapman's 2 HRs Help A's Top Tigers 9-3 for 3rd Straight Win

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 10 months ago

Chapman's 2 HRs Help A's Top Tigers 9-3 for 3rd Straight Win

"Matt Chapman smacked a two run Homer and a solo shot in the athletics third straight win since a six game skid nine three at Detroit Chapman's first round tripper broke a third inning tie is the ace handed the Tigers their fourth consecutive loss mark can also homered as Oakland moved within one game of Boston for the second AL wild card the eighties pulled away with three runs in the fifth taking a six one lead on canon's two run shot numbers like we did tonight it just makes it a lot easier to win ball games banks are right now not much more Josh Harrison provided three hits and two rubies in the win Dustin Garneau with Derek hill hit solo homers in the fifth for the Tigers I'm Dave Ferrie

Matt Chapman Al Wild Homer Athletics Chapman Detroit Tigers Oakland Josh Harrison Boston Canon Dustin Garneau Derek Hill Dave Ferrie
Black Men Executed in 1951 Rape Granted Posthumous Pardons

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 10 months ago

Black Men Executed in 1951 Rape Granted Posthumous Pardons

"Virginia governor Ralph Northam has granted posthumous pardons to seven black men executed in nineteen fifty one for the rape of a white woman the Martinsville seven were all convicted of raping thirty two year old ruby Straub Floyd in a predominantly black neighborhood in Martinsville in January of nineteen forty nine it was the largest mass execution for rape in U. S. history in December advocates and descendants of the men ask governor Northam to issue a posthumous pardons their petition does not argue that the men were innocent but says their trials were unfair and the punishment was extreme and unjust at the time the case attracted pleas for mercy from around the world and in recent years it's been held up as an example of racial disparity in the use of the death penalty I'm Shelley handler

Governor Ralph Northam Martinsville Ruby Straub Floyd Governor Northam Virginia Shelley Handler
"ruby" Discussed on Relationships & Revenue

Relationships & Revenue

05:23 min | 10 months ago

"ruby" Discussed on Relationships & Revenue

"You decided to share your most precious resource with me and that is your time as you heard just a moment ago. I have the infamous the fabulous the one and only ruby fremont ruby. How are you today. i'm doing really dead. I've had a great week. I'm excited to be here. How about you. Oh i am super pumped. Mostly because i knew you were gonna be here today. There are lots of other reasons too. So i can't wait to get into it with you but in order to do that i have to serve the audience. Well by letting them know a little bit more about you so folks for those of you who are listening. You're going to hear the ruffling of papers for those of you. Who are watching. Obviously you can see this. Because i am a person who takes notes and prepares for every interview that i do. So ruby is a certified. Life coach an nlp practitioner. She'd clearly speaker she is a podcast host. She is an author of the fabulous book which i am about halfway through right now is called potent leadership. And the subtitle is dropped. The mask ignite the real and reclaim the leader within and trust me folks. We are getting into that in the very near future. So ruby. That's a little bit about you but you have to other titles that i suppose you probably hold in much higher regard than any of the ones i just mentioned and those happen to be wife in dogma. Yeah yeah mother. To too many yea- many labra doodles that are jet is in training. In fact they're instagram. Handle is doodle. Jet is in case he needs some cuteness in your feed. Give them okay. Consider that done. I will be following the dogs here in the very near future and their names by the way are lucan laya. Yes those of you who are star wars fans. They are brother and sister from the same letter. I don't know what we're thinking little ambitious there but we're getting through it. And how old are they. They are now eight and a half months awhile. Okay so not that long. Have you had now very cool. All right so ruby. We scratched the surface in learning. More about you so. Please dig a little deeper. Tell us take us back..

ruby fremont ruby lucan laya
Equity for Developers With Aaron Kahn

Ruby on Rails Podcast

02:15 min | 11 months ago

Equity for Developers With Aaron Kahn

"You can imagine from my desk you know. Talking to engineers receive offers equity is typically offered. And there's so many questions they've received over the fifteen years running mirror cell. Really excited to meet you here. Aaron and kinda hopefully enlighten our listeners. A little bit with some of your knowledge. This is great. Likewise i think equity is the best kept secret that everybody knows about an attack and so i think chatting some light on the details is going to be really exciting terrific. All right we're gonna kick it off with the easy one for you would love to get your outlook on the economy. And how things are shaping up. So i actually feel pretty optimistic about it. Twenty twenty was a little bit harry. We had what two of the worst trading days since the great depression in three of the best and you bring are having this conversation a couple of weeks ago and it's just so crazy that all of that volatility resulted in a pretty extraordinary year. I think the economy has figured out how to operate in a covert worlds and i attribute that almost exclusively to the fact that we're globalized and the fact that technology has been the life support for our global economy. So i feel good about it. There's a lot to be worried about. There's lots of uneasy about. But generally i feel optimistic. Excellence yeah as do. I in a lot of folks i talk to. I would be curious how you feel that. The current labor shortages are affecting the economy. So that such an interesting question. And you know. It's i feel like it's a very specific. One labor shortages in dining and tourism are having a much different impact than labor shortages in attacker medicine. For example i feel like technology and medicine are in a position. To almost avert the labor shortages there are levers in place to get around the shortages and increase the capacity of the existing workforce whereas you know in tourism and restaurants for example. You can only carry so many trays their help. So many people to their rooms. That's really scary. So i'm curious to see what's going to come up that. And how in america specifically the stimulus checks are going to continue and ed needle really impact. The desire for people's get back into the workforce is obviously it's a risk versus reward dynamic where the workplace and the pay stands right now for a lot of people that's just not worth it

Aaron Harry Depression Ed Needle America
"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

Ruby on Rails Podcast

03:07 min | 11 months ago

"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

"I don't.

"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

Ruby on Rails Podcast

07:32 min | 11 months ago

"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

"Get here. It's a cool dynamic staff. Have you ever had a client from thought. Bots say hey. Where are you talking about me whenever you're talking about your client. That is one of my fears at times happen although we stayed very positive on the show. That's something that's very important to us. There's enough negativity in the world. So we really want to focus on our positive experiences through the week but there have been times where i'm speaking about some of the challenges or things that we are running into that yes. The engineering team is listening to the podcast. And like oh. I heard you talk about the speech that we're working on or this particular challenge and that's really cool. 'cause they get that behind the scenes peek to see how chris and i are chatting about that but yet they know enough and they know which project that. I'm on that they recognize exactly the technology in the feature that i'm trying to describe so that certainly happened and it can be a lot of fun when it does andrew. How things changed for you. Now that you're not working at code fun which was very much like an open source thing like people could see what you are actively working on and now you're working for a company where it's supposed source and so you might not be able to reveal as much as what you're working on at any given point it's different but i don't think it's been an issue per se. I'm not like oh crap. I let that slip if i didn't mean to. That's not really an issue. I really cherish the time. I had it good fun. When i think back on my experiences like that was like my favorite time just because i was able to do that thing that like a lot of people really want to do was working as an open source developer. We were spiking civilised reflex. That's when we were building symmetry flex and trying to build the community joined remote ruby like we started the ruby blend and things were going before a dramatic turn but in terms of the closed and open source. It hasn't been that big of a shift. Just because instead of talking about kind of what i'm doing at work like slow talk about it but just i speak about in more general terms but i also them kind of freed up to talk a lot more about the dump crap. I do on the nights and weekends so the majority of our podcast either have the word ruby or rails it but i think we've all agreed that a lot of the topics that we're talking about or not specific to that community but in a lotta ways. I feel that having podcasts in our community is how we're going to keep our community thriving. So i'm curious if anyone has any thoughts around. Is there a way to market our podcast so that other developers will listen to it. I get really excited. When i get listener feedback saying hey i used to do rails maybe ten years ago but i've been listening podcast and i really enjoyed such and such episode. How can we make. Our podcast is accessible to the general software community as opposed to just ruby. One thing that sends out to me about ruby and rails is because it's full stack because of its foundations tends to be holistically about web development and so whereas i look at react projects or other java script or different things that are going on i see a more sort of narrow. Focus in those frameworks and with ruby and rails. What i love about. It is that it's really about building software. It's about building products that are valuable that deliver value to end users. And so that being the core of it. That's the story that constantly brings me back to ruby on rails. And it's the story that i wanna keep telling as much as possible and it's the thing that keeps me engaged with this community and so i think podcast a great way to continue to literally tell those sort of stories and really celebrate that aspect of ruby and rows and why remains such a productive way to build software. I think related to that one of the things that we should talk about more is the draw rails was look what you can do with one person or two people and i feel like we went down the javascript row. And now you need to teams of people and you end up building bigger stuff and hot wires kind of been like. Hey here's a reminder what you can do with a very small team and i think that resonates a lot with a lot of people building startups and trying to build side projects and everything and and that's one that israel's related but there's a ton of people building hardware stuff in larry bell to and they're all very similar so i think at a certain point. Yeah we're talking about maybe rail specifically but you can apply all those things two different and just different tools. I'd like to add on an extended. Excite full heartedly agree. With what both christie criss chris alvarez said and in addition a lot of the conversations that we have on the bike shed are focused on ruby and rails but then we will extract that particular concept to the point that it really doesn't matter which language that you're using her which framework that you're using we're talking more about the high level. What's your process. What are you thinking as you're going through an implementing this and based on more of our recent conversations. You think were more of a post crest podcast. How much we hype up post grass and things that we can do at the database layer. So i think there are a lot of ways that we can start with the foundation of this is how we're doing it with ruby and rails but then talk about it at a higher level where then. It's really applicable for everybody. If tokyo one technology defined your podcast is will be a layer of l. podcasts. Because we talk about that framework more than we do rail sometimes so that begs the question. Is there room for more ruby and rails. Podcasts outside you know who's currently on this call. I think so and you know i mentioned that eater kupwara podcast a little bit ago. That something he. I actually talked about in. that episode. shared the anecdote about how in the near. America's founding. Ben franklin's brothers. Something like that. He wanted to start a newspaper and somebody told them where the dumb idea that was already had these paper and people might say others already. Albany rails podcasts. There are small handful. But i think there could be ten more rails podcasts or even more than that eventually because i think people have an appetite for help and camaraderie and stuff like that and i don't think we've nearly bottomed out in terms of satisfying people's appetite for that stuff. Yeah i agree with that because a lot of times. Listen to podcasts. Like the more you get to know someone that connection kinda becomes what it's about for me. So yeah. I think there's plenty of room. I mean branded is rubiun telling me about your life as a developer. Allison also throw out there that the way you framed the question is like is there room for it but one of the wonderful things about podcasting is a medium as it's distributed it's not centralized you can start a podcast any day and i will say as someone who inherited a popular podcast or sufficiently popular. Podcast just got to run with that. It has been such a wonderful way to get my voice out there and provide opportunities that. I want that for everyone. I want everyone to have this sort of ability to speak about the way they think about software and then find like minded people and be able to build even many communities within the larger community of rabin rows so beyond the question of is there room which i definitely think there is. I so wholeheartedly support anyone pursuing this for their own reasons. Yeah i think to bring it all the way back. One thing that chris. Jason i care a lot about is like ruby as a community the community aspects of rubio very important to us and like we're like actively trying to like build that up and bring in new people and bring people onto their first podcast like we say it all the time like. Hey you wanna come on the show. Let's now we've had a few people even recognition and jobs from that to us. That is the payoff of doing the show. Maybe our show. Is that the first time someone learns about rails in that to me is like the possibility in the future. It's like how can we market our shows that.

larry bell christie criss chris alvarez chris andrew Excite Ben franklin israel tokyo Albany Allison America rabin rubio ruby Jason
"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

Ruby on Rails Podcast

08:17 min | 11 months ago

"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

"I am jason turns also from remote ruby. I am andrew mason also from remote ruby. And i'm stephanie. The kerry from the bike shed. I'm chris toomey from the bike. Shed and i'm jason sweat from rails jason. Today we're going to cover. The origins of our shows are experiences as hosts. Why podcasting is so important in keeping the ruby community thriving. Now i know personally. I really enjoy the origin story behind remote ruby. So chris oliver. Could you kick us off with that. Yeah we can go back. Maybe to the first time. That jason and i met which jason emailed me out of the blue and was like. Hey you're gonna be rail scouts. And i wasn't planning on it but it was over in kansas city like four hours away from me. I was like no not going. But i'll meet you so you went and drove over there and matt and aben friends ever since and jason had the idea for doing an online meet up and i'll let him explain kind of where that started and turned into the remote ruby podcasts. I thought it'd be a good idea. There wasn't any online meet ups. This was pre even the idea of shutting down the world for a pandemic. And maybe i was just too soon because i got chris to speak at the first one and we have forty people. I spoke to the next one. There's twenty and by the third one there are five of us. So wasn't it really a super sustainable thing for me to do so. Chris and i got together and said what have we tried. Podcasting chris and really done your own podcast at that point. How'd you now. I don't think so. And you and i were just like having calls every week or whatever just to hang out and chat nor like we just record that in publish. That is podcast. So yeah so we've been doing that. I think it's certain twenty eight. So yeah three years in june and somehow people still keep listening to us talk but probably because we brought along our friend andrew. Wow okay no. That's not true. But yes i was a guest on remote ruby before i joined as a host and not to get into the details but i was on another podcast and something went down and i no longer was on that podcast anymore and chris jason were like you wanna come. Hang out with us. I'm like absolutely so i started doing that. And at the same time. I also started the ruby blend with nate hopkins and ron cook and so we were doing that for a while until that had to tragically shut down. But i'm still here with jason and chris. I guess i should also mention that. Jason sweat gave me my start in passing a month or two after i'd started full time as a rails developer on a now archived show called the ruby testing broadcast. Which is the perfect segue. Because jason sweat was also my first opportunity to guest on a podcast. So i was already hosting but hadn't guested. Which is kind of the opposite order. So jason do you want to tell the origin of where rails the jason came from. I'd been involved with podcasting since around two thousand sixteen. I somehow ended up on the ruby roads. Podcasts in luzon there for maybe a year so and then. Somehow i got the idea that i could start my own podcast and as an experiment i started. I guess that called the ruby testing. Podcast which i figured was sufficiently narrow that i could get dr- action and to my surprise guest sexually said yes to coming on the show and also to my surprise. A black sleep listened to the broadcast. That gave me some confidence. So maybe a year. Later broadened and i changed from the ruby testing podcasts. At israel's with jason and been doing that for something like two years. that's fantastic. I wanna move to probably our most experience podcast veteran. And that would be chris toomey. When i was learning how to code i was listening to giant robots and then was excited for the transition that the bike sheds hook chris. I would love to hear the story of what it was like taking over a really popular podcast really maintaining the drive behind it. So as you mentioned. I had done a little bit of podcasting was about a six month. Run where i was a co host on giant robots which was the original podcast of thought bought and that was more in the business in sort of. How do we build a software company. So at that point. I was running up case which was the subscription learning platform that the pod hands. I was talking about the details of the business and the marketing tests in ab tests. And things like that. That i was doing and every week sharing my emerald rather transparently in that thought way that we do. I did that for like i said about six months and then took awhile off and in the background thought had started up a new podcast called the bike shed and that started october. Thirty first of two thousand fourteen. So the show. It's been going for a long time. Now and that was hosted by dark prior and sage griffin and they ran that for a number of years i think about four years that the two of them worked collectively on that but at some point they both moved on from the pot and there was an opportunity for new hosts. This upenn so. I took over august of twenty eighteen. So i've been doing this now for about three years answer for that. First year i took the opportunity to sort of do a tour around thaw and talk with many different individuals from the company a handful of people external without but but i knew that there were so many great voices and ideas and points of view within about that. I really wanted to spend some time getting to know more of them personally and then sharing that as much as i could with the existing audience that the bike shed had but secretly all along i was looking for a person to hang out with all the more. So and steph was the person that was a perfect choice for that. And so the past two years stuff. And i've been chatting and i will send it over to staff to share a little bit of her point of view on that transition but from my point of view. It's been fantastic as dr remember. Exactly when we had the conversation. You're running the bike. Shed and doing an incredible job of just having weekly guest and then you'd reach out to me and said hey. Would you be interested in doing an episode. And i thought no absolutely not. I can't podcast. I can't begin to do this so you continue to convince me and finally said something that resonated where you're like we can just show up record and we don't have to publish. We see how it goes. That's a perfect safety. Net amend that so i showed up and i think the first episode that you and i recorded ended up being titled what i believe about software and it was a lot of fun. I realized i have a lot of things to say and after that i think it was another month or so you continue doing more gas but then you reached out to me i want to be co host and at that point i was super jazzed about it and it's been wonderful. It's been a roller coaster. I have learned a ton. I'm kinda seeing a pattern here. Where over the last three years. It seems like remote ruby came into place bike shed transition. That's when i took over as host of the five by five review on rows podcast. We're gonna call it the golden era of ruby podcasts. But for me. I probably have the longest running podcast. It was started back in two thousand nine on the five by five network. But it's gone through many different hosts. And so i took over a roughly about three and a half years ago as the main hosts from kyle de all and then just a couple of weeks ago. I announced on my podcast. We took the podcast independent. We are now just duff ruby on rails podcasts. And i'm starting to change the model where i'm bringing in more co hosts that way i can get those regular updates that i really appreciate on all these odd cats. We have featured on the show today. I am curious. I wanna talk about how we put together the episodes and plan out how. Everything's gonna go down. I know for me. I'm currently a mix of interviews and co host episodes. So i'd love to hear from andrew. How do you plan out. What remote were be is gonna be week-to-week. This is an easy question because we don't at all we don't plan we do have some guests that come on. And sometimes they may get their zoom link the day of who's to say but we really don't have a plan we don't talk about what we're gonna talk about beforehand. We all just kind of show up. And i think we have that kind of like relationship and flow where it always kinda just works and i think part of that came from actually how chris and i started the show because we were trying to make it as low stress as possible because we knew if we put like a lot of pressure on it. We would stop doing it. it's like our first episodes. Were like youtube. Live links that we just share it out and then our next episodes we are like oh we should start.

jason chris toomey jason turns chris chris oliver aben chris jason nate hopkins ron cook jason sweat andrew mason sage griffin stephanie kerry ruby kansas city luzon matt andrew Chris
Jamie Lee Curtis Reveals Her 25-Year-Old Child Is Transgender

Doug Stephan

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Jamie Lee Curtis Reveals Her 25-Year-Old Child Is Transgender

"Jamie Lee Curtis as an announcement. What's the scoop? She did the cover for an AARP magazine. Coming up the August September issue and the cover story. She discussed her life. Her husband, her two kids, Her oldest daughter, 34, year Old Annie, and Her 25 year old daughter, Ruby, who was born her son and is now transgender daughter. Uh, how do they feel about that? She seems to be here out. Yeah, And she said that she and her husband have watched in wonder and pride as our son became our daughter,

Jamie Lee Curtis Old Annie Aarp Ruby
"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

Ruby on Rails Podcast

08:18 min | 1 year ago

"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

"It just really accelerate. Their learning does not totally. And now that you know to answer your question. What i ended up doing is there. Were some trusted boot camps that i reached out to to help sources candidates that being said when we posted the positions. You can imagine. I got a ton of resumes and cover letters. Nato if it were possible. I would love to hire all these folks but we had to be incredibly picky around. The skill sets that they had based on the code base that we have so. I really am very happy with the three that we've selected but now that we've gotten these three junior developers onboard boarded and hired. Now it's time to pivot to hiring three senior developers. And so you'd mentioned pre show. We should really take moment and flashbacks a conversation that we had last year back in april bright win the pandemic was starting and we saw all these layoffs. It's amazing how much the hiring and recruiting of ruby developers says change. I remember that talk is march or april. You know when everything was really not nice. We really didn't have a feel for this new world and layoffs definitely were happening and we were just trying to remind people. Hey you know there's still people hiring remote neuberger listen people who are sharing that so shop five win. From within three months that they went to digital by default so the remote by default and then later in the year and now went to digital by design. I e r offices will never open again and we are now going to be hiring remote everywhere from a corporate perspective. It means that you have access to the entire town will the planet. If you're willing to support a workflow that can handle different time zones and cultures in higher that obviously taxes with having employees all over the planet just brief aside not even in rubio programming out of non traditional roles. Wouldn't have been remote are heading that way. So i definitely think if that's your thing even as pandemic eases is not a question anymore. I think the default is very remote or at least remote supporting. The offices aren't as strong as they were a year or two ago. There's nothing wrong with offices. By the way. I tried to work in one by just happened in our for shop. If five if i could have my big i probably would have a few days a week in office but yeah totally new world. I think and hiring a black. Ask you on that. So these denver-based employees that meant the juniors. Or how did that go. Yes actually really funny. Because the three junior developers that i ended up hiring all ended up being number based just because one of the boot camps that we hire from is denver-based. Now the remote. I so i think that's going to change significantly. It's funny. There's out of the engineering team only myself in our tier three support. Engineers are not based in denver but to be honest with you when we hire these. Three senior rails engineers. I'd be very surprised if they end up being denver-based i'm completely okay with that. Those were like. I think especially when you're senior if you wanna work remote now you don't worry about requiring that need don't worry about asking for it is just. This is where i live now in like. It's gonna be like you'll watch these movies from the eighties or the nineties. The whole family moves because one of the parents or both. The parents got a job in another city so they have to sell the house and move to another city. That might be a bit of a a curiosity for a lot of families. Going into the future i think for me. I've told our developers we have high empathy and we have high trust so really. We trust that you're going to get your work done. All that i ask is that you have at least some crossover with the mountain time zone. Just because that's where the majority of our developers are. you don't need to have full. Crossover just some crossover and you have to have a good internet connection. If you have those two things you honestly can be anywhere that you want. And one of my developers is actually gonna be taking off to europe and is going to be spending a couple months traveling around and continuing to work and i think that's great. I think that's amazing that you can afford that opportunity in this kind of world. That super cool. There's some in my time zone seven eastern so. We have three hours of really good crossover in you know what you don't need more than three hours of meetings today. Usually we find those three hours or are quite helpful. And you know what you get extra coverage anyway if you have a twenty four seven product then you just go from having eight hours of engineers online to twelve. I just wanted to talk about your juniors there. I just wanted to underline something and kind of really at this another time for the listeners. Out there folks may be hiring you know. I gotta say a really encourage people to hire juniors. I've been through that experience. It was really hard for me to get hired years ago and you are right if the boot camps business models based on juniors getting hired and if people stop hiring boot camps won't run ruby now. I don't think that's the end of ruby bootcamp. Stop because shop if right now is hiring non ruby engineers in teaching them ruby so we probably teach hundreds of people ruby. You're just the company probably get is a similar boat right. Some of these companies is like we just wanna get engineer. He can figure the report out after we get yet. But they'll surprise you right like so. We have the devon intern program so even interns not not just juniors interns. I can see make amazing contributions. Like i'll just wake up. I'm like oh this features ready to go. It's good that's an inter. there's a lot of value there. And i guess my little pitch as i said i wouldn't be doing extracurricular open source work for my first six months because i really just wanted to focus one hundred percent shop. I i still will. But i'm now kind of poking my nose out to see what i'd like to do on my neck time and i think if i were to fire up past rubies again which i did depaz on diaby sunday might be cool. I'd love to maybe feature juniors in each episode something just any way we can give back and help the next generation. I think is awesome. I really appreciate you actually doing the real work here. Which is hiring three juniors. That's wonderful that's really good for the community. So thank you. Of course and first of all i love the term. Nick time i will definitely be using that future episodes and also ruby radar which is a brand new ruby newsletter coming from andrew mason and colin philibert. They have offered to feature juniors and their issues and they haven't gotten any takers yet. Which i think is crazy. So if you're a junior developer listening to this definitely reach out to ruby radar to get yourself featured because the more exposure definitely the better. We need to be hiring those juniors now nick. I kind of envisioned this big thermometer at i and that is you know how many developers they've managed to hired in this year because i think the goal was what two thousand twenty one developers do. You have any idea where they are. So i think we're well on our way so without saying anything because i don't investors and and all that stuff and if it's privileged information i can safely say we are well on our way. I feel like that. That is reachable goal and not only that like so. There's a lot of applications to so like for every person that gets hired. It's not like one person. Applies one person gets hired because we're hiring so much there's way more applications than there are people get hired so i feel kind of uncomfortable talking about it. You know. it's like there's a lot coming in and for my boot camp friends out there. So i went to boot camp called viking code school. It was purchased later on by. I can't remember thankful recently shop. If i did place informer boot graham graduate. Just like me from viking code school so if you think you have to have a cs degree in. That's the only way to get anywhere in this world. That's not necessarily the case. Because i'd say a lot of my colleagues john will beginnings camp so that is a perfect way to wrath of nick. It was so great to catch up. I'm so excited that you are now. Officially a compost in excited to check in with you in future wakes thank you so much. You've been listening to the ruby on rails. Podcast follow apple podcast. Google play or wherever fine. Podcasts are downloaded to stay in the loop on ruby on rails and open source software. While you're at it please leave us a review and thank you for listening..

denver Nato rubio colin philibert andrew mason europe ruby Nick nick graham john apple Google
"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

Ruby on Rails Podcast

07:54 min | 1 year ago

"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

"Rusty neck. So when you're saying about like Leadership exercises do you mean like i'm trying to visualize icebreaker things or other types of exercises. Yeah that's a good question. Yeah we started with a icebreaker so we have some core values attacks us. We have six values and we're always trying to remind each other what they are and so we started off the day with trying to come up with an acronym and we had a really solid acronym. That was winning. At one point we broke up into teams and then someone came up the idea for cat tap which sounds absolutely ridiculous. People loved it and now it's a thing so whenever someone does something positive in slack now we have an emoji to react to it and in some ways. It's very silly. But i kinda like the vibe behind it so we did things like that. We talked about what it means to be a leader. We talked about our. Okr's through the corridor so we as an engineering team committed to smoke ers and we talked about which ones were going to be the most impactful. That's really cool. I find the things i worry about. Being remote sounds like really tackled so the one is just kind of the big physically around people and talking which is so different things. Like i contact or moving your hands or just being congenial. Not starring screen and the other is you know what types of work things work better in person in. I feel like obviously. I haven't met might either so i've got there yet but i feel like things like longer looking. Kr's ours just kind of sitting down for a long time and really thinking. Those things out are probably a lot better in person. Or how did you find that. I totally agree with you. I really enjoyed meeting the engineers one by one and especially the ones that report to me just because we were able to go out for runs we were able to go out for meals. And just general closest that you don't get from being over zoom. I will say two of my favorite experiences from last week. First of all one of my favorite people from customer support came over the airbnb and was working next to me. And it's amazing the stuff that you breath whenever you can hear somebody doing their work. Because i don't get that over zoom right now and she was talking about this really weird bug that causes them to do a lot of extra work and i turned to her and i said did i know about this. And she's like well. We filed this bug like a year ago. And so i pulled open the bug and yes it is quite old and i assigned it to one of our new junior developers to investigate so it felt good to get to hear their workflow because to me if customer support is supported then it just so many positive ramifications for the engineering tam. That's so cool. I never think about that because people talk about meeting a and in person for distributed teams. But i don't know if they really talk about just working together. It sounds like you weren't doing a formal meeting at that point right you john at all. I'm listening dr one hundred percents. I wonder if i were to write a note to self. That would be something. I'd definitely consider taking away. Like maybe even allow yourself a few hours of working in the same room time. That's not dedicated to a meeting. I've always first on the remote bandwagon. But i really think that there is a large drawback that everyone has to face with remote which is little subtle things like up the speed of learning when you're next to someone the speed of communication when you're next to someone when everything's in slack or your chat apper email. Ooh there's just things people wouldn't say in inside that they would mutter under their breath this episode of the ruby on rails. Podcast is brought to you by honey badger. I have been a honey badger user for the past seven years when i started a new job. I no longer ass do use honey badger it is instead of. Where's my honey badger logging. What's honey badger. You ask well when application errors happen. It's nice to know that honey badger has your back. Honey badger makes you a devops by combining error of time and check monitoring into a single easy to use platform. Honey badger send you real time alerts with all the contents needed to see what's causing the air and where it's hiding so you can quickly find it. Six it get on with your day included up time and kron monitoring also lets you know when your external services are having issue or your background jobs go missing or silently fail go to honey badger donohoe and discover how star josh and then created one hundred percent bootstrap monitoring solution. Why is this important. Self-funding means they only answer to you the developer rather than a venture capital overlord. Thanks to honey. Badger supporting the show. When we are at the baseball game. I ended up talking to our two salespeople and just for fun neck i asked the most. What's the one thing we could do. That would help you so much. And they suggested this one small feature again something that's been our backlog for a really long time and we just didn't have anybody to work on it and i assigned again so one of my junior developers they shipped it yesterday completely surprised them. It was like a surprise and delight was almost like a love letter from the engineering team for them and it was just really fun. You know like. I wanted to do more stuff like that. Because the big overarching features are important but now that i have three junior developers on boarded by god. They are so potent already. They've only been around for four weeks. And i can't imagine life without them now. That's so cool. Yeah i wanna ask about how the junior developers are getting on an obviously. Let me know if you've already covered this previously. But i'd love to hear about how you talk about the sourcing engineers and what your thoughts are for kind of growing these folks were junior in two awesome middleweight and then eventually senior engineers so texas has a regular cadence will at least i would like to establish that we hired junior developers on a regular basis a lot of our developers that we currently have now or ones that have been promoted from that so we really do believe that. If we're going to help. You know the two initiatives. I feel our junior developers growing into senior developers. Were not going to help anybody. We're not going to help the tech industry if we're not mentoring junior developers and we're also not gonna help the ruby community if we're not hiring ruby developers who've gone through boot camp where they've been taught ruby and then introducing them to Base i mean this is how we're going to keep the community growing because otherwise if we don't hire junior ruby developers then you know the boot camps are gonna stop teaching ruby which is not great so wanna make sure that we're continuing to keep that engine going that being said we hired three junior developers. Two of them are front end and one of them is back in the one of my front end. Developers actually went through full stack camp so he is also verse in ruby as well and it has just been going incredibly well. I will say that. I needed to come up with basically an agenda for them wake. How quickly should you be within our code base and to be honest with you. I wasn't sure how quick it would take them. And honestly neck they were committing to production within a week. I am seriously so incredibly impressed. That's mazen and i give a lot of credits. you are. Intermediate and senior developers are answering them but also creating that culture where please ask questions and please ask those outlay the i think that's a really healthy thing to institute. 'cause it's easy for me now because i feel a bit more secure in my work than i would have years ago but years ago saying. I don't know what you're talking about like if somebody mentioned a concept or tool for just a programming term if they said like yak shaving her bike shedding and i didn't know what that means burs. Now i'd be like what is that by the way but getting that early than.

Rusty neck badger donohoe kron Badger josh john baseball texas ruby
"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

Ruby on Rails Podcast

07:53 min | 1 year ago

"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

"People have looked the cool things already out there while you're absolutely right. We're definitely going to have to by kevin onto the show. Because i want to dig more into that but going into the jam that you worked on. I'm curious why if this algorithm is so much faster and more performance. Why do you think it's not. The current default is it. more difficult. implementation is at one of those situations where this is how we've always implemented regular expressions. So that's a really good question. And i'm going to answer someone who's not the number one priority. Like you said a kevin's a wonderful person and will be really great to chat to future. It's very simple. When you lay the bear framework for something you can only think somebody steps ahead. I think using and say unix system uses list but pearl so that the papers bit older so talks more about pearl so perl ruby maybe python as well when they were first building our rejects them. Have this approach in. It is one of those things. There's a reason we're rewriting it not doing. Pr against ruby core. It's something that you kind of have to do back end ground up. There's by code level abstractions here really trying to get the performance but have all the feature parody as a ruby regular expressions. Can't you strong. I have. I'd love to go into greater depth but i'm very conscious. That on this platform on the review on rails. Podcast that begun more. Into what evans territory here. But what i want for my -partment you know. Just israeli enjoyable to be able to work with folks of that level. It's a real treat. And i encourage anyone to get themselves in situations whether the most junior person in the room so legally in the eyes of lincoln. I've senior in my title these days. But that doesn't mean i can't be the most junior person real so if you're able to find those rubio's who are just Or even engineer whoever farther. It's a real treat to just sit and learn all you can and unless you're the best in the world which known as you'll be able to find that situation have slightly loved that attitude and it's part of the reason. I enjoyed talking you so much nick. This episode of the ruby on rails podcast is brought to you by scout. Apm scotty pm is leading. Application performance monitoring designed to help rail developers quickly fine and fixed performance issues without having to deal with the headache or overhead of enterprise platform feature vote developer centric. Eli and tracing logic that ties battle next source code. You've quickly pinpoint resolved performance issues like an plus one queries slow database queries memory blowed in more scouts. Realtime alerting weekly digest emails. Let you rest easy knowing that scouts on watch and resolving performance issues before your customers ever see them. Scout has also launched its new air monitoring feature add on the applications. Now you can connect your reporting an application monitoring data one platform. See for yourself. Why developers worldwide call scout their best friend and try their air monitoring and apm free for fourteen days. No credit card required and as an added bonus for rubio in rows listeners. Scout will donate five dollars field source project of your choice when you deploy learn more at scout. Aps dot com slash ruby on rails. Thanks as always scout for their continued support. So you mentioned that you've been traveling a little bit so you came over to the us how to traveling go. Yeah in a non. It was hard right so we miss them. Connect so i. My wife is a foreign citizen so initially. They tried to refused entry until they reviewed our wedding certificate. Everything's a bit rough internationally because of corona virus stuff. We got the. Us is pretty slick but then we had the normal trouble of delayed flights miss connection so took about thirty hours to get home but on the way back. Our tests were denied because they weren't the right kind of dust for ireland so it talked about seventy hours to get home back here to the side of the pond. Sorry i've two homes right. In america home in the uk home the overall yes is really great to be in the usa. Again to remember what hot temperatures are like out here it's like seventy five is a roasting day and then back on it was like ninety eight every day and smoking on my. Oh yeah that's off feels like now i remember. Yeah that's warm. Take seventy five days. It was it we got back here so it had like. The hottest temperature ever recorded in northern ireland. We got back and it was still only like eighty five. Yeah it's still very mild here. Even on his hottest. Today's i guess for the programming side. I'd just say really good to take time and not be programming for actually couple of weeks and you really get a good perspective on your work and how you feel about it when you're full you out of it and have nothing to do to so definitely feel coming back to the code that you're currently working on. Did you do anything. Did you leave any notes and commit messages. What did you do in order to reduce your brain. Yes i love to share this for people. Because i find this is effective since we're distributed team with do a weekly learning our where people can talk about whatever they want and record it. For example. i did a session on building jump for the first time. If you've never done and then we do the weekly demo where people demo what they built during the weekend that's recorded as well and we keep some mild notes for the team but really when you come back. That's your main job. Watched learning sessions by the demos sink. That i think people more than ever are distributed teams and you need to not rely on acing communications so you can't be expecting someone to go two weeks worth the slack messages and consider them caught up because that could be really intimidating so realistically i did those things and before i left i did a hand off no so i just kind of said. Here's what i was mid-flow on if anyone else wants to pick it up. That's fine but otherwise i'll pick it up when i'm back still hard. It's like summer vacation when your kid coming back. But i think that was a positive experience for me. I love that will. I recently returned from denver. I have been talking about on the show for so long. I have almost had a year at textiles. And i finally got the opportunity to go out and meet my team which is so weird. These are people that are very close to our talked all the time every day. And sometimes when you get regular cadence with these zoom calls you almost feel like you're in the same room holy cow. So what was that experience like seeing them for the first time like. I always wonder like be like. Oh this person's a lot taller than i thought. What is it like being in the room as opposed to resume. Yeah first of all might team. Wildly tall haven't many was taller than expected to be. Even though i had the measurements ahead of time it is so different when you meet them in person i will say that. I think i did it the correct way. We decided as a team that we were all gonna get together. Last wednesday and thursday said the entire company. We did a baseball game. And then the next day we got together in a hotel conference room and we did a bunch of leadership exercises and things like that. So i very much had the ability to just come on wednesday and thursday but what i ended up doing is i flew in on saturday night and like you neck. I had all kinds of plane issues. We actually ran out of gas at one point because we were circling burn. We actually had the land somewhere else and sit there for three hours while we got re gassed up ohno. Yeah i was a bummer. But any who one of my developers. Pick me up from the airport saturday night and the next day spent the entire day with our. Us designer actually did something called the manitou incline. People are aware of this surf there in denver but essentially it is a railroad track that got wiped out by a mudslide back in nineteen ninety. But it is this really really steep hike going up one side of the rocky mountain and it was so fun..

perl ruby rubio kevin evans Us lincoln nick northern ireland ireland uk denver baseball rocky mountain
"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

Ruby on Rails Podcast

07:34 min | 1 year ago

"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

"Listen mammoth. Three seventy seven nine year co host britain martin. And i'm your other coast. Nick schneider nick guested as a co host many times when the show was on five by five so it made perfect sense to make him a permanent co host like gemma. I will be regularly checking on for new updates in his world and for his thoughts of what's going on in the community. Nick how're you doing. I am doing fantastic. Thanks for asking brittany. This is my first time on the new exciting format. I kind of like by. The way is bit feedback. How we're still in the canonical. Podcast was like a new kind of iteration. I think of like when comic books. Have kind of a new series within the canonical series. You know this is like the next greatest thing so it is. It's veto but yeah thanks have been going well. Actually as of sunday. I have been a chopper five for half a year. I can't believe to say it's been six months already. And in settling in pretty well. I still feel like i'm in my on boarding phase. I think toby road something a year or two ago. Adobe look at the ceo saying something like it takes a year to onboard. But i thought that was just like a thought leader kind of concept. But i certainly do still feel like i'm on boarding to the company in a good way. So what have you been up to chapel find now that you are. Let's say halfway on boarded. It sounds like you had a recent hack day. That's right yeah so like in my day job. We have internal tooling which i get to work on. Even though i'm not on shop i core. We still get scale like all right. We're adding an endpoint. Can it take a million or question. Our yup okay. Moving on right like so. It's pretty exciting even in the day to day but recently yeah i got to go onto a hack day so a just come back from america. I been visiting family out there. And i didn't intend to work this act. I think they do it every three months or six months. This is my first one. And since it's going to be a way for part of it. I never thought of kind of checking n and i drop in on day two of three day. Hack day and start work. And i'm like oh goodness what do i do now. And kevin newton. Who was a teammate of mine. Now works on a code foundations team. Message me and said hey. Join my team. We're working on something. Cool all right. Let's do this little. That i know i was there on a team with chris. Seton who is. The creator of travel ruby has hd in ruby and probably written most professionally on ruby of anyone on the planet noah gibbs who wrote rebuilding rails mastering software technique and many many other contributions. Over many years. Tom stewart who is the author of understanding computation for horr- eilly and some help from maxine. Cavallet boss faa. Who's leading our at team. A little support from aaron patterson thunder love and me like working on. Hack this project by really excited to talk about it briefly. I'm not gonna act as expert. You're obviously because i'm so far down the totem pole. It's not even funny. And maybe we could have kevin on some time cause he championed this project but it is an open source bit of work so we can actually talk about it a bit more and it was to revisit rebuilding regular expressions in ruby native regular expression handling and there are some interesting theories out there on alternative algorithms if you were to rewrite the regular expression engine and ruby which doesn't gem with a different algorithm. Which was i pitched in like. Nineteen sixty seven called the thompson. Nfl algorithm and there's white papers and everything and there's certain instances where it would be regular expressions and ruby millions of times faster not even thousands tens of thousands. So yeah you know. Normally i would have done a lot more work on it because you have those couple weeks before hacked as we start thinking about what you're gonna do in reading around the subject but i just drop straight in filed a couple of pr's to do what. I could the beautiful thing about shop in these kind of people is. It really doesn't matter how much of a subject matter expert. You are in one area. We all kind of find arbit- and everyone's really really happy to share and teach and grow and even the most senior person at the company is not afraid to say. I don't know so. Yeah that was what is working on. I will give you the link after we talked so we can share it because anyone can look or contribute. Now that is so incredibly cool. I have so many thoughts about this. You mentioned comic books. And my god you have the ruby super team first of all. That is an incredible mix of people to be working on a hack day project and we need more people like having out there who sees people who want to contribute and say is. Hey join my team. Everybody's welcome. This is part of the reason that i love the ruby community so much. So now nick. I'm super curious if shop if i has these hack days every three months. I almost wonder if there's a correlation now to the gems that come out of sherifi. Can i actually like link them up to this regular cadence of these hack days ago. Gosh you might be right. So i can say that like our shop Mantra is developed the public internally secret externally but i kind of jive that with i've listened to some other shop a folk the past i remember in stage griffin. Used to work here before me and they said encore we run. You know like forty runners. Our test weeks. Okay so certain things you could talk about so for the hack days. I think it does time up some of the things we released into the public. I believe we had four hundred seven projects this year. And you know people record video and share about it and like there's no way you could sit down and read every project yourself. I tried to look at forty and that was quite a bit. And i think if you look at of the sea level so like ceo cto cmo cfo. Messaging coming out right now. I think i saw some things that were active projects. Like i think there was talk about. I don't know anything about. Nfc's don fungible tokens but there was some stuff coming through there and that definitely was hacked they project short to your question. Yes i think there is some link here. Is there someone at shop by. Who has the ability to say yes. This project is good enough to be underneath shop. If i get hub umbrella or is that not how they approach it. That's a fantastic question. So for example the actors project we worked on would still be under kevin newton's get help because it was something he'd been working on a little bit before the hack day in all pitched in with our time even though it was Hack day and it was a non fi logo. But the truth is i've actually never taken something from private to public and i would probably have to ask internally to find out what the former processes are there definitely are without naming things are mentioning things that is known when things are made public in. They are discussed in the community. The one thing. I would challenge people though. I think there's a lot that shopper fi has is public that is not we build it in. Maybe we solve a problem and then it doesn't really need to be developed much like maybe once a year like it's just a working tool and i don't know if they get enough publicity so if you go to shop today on the organization and get up and just click on repos and see what's publicly available. There are a lot of really cool jams. Duel boot comes to mind. That are working solutions for rubio's but since they aren't things have to change all the time we don't talk about them or the new releases or stuff like that. So definitely encouraged..

Nick schneider nick guested kevin newton noah gibbs Tom stewart aaron patterson gemma arbit brittany Seton britain sherifi Nick martin maxine Adobe faa ruby chris kevin
The Ruby Super Team

Ruby on Rails Podcast

01:57 min | 1 year ago

The Ruby Super Team

"Nick how're you doing. I am doing fantastic. Thanks for asking brittany. This is my first time on the new exciting format. I kind of like by. The way is bit feedback. How we're still in the canonical. Podcast was like a new kind of iteration. I think of like when comic books. Have kind of a new series within the canonical series. You know this is like the next greatest thing so it is. It's veto but yeah thanks have been going well. Actually as of sunday. I have been a chopper five for half a year. I can't believe to say it's been six months already. And in settling in pretty well. I still feel like i'm in my on boarding phase. I think toby road something a year or two ago. Adobe look at the ceo saying something like it takes a year to onboard. But i thought that was just like a thought leader kind of concept. But i certainly do still feel like i'm on boarding to the company in a good way. So what have you been up to chapel find now that you are. Let's say halfway on boarded. It sounds like you had a recent hack day. That's right yeah so like in my day job. We have internal tooling which i get to work on. Even though i'm not on shop i core. We still get scale like all right. We're adding an endpoint. Can it take a million or question. Our yup okay. Moving on right like so. It's pretty exciting even in the day to day but recently yeah i got to go onto a hack day so a just come back from america. I been visiting family out there. And i didn't intend to work this act. I think they do it every three months or six months. This is my first one. And since it's going to be a way for part of it. I never thought of kind of checking n and i drop in on day two of three day. Hack day and start work. And i'm like oh goodness what do i do now. And kevin newton. Who was a teammate of mine. Now works on a code foundations team. Message me and said hey. Join my team. We're working on something. Cool all right. Let's do this

Brittany Nick Adobe Kevin Newton America
"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

Ruby on Rails Podcast

07:52 min | 1 year ago

"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

"Up with here so i wanna get more stable with the overall architecture so that we can confidently tell folks. Hey the doors are open welcomed at bridgetown. Let's get this party. Started a tagline so that leads me into my next question jared. How can listener support bridgetown. Probably the first thing you can do is just simply go the bridgetown website which is Bridgetown rb dot com and we have links to really fun discord chat room. You're welcome to join there and ask questions or submit ideas or just generally hang out. And then also i'm on the get hub sponsorships programs so you're welcome to sponsor me literally like every single person that is a sponsor of the bridgetown project and of me. You know it's just it's amazing like i don't take any of it for granted. It's just awesome. That i actually get to do some open source work here and people appreciate that and that's awesome so that's another way to support the project and then the last play. Is you know if you build something with bridgetown weed left to hear about it lease get the word out so we can help you get the word out so outside of bridgetown are there other back. End frameworks beside rails. Even keeping a close eye on. Yeah there've been so many. Good ruby frameworks for web development. And i always feel a little bad when i look at different ones and start to play around a bit and then think i just wanna go back to rails because i do believe in a rising tide floats all boats. It's good to have different projects in different things going on contributing to the ecosystem. However i think i finally found something. I'm kinda falling in love with and that's rhoda was initially created by jeremy evans. Who's been in the ruby community for a long time. I think he's actually one of the core team contributors to ruby. And it's a really interesting take on how you'd structure a web app It's it's based on this idea that you kind of have this tree of routes and instead of the sort of invention idea you might have with rails or even sinatra where it's like okay here's a route and then do something of that and here's another route. Then do something with that instead. It's like you kind of start with essentially slash right. It's like the root of your website and within a block. That handles that you know you might have more blocks. To handle whatever's next on the trees there might be several options there and then within each of those sub tree portions. You might have yet more blocks a handle part of that tree so know kind of in this potentially single file your literally building a tree of logic for your site and for really large applications. That might seem bananas but for maybe a simple. Api that static site might connect to the wheelhouse. I'm i'm definitely in here. It's really appealing. So i'm experimenting with that and that's been really fun ball. I definitely gonna have to have jeremy on the podcasts as well so connor recommended you. I'm just going to keep the chain alive. I'd love to hear a rota themes podcast. That sounds awesome. all right. it's on it's on the list. So jared i know you are a self professed nerd and i know you love the marvel cinematic universe for the listeners who might have not dived into it yet. What do you recommend as the must watch movie or series doctor. Strange i love benedict cumberbatch. So i will second that yeah. It doesn't always come up as someone's favourite movie or even top five everyone's always ranking and making lists so. I don't always see doctor strange float up to the top again kind of a funny thing. I didn't grow up reading comics. I wasn't into the you know the comic book scene but my dad had been in his teenage years. So i kind of heard these like second hand stories of like the comics. He loved most to when he was reading them back in the day and doctor strange one of his favorite characters. So he tell me all about you know these wild stories of like alternate dimensions and mystical arts. And all this kind of stuff. It sounded really cool as somebody. Who's like what kind of comic would. I wanna read about. That definitely sounded appealing. Asai went into the movie with kind of high hopes that it would be as just wild. And mind-bending is the you know the comics seemingly had been and i got all of that so yeah i love doctor. Strange i'm super excited about the sequel. The most i really enjoying low key so far. That's i think that might be my favorite of the new disney series. I think the character of low key and just the whole premise of it is awesome and then have to check that out. I washed wanda vision. But i haven't gotten into loc- yet. So i'm almost waiting for a couple of episodes. Be out so that way. I can bench it. Oh yeah it's hard to wait week from week. Oh my gosh yeah way. Too much energy is being expended on thinking about what what's going to be in the next episode where the story's going know. I find myself watching. Videos of people speculating about what's coming but it's fun. It's fun it is fun. So jared what are your thoughts on the future of the ruby and ruby on rails communities. I think the community is really healthy. And i might not have said that a few years ago i think a lot of people kind of have this angst around. I mean it's a meam at this. Point is ruby dead or israelis dead and i distinctly remember even a number of years ago now but before angular kinda rewritten so in the initial like angular days. I had people basically telling me like you're gonna have to learn angular j. ass and that's where all the energy is now. In the era of react being dominant does seem funny. But i think there was a real concern and that concern. Canada drove people to make various decisions on some teams in various projects and whatnot. And it really feels like that's turning around and you know maybe it's anecdotal maybe it's just hearsay. I don't know it feels like a lot of people who have kind of stuck around in the ruby community or rails in particular. Feel much more confident to say like you know. This is the choice we've made and it's working and we're excited about it and then there's like a whole lot of new people coming into the community. Just you know with my little bit of presence on twitter lately talking about ruby. I chat with folks who are learning ruby or maybe picked up a little bit of a few years ago and then kinda got sidetracked with other things are coming back to it now so i think it's good you know there's always more to do. There's always places to go with how we talk about. What's beneficial about learning ruby. Perhaps for the first time in a number of years it really does feel like the community is growing and is a great place to be. I totally agree. So how can listeners follow. You can follow me on twitter. And on get hub at jared see white and i also have a website. Jared white dot com on my serve. Professional web studio website is white fusion dot studio fantastic. Jared thank you so much for coming onto the show. I so admire all the work that you're doing on bridgetown and i am just so excited for the work that you're putting in there and introducing new community members through it and we'll be excited to have you on when it hits one dotto i appreciate that. Yeah thanks you've been listening to the ruby on rails podcast. Follow us on apple podcast. Google play or wherever fine. Podcasts are downloaded to stay in the loop on ruby on rails and open source software. While you're at it please leave us a review and thank you for listening..

bridgetown jared jeremy evans Asai rhoda ruby benedict cumberbatch sinatra connor jeremy disney Jared white twitter Canada Jared apple Google
"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

Ruby on Rails Podcast

07:45 min | 1 year ago

"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

"Initially. It's one of those crazy ideas. We all get at one time or another and then go. Nah no way. Like and then i was just kinda just convention about the state of jekyll on a local portland ruby form and someone there without me saying anything whatsoever. They said well. You could always fork it you know and for some reason hearing somebody else repeat back to me. My own crazy thought as like. Oh well yeah. I guess i could right. So that's how bridgetown was born. Bridgetown the name. It's a nickname for portland. Which is where. I live and work right from the get go. It was kind of this crazy idea born from the portland ruby community. And that's exactly what i did. I forked jekyll. Initially it was just literally like search and replace all the constants in various configurations to say bridgetown. Instead of jekyll. And i totally didn't expect that to work in then it did and then it's like. Oh wow this could actually work. And ever since. Then it's just been a whole bunch effort not just me but several other contributors in the open source community. That's built up around bridge tim. That's wonderful and so what was your first move after you know inventing bridgetown. Were you moving clients to it. Did you move yourself to it. You know what was that path. I try to dog food. At as much as i can. So i do have some client. Projects probably most of them still in development but yeah client projects running on bridgetown. Now instead of jekyll. I've migrated my own sites over to it of course and yeah and also just you know lots of experimenting with kind of new approaches to you know taking advantage of ruby taking advantage of jam stack architecture and and just trying to push the envelope a lot of the early things. I did after forking bridgetown where to add what i felt. Were sort of baseline things that you have to have these days. So for example. Bridgetown comes with a really nice web. Pack integration so just like with rails you can use web packard compile and serve up javascript. Css all the kind of modern front and packages that you need to install and you can do that bridgetown as well and not only that but we have a sort of automatic configuration steps you can take to add in tailwind and smother popular libraries and things like that so yeah that was sort of the early days was to kind of get to a better baseline than since then. It's just been kind of adding a lot of features that you can find now with other modern static site generator set. I feel like we really need to focus on those to stay competitive. This episode of the ruby on rails. Podcast is brought to you by scout. Apm scotty pm is leading edge. Application performance monitoring designed to help developers quickly find and fix performance issues without having to deal with the headache or overhead of enterprise platform feature was a developer centric. Ui and tracing logic that ties bottlenecks source code. Youth quickly pinpoint resolved performance issues like n plus one queries slow database queries memory blow in more scouts. Real time alerting weekly digest emails. Let you rest easy knowing that scalp on watch and resolving performance issues before your customers have received them. Scout has also launched its new air monitoring feature add on for review applications. Now you can connect your era. Reporting an application monitoring data one platform see for yourself wide developers worldwide call scout their best friend and try their monitoring and apm free for fourteen days no credit card required and as an added bonus for ruby on rails listeners. Scout will donate five dollars field source project of your choice when you deploy learn more at scout. Apm dot com slash ruby on rails. Thanks as always scout for their continued support. I follow you and bridgetown on get hub and it just seems incredibly active and i agree with you. Having these projects out there that are ruby. Base is so important to show that our community is thriving. So i just love seeing it. I'd love to hear more about your recent release so the latest release. Bridgetown zero point twenty one. We are working towards a an official one point. Oh release the part of that is to get what i call. Api stable so they're still work ongoing to get to that point but essentially the project is pretty stable. Now a lot of folks are using it in production so don't let the zero dot fool you but yeah in the latest release. It was really focused on kind of rethinking. The place of ruby. In what you're doing when you create a site so instead of ruby kind of being this implementation detail of the software of like. Oh you know this tool happens to be written in ruby but not necessarily doing anything really specific as i build my site in this release. It was really focused on. Let's take advantage of the actual ruby language to really be able to enable some cool things you can do on a site so one example is over in the rails community a really popular project from get hub. Called view component has kind of taken hold and so a lot of people are writing view components and essentially what that means is for each little piece of your site. You know whether it's naveh bar or like card over on the side or like a part of a of a blog article or any sort of little piece of the site. Visually and semantically were in the past. You think that's like a template partial or something like that with view components. There's this idea that you write actual ruby classes for each of these components and each of those ruby classes can take a bunch of different pieces of data as input do things to them and transform them in different ways and then provide all that to a sidecar template file and for anyone. That's kind of familiar with the front end world with react and view and other libraries. Like that you know. It's a very similar idea where you know you have these nice encapsulated little code files that have some kind of template associated with it and you can reuse those components in all kinds of different places. You can even create your own libraries. They're just component libraries and then use those across multiple sites so anyway view component enabled that for rails as sort of server side approach to components. And we have that in bridgetown as well. There's actually two different ways. We implemented one was to have a native component architecture for bridgetown. So you don't even need to install view component or use that he can use something that is very similar in sort of a basic sense and that works well but we also did this crazy project which amazingly ended up working where we actually can import view component as a gem for bridgetown site. And then you can use view component. Just like you would on a rail site and under the hood. There's just this little shim that kind of fools view component into thinking it's running in a rails application but it's actually not so i know it sounds wacky but it works and we have a proof of concept site where it leads up. A bunch of primer components from get hubs primer opponent library and it displays all those and it shows how to you. Know right out the r. b. code to display the components. And it's just like how use it on a rail site but it's on a bridgetown sad excite you can easily deploy that on render reversal or netla fire or any of these kind of hosting services. It's it's pretty exciting. That is super exciting. Wow i just love how inventive that is and how you know. You're almost creating a bridge between a static. Site generator and rails. So i'm curious as well. If i'm comfortable with rails..

bridgetown Bridgetown portland ruby community portland packard tim headache
WNB.Rb: Creating a Community With Jemma Issroff, Emily Giurleo and Sylwia Vargas

Ruby on Rails Podcast

01:58 min | 1 year ago

WNB.Rb: Creating a Community With Jemma Issroff, Emily Giurleo and Sylwia Vargas

"So i interview jemma on episode three sixty two so we've heard some of the origins of wnba dot rb. But recap. how did the organization come together. So like i mentioned a little last time i had been looking to get to know the ruby community quite a bit more and so i was going to all these meet ups. They were virtual during the pandemic most of them so it kind of be berlin. One day in portland one day at different meet ups meeting different people and i was seeing almost all men at these meet ups in wondering why that was the case and so started doing outreach on twitter and trying to see what was happening at at the same time was watching a lot of talks about rubiun at prior ruby conferences and watched one that emily gave from ruby rubicon in twenty twenty and just message on twitter. Saying hey i love you talk nothing else. I was going for no real annual. Thanks for giving the talk. She me back and we just started talking about the meet up from there. Emily you wanna take it away. What happened next. Yeah sure so as gemma said she deemed me on twitter and was just like. Hey i love your talk and i was like oh my god. Thank you so much you know totally makes my day when people send me compliments out of the blue and then she mentioned that she was hoping to start this meet up and wondered if i might be one of the first speakers and it turns out that i actually had tried to start a similar meet up specifically for women and non binary people in tech but before the pandemic i think we couldn't imagine it being virtual and so to have this idea of a collective of women from all over the world specifically working on ruby was like so awesome to me and so we got on a call and just hashed it out and in a month we put together the first wnba dot rb meet up in march

Jemma Ruby Rubicon Wnba Twitter Berlin Portland Emily Gemma Ruby
"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

Ruby on Rails Podcast

07:14 min | 1 year ago

"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

"Teammate is a much better way to go and curious you know. Have you seen the power dynamics shift between you know now. The demand is for developers. Have you seen any decisions made by developers lately where they see an interview process and they say absolutely not. I'm not going to do this like this is not something i feel is rights or are you seeing you know. Salary increases benefit changes. I think we all understand. That remote is probably the new standard. That i'm curious. If you've seen any power shaft yes yeah a little bit in a couple of things there. So one developers do ask me more now than ever before what the process look like for that reason. Companies more than ever before are being awesome about outlining their interview process publicly gun. And they'll have like a dedicated webpage or something within the job description potentially where it's clearly outlined in fact one of your previous guests that you mentioned too. I also recruit for a bold penguin. They have one of the best. I think they're interview guides. That could definitely get behind. People should check out but we've seen more and more of that developers love it. There's just no surprises and very clean concise. So for sure. We've seen a lot more. That i live so we all know that were. I'm based in pennsylvania. But i worked for colorado company and part of the laws in colorado. Is that you have to post the salary ranges on your job descriptions and i love that to the point where when i need to get a reference on how much were hiring for a position i can literally go on our website and look at the salary range there and there's an understanding that the candidate has also seen that salary range. Do you think we're gonna see more and more of that. And how does that change things for developers when they actually get a real salary range up from. I think it changes a lot. It's something that i've always believed in. I think it just kind of goes back to the transparency. Thought where just getting all the facts. All the data upfront is so helpful because no one wants to invest the time and then find out. Oh gosh they don't have the funding. I thought the data the sort of match my current salary or can i get a raise at this company. Salary is definitely not the end. All be all. I always have this discussion with folks. People are so great about it now. I feel like when i first started. It was a little more discreet or close to the vest about salary. Discussions people are so wide open about it. And i appreciate it oftentimes. I'll help them with that in. Go first and let them know the rangers we see and it helps so much. I feel like companies are way more forthright about it. Now we try to be air a little bit on the side of being conservative about it. Because i think it's easy to over promise like the high end of the salary range but yeah companies are being way more front about. It's great sewer developers. I think everyone's kinda got to a point. Where with just kind of lay the cards out there. And i always ask them. We'll how important is it to forsake. You leaning your dream job because it might be five gay less than you're making now or something like that like you might be way happier making salary. That's slightly less because this is the company wants to work for so we would never jeopardize that but just knowing all of those things upfront matter. A lot more of that too. You've actually touched upon a subject that i've always wanted to talk to you about and that is like your salary history so it sounds like you really shouldn't be that invested in your salary history and rather you should be more concerned about your career. Having a cohesive strategy so like a good example is you might be paid really. Well as an i see at a company but maybe ultimately you want to be a manager or you want to be a sole founder and so your next role might be a significant salary decrease. It sounds like you're saying that's okay and if it gets you to a place that you're happy that's what's more important. I don't like to see people go backwards. Frankly of salary. I really don't instinctively. No one wants to go backward on salary so i will start by saying that but the happiness level matters a lot to salaries only one component of a job. You know the people you work with mission of the company. The problems you're solving. There's so many other factors so i do always ask where salary does rink and i get all kinds of answers sometimes. It's number one. Sometimes it's like number three or four can be pretty far down the list by and large being cited to get out of bed every day and get to work is what's most important but you should be able to find that job and at least maintain the same salary or hopefully get a bump but you know i had a client recently. There are awesome. In fact i'll happy to name them and called. You need a budget. I don't know if some of the folks out there have heard of you need a budget. But they've been around a while they had signed up with us recently to do a little recruiting amazing group of people. Just awesome and some of the engineers. We're reaching out to folks about that job any of the personal finance fishing autos there who have used their product before whatnot. They just loved. It was almost like salary matter. They've they just wanted to work for that company. It was like their dream job so that can happen and people are very open to saying. Oh we'll take a look at the whole thing. All the benefits will wanna look at the offer in its totality because the ability to work on a product that that affects people's lives so positively is something i want to be a part of in in cases like that it may make sense to just take a look at the whole thing so it's a case by case basis but your happiness level. Is i think the number one factor you raise a good point there and that it might be easier to recruit for companies where it's a consumer product with. The developers might have used it themselves or a developer tool that they've used at work. Is that true. It makes a huge difference that client in particular you know it was almost like rock star status people get back to saying i've used this for the last five years of change my life. It erased a bunch of personal debt. That sort of thing. So yeah you're a company that is out there and developers are using your products. That's huge and it makes our job a little easier to because we do what we do on our end they'd be able to promote that type of service that type product can really go a long way can elicit some really positive reactions from engineers. Awesome before we wrap. I wanted to share a funny personal stories so you know during the pandemic. I decided that. I was going to invest in a treadmill and i have loved this treadmill. I use it pretty hard. You know it's important. You know to get your fitness and before you work from home all day. And unfortunately my treadmill started rock back and forth a little bit and so alternately reached out to the trenton company they send a technician. Turns out that i broke the welding. Which makes me feel pretty strong. But i'm sure it was just shoddy welding well an order confirmation yesterday. They're just shipping. The whole nother treadmill. Oh good for you. It's good and bad though. Brian because it has two hundred sixty pounds. And i'm going to have to get rid of the other treadmill so for a moment there i will have two treadmills. Bud i just thought it was a funny case of you. Know software as well just sending near random order confirmation for new treadmill no follow-up nothing and so if i had been paying attention i just would have had us two hundred and sixty pound beast. Show up my house and yes while while the only way to lift that two hundred sixty pounds with ambition. That's true out sums it up. That's right you.

pennsylvania Brian two hundred sixty pounds yesterday four five one component first two hundred and sixty pound two treadmills trenton one factor last five colorado years three one
"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

Ruby on Rails Podcast

04:50 min | 3 years ago

"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

"And I was quite impressed with with how was to write in those languages compared to the Java that I was writing at the time. And I also started to meet local reduce there weren't a lot of things happening with the ruby community that. Point Chad valor, happened to just moved to Colorado, so become friends with Chad and era Howard and Jerry hind Gardner who are longtime ruby already in the area, and that my interest in networking and also my sort of newfound interest in ruby led me to create the boulder review user group in early two thousand six January and and that much at that point. It was it was off to the races. And it was very very exciting time, and I really really loved it. So can you tell us the origins of ruby central and how you got involved? Yes. So I didn't get involved officially with ruby central into until two thousand twelve Chad feller was one of the directors when I met him in two thousand five and start going to ruby central events. But at that point, they least they hadn't approached me to help out. I did from my organizing of boulder ruby get involved with mountain west and two thousand seven which was the first regional re conference in March two thousand seven and so I helped co organize that with Mike Moore pet Eyler and did that for three years. I I did probably the least amount of the work of the three. But certainly I was involved and ident- started my my own conference in boulder in two thousand ten which was mountain rock a Rocky Mountain ruby, and it was towards the end of that. That doesn't twelve win. The original directors of ruby central were basically done they were ready to do something else. And so they started to retire resign and found others in the community to take over their spots. And so heaven Phoenix and been Scofield had already taken two of the three spots. And so when David black was the final one to to resign from the original directors. They asked me if I would be willing to help out in. I said, yes. So that's that's how it came to be one. Okay. Well, let's let's talk about rails compensate, one of the conferences that ruby central together. So give us a peek behind the scenes how much work goes into putting together something like rails com. It's it's a lot of work. I will not lie. It is is probably what you expect and probably more. First of all we have to full-time employee's ruby central that is their job. To put on the conferences. And I would say that any point in time eighty percent of their efforts are going towards the the current upcoming conference. But there's always stuff going on further advance. So for example, about twenty four months out. We start talking about that the next conference in in site, selection and figure out where that conference is going to be whether that's become for reels comf- and their site visits to go in. And then I would say about nine months out we start to most retention courses on the current conference. But we start to din spend a little more time on the upcoming conference. So for example in September and October. We start talking about a few things for rails comp. But it really was until November win the team switch gears and starts to spend most of his time on that. The the team is has it down though. It's a well oiled machine in terms of a lot of logistics. But the one. Thing that does sort of change every time is that program aspect because the team, you know, Abby, and Heather Heather and Shirley in Eric who who basically all take part of the the actual organizing of physical vent, logistics communication sponsorships. All this earth thing there they've got their part down. But the program piece, which is what the directors are primarily responsible for which is the content. You love how it's presented who's involved? That's all something that we own it prematurely, and one of the pieces of that is that we form a program committee of of peers from the community, there's usually at least six of them, and they work with the directors to put on the conference to to define the this. If pe- the call for proposals, and and what what we're looking for. And and they drive a lot at they. They do..

Chad feller Chad valor boulder boulder review David black Rocky Mountain Chad Jerry hind Gardner Phoenix Colorado Mike Moore Scofield Eyler Howard Abby Heather Heather Eric Shirley twenty four months
"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

Ruby on Rails Podcast

02:53 min | 3 years ago

"ruby" Discussed on Ruby on Rails Podcast

"Your host Britain Martin on December twenty eighth the call for papers open rails, con twenty nineteen this year's conference will be from April thirtieth may second in Minneapolis. Minnesota quoting from the CFP. We wanna miss a beginner intermediate advanced level material overall, we are looking for talk of interest rails developers. And we take a pretty broad view of what that means. If it's interesting to you chances are we love to see it. Joining the on the podcast today is mardi hot one of the directors of ruby central. Welcome to the show mardi. Thank you. It's pleasure being here. Excellent. Well, mardi can you? Please kick it off by telling us your developer origin story. Sure. Sure. I have a fairly long and non traditional developer origin story. It starts with me as a kid wanting to play video games back in the late seventies early eighties and getting into technology and finding that I liked computers quite a bit. But for whatever reason, I did not think that that was a viable career. I guess thought computer science, and all that was I was too challenging and required too much training for me to actually succeed at and so I did a number of things one being in the army and to being musician professional musician for number of years before I finally sort of ended up on the technology track. And it turned out that when I was a musician. I also trained his an audio engineer. And so is doing a lot in studios, and that was really fun, and I enjoyed sort of the logical nature of of working in a studio. And also during that time, I was helping out at the music school that I had got my training from turned out. I knew more about computers than anywhere else there. So I started doing networking stuff in helping them with anything to do with their with their computer systems, and this was in the early nineties and the internet came available to. Public and I started getting dates Tim L and then landed my first programming job in ninety seven and I had no formal training at all at that point. I have self taught from there on at that. Clint now how did you get involved in the ruby on rails community? Sure. So this would have been two thousand five I had just moved to Colorado from Kansas. And I wanted to have a little more sort of control over my destiny in sort of how jobs were it was not a good market time. And so I started networking a lot. And I remember going to no fluff just stuff conference event in Denver, and I met Dave Thomas and some others and I saw talk on rails and on ruby..

mardi developer ruby Britain Martin Minneapolis Minnesota Denver engineer Dave Thomas Clint Tim L Colorado Kansas