17 Burst results for "Royce White"

"royce white" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

11:39 min | 1 year ago

"royce white" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"What people are doing though and this is One of the one of the biggest roadblocks for for the topic to come into the space it needs to is is that people are very unaware of the different ways. Anxiety can manifest so for example Away to attack a Royce would be to say. Oh Oh you can't get on planes so your anxiety is hindering you from being the NBA player that you could which which is bullshit because how many have you heard that are hugely originally successful. People like Dj Salad or Whoopi Goldberg. or any of these people that are terrified to fly or were terrified to fly that would take buses from one coast to the other coast because they wouldn't get on a plane no problem you just make the schedule around sounded in and so even in one of the things that they did that makes that shows you the level corruption in and when you say like well. Is it better to start. We have to start somewhere. Yes ask but you can't start somewhere with a bunch of corrupt people and that's that's part of the issue with any institution trying to create a changes you do have you. Can't weed out people having anxiety to your depression but you can weed out people who are willingly corrupt. Now when you say corrupt though that to me means like criminal behavior or stealing from the lake describe describe what you mean by corrupt. I mean corrupt in corrupt motive corrupt process of dealing I think a corruption more whereas in like human beings have the potentialities to always be corrupt in their everyday behaviors. But there are those of us that are exercising corruption at a at a higher clip clip So I I don't think it has been explicitly criminal but you know I understand what you're saying but some of these people may be criminal but that's a whole nother. That's a whole nother debate. But you know my my point is here's what they tried to do they the NBA basically try to say well. You can't fly. You can't play in this league. And they let the media perpetuate that because because all the fans can here in this vacuum EST media consumption era is well. How's he going to get back to backs all the NBA The NBA? He player defied every game. How is he going to do it? He can't do it but the reality is that what I actually asked for. And what was supported by medical professionals involved was allow how me to bust two games win. It's possible so if we're going from Chicago to Minneapolis. which is a six hour drive? It's totally reasonable. That I would make that drive instead of take that flight now if I I have to fly from New York to La on a back to back then. I have to fly and we'll deal with that. Have you been buying anywhere aware and the last couple of weeks when you're going to work out flu everywhere. went to Indiana a went to Miami. Flew here flying to Cleveland on Monday. Flying back to Minnesota on Tuesday theories out. Is that overblown those concerns Yeah I wouldn't say overblown that's it's probably not fair Th they're valid concerns but I'm not too worried by having a fly. Come season time. You know flying with your team and your coach staff and trainers is a lot different. been fined by yourself commercial so the point that I think you touched on well. Is that you who have been able to do. Great things with anxiety. I have been able to do great things being Zion. If we take a score of people who have talked about these issues we usually only we know about these people in their issues because they've already done great things and we can even go as far as say people who have tragically ended up taking their own lives. I don't know to better musicians than been Chris Cornell and in print and say prince two because the drug issue is obviously of the spectrum as well so I don't know to better musicians than that of all all time so we're lying to ourselves if we try and create this pigeon hole where we say. Let's put all the people who have mental health issues in there and then we can carry on with society Well because without those people we wouldn't even have the society we have and the people who we don't find out about their issues they're still having those issues that's just the reality is that there's so much that's misunderstood because people are not willing to talk about it because of the stigma that comes along with it like I. I think that most people think that mental illness and anxiety disorder and the spectrum of mental illness is all in your brain that there's snow physical manifestation of it and I mean I don't know about you but when I when I am in my fighter flight my my place of anxiety desiigner of chronic anxiety generalized anxiety disorder. It's a physical pain. It's not a mental anguish. It's like my I'm nauseous. My heart heart rate is up. I feel sweaty. There's no relief. You can't really eat what it does to my stomach is is I think the most uncomfortable part that feeling nauseous the nausea the feeling. Like you can't control like you can't take care of things there. There's just a heightened. Every the sound distortions. My thing is imagine a society in groups of people who are trying to stigmatize mental health mental illness. To say that these people are weak. And you're facing a an entire layer of extra burden a day and still you're able to be the success you are like to me. That's what made the accusations ends of players faking it. So abhorrent to me is like you're letting the stigma or your lack of awareness project a false stigma on me to have to deal deal with when we both just have a conversation honestly about what. This topic isn't what it means and we'll come to an understanding where both of us will clearly be more sympathetic. Thanks to one another's just daily being and I think that's the gym in the midst of conversation about the threat of athletes. Faking injuries. Smart people were just would just go there automatically addict but when you're a corrupt you go around that so and this is what I said. I said because the question was well well how do we measure it you know. How do we measure mental health? I said well the the first thing is you. You'd be humble enough to not think that you're going to be measuring anything because you went to school for sports management and not psychology. So that's probably the first step you should take but but just in procedural standpoint. Let's acknowledge the fact that when you have an athletic injury there's always a verbal test so let's say I roll my ankle okay and You know anytime you wrote an ankle you tear the fibers. You there actually is a tear you may have just not completely snapped a tendon where you need surgery or things. I like that or the muscle or whatever so you got swelling bruising. You got tenderness you got loss of mobility when you come back competition even after. The swelling is gone after the bruising healed when you've allotted the time that they think is proper for you to heal based on previous injuries that other people have had the final say is still you going to court. Let's say or field doing a lap doing a sprint doing down and back hopping on one leg and the doctor says how do you feel and at that point any player has the same potential. Oh to fake or Malinga physical injury the same way. They would mental health issues guys. This mental health one is actually a a place of you could say understanding. It's a place of common ground. That's that's been laid before us. Let's just tap into. Let's walk across that ground together and the sympathy is laying right there for us to utilize and be able to you know e some of the hostility. I think the same thing is true for for every social issue we face whether it's women's rights. LGBT rights religion politics education marriage. You go right down the line. The psychology of the human mind is the common ground. It is common bottom. Have other athletes come to you with their own stories of mental illness. Yes countless I mean just you know countless people in general different public figures of different fields. And you know it's always really special to me to have that happen. That's that's probably one of the most close fulfilling pieces of this whole journey was just to actually be affirmed in let into how prevalent is actually. It's how how happy are you that you were. You know that you came out with this. Did you ever think about. Maybe that would have been better to kind of keep it because people talk about it so much and it had some effect in your draft stock possibly. Yeah I never worried about that I just I noted is more important. There's more people that are affected And in a positive way by me talking about it then just a negative effect. It has on me and You that'd be very selfish for me to worry about the negative impact on myself being one person then millions and millions of people worldwide. I really do believe in in writing my piece that everybody is going through something. So knowing that it doesn't discriminate knowing that I'm trying to change the sigma and not only for you know people in sports but all over the member talking to my agent he said. Are you sure you want to do this. Because a lot of people are talking about suggestion. I don't know if anybody will just understand. I'm trying to help people he goes. I get it if you help one person one kid could be absolutely life. Changing a groundbreaking for that kid. Well you know I think there's so many hidden and people today that probably Maybe they talked about a little bit more and particularly if you have a platform as I do some time I think it can. I think it is therapeutic. I can't tell you how many letters I received from people thanking me for writing this book and talking about the same thing they experience going up and talking about how they got through it and how I got through What do you think there is so much? Shame and stigma around mental health and especially around men with mental health issues. Yeah well I think the issue is twofold. I Say I say that we've done a poor job in media and entertainment and in storytelling telling of depicting the human psyche accurate So I think we've done a poor job of of actually being as as detailed as we would have needed to be for there not to be a stigma there like that kind of superficial stigma like. Oh you're crazy or you know. Oh you're you know you're out of your mind into your news that terminology all the time. You're crazy you're out of your mind and we say as if it's an insult but here's the thing though the the problem with it is and I think this is a bigger problem that we have linguistically As I lay great use it we use it to fold. We use a twofold we use it casually as a joke and then we also use it as an insult and then we also use it when we really WANNA define somebody who may actually be having the worse side the spectrum and so when you use a word off three ways you're obviously going to run into an off real situation in people trying to understand what is meant right because there is is no perfect language because everyone brings to language their own experiences their own hurt their own heartache. Their own baggage in words matter. I think that's the first issue but the the second part of it is that mental health is the actual nut.

NBA anxiety Whoopi Goldberg. Royce Chris Cornell Cleveland Chicago New York Miami Indiana Zion Minnesota swelling flu La Minneapolis.
"royce white" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

08:47 min | 1 year ago

"royce white" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"We continue to try and negotiate some type of love movement on the policy because like I said the medical freshman was involved recommended. It so the next thing we'd suggested that we create a policy and you know. They scoffed golf. Debt that you know and so in response allowed general managers a lot of coaches a lot of other players team owners and the the sports media. They all scoffed at that idea. And you know here. We are five six years later and there's been recent stories not only in the sports world world but specifically in the sports world about more and more people sharing their struggles with mental health. And you know you and I were on probably the front end of that waves and you know six years later with with all the inertia going that way the NBA has just tasked Leah affirm that position without any reconciliation Cillian. That they were supposed to it. You know five short years ago and nothing ultimately you know. My message was was simple. It was that mental health is number one the biggest social issue we face which is what I said then it also is in need of priority and ultimately policy and even more or so than those three obvious points my message was that the psychology of human beings. The human mind is where we should be focusing our energy and in time and it's not going to be an easy solution. There may never be a solution because it's that complex but that is probably the the best reason why are focused. needs to be see there and if we're not even having that conversation or even worse gerrymandering that conversation when it comes about Then wearing a very very bad spot and and I mean all in all that's pretty much a condensed version of what's what's happened with me over the last five years in you know you've been right there so this story where he just pains me because it speaks to so many issues. It speaks to the stigma that is around mental illness. It's speaks to discrimination around disability. It speaks to taking away someone's livelihood because they don't understand understand how to deal with it and I think it's important for people to understand a little bit about anxiety and You know a part of the reason why I wanted to speak to you. Is We connected because I also have generalized anxiety disorder and have had obsessive compulsive disorder. And I really understand how debilitating it is and I feel as though it is obviously something people. Don't talk about but for me to not talk about it. I always felt like I was hiding something especially because in my industry what happens is you go in for a physical much like your business before you started production and they ask you if you're on any medications occasions they ask you if you've ever not been insured before they ask you if you've ever not been able to work for any reason and I felt like before I went public with my diagnosis that I had this deep dark secret that I was never really being honest just about and what happened with me is is after. Milos born. My first son. My anxiety got so bad that I couldn't I couldn't go to work. I couldn't get up in the morning and and I was shooting a show called mistresses at the time and I missed has two weeks of work because I was not able to get out of bed and function and I kept that and production kept kept a secret for me for a long time and I was always so afraid that someone was going to find out and I had unwritten over and over about this topic from for for years. But I'd never done anything to release like not bad or anything you know which is ironic. Because 'cause I write up Ed's for everything it's like. Oh I had coffee this morning gonNA ride and how bad about it but I never I never I was like you know what I'm going to write this and it's just GonNa sit there but at least it will be prepared for when I'm strong enough to to release it and then finally I feel like and I think part of you coming forward with your story. Having people around me coming to me for advice I felt like okay. The time is the time is is right and I released an op Ed for Time magazine about anxiety and I have to tell you I felt like the weight of the fucking world was lifted off my shoulders because I was able to to be honest about myself and end as ah soon as I was able to put that into the universe my truth my my reality with mental illness. It almost de stigmatized it for me which then allowed me to speak about it because I was holding stigma? What's interesting about that? I think this was more of the intuition that I had At Twenty one coming into this league that has you know as a as a global brand it has reached as far as you possibly could imagine. I mean everybody from ages. Seventy down to age seven are fans of basketball are fans of those players are fans of the culture. That stems from such a big company company especially a sports company of that magnitude in the personalities are involved. I said and so we're stuck out to me was that it was obvious to me that being being open and honest about mental health struggles is the first step the first of efficient step in treatment and actually healing and Ashley Ashley not only healing internally but then also trying to find support from others which is what you need at some point. I mean they're going to be able to face those challenges alone and and so the approach that the League took the approach that the sports world has taken in I think is a microcosm of the largest society. Is that if we these people out or if they get over it or if we establish a culture or system where we de incentivized advised those people from putting their burdens on us and US having to acclimate to their burdens than we will somehow usurp any of the high maintenance you you know that they bring and what I told the. NBA In our meetings behind closed. Doors is listen. You can try and push me out or make. It seem like I'm asking for special treatment treatment but what you're doing ultimately is. You're you're telling the people that come after me. That have these issues that it's not safe for them to speak about these issues and I and while you may be convincing yourself that you will then we them out the false premise. There is that more people have these issue than you ever could realize so. Actually what you're doing is you're singling out the people who are on the bench track to actually recovering because the people who are willing to step out step outside the stigma face stigma faced judgment are the ones who are further. Along the road of actually overcoming those issues and I suffer from depression. Depression is with me on a daily basis. It is time for sport to accept its responsibility. Not with this issue as records numbers that I'm really close to. Of course I feel pressure but we'll play we'll fight and I will what's going on in my thoughts Wanting to take my wife they don't define me and and they'll never defy me. They'll never win win. Struggles are going to happen. And you'RE GONNA get punched in the mouth at some point but understand that you can get back up often and get back out there and everybody's going through something when everybody. Everybody has things that you can't see. You can't touch that You know they're walking around with every day Iza go to deal go and see our Rothman keeping in the in the more explode. I don't know why opened up and talked about it but ah I guess I was just sick and tired of having it inside of me for twenty plus years and I was ready to make change. I got.

NBA depression Time magazine anxiety golf Ashley Ashley Leah US basketball Milos Ed Iza Cillian Rothman
"royce white" Discussed on The Herd with Colin Cowherd

The Herd with Colin Cowherd

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"royce white" Discussed on The Herd with Colin Cowherd

"And we went through the entire draft process together, and I are individual workouts, as well, along with Mike Stott in a few other guys. So, you know, sauce, five, Draymond mind. But in terms of the, the flying piece, you know, it, it was something that I would even in high school in terms of flying when we were slide with Howard, flory, on the circuit. I didn't like it. It was something that had I just I just started having to fly frequently right around. At the time out panic attack so going out of town and having panic facts, not knowing that you're dying or not. 'cause that's what panic attacks feel like kinda kinda gave me a PTSD around traveling in general, on top of the fact that I, I really don't like heights and I'm super uncomfortable. Thirty thousand feet in there. I'm gonna comfortable in buildings with, with, with, with, with the elevated it has more than thirty floors if I'm being honest. But, you know, I dealt with they went out in high school, and I it at Iowa State I flew to every game nearly except to, I think Kansas state, and Missouri. But every other game I flew to Michigan when we went to Michigan played in Ann Arbor, food there before the conference play and yeah, just it was a it wasn't issue. But it wasn't an issue that kept me from playing and it wasn't an issue that kept me from planet, a berry high level. Like in a historic level. I don't think there's many players. In history of later. Live their team in all five stats. My certainly don't think there's many in the power six conference. I know there's not many in the big twelve. So, yeah, the flying was an issue, but it was never an issue that stopped me from playing on a very high up. Okay. So when did winter in was during the draft process was after you were drafted when when, when did this happen that, you know, it gets out that Royce white? He, he doesn't he doesn't like lying and, and that becomes an issue with these rockets. Yeah. I mean I. It was always out. I talked about having anxiety and not liking to fly before the draft. I talked about it through the process, which the media doesn't get to see and fans don't get to be a part of. But you know, I talked openly about monies to draft process when I went to my interviews with teams during individual workouts. I talked about my anxiety and my fear flying, and everybody was aware of it. If it never really became a race doesn't like the fly. Now there's an issue we saw the traveling issue if people would be close them out and go back and, and really take a comb to the, the media in sequence of events. The first thing that USA, rockets warranted to dress with the traveling because that was the issue that everybody was was talking about it was unique, that this basketball player doesn't like to fly and how about us thank his career because they fly so much. And you know, people have short memories if not. So long ago that they only two buses in the NBA for NBA players. I know thirty forty years seems like a lot but, but not to me. I read in hundred years spans, but anyway, so they wanted to address that issue first, but it was the one on the table and into them that was solved the issue. And when I in the doctors involved told him at the time is, that's not the issue anxiety isn't just about phobias his anxiety than just about phobias. The treatment of anxiety isn't just the band dating of a phobia, or trying to, you know, navigate around with fear flying. If that's not it. But they wanna do that anyway. Which was part of an arrogance that they showed throughout the process of talking about Mr. helping his show to this day. And what we decided was that I'd be able to drive the game impossible and fly when I had to and that's. Reasonable reasonable plan..

Howard Mike Stott Michigan PTSD NBA Ann Arbor Royce white Iowa flory USA basketball Kansas Mr. Missouri Thirty thousand feet thirty forty years hundred years
"royce white" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"royce white" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"Creates a very difficult landscape, navigate when you're the athlete who's suffering from mental illness so research there isn't a ton. And that's one of the things we wanna do at the center is especially in the Canadian context. Create more research in this area. Interesting interesting. How do you feel that? You are only believe correct me if I'm wrong, you only one of two centers in the world the UK and Canada you being Canada have a facility like Hughes. Why why are we here in the twenty first century looking just the number two? It's a great question. I mean, it's massive undertaking. Especially in the Canadian context because of the way that our healthcare system works the first is actually in in Sweden, and because they've national healthcare system. It was much easier to set up we are running into a lot of barriers around provincial regulations and billing who can see province introduce dictionary. And who can see patients inter jurisdictional and things like that. In addition to that. I don't think sport has been ready to address this issue, certainly even in the last five years, so although it sort of no-brainer to a lot of us. There's a lot of other people who are like, what do you mean athletes in mental illness? So it doesn't quite sunk in yet for everyone. So when you say, it's funny because when you say, what do you mean athletes have mental illness as I was kind of studying up on what you guys do it dawned on may to ask is it possible that the high level of competition, and the fact that children start competing so much younger in a structured competitive environment. Is it possible that the sport itself is engendering and promoting mental illness amongst the athletes. Yeah. Certainly we see a lot more early sports specialization from our young children and a lot of that. Do parents wanting to be have an excellent beyond or the next NHL players. So they're putting their kids in sports really early. But research shows that early sports specialization has a lot of negative effects, including on mental psychological health and on the development of use their physical literacy and their skills. So early sports specialization definitely has has played a role in maybe an increase. I can't say that for sure, but it increase in the mental health challenges. We're seeing an athlete's certainly sport creates a stressful environment. It adds a whole layer of stress that you don't have as non athlete, and so if you have a genetic predisposition to have a mental illness that stressful environment could be a trigger. I like logical concern or will exacerbate something that's already. There is interesting. Chris you say that because with young athletes, go into Lee organizations bid, an NF. Or soaker a basketball baseball. They will have physical screening to assess anything that might present later on in their career or whatever. But how how far away away from addressing the mental issue about being able to identify seeing as you say, they might be predisposed by their own genealogy to have some kind of condition. How far do you think we're away from seeing that become an integral Pont? I mean, certainly we have the tools now to screen for mental health challenges as athletes are coming into programs or institutions, it's just not recognized universally that athletes wellbeing and performance is not only linked to their physical health, but also to their mental health so people could implement these procedures tomorrow, whether they're going to or not has a lot to do about mental health literacy, an awareness that we just haven't reached shed in this community. Well, so speaking of that because we we've got about two minutes left, and God, we could talk to you all day on this code, by the way. It's it's amazing. How expansive this topic is how esoteric it is. Because there's so many people that really need to be educated about mental health, and it really is health. It's about mental health..

Canada NHL UK Hughes Sweden basketball Chris Lee baseball two minutes five years
"royce white" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

05:12 min | 2 years ago

"royce white" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"Wow. Well, said thank you to head. The Berlin assistant professor at the Icahn school of medicine at Mount Sinai. Yeah. When we take this break, we're gonna come back with Krista van sling land. Now, she's the co founder of Canada's first center for mental health and sport appear HD, Canada, and research in mental health, and sport an athlete herself. With no doubt, incredibly interesting point of view, Hugh Leave with with us. us. Come back. Of mental show. Fascinating as always. But now, we have Krista van sling. Co-founder of Canada's first center for mental health sport, an athlete herself Krista. Welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. Well, absolutely. You know, I'm interested to know. What is it that inspired you to make this a concentration is it something personal? And if it is too personal than forgive me. But in or is it just personal experience that you were able to make from observational standpoint. That said, hey, something has to be done. This is an area that needs some attention. Can you give us some insight? Yeah. Sure. Well, I think it's it's really all of that. My own experiences of our Siasi struggling with mental illness was not well received. I don't think sport, or at least the team that I played with was really ready to support somebody like that. And certainly the culture, wasn't optimal and sport culture in general can be. And detrimental to athletes mental health as I really struggled him. I saw a lot of gaps in the care that was available to me as an athlete, and in understanding of coaches teammates, and just the general public. So I felt really strongly that I needed to speak out until my story since doing that. It's become focus of my my life work in both work in personally. So I went onto to do a masters now at the peach level s continue to study this this topic, and that's led to the co founding of the Canadian centre for mental health and sport with Dr Durand Bush. She so interesting, Chuck because from an athlete's point of view, I'm not happy. I come find an environment. I'm working in. I will speak out. Mike people aware Christopher is now going to the next and possibly level above that by creating an environment where athletes don't just have. To make a point of saying, I have this please help me there is somewhere to go. So So Chris can you explain how you go about how you went about structuring an environment. And what were the key components to ensure there is a nurturing and good environment for athletes? I don't wanna say suffo-, but have a condition that might be detrimental. I think suffer as the perfect word people. People don't understand that. When you are when you're dealing with mental health issues. Suffering is probably the perfect were because for a lot of people you're dealing with on your own you're dealing with in isolation. You're dealing with it in fear of being stigmatized, you're dealing with it not knowing what kind of reception you're going to receive when you come forward and ask for help. And all of these things actually contribute to an environment of suffering. And so when you say someone suffers with mental health issues, I think suffering is the perfect word. Yeah. I always tell people that mental illness is more like diabetes than a cold. And that you don't really ever get back to your normal state of functioning, but you're in a recovery period. So your life is changed any live differently. But it doesn't mean you cannot function or you'll never be happy for me my own depression. Pills cycles. I think of it like a train that the train comes through. And it's going to pass they'll probably come around again. Right. Right. So can I ask you what are the percentages? If it is known. I'm not sure if it is what are the percentages as opposed to the general population of mental health issues with sports and more importantly high level athletes. So in general, what we're seeing from limited research is that athletes are experiencing mental health challenges mental illness more specifically at least the same rate as the general population and in certain sports with illnesses that'll be a bit higher. So eating disorders are by far the most studied mental illness in the sport context, and that can that is reached in.

Krista co founder Canada Icahn school of medicine Mount Sinai Siasi Berlin assistant professor Dr Durand Bush Suffering Christopher Co-founder Chuck Chris depression Mike
"royce white" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"royce white" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"There's an optimal level of arousal. See one have a little bit before he about to go over the field or something a little bit arousal little bit of insight because that helps your performance, but it gets a curve and you hit the Optima point. And then when it's too much it starts to become a negative. So and also like having obsessive type traits or attention to details can be a positive thing. But then like academia were I'm in or or in sports when you really focused determined and motivated and want to get it. Right. And don't like to either get it wrong or defeated to extent. It's the same kind of per you're going to have an optimal level of these traits. But once they become too much become. Detrimental. Imagined an athlete had not a far end of the spectrum OCD, but had an element of that could that be used as an invitation part of their abilities and then site for a coach because if you've got CD attention to detail is you'll thing and coaches love that better. Yep. To further bun Gary's point, which I've never thought about it's brilliant. Does that mean there's a spectrum for all of these disorders? Exactly. I mean, they're actually. It's kind of a misnomer. They're called like OCD spectrum disorders. That's the new category these disorders, but they more mean, it's a spectrum TD's type symptoms like there's ticks threats and OCD related, but I would say it's like a dimensional it's dimension. And you can have let's say obsessive like traits as a personality trait. You can have obsessive personality traits at a little bit might be helpful for you again, anything when it becomes too much it could become interfere. But you know, you gotta think the type of people that are attracted to these fields or disciplines. However, you want to call it are gonna have certain traits that attract onto the sports or to become these these elite athletes, and those traits might involve things like attention to detail. But again, I don't think that having the disorder is necessarily an advantage. Just having being slightly higher on certain traits might be well, we are already out of. Time here. But I just want to ask you one last thing from a scientific standpoint Royce brought this up talked about the stigma attached to mental illness, and why this was somewhat silly. Because of the science involve can you give us an education behind like why? And how we look at this medically clinically scientifically as opposed to the way people quote unquote, feel about mental illness. Right. It's important to understand that the rain is an organ like any other. Right. So I and I often uses analogy, it's like if you if you if you get an infection, or you know, you're gonna take an antibiotic treated, it's a physical problem with physical solution break, a leg you're going to get the treatment you need to fix it. If you have stomach cancer, you're gonna get treatment. If it's so it's the same thing when. The brain is ill. You get a neuro chemical balance, you damage, your Posner circuitry, it's just another physical problem, but at manifests itself it symptoms are mental. And because you can't and because they're subjective innocence because a person can only tell you other feeling or what they're thinking end. You can't objectively see it. It gets the stigma of Olek. Can't maybe it's not real. Or, you know, maybe you're making up just like his ical pain. You can never really know much paint. A person is in a house to tell me what they're feeling right? And we have to either leave them or not believe them. But if we can see the bloodstream down, the leg will say, okay, I believe you're paying, but you can't see, you know, most people can't see inside, others brains. And so it's just what the person is saying, and we see it as a weakness somehow like, you know, you should be able to buck up and like all your depressed. Just you know, suck it up be happy. I mean, when we really have to understand it's medical condition that needs to be treated that way. And people should not be stigmatized for having a medical condition..

OCD Olek Gary Royce Posner
"royce white" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

05:08 min | 2 years ago

"royce white" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"They have to remember all the different please what they're supposed to do. It's actually really cognitively demanding. But so a lot of people tend to. Tends to be a higher rate of anxiety disorders amongst population. So with that in mind, it could be that these athletes have higher prevalence things, I the general population. So can you tell us what is going on in the brain? Have we been able to localize or map exactly what the reaction to the brain is is it is it chemical? What exactly is happening in the brain is as signaling? What is happening makes the person become debilitated by something as simple as God. I cannot go outside or my God. I can't get on this plane or something that everybody else finds so simple to right. So there's this general fighter flight response. Basically what's called the sympathetic nervous system that arouses you when there's a stressor, which is a normal adaptive response. And so basically what happens is there's a trigger. Let's say, you know, translators like you see an animal tiger. It's threatening. Then the brain releases the signals in the amid Delilah and to the height Falah, Mus that Lisa's these hormones on accuser like ACT age, which is an abbreviation or hormone that then causes quarters all response that then causes increased heart rate, shortness of breath, all these ideological reactions. So that system that kind of federal response really, do you understand very, well, what happened things I is. This response gets triggered to things that are maybe even benign or randomly triggered. And then they start learning these responses to avoid so let's say they randomly had a panic attack. And they happen to have been in a mall. Now, they're going to start associating fear with going to the mall, and then it leads to these more cognitive associations that in therapy. You're try to start to break down. So that the distress response isn't so easily triggered. Normally benign stimuli. So when you say triggers now, I wanna phrase this carefully because I don't want to confuse the issue. I'm not speaking of triggers as in the sympathetic nervous system or the in visually exposed to something or even experiencing, but can these disorders brought on by other mental health issues such as depression or maybe substance abuse, or perhaps if you're talking about sports players, the abuse of maybe steroids, or what I'm saying is can there be another stimulus other than just your brain itself? Right. So either you know, there's genetic predisposition there's learnt behaviors over time at associations. But then there are there's actually called substance or medication in juice things disorder where. Yeah. And it's actually a diagnosis where? Anxiety due to substance toxication or to withdrawal or medical treatments. Sometimes these either medications or drugs can trigger an exiled response. And so as a clinician you have to be able to ratio is it just a person who has an executive order or is it being triggered by subsidies. So that's that's one issue. Another is with depression. So there's huge as keep you come into the coq of depression anxiety about sixty percent of people have depression also have anxiety vice versa. And I don't think it so much that one is triggering irks. I think they have a lot of underlying geology or causes. So for instance, fsr is or serotonin selective. Serotonin reuptake inhibitors can treat both depression anxiety. Something that can treat. Both you start to send the mechanisms related are similar and that being said depression can exacerbating Zayed's and vice versa. So they don't help each other. But I don't I don't know that it's that Sony has depression, it triggers things I think they just tend to call a purpose. They have similar underlying mechanisms. Gotcha. Gotcha. Well, interesting we're talking here about mental conditions in a negative state. And it's the present and do affect people negatively all this someone of one in my mind, other any mental health conditions could actually be beneficial to an athlete or say coach. So what say that in most cases, having a full blown medical. Like psychiatric condition is probably not going to be helpful most of the time. It's a hindrance. However, there's dairy in terms of the severity of the symptoms. So there's something called the York's Dodson curve, which basically says that in terms of arousal level or inciting..

depression sympathetic nervous system panic executive Lisa York Sony Dodson Zayed sixty percent
"royce white" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"royce white" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"Life, your work, your daily activities your relationships. That's when we incinerate disorder. Interesting. You say that it's been there are a couple of high profile athletes soccer player who did have a field flying. And based in Europe in the UK and the head to drive him two games. They. Played in Italy or Germany or Spain. Otherwise, big big problem. I'm just wondering now doctor. We are talking about this condition and is prevalent throughout possibly twenty percent of adults in the USA, Ken sport, exasperate, these conditions, or is the other factors involved. I think there's we know. Yeah. In Zion offers in general like that whole category of disorder is about eighteen to twenty percent of the US population. It's the most common form of mental illness, and there's genetic factors involved as well. So basically, we have what's called the stress day at this model of psychiatric illness, which you're born the predisposition, but it will express itself depending on the stressors that you are exposed to. So whether it's high performance sports or really highly demanding job in corporate America, the stress is going to interact with your ability and probably cause a lot of being Zayeck disorders emerge or the symptoms swimmers. So I don't think it's particular that the sports it settle will bring on an exile disorder. I think those who are vulnerable or predisposing Zayed's anytime major stressor is probably gonna exacerbate the does it. So would you would you expect it to be more prevalent in an elite athletes say an NFL? Quarterback defensive lineman. Just I don't want to say I've ridge, but a high school athlete, or is it all the post. Why? Don't cope. Right. I'd say I mean, I'm not I don't know what the actual statistics are on this. But I would resumed prevalence rate is probably going to be about equal whether they're playing high school sports professional sports a lot of so do some Noor cognitive testing of athletes performance affects people need NFL NHL. And what's interesting is. I find that they really well on cognitive tests like way better than the average person. So they're about average in many things, but we also know that there is some time morbidity between or co occurrence kinky, both high intelligence and invited disorders, and these these plays naked, you memory tasks like, you wouldn't believe it makes sense..

NFL USA soccer Europe Ken sport UK Zayed Spain America Italy Germany twenty percent
"royce white" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"royce white" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"Back to playing with science. The show is a mental health show. We need some experts, and we have to I is probably familiar with neuroscientist headed Berlin assistant, professor of psychiatry at the Icahn school of medicine at Mount Sinai, doctor, how are you? Harry doing well doing well. Thanks in. What we always happy to have you on because we learned so much about the brain. And the wonder they're in. And so here's what I'm interested in. We all suffer from anxiety. We all suffer a certain amount of panic at times we all suffer from phobias. What is it that causes this to be categorized as an illness? Right. As opposed to just a condition that people experience and then move on with their lives. Right. So inside the generals normal motion the have, and it's jacked it, right? We've evolved have the spider flight response. Which is if you see something threatening. No, it arouses a lot apartments in our chemicals causes your body to respond to either freeze or run and avoid that. That harmful stimulant, but when it gets to become a disorder, basically, it's when it's being Zion or the stress or the fear you experience either specific stimuli or in general is excessive. It's persistent kit last for very long time it's out of proportion with the actual trigger or the fear of the provoking stimuli. And it causes these avoidance haters as well, so for example, sphere flying in my makes a little bit having study, but it so much that you can't even get on a plane, or it's out of a portion with the actual risks applying, you know, that's when it becomes a prominent interferes with your personal.

Icahn school of medicine Mount Sinai stimulant professor of psychiatry Harry Berlin
"royce white" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

04:47 min | 2 years ago

"royce white" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"Get them. I'm Gary O'Reilly. And I'm not this is playing with science and a recent show. We address the topic of gender in sport. Today. We explore another contentious issue that of mental health if you realize that one in five adults in the USA suffer from mental illness. It's no surprise. The serious issue is present in sport, even at the elite level. Yes. And some of sports major stars have opened up about their battles with mental illness. Michael Phelps the most decorated Olympian of all time as one of them who recently came out about his struggles with depression, another athlete to make a stand is former NBA player, Royce white who will actually be our first guest yet. And he has some fascinating views and thoughts, and it's going to be interesting to listen to him and following Royce white will be neuroscientists head abo- Lynn as well as Krista van Slinger and research at the university of Ottawa. And co-founder of Canada's first center for mental health and sports. So let's not waste more time. Shucks, straight twelve. I guess absolutely MBA first round draft picks last played for the London. Lightning of the National Basketball league of Canada. But it doesn't stop there. He led his team to the Canadian championship whilst being voted in most play that same season. That's right. Being an interesting road, so far, but there are all sorts of things to lock pack and discuss and as the title of the show will tell you mental health has played a large part in Royce whites boss, Kabul history. So Royce, welcome to the show, sir. Thanks for having me guys. Welcome. You know before we even do anything. I think it's important to have you tell your own story in your own words because there's a lot has been written about you. I've watched a quite a few little interviews of people talking about you. I've written read other things that people other players have quoted speaking about you. But now that we have you here. Let's just have you tell your story, and then we can go from there. I'll say, you know, the central theme of my story about five years ago, I had a theory, and my theory was that the mental health dynamic was at work in the NBA in large part the same way. It wasn't a greater society and that anxiety, and depression and trauma and stress an addiction, and ultimately stigma was having a very pervasive affect in the underbelly. In the league that was a intuition that I had. But in proximal sense. I'm a person who was diagnosed with anxiety disorder in highschool at the age of sixteen. My was very public about my anxiety disorder in college upon entering the draft the conversation about the two thousand twelve draft beyond Anthony Davis is extremely the excitement around Anthony Davis as extreme talent. And attributes was the mystery of of where I would be drafted in and not because I lacked the skill or I lacked passion or the intensity or the Phil for the game. It was because there was a conversation happening within the NBA with GM scouts, etc. And all of the draft prospect experts the draft board guys that was really questioning how the NBA viewed mental health, and this is before I was ever drafted. Right. So I was hearing that shatter because the players and the people with inside league are the only ones involved in that conversation. Besides what makes its way out onto the internet for the public to to interact with and even when it does it's very very minimal. You know information at the public is given access to, but I was given access to all the things at the GM were saying regards to how they fell Ding's ICTY was a risk and how mental health was, you know, more so unknown in Opole my arrival in the league when it came close to time to start the season. I went to my team, and I asked what what's the mental health policy. You know, what's the program? What what are we going to do to create the same type of environments that I've had success with in the past bid at Iowa State or bid in high school at and Hopkins ice-cool here in Minnesota, which both very progressive progressive environments in terms of the way that they've you'd mental health in again as rookie? I had no clue really what the answer was going to be..

Royce white NBA Gary O'Reilly Lynn National Basketball league of Michael Phelps Anthony Davis GM depression USA London Canada Kabul co-founder Iowa university of Ottawa Minnesota Krista van Slinger Opole
"royce white" Discussed on StarTalk Playing with Science

StarTalk Playing with Science

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"royce white" Discussed on StarTalk Playing with Science

"Landscapes navigate when you're the athlete who's suffering from mental illness so research there isn't a ton. And that's one of the things we wanna do at the center is especially in the Canadian context. Create more research in this area. Interesting interesting. How do you feel that you only want believe? Correct me if I'm wrong, you only one of two centers in the world the UK and Canada you being Canada the have a facility like Hughes. Why why are we here in the twenty first century looking at just the number two? It's a great question. I mean, it's a massive undertaking, especially in the Canadian context because of the way that our healthcare system works the first is actually in in Sweden, and because they have national health care system. It was much easier to set up we are running into a lot of barriers around provincial regulations and billing who can see province introduce dictionary. And who can see patients inter jurisdictional and things like that. In addition to that. I don't think sport has been ready to address this issue, certainly even in the last five years, so although it sort of a no-brainer to a lot of us. There's a lot of other people who are like, what do you mean athletes in mental illness? So it hasn't quite sunk in yet for everyone. So when you say, it's funny because when you say, what do you mean athletes have mental illness as I was, you know, kind of studying up on what you guys do it dawned on me to ask is it possible that the high level of competition, and the fact that children start competing so much younger in a structured competitive environment. Is it possible that the sport itself is engendering and promoting mental illness amongst the athletes. Yes, Erta we see a lot more early sports specialization from our young children and a lot of that. Do parents wanting to be have the next Olympia or the next NHL players. So they're putting their kids in sports really early. But research shows that early sports specialization has a lot of negative effects, including on mental psychological health and on the development of use their physical literacy in their skills. So early sports specialization definitely has has played a role in maybe an increase. I can't say that for sure but increase in the mental challenges, we're seeing an athlete's certainly sport creates stressed environment. It adds a whole layer of stress that you don't have as non athlete, and so if you have a genetic predisposition to have a mental illness that stressful environment could be a trigger. I like logical concern or will exacerbate something that's already. There is interesting that you say that because with young athletes, go into Lee organizations bid, an NF. Or soccer a basketball baseball. They will have physical screening to assess anything that might present later on in their career or whatever how how far away away from addressing the mental issue about being able to identify seeing as you say, they might be predisposed by their own genealogy to have some kind of condition. How far do you think we're away from seeing that become an integral Pont? I mean, certainly we have the tools now to screen for mental health challenges as athletes are coming into programs or institutions, it's just not recognized universally that athletes wellbeing and performance is not only linked to their physical health, but also to their mental health so people could implement these procedures tomorrow, whether they're going to or not has a lot to do about mental health literacy, an awareness that we just haven't reached shed in this community. Well, so speaking of that because we we've got about two minutes left, and God, we could talk to you all day on this code, by the way, it's it's amazing..

Canada NHL UK Hughes Sweden Lee soccer basketball baseball two minutes five years
"royce white" Discussed on StarTalk Playing with Science

StarTalk Playing with Science

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"royce white" Discussed on StarTalk Playing with Science

"In most cases, having a full blown medical. Psychiatric condition is probably not going to be helpful most of the time. It's a hindrance. However, there's dairy in terms of the severity of the symptoms. So there's something called the your Dodson Kerr, which basically says that in terms of arousal level or Xining. There's an optimal level of arousal. See one have a little bit before you about over the field or something a little bit arousal little bit of exciting because that helps your performance, but it gets the curve and you hit the point. And then when it's too much it starts to become a negative. So and also like having obsessive type traits or attention to details can be a positive thing both in academia were I'm in or or in sports when you really focused determined and motivated and want to get it. Right. And don't like to either get it wrong or be feed to extent. It's the same kind of Perv. You're going to have an optimal level of these traits. But once they become too much become. Detrimental. Imagined an athlete had not a far end of the spectrum OCD, but had an element of that could that be used as an Titus part of their abilities and then site for a coach because if you've got a CD attention to detail is you'll thing and coaches love that a better Europe to further bun Gary's point, which I've never thought about it's brilliant. Does that mean there's a spectrum for all of these disorders? Exactly. I mean, they're actually. It's kind of a misnomer, but they're they're called like OCD spectrum disorders. That's the new category these disorders, but they more mean, it's a spectrum of TD type symptoms like there's ticks rats OCD or later, but I would say it's like a dimensional. It's a dimension. And you can have let's say obsessive like traits as a personality trait. You can have obsessive personality traits and a little bit might be helpful for you again, anything when it becomes too much it could become interfere. But you know, you gotta think type of people that are attracted to these fields or discipline tub. You wanna call it are gonna have certain traits that attract them to the sports or to become these these elite athletes, and those traits might involve things like attention to detail. But again, I don't think that having the disorder is necessarily an advantage. Just having like being slightly higher on certain traits might be well, we are already out of. Time here. But I just want to ask you one last thing from a scientific standpoint Royce brought this up talked about the stigma attached to mental illness, and why this was somewhat silly. Because of the science involve can you give us an education behind like why? And how we look at this medically clinically scientifically as opposed to the way people quote unquote, feel about mental illness. Right. It's important to understand that the rain is an organ like any other, right? So and I often use analogy it's like if you if you if you get in Beck shin, or you know, you're going to take an antibiotic treated, it's a physical problem with physical solution break, the leg you're going to get the treatment you need to fix it. If you have stomach cancer, you're gonna get treatment. If it's so it's the same thing when. The brain is ill, you Nora chemical, imbalance damage pumps, nurse circuitry. It's just another physical problem. But at manifests itself, it's symptoms are mental. And because you can't. And because they're subjective. Innocence is a person can only tell you other feeling or what they're thinking end. You can't objectively see it on. It gets the stigmas of Olek. Can't maybe it's not real. Or, you know, maybe you're making up just like his ical pain. You can never really know much pain. A person is in a house to tell me what they're feeling right? And we have to either leave them or not believe them. But if we can see the bloodstream down, the leg will say, okay, I believe your pain. But you can't see, you know, most people can't see inside, others brains. And so it's just what the person is saying, and we see it as a weakness somehow like, you know, you should be able to buck up and like all your depressed. Just you know, suck it up be happy. I mean, when we really have to understand it's medical condition that needs to be treated that way. And people should not be stigmatized for having a medical condition..

OCD Dodson Kerr Beck shin Olek Royce Europe Gary
"royce white" Discussed on StarTalk Playing with Science

StarTalk Playing with Science

05:16 min | 2 years ago

"royce white" Discussed on StarTalk Playing with Science

"Of athletes high-performance affects people need NFL and NHL. And what's interesting is I find that they really well on cognitive tests like way better than the average person. So they're about average in many things, but we also know that there is sometimes a high morbidity between or co occurrence between people of high intelligence and invited disorders, and these these place naked, you memory tasks like, you wouldn't believe it makes sense. They have to remember all the different plays in what they're supposed to do. It's actually really demanding. But so a lot of people tend to. Tends to be a higher ratings I disorders amongst population. So with that in mind, it could be that these athletes have a higher prevalence things, I decided general population. So can you tell us what is going on in the brain? Have we been able to localize or map exactly what the reaction to the brain? Is it is it chemical? What exactly is happening in the brain is signaling. What is happening that makes the person become debilitated by something as simple as that? I cannot go outside or God. I can't get on this plane or something that everybody else finds so simple to do. Right. So there's this general fighter flight response. Basically what's called the sympathetic nervous system that arouses you when there's a stressor which is a normal again adaptive body response into basically what happens is there's a trigger. Let's say translators like you see an animal tiger strengthening. Then the brain releases the signals in the amid Delilah and to the height Falah, Mus that releases these hormones on the tight like ACT age, which is an abbreviation or hormone that then causes cortisol response that then causes increased heart rate, you know, shortness of breath, all these physiologic reactions. So that system that kind of federal response really do you understand his eulogy? Well, what happens if things warders is. This response gets triggered to things that are maybe even benign or randomly triggered. And then they start learning these responses to avoid so let's say they randomly had a panic attack. And they happen to have been in a mall. Now, they're gonna start associating fear with going to the mall, and then it leads to these more cognitive associations that in therapy try to start to break down. So that the Trent distress response isn't so easily triggered. Normally benign stimuli, trusting so when you say triggers now, I wanna phrase this carefully because I don't want to confuse the issue. I'm not speaking of triggers as in the sympathetic nervous system or the invisibly exposed to something or even experiencing, but can these disorders brought on by other mental health issues such as depression or maybe substance abuse, or perhaps if you're talking about sports players, the abuse of maybe steroids, or what I'm saying is can there be another stimulus other than just your brain itself? Right. So either genetic predisposition there's learnt behaviors overtime in associations. But then there are there's something actually called substance or medication in juice things disorder aware. Yeah. And it's it's actually a diagnosis where? Anxiety due to substance talks, occasion, or to withdrawal or SLA medical treatments. Sometimes these either medications or drugs can trigger an exiled response and still as a clinician you have to be able to get Renshi eight is it just a person who has an executive order or is it being triggered by subsidies. So that's that's one issue. Another is with depression. So this huge as keep you come into the co currents of depression anxiety about sixty percent of people have depression also having Zaidi vice versa. And I don't think it's so much that one is triggering me other. I think they have they have a lot of underlying ideology or causes. So for instance, SS arise or serotonin selective. Serotonin reuptake inhibitors can treat both depression, anxiety, something that can treat both. You you start to send the mechanisms related are similar and that being said depression can exacerbating. And vice versa. So they don't help each other. But I don't I don't know that it's that Sony has suppression it triggers things Ivy. I think they just tend to call a Percocet similar underlying mechanisms. Gotcha. Gotcha. Well, interesting Doke to we're talking here about mental conditions in a negative state. And it's the present and do affect people negatively all this summit of one in my mind, other any mental health conditions could actually be beneficial to an athlete or say a coach. So what say that?.

depression sympathetic nervous system NFL NHL cortisol Sony panic Renshi Zaidi executive sixty percent
"royce white" Discussed on StarTalk Playing with Science

StarTalk Playing with Science

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"royce white" Discussed on StarTalk Playing with Science

"Personal life, your work, your daily activities your relationships. That's when we incinerate a disorder. Interesting. You say that it's been there are a couple of high profile athletes want a soccer player who did have a feel flying. And he based in Europe in the UK and the head to drive two games. They played in. Italy or Germany or Spain. Otherwise, big big problem. I'm just wondering now doctor we are talking about this condition, and it's prevalent throughout possibly twenty percent of adults in the USA, Ken sport, exasperate, these conditions, or is the other factors involved. I think there's we know anxiety disorders in general like that whole category of disorder is about eighteen to twenty percent of the US population. The most common form of mental illness, and there's genetic factors involved as well. So basically, we have what's called the stress day Athas model of psychiatric illness, which he you're born the predisposition, but it will express itself depending on the stressors that you are exposed to. So whether it's high performance sports or a really highly demanding job that an on corporate America distress is going to interact with your ability and probably cause a lot of being Zayeck disorders emerge or the symptom swimmers. So I don't think it's particular that the sports it settle will bring on an exile disorder. I just think those who are vulnerable or predisposing Zayed's any kind of major stressor is probably gonna exacerbate this. So would you would you expect it to be more prevalent in an elite athletes say an NFL? Quarterback defensive lineman. Just I don't want to say, I've ridge a high school athlete or is the post. Why? Don't come. Right. I'd say I mean, I'm not I don't know what the actual statistics are on this. But I would resumed prevalence rate is probably going to be about equal whether they're playing high school sports, professional sports. What I a lot of So Nero cognitive testing.

USA Ken sport soccer Europe NFL UK Zayed Spain Italy Germany twenty percent
"royce white" Discussed on StarTalk Playing with Science

StarTalk Playing with Science

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"royce white" Discussed on StarTalk Playing with Science

"To plan science the show is a mental health show. And we need some experts, and we have to I is probably familiar with near scientists Berlin assistant, professor of psychiatry at the Icahn school of medicine at Mount Sinai, doctor, how are you? Harry doing well doing well. Thanks in what we always happen to have you on because we learn so much about the brain. And the wonder they're in. And so here's what I'm interested in. We all suffer from anxiety. We all suffer a certain amount of panic at times we all suffer from phobias. What is it that causes this to be categorized as an illness? Right. As opposed to just a condition that people experience the move on with their lives. Right. So exciting generals normal emotion, the have and it's jacked it, right? We've evolved the spider flight response, which if you see something threatening, you know, it it arouses a lot apartments in our chemicals causes your body to respond to either freeze or run and avoid that at that. Harmful stylish, but when it gets to become a disorder, basically, it's when it's being Zion or the stress or the series experience either to specific stimuli or in general is excessive. It's persistence it kit last for very long time it's out of proportion with the actual trigger or the fear of the provoking stimuli. And it causes these like avoidance agers as well. So for example, sphere flying in my makes a little bit of anxiety. But it so much that you can't even get on a plane or it's out of proportion with the actual risks supplying, you know, that's when it becomes a prominent interferes with your.

Icahn school of medicine Mount Sinai professor of psychiatry Berlin Harry
"royce white" Discussed on StarTalk Playing with Science

StarTalk Playing with Science

04:47 min | 2 years ago

"royce white" Discussed on StarTalk Playing with Science

"Get them. I'm Gary O'Reilly. And I'm not this is playing with science and a recent show. We address the topic of gender in sport. Today. We explore another contentious issue that of mental health if you realize that one in five adults in the USA suffer from mental illness. It's no surprise. The serious issue is present in sport, even at the elite level. Yes. And some of sports major stars have opened up about their battles with mental illness. Michael Phelps the most decorated Olympian of all time as one of them who recently came out about his struggles with depression, another athlete to make a stand is former NBA player, Royce white who will actually be our first guest yet. And he has some fascinating views and thoughts, and it's going to be interesting to listen to him and following Royce white will be neuroscientists head abo- Lynn as well as Krista van Slinger and research at the university of Ottawa. And co-founder of Canada's first center for mental health and sports. So let's not waste more time. Shucks, straight twelve. I guess absolutely MBA first round draft picks last played for the London. Lightning of the National Basketball league of Canada. But it doesn't stop there. He led his team to the Canadian championship whilst being voted in most play that same season. That's right. Being an interesting road, so far, but there are all sorts of things to lock pack and discuss and as the title of the show will tell you mental health has played a large part in Royce whites boss, Kabul history. So Royce, welcome to the show, sir. Thanks for having me guys. Welcome. You know before we even do anything. I think it's important to have you tell your own story in your own words because there's a lot has been written about you. I've watched a quite a few little interviews of people talking about you. I've written read other things that people other players have quoted speaking about you. But now that we have you here. Let's just have you tell your story, and then we can go from there. I'll say, you know, the central theme of my story about five years ago, I had a theory, and my theory was that the mental health dynamic was at work in the NBA in large part the same way. It wasn't a greater society and that anxiety, and depression and trauma and stress an addiction, and ultimately stigma was having a very pervasive affect in the underbelly. In the league that was a intuition that I had. But in proximal sense. I'm a person who was diagnosed with anxiety disorder in highschool at the age of sixteen. My was very public about my anxiety disorder in college upon entering the draft the conversation about the two thousand twelve draft beyond Anthony Davis is extremely the excitement around Anthony Davis as extreme talent. And attributes was the mystery of of where I would be drafted in and not because I lacked the skill or I lacked passion or the intensity or the Phil for the game. It was because there was a conversation happening within the NBA with GM scouts, etc. And all of the draft prospect experts the draft board guys that was really questioning how the NBA viewed mental health, and this is before I was ever drafted. Right. So I was hearing that shatter because the players and the people with inside league are the only ones involved in that conversation. Besides what makes its way out onto the internet for the public to to interact with and even when it does it's very very minimal. You know information at the public is given access to, but I was given access to all the things at the GM were saying regards to how they fell Ding's ICTY was a risk and how mental health was, you know, more so unknown in Opole my arrival in the league when it came close to time to start the season. I went to my team, and I asked what what's the mental health policy. You know, what's the program? What what are we going to do to create the same type of environments that I've had success with in the past bid at Iowa State or bid in high school at and Hopkins ice-cool here in Minnesota, which both very progressive progressive environments in terms of the way that they've you'd mental health in again as rookie? I had no clue really what the answer was going to be..

Royce white NBA Gary O'Reilly Lynn National Basketball league of Michael Phelps Anthony Davis GM depression USA London Canada Kabul co-founder Iowa university of Ottawa Minnesota Krista van Slinger Opole
"royce white" Discussed on I Am Rapaport

I Am Rapaport

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"royce white" Discussed on I Am Rapaport

"Okay i'm just gonna say this the two thousand seventeen sick fuck of the year winter he he was a clearcut favorite amongst the rest right now it's just about who's going to get second place who's the winner was clearcut from the beginning along with that like i said we have reut jones jr sixtime world champion boxer in four we classes pensacola in the mother fucking house great interview with roy then we got four nba player in store in iowa state royce white you remember that name royce white nah nah not too familiar with dead member he was a guy two thousand twelve draft he was obviously the best player in two thousand twelve draft arm and he was struggling with anxiety god drafted by the houston rockets we talked about this i remember this is pre park as well we talk about it and and he added anxiety so bad he was afraid to fly and it became a whole thing and inevitably you know he breaks down his story you know he was released by the houston rockets i think you know they consider them too much of a problem it very outspoken he's in the same draft class with our guy andre drummond dame lillard anthony davis bradley beal big do like six nine to seventy like a like you know they were saying lebrun ish handle the ball was it was a stand out in the tournament so we got royce white talk to my histoy where he's at he's still play a pro bowl i think you're wanna back in the nba's to tell did not to wind up in the back a backup in the nba but he's definitely outspoken.

roy pro bowl nba iowa royce white houston andre drummond anthony davis lebrun