14 Burst results for "Royal Society Journal"

"royal society journal" Discussed on Kottke Ride Home

Kottke Ride Home

02:32 min | 4 months ago

"royal society journal" Discussed on Kottke Ride Home

"So promising methods for up cycling plastic into more valuable materials and the curious case of the extremely moldy twiggy. Here are some of the cool things from the news today. Tar Degrades you know the adorable microscopic water bears that can survive basically anything like being frozen for thirty years and then being revived again or as a species surviving all five mass extinctions. will newly discovered strain of tar grade has another superpower protection from lethal levels of ultraviolet light. A recent study published in the Royal Society Journal found that the Para macrobiotics because our strain of tar grade I detected in Bangalore exhibits of fluorescent shield to protect against UV, light causing them to glow. Quoting. C.. N. For the experiment send deep M S RAPA Assistant Professor at the Indian Institute of Science exposed this tar grade along with another type of tar degrade hippies exemplary to UV, light all of the Para macrobiotics agreed survived for thirty days after fifteen minutes of exposure to the lethal raise the other tar degrade died within twenty four hours of exposure. The hardy tar degrade was also the only specimen observed the experiment to have glowed under the harsh light which the researchers revealed the key to their survival. The research team proposed that the tar degrade has fluorescent shield that absorbs the harmful light and emits a harmless blue light, which is what causes them to glow after discovering that their ability to glow was the tar degrade secret weapon S. Orapa made a fluorescent extract from the Para macrobiotics be alarmed strain and covered the other type of tar degrade used in the experiment in the protective material when exposed to UV light this enhanced tardy grade which had originally died from exposure to the radiation after a day showed partial tolerance and quotes. The light used in the experiment is stronger than the UV light that reaches us on earth from the Sun. But after conducting more experiments on tar degrades Esmeralda to expand his research and says, it's possible in extract of the fluorescent shield from the tar degrade could be used as a sunscreen for humans. Tar. Grade. SUNSCREEN coming soon to goop.

RAPA Assistant Professor Bangalore Indian Institute of Science Royal Society Journal S. Orapa
New species of water bear uses fluorescent 'shield' to survive lethal UV radiation

Kottke Ride Home

02:09 min | 4 months ago

New species of water bear uses fluorescent 'shield' to survive lethal UV radiation

"Tar Degrades you know the adorable microscopic water bears that can survive basically anything like being frozen for thirty years and then being revived again or as a species surviving all five mass extinctions. will newly discovered strain of tar grade has another superpower protection from lethal levels of ultraviolet light. A recent study published in the Royal Society Journal found that the Para macrobiotics because our strain of tar grade I detected in Bangalore exhibits of fluorescent shield to protect against UV, light causing them to glow. Quoting. C.. N. For the experiment send deep M S RAPA Assistant Professor at the Indian Institute of Science exposed this tar grade along with another type of tar degrade hippies exemplary to UV, light all of the Para macrobiotics agreed survived for thirty days after fifteen minutes of exposure to the lethal raise the other tar degrade died within twenty four hours of exposure. The hardy tar degrade was also the only specimen observed the experiment to have glowed under the harsh light which the researchers revealed the key to their survival. The research team proposed that the tar degrade has fluorescent shield that absorbs the harmful light and emits a harmless blue light, which is what causes them to glow after discovering that their ability to glow was the tar degrade secret weapon S. Orapa made a fluorescent extract from the Para macrobiotics be alarmed strain and covered the other type of tar degrade used in the experiment in the protective material when exposed to UV light this enhanced tardy grade which had originally died from exposure to the radiation after a day showed partial tolerance and quotes. The light used in the experiment is stronger than the UV light that reaches us on earth from the Sun. But after conducting more experiments on tar degrades Esmeralda to expand his research and says, it's possible in extract of the fluorescent shield from the tar degrade could be used as a sunscreen for

Rapa Assistant Professor Bangalore Royal Society Journal Indian Institute Of Science S. Orapa
"royal society journal" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

01:34 min | 5 months ago

"royal society journal" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"Keep its catering staff employed. Finnair will start Ling business class meals at supermarkets in Finland called Taste of Thin air. The ready made dishes include reindeer, meat balls, Arctic char and teriyaki beef. A legendary comedy club is closing its doors but vows to be bad enough to destroy my life. No respect. Dangerfield's, which was founded by Rodney Dangerfield in 1969, will shut its Upper East Side location, but the owners say They plan to re open in the future in a new location. They cite the shutdown because of the severe financial burden caused by the pandemic wins. News time 8 50 for a new study says Australia's Great Barrier Reef has lost more than half of its coral In the last three decades, and study co author Terry Who says there is a way to stop that decline. The only way to turn the downward trajectory of the barrier reef around is to deal with the root cause of the problem, which overwhelmingly Is go warming. He calls the loss shocking and says it happened in both shallow and deep water. The study is published in the Royal Society Journal. 63. Degrees now Clear sky in New York. We are going down to 56 in Midtown Tonight wins news Time 8 50. For all our sakes, we need to avoid crowds as much as possible. But what if you need to go to the post office.

Great Barrier Reef Rodney Dangerfield Finnair Finland New York Terry Who Royal Society Journal. Australia
"royal society journal" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

01:38 min | 5 months ago

"royal society journal" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"In a bid to keep its catering staff employed. Finnair will start selling Business class meals at supermarkets in Finland called Taste of thin air. The ready made dishes include reindeer, meat balls, Arctic char and teriyaki beef. And cost about 10 Euros or $12 legendary comedy club is closing its doors but vows to be back destroying my life. No respect, I don't know. Dangerfield's, which was founded by Rodney Dangerfield in 1969 will shut its upper East Side location due to what its owner's call a severe financial burden caused by the pandemic. But they say they plan to reopen In the future in a new location. Wednesday's time for 54, a new study says Australia's Great Barrier Reef has lost more than half of its coral in the last three decades alone. In his study, co author Terry Hugh says there's A way to stop the decline. Only way to turn the downward trajectory of the barrier reef around is to deal with the root cause of the problem, which overwhelmingly Is go warming. He calls the loss shocking and says it happened in both shallow and deep water. The study is published in the Royal Society Journal. 67. Degrees now a sunny on this gorgeous day we are going down to 56 degrees in Midtown Tonight. Wednesday's time for 55. This is Jo Jo thinks he's seen it all. I've seen it all gold encrusted pork chop. Seen.

Great Barrier Reef Jo Jo Rodney Dangerfield Terry Hugh Finnair Finland Royal Society Journal. Australia
"royal society journal" Discussed on Probably Science

Probably Science

06:39 min | 7 months ago

"royal society journal" Discussed on Probably Science

"Pound, West German judo team member who managed nine and a half hotdogs, despite having never eaten one before the competition. Wow had talks not reached. Germany in one, thousand, nine, hundred four. You can win with nine and a half in ten minutes like under one minute. You could win this thing back then. Council rate miscount mount yet. I would love to know at just what period in time! I could have Burkan various world records in various sports, right? Yeah, then he ever. Employees don't so many times. We eaten all sorts of awful ship. I'm just thinking about other sports like I'm. I'm pretty on athletic person I'm just wondering how far back I'd have to go to be able to win. Say the hundred meters. If you go back far enough and they were just running in dress shoes. And a suit while drinking. If I showed up in some Reebok's could i. Could I. In the French. Eighteen could I have all. I have to go back to prehistory. Is that never a point in recorded human history where I could have been the fastest runner. I I'm looking at the progression of 100-meter-freestyle. Because I was. A swimmer was a better swimmer twenty years ago, but I would have held the world record up until. The sixty s and nineteen sixties. Yeah, WOW! shed. Thereabouts. That's remarkable. Because also you took it seriously at college, but you will never. You will never pro or even semi pro. You know you're never even at NC double as it was only. Successful within a league that had the didn't have any athletic scholarships so. And you would have held the world record I. Mean this is in long course meters I never. If you, if you translate my hold on a second. Let me do this. Swim Swam? Converter continue on. To figure out if this is actually true. Entail different sort of technique in. Oil or the size of the swimsuits and things like that. It's just Well I think a lot of technique. Things had a think until the. If, you look at like Johnny Weissmuller they slam with their heads out of the water for some reason, which definitely slows. It was heads up like water polo swimming. Let's see event hundred freestyle. I know I did forty-five seventy two in one hundred yards. From shore course yards. Meters! and. Oh fifty to thirty four, which was the world record? Until nineteen sixty! Eight wow, yeah. Wow Yeah And I think like could've beaten. The I could have I could've eaten the hotdog eating. World record. In. One thousand, nine, hundred four had being an adult. Harian could top nine and a half in ten minutes. I have to do that right now I. Think I'm very slowly to. You've seen me eating. Slowly, too, but I still think I could have done that with a little bit of practice to so till the condiments to make sure you can get him in slicker needs needs some moisture with that's the. The big revolution came in the one thousand nine, when the participation of Japanese extreme eaters changed the playing field in two thousand one to Karaoke copy Ashi down fifty dogs, smashing the previous record of twenty five and eighth. So He. He almost doubled the well the previous world records. By. The big change was, it was no longer just huge guys. You'd like to lead to lots. It was thin guys who trained their stomach to expand and didn't have large amounts of fat, pressing down to compact it. So. Elites eaters don't follow elaborate training regimes with some ingesting voss volumes of liquid or gels to expand the stomach without having to process the calories chestnut. This year's winner claims to train for three months leading up to the competition. Including weekly practice runs a Kathy Control Diet and yoga breathing exercises to help with mental focus in the trait, being lean is generally viewed as an advantage because a thick layer of fat around the middle constrict with stomach. The eighty-four theoretical maximum comes from fitting a curve to the data, and also factoring in the possibility of outliers whose performance lies within a certain error margin of the curve. The predictions should hold true smoker says unless I knew kind of competitive shows up someone with gigantism or metabolic condition that place them went outside the normal parameters of human biology, but that's also we'll. Sport isn't like one of the things we discovered from from Epstein's book. Is. Just? How much genetic freaks factor into sports to the extent. There was some statistic up, Mount. In. I commerce the height was and what the exact percentage was, but there was an. Over seven foot tool I think it was over seven foot one. You had something like a one in ten chance of playing in the NBA like almost. I looking. I'm plucking the numbers out of my out of faint memory from several years ago, but it was. It was some ridiculous proportion of people over seven foot tall in the NBA. That's amazing. Garnered swim team who was maybe at least six ten, but he always wore this t shirt. His mom had made for high school and said no I. Don't play basketball. The prediction. The limiting factor is likely to be chewing and swallowing gastric pass. T based on the survey ship at the end of the ten minutes. Many competitors are still trying to go down more sausages in Buns, according to the Research Club published in the Royal Society. Journal Biology Letters. That's the journal. The achievements of human speeds are impressive, even by comparison with other species, humans are able to eat foster than Bez oil, or clarity's said small. Moves wished evaporates incredible speed could outdo even hugh elite human eats US however. Better than bears and coyotes, but worse than wolves right so if you'll making that Ed, Budde Adaptation. Told by one experience with competitive eating was a five minute competition it backyard barbecue. and I as playing with a four or five other people I didn't know a lot of people at this barbecue and somebody's doing.

NBA Reebok Johnny Weissmuller Biology Letters Pound Germany West German judo basketball gigantism US NC Mount Harian Ed Epstein Royal Society Research Club
"royal society journal" Discussed on RNZ: The Detail

RNZ: The Detail

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"royal society journal" Discussed on RNZ: The Detail

"New Zealand we have aspirations to hit one million New Zealanders being able to speak Basic Maury by tweeting Foodie one million speaking basic today in twenty years as the government plan. Some say that's impossible in the findings is released and the Royal Society Journal and Based on Census Data Make It look pretty bleak. They say the language is on its way to extinction. But what if we've I've got the numbers wrong. Unfortunately the question on the census is essentially. I would say vague since what I'm saying is I don't think. The census gives us a reliable pitcher. I'm Sharon Break Kellyanne today on the detail language expert Chris Lane crunches the data NC. He's cautiously optimistic. And he tells me why as an Australian he's passionate about to deal my brother marriage and I've original one and hey tribe. A group of people had their own particular language as a chart. I learnt that the last night if Speaker had died in the nineteen sixties axes. But I knew three year study called gift. Theriault a boost help us reach the million by twenty forty even for people who don't speak speak or learn at the study's been given six hundred sixty thousand dollars from the twenty nine thousand nine miles John Fund. BHUTIA WRONG AHO. To quote explore explore with the adult language acquisition can be facilitated by awakening. This latently acquired knowledge called a Proto Lexicon foof well to put into plain language. His Professor Genetic Hang From University of Canterbury we've discovered that Non Mardi speaking. We can use. The islanders actually have quite an in depth knowledge about The funder takes the sound structure of the Mari language. And we think. I've built this up through incidental exposure through their lives so from schools where they might to a few Wyatt to being present speeches. Go to New York. Aw Poor Chord devenue always inspired to uphold the mono of my Tepa as code in the words of the Moldy Pavilion. The people with you. Oh okay okay okay. Hi Marie welcome ceremonies detail. Model Train. J. Singing the national anthem. We were quite surprised to find that people who can't speak model dark. No the means of very meaning Mardi. Weeds have built up quite an extensive knowledge of the word forms of Mardi Protons Lexicon. Yeah so what that means. Is We know that infants. For example when they are exposed to the language. Pick pick-up what we call a proto lexicon and that's woods before you attach meaning to them so imagine a child you're listening to me now and you can understand you know you can hear. Yeah the different words and I'm speaking but wind children listening to adult. Speaking at order sounds like one long gobbled Piece of sand and perhaps get the same sort out of an experience of you've ever traveled overseas and been in a situation where people speaking a different language that you don't understand you can't hear the words that will just sounds you know a complete You know experience. So that's what it's like for children young children and what they do is they proceed. Only sounds and they hear some sounds mock walk on often and more in combination with other sounds and they gradually Lynn Woods but when we say we learn them they understand the form so they might hear the word kit it for example. I'm being spoken a lot around them. And so they get used to. And they realize that it's a weird obviously not consciously they registered it and then they'll attach meaning meaning to the word. They'll see that Kit That's associated with that fluffy animal that I play with so a product is that knowledge of the forms of of our language before you attach meaning to it. We've known and fence go through the sort of stages part of being able to be speakers of a language but we've never known before WH- anywhere in the world that adults could build up a proto leaks Akon and New Zealanders just the ideal place to study this. Because we have a language like Mardi any that is reasonably widespread people get exposed to it incidentally but we know they don't speak it so for example. What kind end of woods did you grow up with? You grew up on the west coast. What sort of Mardi words did you grow up with it? You know you almost take for granted that you you don't realize that you know them but you do I guess even place name so I grew up in So one was growing up on you that was exposed so that would assault written. I heard it spoken But I didn't know that it was made up of Hokey and take out the meanings of those but I got to know those sorts of sound around and combinations and so on and When I went to private school and one of the Fist Mardi songs that we went was to teeter my And we saying that and we saying that without knowing where to meet..

islanders Lynn Woods Chris Lane Mardi New Zealand Sharon Break Kellyanne Royal Society Journal government Moldy Pavilion Theriault New York assault University of Canterbury Professor Speaker NC WH Marie Mari
"royal society journal" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"royal society journal" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Introducing diseases and preying on them all depending on how a given organism fits into the black or Brown rats approach to life, and sometimes the unfortunate natives that fall to these new rat overlords are rodent species themselves. So we've touched a touched on some of these in our discussions of of Christmas Island. Oh, yeah. Was the idea there that there was some native rat on Christmas Island that kept the crab populations in check originally. Yeah. That's the hypothesis anyway. And then they're like invasive rats that killed off those rats, and then the crab population skyrocket. Right. Yeah. But that's potentially what's happening. So the the first success story, though, here was that of the black rat and house mouse, they fold human agriculture expansion for thous-. Thousands of years. But interestingly enough, the Brown rat didn't leave its native abode in China and Mongolia till far more recently. And so this would be the difference alluded to in of rats willingness to take to see or take to the road as looking at a two thousand sixteen genomic study published in the Royal society's journal proceedings. Be that mapped the expansion of the Brown rat using tissue samples from three hundred and fourteen rats from seventy six global locations. Well, so this was the first in-depth genetic study of Brown rats from around the world, and it was conducted by Fordham university, they followed this species movements first of all into southeast Asia. And from there, I believe they went to that hit Japan and Siberia, and then there was another movement that ends up going out across Eurasia via the silk road. And then once it gets all the way to Europe. That's that's where it really sets off because here. It is perfectly lined up for the voyages of discovery. And of course, of course, colonization and exploitation so from here, they end up reaching the Americas, Africa, Australia and untold islands between and one key point here. According to the researchers is that while the black rat is a natural expansionist following the path of grain garbage through human history, the Brown rat is other will is is usually normally, you know, normally happy just to hang out in a single location. He's the Bilbo Baggins of rats. You know, he's not eager to travel and adventure at least not without some prodding. But of course, we know Bilbo does travel. He does adventure. Right. So so the question then is what prodded him on what product the this particular species of rat on elevensies. Well, basically. Yeah. But again, the house mouse originated in the fertile crescent black rats in. India? So, you know, early farming societies in widespread trade, that's what pumped these rodents out pretty early on. But the Brown rat didn't really jump into high gear to the last three centuries. The most recent three centuries of human civilization. Oh, well, particularly the Brown rats of Europe again who departed on these voyages to to take north and South America, Africa, Australia, and and in that the Brown rats expansion expansion. The the authors argue here is entirely human mediated, it it's depending in two very large extent on the ships. Interestingly enough, the researchers didn't find evidence of a lot of rat immigrants though to New York City, they're looking at the the rat genome there, but so many ships come there. Yeah. So you and certainly the rats are still coming, but they pointed out, the what appears to be happening is the New York City rats are just so entrenched. So well fed in powerful and just so. Mean and territorial. They can't be thrown. Exactly. They can't be beat. So they're actually protecting their territory from new incoming rats. If you can make it here, you can make it anywhere, but lots of people who can make it. Elsewhere can't make it they're right. And of course, this this would hold true, theoretically for places beyond New York City, essentially, like once the the rats have entrenched themselves once the Brown rats have have taken over an area. They're going to hold it. They're gonna hold that fort because this is their sweet garbage empire. All right. I think should take a quick break. But we come back. We will talk about ballast water and bilge life. You know, people say necessity is the mother of invention. But that's not always true. Sometimes the mother of invention is advertising. Yeah. Or pure accident. How about ego maniacal delusion? Absolutely. Or just a desperate longing..

New York City Christmas Island Europe Africa Australia southeast Asia Fordham university Royal society thous China Japan Mongolia Americas Eurasia India South America Siberia three centuries
"royal society journal" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"royal society journal" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is science Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin. So I never really thought I'd study Pena size, but I sort of stumbled on this topic Mark lider, a biologist at Dartmouth College light travels to Costa Rica to study hermit crabs a species called sina Beata compresses. These land crabs do some interior remodeling of their adopted shells, the extensively hollow them out removing Streit's called spiral cholula to give themselves some extra elbow room. The renovation renders. The shells more precious to their owners and two other covetous crustaceans as well. These more valuable shells, though are also more easily stolen since without the spiral. Kolya Mellon signed the shell to grip onto individuals are pretty liable to have their property snatched from them, particularly when they're engaged in other activities like copulation which requires coming part way out of the shell despite his work in the field. It wasn't until lighter was wandering through Ziam that he noticed something about his favourite crabs the really striking thing. Was that scene? Evita compresses the one who social behavior I've been studying for so many years headed unusually large penis, in fact, bigger than any other species the observation gave him an idea, which he dubbed the private parts for private property hypothesis in a sense, the hypothesis posits that in large private parts can be an adaptation extending amounts sexual reach and thus enabling both him and his partner to remain safely tucked away inside their shells, while they copulate thereby protecting the private property of their shells from being stolen during sex Darwin proposed a similar idea to explain why barnacles which are stuck in one place are so amply Dowd did test his private parts for private property hypothesis light or sized up more than three hundred male museum specimens, including hermit crabs that live on land. And it's see any found that crabs that carried custom coverings head the most impressive Kornel equipment at the same time species that got their shells off the shelf had bigger geared than did crabs that walked around with. Oh, shell at all is results revealed in the Royal Society journal open science, it's intriguing to think that this high posses might have greater generality beyond hermit crabs. But like a hermit crab encountering a humdrum. Shell Lantra says he's going to leave that one alone. For me. I'm much more curious about how forms of animal architecture and remodeling in the environment impact social behavior. Thanks for listening for scientific Americans, sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin.

Karen Hopkin Shell Lantra Kolya Mellon sina Beata Streit Mark lider Pena Kornel Dartmouth College Costa Rica Royal Society journal Ziam partner Dowd sixty seconds
Intimate Hermit Crab Keeps Shell On

60-Second Science

02:30 min | 2 years ago

Intimate Hermit Crab Keeps Shell On

"This is science Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin. So I never really thought I'd study Pena size, but I sort of stumbled on this topic Mark lider, a biologist at Dartmouth College light travels to Costa Rica to study hermit crabs a species called sina Beata compresses. These land crabs do some interior remodeling of their adopted shells, the extensively hollow them out removing Streit's called spiral cholula to give themselves some extra elbow room. The renovation renders. The shells more precious to their owners and two other covetous crustaceans as well. These more valuable shells, though are also more easily stolen since without the spiral. Kolya Mellon signed the shell to grip onto individuals are pretty liable to have their property snatched from them, particularly when they're engaged in other activities like copulation which requires coming part way out of the shell despite his work in the field. It wasn't until lighter was wandering through Ziam that he noticed something about his favourite crabs the really striking thing. Was that scene? Evita compresses the one who social behavior I've been studying for so many years headed unusually large penis, in fact, bigger than any other species the observation gave him an idea, which he dubbed the private parts for private property hypothesis in a sense, the hypothesis posits that in large private parts can be an adaptation extending amounts sexual reach and thus enabling both him and his partner to remain safely tucked away inside their shells, while they copulate thereby protecting the private property of their shells from being stolen during sex Darwin proposed a similar idea to explain why barnacles which are stuck in one place are so amply Dowd did test his private parts for private property hypothesis light or sized up more than three hundred male museum specimens, including hermit crabs that live on land. And it's see any found that crabs that carried custom coverings head the most impressive Kornel equipment at the same time species that got their shells off the shelf had bigger geared than did crabs that walked around with. Oh, shell at all is results revealed in the Royal Society journal open science, it's intriguing to think that this high posses might have greater generality beyond hermit crabs. But like a hermit crab encountering a humdrum. Shell Lantra says he's going to leave that one alone. For me. I'm much more curious about how forms of animal architecture and remodeling in the environment impact social behavior. Thanks for listening for scientific Americans, sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin.

Karen Hopkin Shell Lantra Kolya Mellon Sina Beata Streit Mark Lider Pena Kornel Dartmouth College Costa Rica Royal Society Journal Ziam Partner Dowd Sixty Seconds
"royal society journal" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"royal society journal" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"You implant under your chest Euler skin area. He and his co founder, dude, how they both have these chips that are in their chests, and it looks very cyborg, Ian. And it looks like iron, man. It's like you have become iron man because you're putting this thing. You don't see a lot of those movies. But I know there are a lot of people out there that do that are nerdy. Like me. But it's like iron man when he has that thing in his chest. That's what this looks like that on a smaller scale. Iron man's man has a big thing and his chest. It's like, I don't know what it's called. But he has a staying in his chest at it's like he turns it and takes it out, and like recharges it and stuff like that. But it's this thing that makes him become iron, man. Oh, okay. All right. So this guy, obviously thing that that's gotta be where this whole idea. Well, he just wants to have a new human sense. That's what it is is it's a compass. So basically this vibrates every time he faces north this is so weird. So it basically has transformed his body and his partners body into functioning navigational systems. I would not want this at all. I wanna be I don't want to be at human GPS. But the, but they're they're going to solve as they believe that this is something that they can they can market, and my husband would be so happy if I had this because then I wouldn't be calling every five minutes going where am I? He's listening right now. I'm sure yeah. You need that probably a lot of women out there who are sick and tired of their dude's not asking for directions. But I always I mean, I'm I'm even with the GPS. I still unlike suck directions, and I constantly call. And I'm like, what am I? He's like where are you at the corner of so-and-so-and-so's? So and he's like fine. And then he'll help me. This is what he's supposed to do. So he would love it. If I actually had a compass chip in me. I know interested in this. This is horrific. But he says imagine you could navigate the world exactly like a bird. And you would know exactly where you were all the time blind people could navigate so I mean, he's saying this is this is why he thinks this is a marketable thing the blind thing. That's now I'm now I have all the fields. I mean, it makes me think. Okay. Well, it would be kinda neat for a blind person to be able to navigate but still then it would put blind like service dogs at a out of business. We can't have that now. Anyway, if you're interested in learning more about this gadget, you can check out the cyborg nest that's the name of his company. Also, if you've ever worried that your girlfriend or wife is cheating on you. There is now a way that you can tell. According to a study. This is from Oxford stakes stakes with Alex. Because these scientists from Oxford that carried out the research, it's been published by the way in a Royal Society journal. The research concludes that women who have long index fingers are more likely to sleep around. Okay. And then it goes into this whole thing about how women with long ring fingers are more likely to have traditional female jobs like like a nurse. I mean, this is and women with longer ring fingers or more likely to be lesbian. And so I'm like, I'm thinking, I'm like, okay. So you just you start looking at peoples ring finger you're like so that person's a lesbian cheating nurse like what? I mean, I think you can obviously safely come to that conclusion. This is science. It's science science based on Ringling ring finger link. Thanks, mark. But no it's actually about the difference between the ring finger versus the index finger. It's all about proportion, and I'm sure this is entirely accurate. So accurate in the Royal Society journal as accurate as horoscopes, you guys have.

Royal Society journal co founder Ian Ringling so-and-so-and-so mark Oxford Alex five minutes
"royal society journal" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

07:20 min | 2 years ago

"royal society journal" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Seven twenty AM eight on. One eight seven seven. C D A L I. So we're being told that young mosquitoes are eating plastic. And I guess fine. I mean, you know, we re rather the mosquitoes e plastic than us. But they say that could contaminate other insects and mammals authors of a paper published in the Royal Society journal, biology letters on Wednesday found the one mosquito larvae. Eats micro plastic. The plastic can remain in the insects body into adulthood, then the micro plastic be transferred into whatever might eat that mosquito including burbs now, the UK researchers conducted they're studying the lab, and they say it's not a stretch to think the plastic move up the food chain in this way. So then you, and I eat the bird, and now we have the plastic now, I would assume you would poop out the plastic. But maybe not you might absorb some of the chemicals on in the plastic. They say the application is that you're gonna plastics at the bottom of the pond that are now going up into the air being by spiders, and bats and animals are normally wouldn't have access to that plastic. No, no, no, no trust. We spiders are all up into the plastic. Spiders, have a lot of access to plastic. Yes, they do. So then my guess a spider sit there and eat the plastic because I hate spiders. They got nothing better to do that the bug me there. They're there. I do not like spiders at all. That's author. Amanda at England's university of reading in England, they call it reading instead of reading well because they're British. They can do whatever they want. They they do that. They, you know, everybody says America's English came later. I secretly think that's British change their English. Once we I I think I, you know, I do I have a lot of conspiracy theories about the British. Family who were British. So I mean, you know, I respect them. But I think that the British, you know. Never got over the whole revolutionary war. So I do think they're planning to come back. And I do think that I just do and. Yeah. I also think that once we started to go. You know? And let's sit down for some fakes giving Turkey. I think some the British started to go you need, speak, COPA, speak, livable proper. People don't think that all English is being used in America. And they started to inflect and seeing a more. I don't think I really think the British in the seventeen eighteen hundreds did sound like the I don't think they did that. I think this had like this reddish. The british. That's it. That's all I have some pint of been that's how they said it now, it's like green tea. Let's put some more roundabouts in America. So people get stuck then we could out Bush. We want to get all country back. I don't know what to say. But anyway, I just think I am I wrong or am. I wrong. I just think the British have changed the way they talk to sound different from Americans. Now, I don't know why anybody would want to shy away from the way we sound. I think we Americans sound pretty damn good. But I guess as people of other countries like to have their own dialect. I pretty proud when we die loved where Americans talk America's top Greek. I really dig it. The French atop the friendship. I I don't think I ever learned French I want to I told you guys French different the way the French speak, the French they speak really quickly, and they don't eat on C eight. Yeah, we American slur are. Words like y'all, but but the French, you know. Like what? Is that? Pa. Can you slow it down? We what what did you say? Did you say we see we like us if we say the word we? We save. Slowly, we e long gate, the we're like we are going to WalMart. The French are like we. It's a very fast bullshit. Do you mean phone your is? There are at the end. Well, maybe there's an OR. And I think the French do it purposely because they don't want us to learn their language because if you speak French, it's it's it's a delicacy. It's it's beautiful 'cause I tried. I was in Paris was the first time life ever bears, and I tried to speak as. I was trying to do all my friend channel owned it while I was trying to count and everything and they they're looking at me like I spoke to slow. And what did you say? What what what can you slow down? Please. No, no. So I it's an issue. But yeah, we we Americans. We talk slow. Well, we don't talk slow. We just really round out. Our our our I think we are dip thongs. We got dip thongs that. They don't have I believe or maybe they do have dip Fung's, but they're not proud of it. And so they hide it. Okay. So let's go back to these spiders or these mosquitoes eating plastic so micro-plastics use of the study were these small, latex, beads and authors noted smaller beads, pranzi beads here nother country, say bead like that. Transfer more easily the larger beads into the mosquitoes adult stage now Kalugin told USA today. Our study was a proof of concept in the laboratory. Well, she probably didn't appreciate accent. Set in the laboratory, what are the next steps we be to supple lakes with plastics and -squitoes. To measure, this is say mosquito they say mosquitoes, so what they're gonna do is going to have sample aches. These little micro beads in there, and they say Arctic ice is even choked with a record amount of the pollutants. Okay. I need to say something about the Arctic ice. Sorry. I'm going on a tangent here. But this is this is something I need to say, okay. We're like coming into October. Right. I live in Nevada. It's hot. And I know there's all this discussion about global warming. And everybody's blaming their car or them eating a an in and out burger and.

America England Royal Society journal UK Turkey WalMart Amanda Bush Paris Nevada Pa Kalugin USA Fung
"royal society journal" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

03:31 min | 2 years ago

"royal society journal" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Talk of Las Vegas. Fame. One in seventy seven zero C D A L I. So we're being told that young mosquitoes are eating plastic. And I guess fine. I mean, you know, we re rather the mosquitoes plastic that is. But they say that could contaminate other insects and mammals authors of a paper published in the Royal Society journal, biology letters on Wednesday found the one mosquito larvae. Eats micro plastic. The plastic can remain in the insects body into adulthood. Then the micro plastic could be transferred into whatever might eat that mosquito including burbs. Now, the UK researchers conducted they're studying in the lab, and they say it's not a stretch to think that plastic can move up the food chain in this way. So then you and I eat the bird. And now we have the plastic now, I would assume you would poop out the plastic. But maybe not you might absorb some of the chemicals on in the plastic. They said it applications plastics at the bottom of the pond that now going up into the air being vice spiders and bats and animals normally wouldn't have access to that plastic. No, no, no, no trust me. Spiders are all up into the plastic. Spiders, have a lot of access to plastic. Yes, they do. So then my guess spider, sit there and eat the plastic because I just hate spiders. They got nothing better to do than to bug me there there. I do not like spiders at all. That's author. Amanda Calcutta England's university of reading in England. They call it readiness of reading well 'cause they're British. They can do whatever they want. They did that they, you know, everybody says America's English came later. I secretly think that's British changed English. Once we I, you know, I do I have a lot of conspiracy theories about the British. I've family who were British. So I mean, I I respect them. But I think that the British, you know, never got over the whole revolutionary war. So I do think they're planning to come back. And I do think that I just do and. I also think that once we started to go. Yeah. You know, and let's sit down for some thanks giving Turkey. I think some of the British started to eat speak little culpa, next, speak livable proper. People don't think that all English is being used in America. And they started to inflect and seeing a more. I don't think I really think the British in the seventeen eighteen hundreds did sound like these. I don't think they did that I had like this reddish. The british. That's it. That's all I have some pints of been. That's always added. Now, it's like. Each..

Amanda Calcutta England America Las Vegas Royal Society journal UK
"royal society journal" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"royal society journal" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"Only delicious but in reasonable quantities is good for you that's one bit of science today i got another thing on the on the science side that i wanted to share with you and that is what do we this is according to science on this is not like my opinion right later in the show sometimes i like to just talk to you about the he stuff out there you know what are the people in the lab coats doing all the fancy calculations what are they coming up with here's what we since found out science tells us that women find most physically attractive is now i'm gonna leave you hanging in there for a second because i feel like there are a lot of different things that you might have tossed into the mix there are a lot of different possibilities you might think to yourself a great head of hair a winning smile a square set jaw these are the things that women find attractive but if you thought all those things you would in fact be wrong because according to science the study this is the royal society journal open science journal said that a man's the length of a man's legs in proportion to the rest of his body is in fact a single most important indicator of whether females will find him attract this study roads a study says wrote a right buck women don't care about men's elbows or knees and male arms are generally sidelined their relative relative length to the male body had no effect on a.

royal society journal open sci one bit
"royal society journal" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

The Guardian's Science Weekly

05:59 min | 3 years ago

"royal society journal" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

"Things. Just you can imagine the job hosting you get eight hundred applicants or at a granting agency. There are a lot of grants and I have to triage in so proxies, get used. People use the best proxies that may be vailable to them. Things like impact factor impact factor is not something that was sanctioned by any academic organization. It was created by publisher to advertise their products. Just explain what impact factor is an impact factor is the rate at which papers in journals in a particular journal are cited authors on their papers in IM factor journals because in some countries you're. Promotion involves a calculation using a formula that includes the impact factor. Journals have published what we want is to results. But journals often select for well, hype enters are incentivized to take on papers, which will give their journals, high impact and editors have deliberately gamed the system in many times to elevate the positions of their journals as well. It was considered doing good for the journal and therefore you attract better papers. So if you're if you're selecting, for example, on the surprise, value of a result, there are many things that can make a result surprising other than its truth value, but used to be an informal proxy is that people knew IS if you get up paper in science or nature, or proceedings after Kennedy scientists or Royal Society, journal, more people will see it. It's likely to be cited that became I used to word industrialized. It became an industrial standard and then universities at condemning societies took it on board as a proxy which made it possible. The process, a large numbers of people in paper. Applications. You will find occasional people who who defend the criteria, but the system is very sticky and so trying to get enough people to coordinate civil Tena sleet to change. The situation has been difficult. What is the negative consequence of the emphasis on publications as a consequence, if you reward something other than, say, detail judgment, a debate about the truth, value of the work and instead reward. Something else like productivity than what you get is more productivity and not more of the things you want. In this study into the natural selection of bad science, Richard and his co author pull smell Dino at the university of California set argued that the scientific community is creating a situation where if a scientists can produce more papers with less data, they can get more grants to keep that longer term research pursuits alive. I asked Richard to unpack this argument and explain what it comes down to in the lab. So do a lot of small studies, small cheap studies, small numbers of subjects, small numbers, replicant units, and they only published the ones that work out because if you do enough of them your farm asterisks, this is what I call it. Why asterisk? Because the distance after puts an asterisk by a significant result, if you run enough small team studies, you maximize the chance that you get one asterisk and then that let you get publication. Let you get your next Graham. So asterisk means this is a postive finding of statistical significance. Exactly. And. I jokingly call it stargazing to harvest the stars, the individuals who do them or not cheating. They don't hide these behaviors there in print as advice, but give us a sense of how damaging how problematic this is. I wish I could. I think it's very hard to measure precisely the damage. But I think in general, the quantitative assessment damaged with come from the replication projects that have gone on, or example, pharmaceutical industries are interested in making cancer treatment drugs from initial positive lab results for cancer drugs. And so they, I said about just trying to replicate the publish papers and eighty percent of them could not be replicated. This isn't an industry where they're trying really hard to do it because they want to to get the profit stream going to do that. The thing needs to work. In this study into the natural selection of bad science, Richard and his co author pull smell Dino at the university of California said, argued that the scientific community is creating a situation where if a scientists can produce more papers with less data, they can get more grants to keep that longer term research pursuits alive. I ask Rishard to unpack this argument and explain what it comes down to in the lab in labs. Junior scientists have been explicitly taught for several generations now that the way to be successful and that needs to publish. But also to discover things is to run a bunch of small treatments to measure a bunch of potential outcomes. And then the ones with Asterix are the correct. Those are the true findings and you publish those and you don't have to mention the other thing is you said that these issues that have been raised time to gain the the need for improving science is not a new one. What should be done to scientists agree on what has to be done and how that might be achieved. I don't think that there's precise agreement on remedies is not a simple issue of say, typical industrial situation. So that's frustrating. And there are many attempts down to come up with new institutions. According to Richard aware of these issues is improving, but we need to remember that these mechanisms have been in place a long time. Historically, he says, scholars have raised concerns about them for years. After the break, we'll turn to to scientists from different areas of research help rolled in the scope of the conversation and discussed the general problems at hand. Even questionable wants to cheat. So wrong findings, simple other issues. We need to keep horizon space eight so that more time available to do this essential work. That

Richard Dino university of California Tena sleet publisher Royal Society cancer Kennedy Graham Rishard eighty percent