22 Burst results for "Royal Academy"

"royal academy" Discussed on Feminist Current

Feminist Current

05:57 min | 9 months ago

"royal academy" Discussed on Feminist Current

"I just felt like, you know, I done it for 9 years, mainly done it for nothing. You know, it wasn't like a massive money making operation. It was a grassroots organization to try and improve birth and I just felt like I can't pour any more into this. If everybody hates me like this, you know, I just felt like really hated. And I just wanted to sort of move on from it. So I was already like pretty worn down by the pandemic. I'm thinner. So I just thought that's the last straw. I'm done with that. So but I was, you know, really worried about publishers finding out that this had happened, you know, anything I was worried about my livelihood really. So kept require. And then I finished this book, which I've just came out like in the summer, I finished. It went off to suppress. This is a book for preteen girls about periods. And so that was kind of like in the bag and other things were going on in the world of the gender debate if you like. There was the essay that was written by chimamanda, which really spoke to me because she spoke about a different situation that happened to her, but she wrote it so beautifully and she articulated so beautifully, you know, the I said it was called it is obscene. And then a woman in the UK who I believe had I know you had in your podcast because I listened to it just a while she was canceled or bullied or whatever you want to call it by the Royal Academy and she was in the news a lot and she got an apology and I was you know I was sitting there listening to almost thinking I want them kidding. There are apologies. Yeah..

chimamanda Royal Academy UK
Fresh update on "royal academy" discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

01:20 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "royal academy" discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"By a young muse named Mercedes. Join us all month long for fascinating stories of women who are drivers of creativity, inspiration, and artistic expression. Hello. From wonder media network, I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is when manica. This month we're talking about muses. Women who were drivers of creativity and inspiration. Today's muse inspired the character Sally Bowles. Cabaret singer and Christopher Isherwood's novel goodbye to Berlin, and the musical adaptation cabaret. We're fictional Sally was on troubled in naive. Her real-life counterpart was driven, politically engaged, and curious. Let's talk about gene Ross. Gene iris Ross was born in Alexandria, Egypt in 1911. Her father was Scottish and worked in the cotton industry. Her mother was the daughter of a wealthy industrialist. Throughout Jean's childhood, the family lived in luxury. Then, gene was sent back to England for school. She was miserable. By the time gene was 16, she'd had enough. She faked a pregnancy and got herself expelled. The next few years were a revolving door of experimentation, going to finishing school in Switzerland, a short stint at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts. A small role in a low budget film called why sailors leave home. Sheen wanted to find more acting roles and her production company in Germany was hiring. So when she was 19 years old, she made her way to Berlin. In the early 1930s, Berlin was in the final years of a creative golden age. Peter, art, literature, sociology, psychoanalysis, science. It was all blooming in Germany's capital city. And gene wanted to be at the center of it. But like Sally Bowles, the character she would inspire, genes dreams of being an actress, remained dreams. Instead, she found work modeling for magazines and singing, though not very well, at cabaret. It was there in the club scene that she met Christopher Isherwood. Christopher was a young writer, who was exploring his sexuality as a gay man in Berlin. He and Jean shared a flat and became intimately close. He later wrote that they were like siblings, platonically sharing a bed when their apartment became too crowded. Gene and Christopher anchored a crew of young, British expat artists. Many of whom were rebelling against their wealthy parents. Jean, with her huge eyes, her wit and her sexual fearlessness, enchanted their circle of friends. As the only woman she delighted and shocking them with stories of her romantic exploits. But soon Jean became pregnant. Christopher posed as her partner in order to help her get an abortion. She nearly died from the procedure. When Christopher went to visit her in the hospital, he was met with disgust from the nurses. Word had spread that he was the father. How could he have put her through this? In reality, the father was a German actor. This tragic comedy of errors would become the climax of Christopher's novella, Sally Bowles. That story would later anchor his novel goodbye to Berlin about the rise of fascism during the last years of Germany's Bohemia. While Jean was recovering from her abortion, the Nazi Party began to take over Berlin. By 1933, gene had fled to England. Back in London, Jean joined the Communist Party. Around this time, she met Claude coburn, a British journalist. Gene also began writing about politics. The couple was on vacation in Spain when the Spanish Civil War broke out in 1936. Instead of fleeing, they stayed to report. Gene filed stories for the daily express. And Claude wrote for the daily worker. When he began fighting alongside the Spanish Republicans, Jean would file stories for the daily worker too, publishing under Claude's name. Jean was an anti fascist political activist for the rest of her life. She also continued her love for the arts. She spoke fluent German and she used that skill to help German directors in exile produce films. She also served as the film critic for the daily express. Her pen name was Peter porcupine. In 1939, gene and Claude had a daughter, Sarah. Just a few months later, Claude abandoned the family. Jean settled into her life as a serious journalist, political activist, and devoted single mother. Meanwhile, Christopher Isherwood's novella Sally Bowles entered the public sphere. From the get, Jean was uncomfortable with her reincarnation as Sally. Sally was hedonistic and flighty and aloof. Even as Nazis began marching through the streets. This characterization was a far cry from the person gene had become. The novella led to a novel, which later was adapted into multiple stage productions, including cabaret. In 1972, Bob Fosse revived the story again when he directed a film adaptation. Liza Minnelli famously played the part of Sally Bowles. And a portrayal that reignited the public's interest in gene. Jean's daughter, Sarah, later recalled the journalist would often come to their door, wanting to talk about sex. But gene wanted to talk about politics..

Jean Sally Bowles Berlin Christopher Isherwood Christopher Jenny Kaplan Manica Gene Ross Gene Iris Ross Gene Royal Academy Of Dramatic Arts Germany Sally Claude Alexandria England Sheen Claude Coburn Egypt
"royal academy" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

05:45 min | 9 months ago

"royal academy" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"To the next gallery that we're going to look at because it was owned by Joshua Reynolds. That's right. So owned by Josh Reynolds, who, for us, there is another connection there that Reynolds was the first president of the Royal Academy building was built for the Royal Academy, the room in which we're standing now seems to have been the place where Reynolds was laid in state after he died. And Reynolds cherish his picture for him, it becomes an example of how to successfully paint a nocturne. But in fact, it wasn't just Reynolds constable also knew it had prints of it at the foot of his bed. And it becomes a really influential picture for the development of native English landscape painting school. Let's go and look at those Reynolds now. So we're just going to briefly look at this Reynolds because it seems to me to relate directly to the picture that we've just been talking about. I think you're right there. This is a large canvas. Depicting Cupid and psyche, which Reynolds painted as an exhibit for the Royal Academy summer exhibition, which means that in 1789 it was actually first unveiled in the courtauld spaces on the top floor. And it's Cupid in psyche, Cupid is a sleep on a bed, having made love to psyche. She is holding up a candle and has discovered his identity, which was forbidden. He is about to wake up because a drop of hot wax falls onto his body and she is sort of banished as a result. In the top right hand corner, there is an open let's call it a window with a view to the night sky and the moon. And one imagines that as Reynolds was working on this painting that he might have had reference to the Rubens landscape by moonlight, which for him was an exemplary picture of nighttime effects. Let's go upstairs and look at this extraordinary new grand gallery. Now we're in the great room. And it's difficult to choose one work to talk about in here because it's just I feel like we're just surrounded by masterpieces..

Reynolds Josh Reynolds Royal Academy building Reynolds constable Royal Academy Joshua Reynolds Rubens
Who Was George Fredrick Handel

5 Minutes in Church History

04:20 min | 1 year ago

Who Was George Fredrick Handel

"Welcome back to another episode of five minutes in Church history. On this episode, we're talking about a composer George, Frederic Handel and I resist the urge to have upon here and say that we going to get a handle on handle. But let's get a handle on hindle. He was born in sixteen, Eighty five in Hallo- Germany the importance of that year is it was the same year as the birth of Johann Sebastian Bach sixteen eighty five was a great year for the birth of composers apparently, and now Bach to handle and I promise. I'm done with punts. Well handle was originally set to be a lawyer but he loved music and he quickly showed his prowess as an organist and at composing, and so he said off to be a musician. He spent some time traveling around Italy and then he was musician for the elector of Hanover. Now, the importance of the elector of Hanover was that he was the heir to the throne of England and when Queen and died childless the elector of Hanover became King George the. First of England handle moved with him to London and the year was seventeen off and from then on hand spent the rest of his life in Britain, and he's while born in Germany and German descent is known as an English composer under George. The first t founded the Royal Academy of Music, which he directed for fifteen years early on in London Handel composed for King George the first his famous water music or as in handles beloved German Tongue vassar music. The first time it was performed for King George loved it so much. He ordered it played again and then he ordered it played again. So debuted three times in a row in seventeen seventeen. After. He finished his time handle finished his time at the Royal Academy of Music. He spent much of the Seventeenth Thirties writing operas, and then he said about to write what might be considered his magnum opus the Messiah. Handel. was by all accounts obsessed with work. We would say today a workaholic and he poured himself into his work as a composer as a musician. Sadly in seventeen fifty one he went blind and then in seventeen, fifty, nine, the age of seventy four he died in, London? He was buried in Westminster Abbey and of course, the grand organ of the Abbey and the choir played his beloved. Messiah. Handel one said I should be very sorry if I only entertained them referring to the people who listen to his music, he wanted people to not only be entertained but to beat moved by his music and that was certainly the case with the Messiah. The Messiah was first performed in Dublin on April thirteen, seventeen, forty two it was performed the next year in London and King George the second was in the audience attending and when he got to the chorus for part to the Hallelujah Chorus King George, the second was moved that he stood up, and of course, when the king stands everyone else stands in. So the whole theater stood alongside of the king and that started tradition of standing during the Hallelujah course. The Messiah is in three parts. Part one begins with prophecies of the. Coming Messiah from Isaiah and Psalms, and takes us right to the shepherds watching their flock at night on Bethlehem's hillsides. Then part two covers the passion, the suffering in-depth of Christ and ends with that Hallelujah course part three picks up with Christ's resurrection and continues with his ascension and what theologians call his present session in glory, and then it ends with the day of judgement to come as the Messiah the king comes in glory. Well, that is Handel's Messiah and when he was finished writing the musical score, he signed it s D. G. Solely Dale Gloria.

King George Frederic Handel Royal Academy Of Music London Handel Hallo- Germany London Hanover Hallelujah England Johann Sebastian Bach Westminster Abbey Seventeenth Thirties Isaiah Italy Bethlehem Dale Gloria Handel. Queen Britain Dublin
"royal academy" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"royal academy" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Also he opens up Microsoft Word on his computer and creates a file called plan for museum invasion that stuff and it's a little on the net I know but you don't think anyone's ever gonna see your hard drive you know like in some ways it was like this it's a smart thing to do like to build a list of the things that you're gonna need to pull off a museum heist you don't want to just wing that wing okay now but I mean he wrote on there that the I mean he would need a glass cutter and I said was this like one of those things you see in the movie were you know it's some perfect disc shaped glands that they can take pant yeah and it it was just like a hand held like almost like an exacto knife and I was like what did you practice and he's like now I don't think it's gonna be that hard the evening of June twenty third two thousand nine and when finished playing a concert at the royal academy of music and boarded a train to train adding to him he brought along only one empty suitcase a pair of latex gloves he took from his doctor's office some wire clippers a little LED light and the glass cutter act for the hive it came up from the station is thankful for with a suitcase on the night before the detective on the case Adele Hopkin took her to.

Adele Hopkin royal academy of music
An Interview with Jason Watkins of 'The Crown'

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

08:38 min | 2 years ago

An Interview with Jason Watkins of 'The Crown'

"My next. Guest is a legendary and award winning actor of the big and the small screen. You can currently find him in his fantastic portrayal of Wilson in the crown. Please welcome Jason Walk Ins Jason. So happy to be talking to you today loveless tote you thank you for inviting me on the show. Yeah I mean I'm so blessed to have you on you know I I have to say to you before we get into the real meat and potatoes of your career and life here. I'm starting to believe that. Only great people are born in October. I think this is is true and it does take. It takes a long time for people other months to really understand this. Of course we all know over here in fact we say every day here in the UK said that people born up there by Just blasted more special than in other months. But you know I I don't WanNa put anybody else stateside but it is a truism that we're all gonna come to terms I I. I am an October sixteenth. I know you're in October. So it's twenty yes so it is. Yeah and I also have to say that you know and this is you know I really feel. I feel like my guests that come on from England and Canada. There's an unmatched kindness. Not that that's not to say that my American guests or other guests or not. But I feel like there's a kindness there that it's really unmatched. Yeah I yeah I mean you'd have to ask Yeah I mean yes I think so. I mean nine MCI I mean my wife did say one of the reasons was that I was coined. I'd like to think that it was just meeting of the rest of ovulation of the UK. ORLANDI candidate Yeah I don't know where we tend to be. I don't know I think some think Americans ought to say what they think. And maybe we're a bit more guarded. We think denial but I think Americans are much more direct and I think Brits perhaps a bit more go round the houses a bit and we have have a different way into things but I think I will I I can be myself. I suppose I do. I do try and be kind of kind of this guy's a fairly long way. So yeah that's well said well said you know how how much of your before getting through some of the things I want to get into your. How much of your time during the course of your career have you spent in the states filming or or is it been mostly in England or UK in that area what spicy it must be in the UK in Spain Italy And in France briefly worked in the states downey honey. I've never done any filming face I've done plays in the states. Throw Shakespeare Company Many ago now but I've not taking taking that plunge and you know it would be nice to think that maybe something Kim crop up over there in the next couple of years. Maybe off the back of the crown but I I have a life here and I've lost two children and it's difficult to feel that I can jump on a plane but I am what I really would like to the states. And maybe you know maybe it now is the time but No offensive work. There says made that can happen at some point. It's not like you're when you have. You have unbelievable filmography. You know you have the doctor. Who Franchise James Bond Franchise so? It's not like you're not well known in the states. Just just a matter of time I would say Jayson and especially the right tragic income. Nothing's couple of pilots to come by and the couple might be worked out no works. How cold although wasn't sure about so you know I'm available America? Let's see what we love. You think so much incredible material. I mean we're producing some really good stuff after say in the UK. Just great stuff coming out of the states you know you eat succession for example is great. Show unbelievable those two. They're just fantastic stuff and so we know something like that would be a real adventure. There's no question there's no question and the good thing with forums and platforms like net flicks and Amazon prime. Is We get to see some of that work. That's created in England. Yeah I mean I know you've called ox is well. I think that that's redux available. Yes yeah and that's that's I just think it's just I think it was the launch before it most here but he had some new platforms. I think the IT's incredible. Isn't it how how hungry people often new content and And an author thing was really good. Is there such different worlds. That people being able to view things in different wells different times very unusual stories and I think I think perhaps micheals studios in classrooms realizing the The great the public do want to delve in D.. Talent different different wells and different the way different. People live and socialize. The way they work I and I think that's That's amazing really that the breadth of materialize is expanding as well as the content which I think is crucial capable guy. No Oh that's really well said it and not only that the opportunity for actors is now increased as well so we get to see a lot more accurate. We see more shows more creativity so yeah for for a whole bunch onto reasons. I'm so happy where we live in times that we do. Jason yes Golden Age Television. I think I mean net flicks particular work Investing investing love Monday in the UK. In shepperton studios. I think that you know they've they've purchased some of the sound stages armed Building new swell. So you you know this this It's a good time to act and to work in the industry. Yeah absolutely and you don't feel like you're not the first guest. I've had gone to the Royal Academy the Dramatic Art. I feel and I can't put my finger on who else but I know I've said this name that before. How big a part has that kind kind of making you into this refined actor? Obviously you're always learning but how much of a part to play in your life as an actor I mean without it. Could you be where you are today or was that kind of credit. A lot of into that. I think when you're young I mean I went there on US twenty and I think I was quite to from the suburbs fairly unanimous tickly. Didn't much I'm the I'm GonNa History in the story. So as bits of fresh-faced I and Competitive Country Bumpkin almost nothing. It just introduced lots of different things and different forms Taser and technical staff and also encouraged what I can do. Naturally I think what I did. Well L. Naturally I think he can Hans expanded and inspired me. Perhaps and so I think those things kind of stay with you. I mean I think that was a great. I mean I thank some of the teachers you know there were at a fantastic catch Washington mazing accent dialect teacher and I've been I still thank keep in touch with their. We'll see her into her and remember the kind of Tito whether she she's not age. When you're that young those things sort of stay with you I I mean actually I mean even before I went to Rawda defend his school and and I? I'm kind of a homeless person. The street and I was kind of improvising. Him and describes. It's my friend and he said why don't you just sort of improvised I'll draw you so. I ended up being before when Toronto doing these characters than while I was rod stiff fill characters take Haq's back to implying. he drool me so there was this kind of The memory of doing that was a weird. We stayed with me. I really enjoy character acting building different characters off the people on the street meet and they will kind of go in and also still. I'm still doing that all. These is later nothing rotter it. Kinda rationalized that gave us structure in a place that you can carry forward into your work

UK England Jason Walk Wilson Amazon Shepperton Micheals Studios America Jayson Rawda KIM Royal Academy Toronto Canada HAQ Tito Dramatic Art Hans Downey France
"royal academy" Discussed on X96

X96

02:47 min | 3 years ago

"royal academy" Discussed on X96

"Movie rocket man, Paramount's Elton, John musical. Is going to be rated R. Does that mean we get Elton John sex? That it will be an intimate love scene. Wayne terribly Edgerton who plays Elton John and Richard Madden who plays is former manager and lover, John Reid director, Dexter Fletcher is in the midst of editing the film, which is slated for release in may on may thirty first. After a Daily Mail story reported that paramount is pressuring filmmakers to cut at least part of the scene. Fletcher tweeted seeing much speculation about rocket, man. That's good. It's still unfinished. So it's nothing but rumors it has and always will be the no holds barred musical fantasy paramount and producers passionately support and believe in you can holds barred some of it paramount screen tested Dirac it man last week in Pasadena, according to a source and receive scores in the high eighties for the forty million dollar film. A promising sign for an unfinished musical that grapples with some challenging themes including Elton John's drug use and addiction. The movie also includes scenes from the singer's childhood as a student at the Royal Academy of music is friendship with writing partner Bernie Taupin played by Jamie bell. I just countable actor. I just have a problem with me not having L. You can't fake Elton. John in the. Yeah. The actor is going to be actually singing, and he doesn't sound like I would. I would maybe give it a pass. If I listened to it and went. You know, like the guy that took over for Steve Perry and jury you sounds just like him. Yeah. If it were like that I go. Well, okay. Then but he doesn't like him. Yes. From the beginning rocket man's producers, including Matthew Vaughn, envision it as different and grittier film, then bohemian rhapsody with Edgerton singing John's songs live and with the singer sexuality explored in depth. So it's they're doing what bohemian rhapsody wouldn't do. I guess it's it's designed to be a. I guess a take on what Elton John's life, but Elton John signed off on he, and I, and I guess he's using he's you said, I don't care if it sounds like me I wanted to be an examination of my life. I was pretty young when Elton John got married. The first time. And I remember seeing a news story about it going. What doesn't make sense? Like, he was marrying.

Elton John Paramount John Reid Edgerton Steve Perry Dexter Fletcher Royal Academy of music Richard Madden Bernie Taupin Matthew Vaughn Dirac Wayne director Pasadena Jamie bell partner forty million dollar
"royal academy" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:44 min | 3 years ago

"royal academy" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A tweet or something. Not a musical genius. Like this. I should point out that he did get rounds finishing his third symphony. And it is wonderful. But I love that this was just his kind of side hustle procrastination. And it was really interesting to me that for years and years and years that was only heard behind closed doors. It wasn't public. And sometimes I think what else might be out that locked in the volt locked in the vote just because there's so much snobbery that abounds. So that's a I think rather beautiful one. Our next day is max Richter people probably Nomex Richter. Yes. So I think max Rick's more than anyone else in contemporary classical music is really doing so much to open the door to what this extraordinary sound world. Genre can be we've talked on the program before Alison he's a really interesting figure because he graduated from the Royal Academy of music, which is like the equivalent of the Juilliard he signed Deutsche Grammophon, which is about the most illustrious classical label that there is a lot. Of course, there are others. He was published his first. Album by boosy and hawks who will say published people like Edward elgar and Richard Strauss. An equal Stravinsky. So all these classical heavyweights, and he composes at the piano owed school with the manuscript paper and very much is seen in this tradition. That goes all the way back to bark and even beyond and yet his music has this incredible hybrid language that really speaks and resonates with people who don't have any background in classical music, and he might not be familiar with some of these composers. I just mentioned, and he is often to be heard his music in places like club nights and raves and not just concert hall of that. You know, he's got such phenomenal musical intelligence. I think he's personally, I think he's a genius. And he's so interesting what he's doing at the kind of boundaries of classical music and pushing those boundaries what can classical music do in an electronic and digital age. So successful with it. He is extremely successful. It's fair to say, I don't want to suggest. I don't know the details. But I imagine he's among the. Most successful classical Moses working today, and his music is HUD in films and soundtracks and across different platforms and joiners, which is great. And he's also he's incredibly thoughtful and intellectual writer and composer as well. And he uses his music like so many composers have done throughout history to explore political ideas and ideals and say the peace I've chosen for today, the twenty sixth of February is a piece cooled Vladimir blues, and it was on the twenty sixth of February that this album came out in two thousand four and he wrote the blue notebooks as a protest album as he described it about Iraq and a meditation on violence and that the utter futility of so much conflict..

Richard Strauss Royal Academy of music max Rick max Richter Deutsche Grammophon writer Edward elgar Vladimir blues Juilliard Iraq Alison
"royal academy" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

10:24 min | 3 years ago

"royal academy" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"And so this kind of study of Kito, I think is truly challenging and in the context of the period today, it raises fraught relationships between the adoration surveillance and subjugation of blackmail bodies in American society. So it is indeed a powerful powerful image was Mapplethorpe immersed in Greek and Roman art because some of these compositions have a formality to them, though, they could be sculpted out of marble, so Mapplethorpe famously said that if he had been born a hundred or two hundred years ago, he may have been a sculptor and. But he you'd photography as a very quickly to make sculpture. And you see that in the way that he stages the environments for his sitters his approach to picturing the human form kind of reflects this keen interest in classical Greek and Roman statuary, and he spoke about specifically. How the blackmail nude? Acted like bronze to him and reproduction. So that that references definitely there. And it also ties through the practice more fully in his kind of obsession with perfection and the idealization of the human formed throughout his practice that he translates many different subjects whether it's flash or or the pedal of a flower that kind of pursuit of perfection is always there later, we have the sex pictures, a whole body of work focused on the gay SNMP ADI. For example. There's this SEM same with two men named Dominic Elliot from nine hundred seventy nine one is nude and chains hanging upside down with his arms outstretched and cuffed and the other grabs the first man's testicles. The images seem relatively unflinching was his intention to shock so maple created these images in the seventies and eighties. And he also produced a series of thirteen works as. As part of his ex portfolio on SM practitioners in Dominic and Elliott, which we're looking at we can see this kind of consensual sexual relationship invested with the dynamics of domination and submission. The two men are posed frontally in meet the camera and Roberts. I as typical in a traditional portrait and the image suggests and association between the state of masochistic desires of the subjects and religious imagery of pain and ecstasy and Mapplethorpe said that for him as an means sex magic, not sadomasochism. And so yes, these images of this community are unflinching. He approaches the subject in the same way as he approaches a flower or portrait commission, but I can't speak necessarily to his intention to shock other than to say that he doesn't like that particular word. He said that he was looking for the unexpected in things that he had never seen before. And he felt an obligation as kind of part of that community to take pictures of them. And so I think in this image and others from the series. And this theme we see how Robert is confident his mastery of the medium of photography, and the kind of formal structure of his compositions that he can take it to any subject, however, extreme and essentially cast it. Within the highest traditions of art. He creates a space where even the most extreme sexual subculture. An axe can be made into fine art. He seems to be not just an observer, but an active participant in these sexual encounters. All right. Yes. Robert was a participant with within this community. And in the nineteen seventies. He really cultivated that image. Patti Smith noted in her memoir that Robert was not a voyeur that he was offensively involved in the work that came out of his SM pictures, and he took several self portraits in the early nineteen seventies exploring his own desire and arousal, and we see that in his self portrait with full-width that he's looking back at us with this kind of defiant gaze, even though he's in this voter moment. He's projecting an image of power and control. Which is I think an interesting aspect of of his images of himself within this community. Then there's the floral still lifes like this one Calla lily from nine hundred eighty six are they sexual as well. Do you say? So that's an interesting question because Mapplethorpe actually produced his floral still lives at the same moment that he was producing his SM pictures, this part of the x y and z portfolio extra SM images. Why or the floral images and see where the black nude images? And so. In this part of the gallery. We've actually paired the floral imagery with some works from the x y and z portfolios to make just that point that Mapplethorpe was bringing his characteristic visual static and controlled compositional style to both subjects he said that he didn't. Have a different approach whether it was a flower or a cock. It's the same thing. It's my vision he said that kind of pursuit of perfection inform. And so while some critics and collectors even galleries have said that the, you know, kind of tastefully elegant flowers are intended to appeal to collectors put off by the more explicit images. His floral portraits, in fact, are not entirely innocuous. They present their subjects as kind of phallic stand-ins if you will and their suffused with kind of overt sensuality in Layton desire. There's this kind of implicit or explicit tension within the work itself when we look at the floral. Pieces because they're very fragile yet. Kind of standing out attention in the center of the composition. So nine hundred eighty six in September of that year Mapplethorpe received an aids diagnosis didn't he which must have been crushing. How does he focus his energy after that? So he was cognizant of his limited time following the nineteen Eighty-six diagnosis and he worked to safeguard his legacy in the final years of his artistic practice. So he prepared for two retrospective exhibitions. He has established the Robert Mapplethorpe foundation to manage his estate and support the medium of togr Affi in arts institutions, and they also fund HIV aids medical research. So who's very aware of what his legacy would be with that diagnosis. We're standing in front of one thousand nine hundred eight self portrait, which Mapplethorpe appears shockingly gaunt as he sits there ripping walking cane that's top by a skull. He would die soon afterwards and early eighty nine right from aids related complications. Why do you think he chose to depict himself that way? I think that despite his weakened condition that the image shows, his confident expression firm grasp on the Cain, kind of exuding, this characteristic sense of control and mastery of all things even death that he chose to represent himself in this really haunting manner kind of holding this over at Lee morbid symbol of death. I think speaks to an awareness, and perhaps acceptance of his own mortality and of his life. Yeah. The year he died in June nineteen thousand nine because of an upward precipitated by US Senator Jesse Helms over the explicit content. The Corcoran Gallery in Washington cancelled a full scale Mapplethorpe show that was due to make a sop at the museum. The show also led to calls to defend the NEA which partly funded the exhibition three decades later how do these controversies strike you now? I think that these attacks on Mapplethorpe's work both raised his profile. He really became a household name at that time. But to some extent limited the kind of public discussion around his art today, perhaps the challenge of Mapplethorpe's work is that the artists may be more well known than his actual work and so- contemporary audiences may associate Mapplethorpe with SM or censorship. And I think the full range of what he's produced is going to be a real revelation to people when they see the show now from a historical perspective. Of course, any presentation of Mapplethorpe's, photographs has to engage with censorship and the nineteen ninety exhibitions and the controversy that arrived at the time. But it's only one aspect of Mapplethorpe's work and his legacy. And so we're hoping to kind of show more complete and complicated. View of his practice. That pushes the photographers' work beyond these kind of past controversies and into the moment where we're living now, and we look forward to thinking gauging audiences both young and old. And how babe you this work in the world that we're living in today? I think it's a powerful moment to look at rubber maple for. Thank you Lord. Thank you. Implicit

Mapplethorpe Robert Mapplethorpe foundation Robert American society Dominic Elliot Patti Smith aids Corcoran Gallery US Roberts NEA Senator Jesse Helms Layton togr Affi Washington Cain Elliott Lee two hundred years three decades
"royal academy" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:51 min | 3 years ago

"royal academy" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"And she's only lit by the light coming from the windows in the space, and it's to me an incredibly intimate invulnerable portrait of of Patty, and you really see the kind of deep friendships that they shared in this image, and that relationship between the two of them playing out in the way. She's looking back at him taking the image of her. I don't think in any other subject, you see this level of emotional intimacy, perhaps such just me as the curator kind of projecting my own knowledge of their of their relationship. But I do see something here in this image that. Is not as noticeable or present and kind of later portrait's of other artists in the eighties. That are much more staged and her roic in nature this nine hundred eighty six photograph of Andy Warhol, he seems to have what looks like a halo around his head where how did the two of the meat so maple syrup. I met Warhol in the nineteen seventies. When he served as a staff otographer at interview magazine, the kind of celebrities strutted magazine of that era still in publication today and this portrait imagines him as a kind of religious icon with as you said a halo of light around his head. And so you see in this. Portrait Mapplethorpe connecting himself as a younger artist too. To the kind of celebrity of were hall and. Unlike though, I think Warhol's images of. Kind of commodified celebrity Mapplethorpe conceives his portraiture as capturing real genuine expressions of his sitters personalities. And so when you look at the center of image gays into Andy Warhol's is you feel like you're getting to know him personally, it's a very powerful direct image with this kind of Tondo of light around his head and. I think that this this image also exemplifies the way in which Mapplethorpe used his connections to artists and figures within the artistic community to build his own network, as I mentioned, he's a very savvy artist in that way aware of how he would need to propel his career forward through. These relationships will Warhol apparently did a portrait of Mapplethorpe's welded me. He did. Yes. An incredible series of silk screens, actually, similarly shoulder up headshots Mapplethorpe, but in motion, which is an interesting way to represent the artists and one that we kind of nod to with the self portrait that we've hung next to Andy Warhol in this part of the exhibition where receive Robert in motion kind of looking back at his idol and mentor. To his left. By the start of the eighties. He apparently turned his focus to make it black men. Some of whom he had sexual relationships with the men seem more like aesthetic objects than human subjects is that problematic for you. So in this work called a heat hito, which is named after the sitter receive this kind of richly detailed look at the heat. Does body he references Mapplethorpe in taking this image? References a recurring image that's found in nineteenth century painting and photography in which a new male subject has his knees post, poultry his chest and had bowed and he's positioned on a pedestal as his body were a sculptural object. And specifically Mapplethorpe was looking at a photograph by Willem van glowed in of a white subject. But here he's restaged that trope with a black Ma. Model and that really does actively a complex of sociation and can be viewed by some as problematic the multiple perspectives kind of recall this historical pseudoscientific practices of perhaps indexing, racial difference. While the models kind of place on this pedestal evokes, the kind of commodification of black bodies during slavery. And

Mapplethorpe Andy Warhol Willem van Patty Robert
"royal academy" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:23 min | 3 years ago

"royal academy" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"What influence did like staff have on maple for? So Sam Wang staffs patronage of Mapplethorpe allowed him kind of freedom and needs to fully pursue has photographic work. He gifted the artists hustle blood camera for Christmas in nineteen seventy two which replaced the polaroid camera that John mckendry had given him in nineteen seventy-one. But both of the men kind of played a really important role for me Thorpe in his education in the history of togr Affi and connecting him with other artists and curator's and also potential commission subjects within the kind of cultural figures of New York wag Steph was also one of the first collectors to realize the importance of. Photography and built a renowned collection of otographer few that Mapplethorpe was able to witness and which now actually resides at the Getty in Los Angeles and so- Mabel developed an appreciation for photography as an art. And as an object thanks to that relationship, and he said that he fully understood what photography that when he could pick it up and hold it in his hands. And so that sense of the photograph as a unique thing as a fine. Art object is really solidified through that experience. And we see that reflected both in the way, he can pose his images. But also in the way that he frames them and present some publicly most of his subjects seem to be artists and performers. What's the dynamic between Mapplethorpe in his subjects while he's photographing them? So I I guess I would turn to Ken moody, which was one of his subjects frequent subjects in the eighties. In addition to the kind of artists and friends and acquaintances that he met in the seventies New York. He also sought out particular sitters over and over and over again, and one of those kind moody, and he talked about how. Robber always made him feel comfortable in the studio. I he provided a robe if he was doing nude shoot he made him feel confident. And I think that that's interesting to think about within the context of the kind of photographer sitter relationships that it is a give and take. Of course, Robert was always in control. He was never not directing the shoot if you will. But he he didn't make his his subjects feel comfortable and able to express themselves which is something that's very specific to his portraiture that he translates kind of intimacy in his works. I see that there's a portrait from nineteen seventy six of Patty Smith is early lover and muse she sitting on the floor naked with her knees. Drawn up to her chest next to some radiator pipes and went looks to be an empty. Room apart for Mayport self portrait. She seems to be one of his most photographs subjects doesn't she? Yes. Patti Smith is one of maple most photographs subjects and the two artists and collaborators met in nineteen sixty seven and they were in twined from that moment until the artist's death in nineteen eighty nine and they embarked on what both have described as a kind of lifelong relationship. They were lovers. They were friends, but they were also kind of truly collaborators, and she had you Smith herself has referred to Robert as her kind of soul twin, and I think when we look at this image. We see not only the kind of compositional and technical skill of maple Thorpe as you said on the left hand side of the image of this kind of lines of radiators. With Patti crouch against them. Her ribs are tracing that same kind of line up her nude body. And

Mapplethorpe Robert Patty Smith Ken moody John mckendry maple Thorpe New York polaroid Patti crouch Thorpe Sam Wang togr Affi Mayport Steph Los Angeles Getty Mabel
"royal academy" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:36 min | 3 years ago

"royal academy" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Which is what I think we see in these first portraits in the exhibition as an artist Mapplethorpe started out with constructions, and collages photographs for magazines and books, you have three collages here. Black bag green bag and red bag all from nineteen seventy-one. What does he put together here? So in these works, we see Robert Mapplethorpe working in collage. He went to Pratt to study art in the nineteen sixties. And there he was trained as a sculptor and painter and he didn't really pick up until little bit later. So at this moment, he is bringing together found imagery to make kind of some blockages, and he noted when he was an art school that he was really inspired by Joseph Cornell and Marcel Duchamp, and so here we see that. He's take. Taken a found potato bag, which we were able to confirm with infrared photography in our conservation studio, and he spray painted these bags and then behind the screens and the center of the bags. He's a collage found imagery of called forum gay pornography magazines, and then he spray painted around the work to kind of create this object. And what's interesting here is we see references not only to kind of growing interest in representation of gay identity at that time. But also, his kind of Catholic upbringing, you know, this this gritted of net almost in front of the pornographic images creates a screen, and he spoke specifically about his first experience. Going to forty second street in the sixties and seeing the kind of sex shops and wanting to go in but not feeling comfortable. Not sure you know, what he would find inside. There was a sense that he couldn't fulfil that desire to access those images. And so he translated that feeling in these particular works by adding the screen or veil that really references his experience of perhaps being in the confessional during his Catholic upbringing, and we see that appear again, and again in his practice some of his SM photographs are framed kind of smoking mirrors or smoking glass to create a veil and some of his other pictures include actual fencing in the glassy cans, see you can access these images. Apparently Mapplethorpe's first camera as an artist was a polaroid model. What prompted him to be in take up Taga fy to begin photographing. So Mapplethorpe in nineteen seventy was living really bohemian life at the Chelsea hotel. And he meets artists and filmmakers Andy Daly, who lends him a polaroid camera, and he begins to kind of experiment taking his own images with hundreds in fact, and. He was at first a little suspect of the polaroid as a medium, but eventually he really embraced the polaroid camera and photography in general because of its immediacy he spoke about how when he was working in other mediums, he had to kind of wait to see the final product and with a polaroid took sixty seconds. And then you could see the kind of fruits of your labor and creating a composition and. He was lucky because the poll polaroid film at that time was quite expensive. But he received a grant from the company and some free film to to do his work. Thanks to. John mckendry who was a curator at the Metropolitan Museum of art. And whom he met around nineteen seventy one. So he had an opportunity with the polaroid to kind of work more freely and and do some experimenting at this early point in his career. In nineteen seventy-two Mapplethorpe met the art collector in retired curator Sam wags death who became his lover and mentor. What

Robert Mapplethorpe Andy Daly Marcel Duchamp polaroid Joseph Cornell Metropolitan Museum of art Pratt Sam wags Chelsea hotel John mckendry sixty seconds forty second
"royal academy" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:02 min | 3 years ago

"royal academy" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"What's behind that? So implicit tensions kind of has a twofold meeting. The first relates directly to the work when you're looking at his pictures, you see this tension within the composition the lighting, the relationship that he has as the maker, and the sitter that he's taking a picture of whether it's a flower or Fallas or person there's a sense of this kind of compositional tension and subject matter tension. There's also attention within the work. And it's kind of societal space when the works were made we have kind of gave Gration movement. We have the censorship and culture were debates that I spoke about earlier we also have the rise of fine art photography with. Thin artists or artistic space where we're seeing photography being valued and taken seriously as an art form and all those things are important when viewing these works. But the second meeting of the exhibition is that of the title implicit tensions is that it relates to the second part of our year long exhibition program. So in July, a second part of the show will open looking at kind of the contemporary resonances of Mapplethorpe's, work and contemporary photography and one of the key works in the Guggenheim's collection. That will be showing is a work by Glenn like on. And it's called notes on the margin of the black book, and in this work ligon takes Robert Mapplethorpe's black book, which was a publication. He made in nineteen eighty six. If you know Roberts practice, it all he did create these books periodically where he combined his images in kind of a narrative, storytelling, and this particular book looked at the black male nude and so- Glenn ligon took that book kind of starting point for his work and brought in tex- panels with quotes by artists writers art, critics all different kinds of wages to give voice to the black Nunes that that don't really have indentity if you will in in the actual publication. So there's this kind of criticality that he brings to Mapplethorpe's work and one of the techs panels is by the English, novelist. Alan halloween's, Hearst and his entry. He talks about the implicit tension between Mapplethorpe as a white male photographer and his subject but blackmail, nude. And what that means for their artistic production. The relationship we're standing in front of to self portrait's, and he seems to be experimenting with different presentations of gender in one. He's the bad boy in a leather jacket in another. He is a feather hairstyle and he's wearing lots of makeup. Do you think he's playing to an audience or trying to convey a message here, I do and it's often said that Mapplethorpe is his own favorite subject? And so perhaps he's playing to himself. But he he consistently created self-portraits throughout his career starting with his earliest Polaroid's in the nineteen seventies until his kind of final image. The death mask self portrait from nineteen eighty nine that we have in this exhibition or nineteen Eighty-eight rather than we have in this exhibition, and he was really a master of cultivating his own self image. And he used. His self portraiture as a strategy that. He could use them to kind of experiment with different modes of self presentation. Which

Robert Mapplethorpe Glenn ligon Polaroid Gration Hearst Roberts Nunes Alan halloween
"royal academy" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:28 min | 3 years ago

"royal academy" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Bill Olympic landlord life death. Rebirth is at the Royal Academy from the twenty sixth of January to the thirty first of March, you can read an interview with both Martin Clayton and repair of in the January printing of the newspaper or at the newspaper dot com. We'll be back to about Robert Mapplethorpe at the Guggenheim after this. The images taken by the photographer. Herbert Ponting June captions got ill-fated exhibition to the south pole in nineteen ten to nineteen thirteen the Terranova at the ice. Kate Evans is probably the most celebrated the huge slab of ice which dominates the four grams of the composition appears to loom over the fragile ship serving as a metaphor for the unequal contest between man and nature wonderful printed the photograph originally, so by the finances appears in Bonham's travel, and it's beret sewn in early February Ponting's adventure supposed to photography combined with his meticulous attention to detail in fruits the generation of Tokyo's, his work. When the exhibition has never lost its capacity to excite and leave us to find out more. Visit Bonhams dot com. Welcome back. Now, the good high museum in New York is organized a year long exhibition of photographs by Robert Mapplethorpe, one of the most acclaimed yet controversial artists of the late twentieth century, titled implicit tensions Mapplethorpe now. The show's conceived in two parts starting with the one opening on Friday, which focuses on the entire length of Mapplethorpe photography career from nineteen seventy two nine hundred ninety eight the artist died in one thousand nine hundred nine from aids related complications, a senior editor New York. Nancy Kenny went to the Guggenheim this week to walk through the show with Lauren Hinxton, one of the show's, creators. Tell us Lauren how did this exhibition come about? So twenty nineteen marks the thirtieth anniversary of Mapplethorpe's, death and with this exhibition. We're hoping to show the full range of his extraordinary artistic contributions and the impact that the Robert Mapplethorpe foundation gift has had on the Guggenheim's photography exhibition program. So my co curator's than I Susan Thompson associate curator here at the Guggenheim and our curatorial assistant Levy prom. We're hoping to represent the kind of nuance and complexity of Mapplethorpe's art, and we're hoping to engage audiences who may only know me before the person and not actually his production and bring them in to see kind of the wide ranging career and subject matter that he addressed with his practice. And for those that know his work. Well, we think that they're going to be quite a few discoveries to be made in the show, especially the early works that we have in our collection, everything on view is drawn from the Guggenheim's collection. As I said is from the Robert Mapplethorpe foundation gift which came to us in nineteen Ninety-three. We received some two hundred works at that time, and it really catalyzed are photography collecting practices here at the museum. So the themes that you'll see in the exhibition. Ranging from expiration of identity through self portraiture to race and gender and the kind of censorship of sexually explicit imagery. All of these kind of complex topics are are looked at within our broader collection Mapplethorpe has really had a profound impact on the field of contemporary photography. And so in the second part of this exhibition program, we're going to be highlighting that impact and looking at the complex conversations that have arisen around his work. Several of these kind of threads in the practice from exploring identity through self portraiture to his representations of race and gender are reflected in works that have been acquired by the museum through our photography council. And so we really view this moment as an important one to tease out some of these conversations and critical. Silence's that contemporary artists have brought to Mapplethorpe. So we'll have a selection of contemporary artists on view from our permanent collection starting in July. And the title implicit tensions. What's

Robert Mapplethorpe Guggenheim Lauren Hinxton Herbert Ponting Bill Olympic Royal Academy Kate Evans Martin Clayton Susan Thompson associate curator Terranova New York Nancy Kenny Bonham senior editor Tokyo four grams
"royal academy" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

05:08 min | 3 years ago

"royal academy" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Spent time influence of surrounded Rene sought. But obviously was then so committed to the Evan God to to to to modernism that he was striking new direction. Intrigued by he was influenced by the Spacey's. He spent time in where he was recording sound much more than perhaps at that stage. The imagery that he saw. No, he wasn't interested in the imagery that time, but he was interested in mapping sound. He had worked with David Tudor on rainforest projects. He heard studied, you know, electronic and contemporary music, while contemporary music, didn't exist. It was it was it was evolving at the time and very very interested in it. But especially mapping spaces, you know, like this every room has a different different sound different environment. And so, but also he was always interested in what he called the background sound. And that appears in in a lot of the works. You'll hear that. In just owns ascension on fire woman in the last room when you go in the should probably record some of the sounded, but you'll hear that it. It's kind of the it's kind of it's it's nothing's happening or very little is happening. But you know, you're in a space because it has. As a particular resonance at has particular sound to it that, you know, we don't normally pay attention to those things, and but then he draws your tension to that. Because he he uses those sounds and then on top of that once things start moving, you know, he will build the sound, according to what whatever the action is. But in the early days, we we literally recorded the sound of the same time as recording the image. And that's pretty much what we used one of the things I'm struck by. We're not in the videos in these installations is that the sound is on the one hand almost mental like the wind will. Like being underwater. But then also it feels also very much like the sound of the body when you headphones on isn't an intention to build that in a way to create these duality into exterior experience. Always always. That's very good observation. And it depends. What? If you slow things down the sound usually get slow down as well. Depending on what what it is. When you slow something down you step away from your surrounding reality remove into an inner world, which is not the one that we usually end when we're walking to our jobs of sitting at out, desks, whatever we don't usually we don't we don't usually aware of surroundings. So when you come here, and you're watching something or listening at you're actually paying attention finally to those kinds of things, and maybe even your own body sounds, and maybe even allowing yourself to sit and think about something that you don't normally think about which is self reflection, basically or just reflection. And lastly, I'd like to ask about your collaborative experience from when I've heard you talk about the work in the past. It seems to me that you're very technically involved in the production of the work and the Bill. Is the kind of ideas man, who some works and researches tell me about that experience. How much is there a sort of give and take an tool for do? You have clearly defined roles as we've worked together over these many years. You know, it used to be that, you know, come up with a shortlist of something rather than to figure out how to or we both figure out how to go and do it. You know, always always there, helping with the recordings or sound recordings especially in the video recordings. And of course, we always talked about the ideas with the installation pieces, you know, he'd sit in his room for sometimes a month or so, and I go okay that's enough because he could do that for years. And then we would talk about the the kinds of things that he would come up with. And I was kind of like a sounding board. You know, we would analyze or sink about or was very often couple of things that just like hit me in the gut. You know, like once once I respond to something once I responded network, I'm going, okay? We gotta do that piece. You know, he couldn't see that. Because he was like buried inside. And I could kind of see the outside of it a little bit and interpret sometimes he didn't have a clue sometimes what he was doing. So in that sense. There was Phil like a little guide or something. And then, you know, an India. It's kind of like he's used the word midwife, you know, like giving both to the to the, and that's kind of in a way how we feel that that that these pieces of children are children in a way. But yeah, ideas are his for the most part in of course, of, you know, made suggestions, and, you know, been involved in the work so much that kind of you know, I I feel. Know comfortable about doing that. And he does to cure. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you so much for being here. Bill

David Tudor Rene Phil Bill India one hand
"royal academy" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

05:25 min | 3 years ago

"royal academy" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"And cinema and video at cetera. Not not a message or something that you would make exactly, but we find that this wonderful resonance that's created when you when you place any work in a space that is not normally used for this kind of work. But I suppose also thinking about it. Win. These galleries were built they were built quite often for very grand paintings. And it seems to me that you and Bill you make work with with a strong ambition to make big statements in the same way. That many of those great paintings did. Well, that's true. There is a variety of work, some some pieces of very small little flat-panel screen pieces and some gigantic you'll see five angels installed here. I don't know if you've won. But the five angels piece requires a very large room, and and the room to me feels like you know, I saw the exhibition that they had here a year ago. The Charles I XE Bishen with tapestries on the walls, and I'm going. Well, this is like this has the same kind of feeling, and you right, but whenever afraid of these spaces because we know we can fill them. But we also know that there's something different that happens. Cathedrals or member one piece in Melvin was shown in the old, Melbourne gaol. And so so it really I also in in avenue on this like amazing spaces there too. We did a an exhibition in nerveless of Joan in the in beautiful monastery and underground and the pieces were actually placed in their cellars. So so that was it was a very interesting experience that too because the pieces were in stone, essentially, you know, and that was really really beautiful to show there. Does it feel risky to show your work alongside and Oprah STA? We were at first very much in awe. And it doesn't feel risky. It feels quite comfortable. Once we started working on the exhibition because the subject matter the themes that both artists have worked with all the lives are similar, and in fact, that's I believe was Martin's impulse from the beginning was to show was to inform not only our work, but for the work to inform the MichelAngelo's will because Michelangelo has Martin suggests has bloodly been known as you know, Sistine Chapel. David sculpture, you know, really large enormous works and not so much. You know, people would not think very much of the drawings in that sense. But in fact, they probably contain more of the emotion because when when you see preparatory even perpetrate during when you see that you see the duress. Let impulse behind the artists hand it's the artist hand when see the Sistine Chapel. Okay. That's awesome and overwhelming and all the rest of it. But he didn't paint the whole thing. You know, you've got a whole workshop working on that. But but the the the drawings of very precious because they are directly from him. And and that's where I think a lot of the emotion comes from. You've mentioned earlier that you work a lot with water. And I'd like to ask you about this very formative moment in bill's life where he jumped into a lake and the he's inflatable was lost. And he was he sunk to the bottom and nearly drowned, but it had a transformative effect on his life, and and has affected his work ever since is that is that to you need. Well, he didn't even remember that story for the longest time. I think journalist him one day, you know, you work a lot with water. Did you have you have you ever heard of near drowning experience? And he thought about anyone. Yes. But I don't think that there was any any in his mind. There wasn't any concern of fear. You just went on underwater, basically, his eyes were open, and he saw this beautiful landscape underwater landscape, and you know, but of course, the adults knew that eventually he will, you know, they rescued him. So there wasn't any fear attach to that. But the vision of the of this watery world is something that he hadn't encountered before. And I think that probably made quoted deep impression so then later on in life, you know, that kind of sense, you know, those things don't go away, and you can't necessarily recall them immediately or you can't necessarily. You know, talk about them, or you know, at knowledge them. But, but they are they're like everything else that we do you could walk on the street in Florence and you'll be surrounded by the renaissance and at the same time you'll rejected because you're what you wanna do is to on video camera. You know, and and do Evan God work. That is an interesting thing is that Bill in the mid seventies spent

Bill Sistine Chapel David sculpture Florence Michelangelo Melbourne Melvin Joan Evan Martin one day
"royal academy" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

05:22 min | 3 years ago

"royal academy" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Yeah. East people Tostes brought to you in association with Bonhams auctioneers since seventeen ninety three with expertise in more than sixty categories of collecting it specialists will connect you with your passion. Find what defines you at Bonhams dot com. Hello. Newspaper podcast. Thanks for joining us. I'm Ben Luke this week major exhibitions in London, New York. Looking to American artists who merged in the nineteen seventies later in the past our senior editor in New York. Nancy Kenny takes walk around the new Robert Mapplethorpe exhibition at the Guggenheim in New York with a curator Lorne Hinxton Mapplethorpe famously said that if he had been born two hundred years ago, he may have been a sculptor, but he used the tiger fee as a very quickly to make sculpture. And you see that in the way that he stages environments for his sitters, but I to special collaboration between the Royal Academy and the Royal collection in London. Cries just heard those of a woman about to give birth in Bill Viola's, non triptych, a video installation from nineteen Ninety-two that many regard as muster piece. It features three screens on the left the woman in labor on the right Bill viola zone mother in hospital on her deathbed. And in the middle of clothes sub acquiesce figure in the state of limbo this work from the Tate's collection is now at the Royal Academy directly opposite for works by the renascent smarter Michelangelo. He's great Ted Tondo in the RA's collection, featuring the virgin and child and John the Baptist and three drawings to more depictions of the virgin and child and a remarkable lamentation over the dead Christ. This is perhaps the most emblematic pairing in the role academies, huge exhibition Bill viola Michelangelo life, death, rebirth. One of the big questions when they exhibition was announced whether the curator's, including Martyn Clayton, who's head of Princeton during Britain's Royal collection with data show Michelangelo and viola together, in fact. The gallery. I described one of three rooms in which these artists separated by five hundred years, and by the most ancient and the most modern media shown directly in comparison Clayton's king to stress that this is not a frankly, I'm wise attempt to suggest that viola is an artist on a par with Michelangelo. Instead it aims to eliminate their common themes, and particularly the purity and intensity of the spirituality in their work. Boo is I'm well not able to travel, but he's wife and collaborator forty years. A repair of is in London. And I went to the RA to speak to her. I began by asking here to take us back to two thousand and six and her viola visit to Windsor Castle to see the Michelangelo drawings grim southern who is we've known since for quite a number of years now is good friends with mutton Clayton. And he thought that maybe we would like to go and visit the Royal collection the print room and the print and joins much say, and so we we arrived with L. Two children two boys. And we're treated to the most amazing experience that it's still a highlight of lives. Martin had pulled some Leonardo drawings that were trying to express chaos the chaos of tempest, and because we work a lot with water, and it was very kind of him to think of that. But then he pulls Michelangelo drawings as some of which are actually here in the exhibition. The crucifix is especially that he created towards the end of his life when he was dealing with issues of mortality, and there were very personal drawings. You know, Martin says that he they won't made for anybody whereas other pieces here that you'll see, you know, they're finished drawings, and the we're at very often gifted to friends or or maybe a patrons. But these were you know to see them six inches away. Without any glass was extraorde. Inari you could see every little shading real little pencil or charcoal Mark and the emotion that was pouring out of these just major cry and to immediately from the idea that you might either eat the make work in response to these drawings or make a show where you might be showing alongside them. Not no not immediately mountain actually thought of that. We never would have suggested something like that. But in fact, not that long afterwards center a letter and said peps, we might be able to do a project together with a launch those drawings. And we just about died, you know, but it it. It's taken this long to get it together. You know, Martin's very busy, and we were very busy. But now it's and then we were offered these galleries. So we had to bring the show is actually going to be next year in the secondary. And but now we have these galleries, and it's just spectacular. I must say that the space. Bases in this building are absolutely perfect for to cradle exhibition. Pretty interesting because you think to these these are old galleries, they would generated before anybody even conceive of the moving image and

Michelangelo Lorne Hinxton Mapplethorpe Martyn Clayton Bill Viola Martin London RA Ted Tondo Royal Academy New York Robert Mapplethorpe Tostes Windsor Castle senior editor Boo Ben Luke Nancy Kenny Tate Britain
"royal academy" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"royal academy" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Who was this woman, even for art experts, this likely probable, founder of modern abstraction was a mystery. I saw many many exhibitions on modernism in that period. And I thought it's very unlikely I come across someone who is as important as him out of tin was and so it really struck me that this artist was completely unknown to me. Julia Voss is an art historian in Berlin. Who is now writing the first substantial biography on Helmuth Clint, she says HAMAs story begins in eighteen sixty two in Stockholm where she's born into a family of naval officers family were actually the makers of the big now chops and of the Baltic Sea. And what they what you've actually do you make something that is hidden because it's underwater you make it visible for other people. And I think that's very compatible to what? She's doing she also makes a world that is hidden to other people visible to them. She attended the Royal Academy during the early years of when they let women into the Royal Academy. Tracy bash Goff is the curator of the Helmuth Clint exhibition at the Guggenheim. She would have been trained as a traditional painter in done sort of classical drawing painting exercises making landscapes portraits. I mean when she studied at the academy, she got the gold medal for history painting, which is absolutely extraordinary for woman in the eighteen eighties. So I think that would have been a career pass there. But she wasn't interested in nineteen thousand six she starts completely new thing. So in one thousand nine hundred six Helmuth Clint begins a whole new artistic and professional venture one. That would be a total, right. Turn from her strict academic education. But what's interesting is that the timing isn't coincidental. There is a lot going on at this moment. The turn.

Julia Voss Helmuth Clint Royal Academy founder Baltic Sea gold medal Goff Stockholm HAMAs Berlin Tracy
"royal academy" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"royal academy" Discussed on WSB-AM

"You wanna ride a bicycle? I love with my car. Okay. Is it? This reminds me, I know going the other headlines, but NASA just put what are they they went to the furthest object in the solar system and did a fly by it's like something's past Pluto. Because I think it's the same thing that gave us the pictures of Pluto way out there, six hours for a signal traveling at the speed of light just to communicate with in the movie, do they cover the figure, Taurus, the great, Brian May is a sort of. He's an astronomer of some kind. I don't know what level. Yes, they do. But he's part of the Royal Academy a such and such. And I saw yesterday. I don't know if we can find this. And dig it up he wrote a song for that that fly by and I was listening to that song, and we'll have to pull it up. But you know, Queen was one of those bands one of the few bands where everybody in the band wrote songs and. I didn't know which songs Brian May wrote. And then when I heard that thing yesterday, I thought oh, I think he wrote flash. I think this guy wrote radio Gaga. It's not they're not their best. So so you enjoyed it. I did I really didn't really the whole thing that the end is Live Aid set. It's that play out. I would say people said it was twenty minutes. I felt like maybe ten fifteen at the end it's long. I don't want to spoil it. I mean, I think you should have stuck around after after the credits 'cause I think Led Zeppelin came on with the reunion. Do they did you should have stuck around a little more Live Aid? Let's do this more headlines for Friday January.

Brian May NASA Zeppelin Queen Royal Academy twenty minutes six hours
"royal academy" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:15 min | 3 years ago

"royal academy" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Young African innovators have been shortlisted for the two thousand nine hundred Royal Academy of engineering Africa prize, the continent is witnessing a wave of technological creativity. With scientists developing applications that cut across health and medical diagnosis sign language as well as water and sanitation. This core corgi is one of those on the shortlist list, and she joins the program now to tell us about how magic water her innovation harvests water from Airbus great to have you with us. Congratulations on the shortlist. I appreciate so. So you're literally turning air into water. How does that work? Not exactly because they already what I in the air. So basically, it is a lot of what have you painted just expecting that from the atmosphere? And the way we do these. So imagine, you ain't no very hot phase. And you're taking a cold. And there's a lot of what outside of the. And that is the coordination water that we're using. But basically does so many other methods of getting water from people can have issue of fog that that that we're using other moment is very invitation coalition motel. So we researching and using. For example. Jessica an example of a difficulty silica when you buy a new shoe, you'll find us more packets of coaches. So they're like crystals in a in a paper bag. Exactly. Yeah. Exactly. So basically they absorbed by they I talked to what I'm gonna choose from. And when you hit them up and they release that water. And that's correct. The reason why we use silica just specifically because he doesn't contaminate what they anyway. So what you get basically fueled whatever clean water, and how are you heating, the silica gel? So the momentum expo using traitor. So basically, you're just using solar energy SAT's. To basically minimize the cost or the cost of the overall technology because the communities we are watching. What's in Kenya? I low income Soviet they make full of the overall cost. And best tell me about the scale of your project. I mean, how much water can you produce and how long would it take? So we'd be new technology using Jessica our prototype. He's unable to get any type of wartime. I'd be that. He's we've the Desi comes. But coordination can go all the way to a thousand by date. And that's and that's hopefully, how you want to grow it to just give us a little bit of background on your work. And why you chose this particular kind of technology using air to produce water in that way. So basically, I have lived in Kenya all my life, and I started out water filtration company that was being activated. And we did that for two years that fifty seventeen generally we heard in the bay long drought eighteen we face, whatever, you shouldn't. So you go for five months ago, the top and Utah's very hard. Sometimes you'd find you only have like a couple of what they just to take our show. So you do something like we call you expunge bathing. So it became for me became tonight or pending that there was what he's be done even though volumes does not. So he came he it came out of necessity. Basically, just finally Beth what will you do if you win the prize? So the moment we have so this device at individual level and private people are using them. But we are. Really targeting community deployment want to pilot a community priming for the well. Best of luck with it. All Beth Koi. There. One of those short listed on the African innovators at Royal Academy of engineering African prize. Five minutes to the hour. Let's talk.

Kenya Jessica Royal Academy of engineering A Royal Academy of engineering A Airbus Beth Utah Five minutes five months two years
Connecticut, Lisa Lacerra and Michigan discussed on The Lars Larson Show

The Lars Larson Show

02:27 min | 4 years ago

Connecticut, Lisa Lacerra and Michigan discussed on The Lars Larson Show

"In the bill cosby sex assault trial concludes its ninth day with an expert witness disputing the accusers account of the drug she says she was given before she says she was molested defense says expert witnesses have exposed accuser andrea constanze accusation is made up saying blue pills that paralyzed her weren't quail lutes cosby spokesman andrew wyatt says benadryl that cosby did say he gave some of the women is a legal drug that does not call paralysis unconsciousness memory loss blurred vision nor does is down the central nervous system prosecutors rested their case earlier today judge steven o'neill says he expects testimony to wrap up early next week with the jury getting the case soon after grenell scott fox news southwest airlines sought more time to win spank fan blades like the one that's napped off during one of its flight and caused an engine break up the left a passenger dead this week the airline opposed a recommendation by the engine manufacturer to require alter sonic inspections of certain fan blades within twelve months saying that's not enough time the elton john biopic has gotten the green light rocket man the bio pic on elton john is out of the gate and ready to go with taryn edgerton set to star as the iconic piano player edgerton said to sing john songs himself as he portrays the singer in various stages of his life with production set to begin in august the film written by lee hall will include john's beginnings as a prodigy at the royal academy of music to his emergence as music superstar and his partnership was songwriting collaborator bernie top john's career was launched in nineteen seventy three with the album goodbye yellow brick road edgerton played the lead in the british film kingsman michelle pollino fox news michigan couple celebrating the birth of their fourteen son ketari schwantz have no daughter lisa lacerra fox news radio here's the latest weather from the talk of connecticut showers early then cloudy tonight with lows in the upper thirties chance of an afternoon shower for friday highs in the low fifty s partly sunny saturday high fifty five mostly sunny milder sunday highs in the upper fifties get the latest forecast online at talkofconnecticut dot com weekdays at one pm the dave ramsey show on the.

Connecticut Lisa Lacerra Michigan Michelle Pollino Bernie Top Royal Academy Of Music Southwest Scott Fox Steven O'neill Andrew Wyatt Andrea Constanze Assault Bill Cosby Ketari Schwantz Lee Hall Taryn Edgerton Elton John Twelve Months
Toys R Us "Amazoned"

Tech News This Week

02:02 min | 4 years ago

Toys R Us "Amazoned"

"Amazon you know what it's like to be amazon that's right just like google amazon has become a verb amazon d means your business has been crushed because amazon is either going into or thinking about going into your industry this week toys r us became a probable victim to being amazon d announcing that it's shutting down all its stores you can expect to see fire sales of course all the toys r us stores and much of the merchandise is more than likely going to end up for resale on ebay with ebay merchants going out and scooping up toys for pennies on the dollar and then reselling it to you oh in one quick tip if you have toys r us gift card now a good time to use it okay here's a story that anyone with a pacemaker needs to know and we'll stress that it's something you don't wanna hit the panic button over at least not yet the royal academy engineering is prestigious british organization composed at the uk's leading engineers from all sciences so when they issue a study it's worth everyone's attention especially this one economy says that hackers now pose a serious threat to internet health devices emaar i scanners for example or very vulnerable if they're hacked their images could hide serious health problems and of course they're drug pumps in use in hospitals all over the world if they're hacked they could deliver an overdose could be fatal in most alarming though is that pacemakers which been internet connected for a little more than a decade can conceivably be turned off by hackers that we've known that these devices have been theoretically vulnerable for some time but this warning centers on the fact that even though we know between the hospitals and the manufacturers no one seems to be taking the threat seriously we said don't hit the panic button the aware of the dangers and talk it over with you don.

Amazon UK Google Ebay Royal Academy Emaar