35 Burst results for "Roxanne"

"roxanne" Discussed on The Thriving Dentist Show with Gary Takacs

The Thriving Dentist Show with Gary Takacs

03:31 min | Last month

"roxanne" Discussed on The Thriving Dentist Show with Gary Takacs

"In your schedule. The ideal day will have a mix of all three of those elements, Roxanne and water. But what's really important to remember is the order in which you put them into the vase. Near what would happen if I filled the vase with water to the top. Is it full? Yes. And if I dropped, if I dropped a rocket at what would happen. The water will spill out. Right. Because it's already full. In other words, what is the last ingredient? If you put it first, then you can't put anything else. You want to put the proper order in. You want to put the rocks in your schedule first. Then you put the sand in and then things left over. We can fill those with water. We can use that as felt. Right. Rocks represent your production blocks. Your production blocks. Sand represents minor production. And water represents little or no production. And so you have to define what are the rocks in your schedule. So for example, Invisalign could be rock, right? Absolutely. But let's take more traditional general dentistry. You know, a crown is definitely a rock. Right. If you do a root canals would be a rock or a surgery, you know, would be a rock. If you're doing two crowns, I would absolutely be a rock. Filling. So this is what we call high value services. Dentistry. I think of high value services, things like implants, and smiling. And those kind of things. But I'm talking about everyday general ministry. And so the fillings could be a rock if you do enough of it. If we're doing a quadrant of fillings, it could be a rock, but if you're doing a single tooth, two surface, that sand. So define what the rocks are in your practice based on your mix of services, define what you're saying is, and then define what water is. An example of water might be a suture removal or a post-op check might be considered water. Let me ask you this guy. So let's say the doctor wants to produce $5000. I just made up that number in one day, right? Now, what percentage of them should be rocks before we start putting the sand in? Well, a simple model would be to have three different lengths of rock appointments in your schedule. For example, one might be an hour and a half rock and the other two might be one hour rocks. So that would represent three and a half hours of the 8 hour day. So you put those in the schedule first. You literally block schedule and doctors, I would suggest that you not only go out for the rest of this year, 2022, but go out for all of 2023 and put those rocks in your schedule. You want to put those in the schedule first. Put those rocks. Now the other type of appointment that I want you to block schedule is the doctor part of the new patient exam. The doctor part of the new patient exam. Because that's a captive a point. Now, questionnaire is the doctor part of the new patient exam, rock, sand, or water. Well, it's a rock long-term. It may not be rock today. In other words, that patient could rise in $20,000 in dentistry, right? A $30,000 in dentistry. But it's not a rock in terms of production. It's not. So I would call it sand with the potential to be a rock. Oh, okay. With the potential to be around. We want to block your schedule for those because you want to be able to accommodate new patients soon from the time they call. So figure out what your new patient flow is. If your new patient flow

Roxanne
"roxanne" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

06:23 min | 6 months ago

"roxanne" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Hostages, and yet New York City was still the most glorious move that we could make. And the reason I signed up for this horrendous experience is because I don't want to go anywhere else. One of the things I'm struggling with is exactly what you're talking about here, which was the 70s were really bad. And we had unemployment on top of all that. We had inflate. We had everything. It was the worst. And I remember waking up in my senior year of college, the Boston I was in New England in Boston Globe was on my doorstep a picture of the helicopter debris all over the desert floor because we just botched a rescue mission for the Iranian hostages. And I just thought, oh my God, we just suck. It's over. It's done for America. But I didn't have the same horrible feeling I have now. And I'm wondering, is that just because I'm older? You know what I mean? Because it was bad. It was really bad back then, but I maybe I was just more flexible as a young person and America losing its shit didn't bother me or I don't know. You know what I'm saying? You know what I'm saying? I do. And I just have a real struggle with that because it doesn't seem to bother my kids as much as it just eats away at me. They're just like, yeah, I can't afford to live here. I'm gonna have to move. That's it, period. Yeah, no, I don't want a new move to moved away. And the fact is the pendulum always swings. And there's your mouth of God's ears, but it has not happened yet. It just keeps getting worse. But then there's a chance. Yes, if we get rocks and in there, then just we get a couple of rock sands in government. I will change my tune completely. Look at Virginia. Look at the San Francisco school board. Look at me, people have started. We outsourced politics. Just like we seeded ground on education on culture, we also outsource politics to this class of people who had Robert's rules of order in their backpack and really liked the model UN, and it turns out those were not the right people to do that. I think it was used to be a great Ivy League that said they loved student athletes because there's their only people on campus who knew how to lose. Well, real people know how to lose and we know the costs and getting us all into office will be great. Well, again, as I'll say it again, your mouth to God's ears, so vote for Roxanne beckford hoag. Tell us about the business you guys and your husband have. So we I had so many children. But I didn't know what to do. But it was the nascent days of the Internet, and it looked like everyone was making websites, has been learned how to code, and it was either porn was big. We were like, nah, not that. And we really were committed to parenting and attachment parenting, and I was nursing mom and did that. And so I started designing nursing clothes. And so it's called one hot mama, and if you don't spell it right, you do get born. So it's. And so we have, we have a website for moms. Is that your main business? You have other stuff. That's our main business. Are you acting still? Are you going out? I was. So I was finally aging into district attorney, land? Well done. Yeah, I know. That's cool. Played an ambassador on YouTube. And when the pandemic started and I was on hold for a very long time for a late night comment who's someone on his staff clearly wanted to make fun of Kamala Harris when my hair straight, you can see the Kamala. And I got COVID tested 27 times, always on hold. They never quite did it. And then a couple months ago, sag decided to zig when everyone else is zag and zagging and require a booster. And I'm adamant about medical freedom and about my personal bodily autonomy and so I was dropped by my representation because she said no matter how great you are, they're not going to take your exemption. That's insane. I have B and T cell immunity. I have regular antibody titers to sort of prove, look, look, it's still good. And I'm persona non grata. So they took away they hurt my business. They took away my ability to acted to volunteer with my kids and my kids were destroyed, so I'm coming to get you. I'm just looking at some of your other stuff. All I can say is godspeed. And is there a website people can go to? It's super Roxanne dot com and definitely spread the word because we they're more of us than there are for them. Are there? There are, we just. But LA is so chill. People are so excited. I'm just so I just have no faith. When Gavin Newsom won his challenge of what do they call recall challenged by such a big margin, that was shocking to me. It wasn't shocking to me because I was looking at the numbers as it went along because I worked with the recall and I was helping Kevin kiley and there were as the recall went along and it was yes, yes, yes, yes, and then once he was able to personalize it and say, oh, this person is a terrible. I mean, we're talking about people who, especially younger people than us, I'm 56. I'm sure we're right in the same ballpark. It's the same ballpark. Once you're over 40, it's the same ballpark. Is that we're talking about people who've been marinated in anti americanism for so long. They don't know they're soaking in it. Remember you're soaking in a march? So people who see the American flag and viscerally. Do they contract and they throw up a little in their mouth. Yeah. And he was able to act, those people were ready to recall him. And then when it became, oh, there's a chance that someone maga like can get in. Ultra maga. Right? That's problematic. Those same people now, like foamy ones, same one, you have several me twice, name on me. They get it. And even yes, I can tell you why. Roe versus wade Lee happens. Yeah. And this group that I'm in. Again, you know, college educated women with children in the home ripe for the picking. And to a woman, they all went, my body, my choice. You, because I know what you did to my children. Where were you? Where were you? I dig it. All right, let's leave it at that Roxanne. Thank you so much for being here. And thank you for doing this, even if it stirs the pot. If this one doesn't go right, don't give up. Let's see you somewhere, please. No, I'm done. Now is it? Let's get her in here, guys. Really, I can't sleep at night anymore. And I've lost faith in the electorate. That's the problem. I've just completely.

Boston Globe San Francisco school board Roxanne beckford hoag America COVID New England New York City Ivy League Kamala Harris Boston UN Kevin kiley Virginia Robert Gavin Newsom YouTube wade Lee LA Roe Roxanne
"roxanne" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

01:44 min | 6 months ago

"roxanne" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

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"roxanne" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

02:35 min | 6 months ago

"roxanne" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"About safety. Everyone. The fact that you could get murdered going from your car into your house in Beverly Hills or encino is in lagging indicator that something is wrong. Right. I mean, Karen Bass said, oh, I feel perfectly safe in Los Angeles. She's running for mayor, and why people across the country should care about this is that Sacramento is sort of the Petri dish for legislation. But the board of supervisors is an executive legislative and quasi judicial body that rules with an iron fist and the stuff that comes out of there then goes to Sacramento and gets exported to the rest of the country. They're the ones who did the single use utensil ban and plastic bag. I mean, they really focus on the things that matter. Facetiously. Yeah. Yes. Wow, it gets so stricken and upset when I talk about this stuff. It just seems so gross. And so contrary to what people want and what people need to thrive. Well, that's the thing. America is a high trust society and we trusted people that we elected and what I don't get is I just think it's so bizarre to care about things that don't help humanity or anybody else and then disregard things that really profoundly affect people's lives and risk their literally ability to go on surviving. People dying because their decision. They think that they're taking the compassionate stands. Because remember, they sit in this weird ivory tower where even if you've ever been to a board of supervisors meeting or city council meeting, they're up on this huge thing, you know, come before us organelle and mask for your indulgences. And they have a relationship with unlike first responders like fire and sheriffs and police who are out there every day 24/7. So they get petitioned by these groups who bring in sort of AstroTurf first to read. Hi, I'm Roxanne and I want you to close the men's central jail. Why? Because it's the right thing to do. Are you insane? Well, they're looking to do that. They're doing it. And they canceled the contract to build a new one. I know. And that one was going to have a beautiful, huge mental health wing, fully staffed, fully staffed. I mean, that would have been an answer to so much. But they think I don't know what they think. They're so out of touch. And I think that's why it's so important that we have this cycling through of people and obviously term limits don't do it, but people who, as the founders intended, serve and then come back out to live under the rules that.

board of supervisors Sacramento Karen Bass encino Beverly Hills Los Angeles America Roxanne
"roxanne" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

06:18 min | 6 months ago

"roxanne" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"But any of that, he just said, will everyone everywhere else when they come to this country sees how corrupt and elite and your legal system and as far more so than anywhere else in the western world? I was like, oh my God, I knew it was bad. I didn't know it was that bad, and that he could see it. Oh, there goes Gary. His last few episodes are Douglas Murray, followed by Eric Schmidt and then Ricky Gervais. That noted scholar Ricky Gervais must have been him. No, it wasn't Ricky. Do I heard that one too? If it's Eric Schmidt is a British guy and they're talking about excesses of the left and the right. The title is the future of artificial intelligence, but what you're talking about is Murray. Yeah, western culture and its disconnect with Douglas Murray. All right, Doug smart. And basically that was sort of the premise of the wasps of old. Don't rub their noses in it. Yeah. Don't get a flashy new car. Don't get interested behind the walls. And everything will be fine. And what we're seeing and what was exemplified by Obama's party on Martha's Vineyard where I used to go every summer is that people were really upset that he turned the light on because they really don't like you to look under the hood. Oh, I know. Yeah. And so that's what's happening now. And that is aware of this. So he's being criticized for his excesses. Well, how big part of the elite is? Because they are showing that he's part of the Vernon Jordan and Bill couldn't, they all had these party, but you do it quietly. You just love you. Don't scare the help. You have your car is and coming from a third world country and having gone to a boarding school with lots of kids of deposed former heads of state. You have the armored car that on the outside looks regular and on the inside, it's a Bentley. But don't make them come after you. Yeah, don't make them envious. Yeah. There's a line that you don't want them to think that's changed. Well, tacky is as tacky does. I don't know, you know, I went to school in the south as you know, and tackiness was a big thing and that you just don't be tacky. And that went away at some point. Well, it seems like this is a whole other topic. I'm going to get off it quick, but sort of showing wealth and opulent consumption has become a virtue in certain areas. And that's not good in my opinion. The opposite of saving and investing and building and doing something with money. Well, and there's also a difference between you're showing off your opulent wealth and saying, you can do this too. We can all be rich a law say a Donald Trump like figure who's like want to ride in my private plane. It's super cool. And people who an Al Gore who has what, 8000 cubic feet of water to water his fabulous lawns every day, but then tells you that you must stop showering every day. Well, nowhere more so do I hear stuff like that from LA in California. Where literally the way I think about California government now, whether it be local or statewide, is their failures are being cast upon the citizens. Like, well, no water, everybody. So you're going to have to deal with that. Why don't we have water? What else are you doing? Yeah, I fled that. What is your basic function except to give us things we need to survive? So what are you going to do differently? And which CD running for? So I'm running for the LA county board of supervisors, which most people don't know exists. They're 5 seats. Oh, I know it well. Yeah, so most people don't, because they keep it under the radar because it turns out those 5 people who used to be called the 5 kings when they were all men. They're all women now, and I refer to them as the view. Because it is Katherine barger's mostly sane, and then there's four lockstep doctrinaire ideologues who just want us all to suffer. And it doesn't matter to them. And so only two seats are up for election in this election. By the way, the election that we're having for the past month and we'll continue to have until June 7. It's not a regular primary, like most people in the rest of the country think of California of course, is crazy. So we have basically two general elections. This is the mini one. And two seats are up, district one and district three. District three has been the held by the Dorian of from Zelda. She was Zelda in dobie Gillis. Sheila qule. And she is retiring. She has a term left and unlike every other politician who clutches until they're dying breath, she is not running for reelection. There may be some issues coming down the pike. Well, who knows? But it's an open seat. Very much. Oh, yeah. Well, and there's also some no big contract. I mean, sheriff Alex villanueva told me that of the 3200 plus counties in America, LA's governance is the most corrupt the worst the most suggested I get security. Well, and it's interesting to me, now I know Catherine barber personally and I interviewed him many times on television and things. And I kind of trust her and she hates how I was feeling the way. And I don't understand why. He looks to me like the only guy doing anything in government in this town. Every move he's made. I'm like, good, good. Thank you. Alex, please. Thank you. And I've interviewed him a couple of times too, and he's seems like a straight dude. I didn't vote for him. I don't think I like, you know, I was like, ugh. But I've met him now a couple of times and talked to him and listened to his post teams. So Catherine sweet lady. I think there is such a thing as Stockholm syndrome. We saw it with Patty Hearst, and we're seeing it now. You are locked in a room. Well, in a virtual room because they deemed themselves essential enough to get paid, but they didn't work. Many of them have really serious problems legally coming their way in terms of bribes and all kinds of stuff. The corruption is starting to come out with the city council and the board of supervisors. And Catherine is a human being and all human beings want to get along with her. Okay. All right, so you think it's just something that they've adopted there. One of the healthiest things you can do, of course, is.

Douglas Murray Ricky Gervais Eric Schmidt Doug smart Vernon Jordan LA county board of supervisors Ricky California Katherine barger Murray Vineyard Gary Martha Donald Trump dobie Gillis Sheila qule Al Gore Obama LA sheriff Alex villanueva
"roxanne" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

08:22 min | 6 months ago

"roxanne" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Today it's my privilege to bring in Roxanne beckford beckford Hodge. I beg your pardon. I'm used to hoping spelled HOA G, it's a hoag HOG GE now, this is a little bit unusual for this podcast. I came upon Roxanne and I became intrigued. She is campaigning for the LA board of supervisors. She is called the super mom for supervisor, which you'll find out why. And it's super Roxanne dun cam. Dot com is where you can find out more about her. Also, Twitter at Roxanne hogue in Roxanne beckford BEC FRD hoag, at Instagram at Roxanne Duckworth hoag. Now, the reason we're doing a local story for you all is you hear me and Adam complaining all the time about what a freaking catastrophe Los Angeles is. And I don't even know what Roxanne's positions are or anything, but I love the idea that somebody capable just goes, I can do this better. I don't care who you are. I'm ready to listen. Just somebody because this is what this is what the founding fathers intended was local government by local people engagement with all. The habit of democracy they used to call it. A guy named Alexis to talk Phil came over here from France in 1822 and studied it. And that was he thought the great breakthrough that America discovered that you could have a national practice of democracy if you practice it regularly locally. So congratulations for being a part of that Roxanne. So welcome. Thank you so much. So tell me, how'd you get into this? So I'm an immigrant. I'm from the island of Jamaica. I'm deathly afraid you're going to go, I'm a lifelong political operative. And I grew up wanting desperately to have Robert's rules of order be my Bible. I'm not one of those. Never did student counsel. Wasn't one of those model UN kids. I was decided to either being a doctor or an actor and I decided one was decidedly easier. And so I went with the actor and I've been here in LA as people do for 30 years, came out here, gave myself a year to get a sag card and did and there you have it. And did a couple things alongside of that. Yeah, I had a few children. Yeah. In LA, anything over one is sort of. What happened? Number two. Number two is like eyebrows up. Yeah, so I had four. You have four. And part of the eyebrows up is how do you form that here? How do you do it? Well, you keep moving further and further north. Each kid you have. Now you had your kids all at once. But I had one, and then another one. And each time we moved. And then the twins. Almost almost to the venture line. I'm in north Hollywood. Well, we know about that. Yes, yes. So there's a little commuting involved. But that's why my interest in the issue of homelessness in people who have pitched a tent next to the beach and they say, well, they can't possibly move. And I go, I did. I couldn't afford to live where I was living each time. I had another kid. Right. You know, let me just quickly throw a thing on the table here, which is as it pertains to moving and being an immigrant. I did a daytime radio show a few years ago and my partner was Leanne tweeden, and she, all of a sudden, she goes, she said something very profound. She goes, we have what 800,000 undocumented immigrants coming into this town. This year or something, or we have in the city around here, not one of them is on the street. They came here without documentation without a family without a job without a house without anything. And they managed to find a place to live. And tell me how it is that those people, well, because they're sick, of course. Their drug addicts and their ill. Okay, I'm all about that. And I know how to manage that, which of course drives me insane. But what's your thoughts on this? Well, because I'm an immigrant and when I became a U.S. citizen, I actually did take the oath to protect and defend the U.S. Constitution. And so the first time, I mean, and I was older because I'd had kids in that sort of distracts you for a little bit. But when I noticed that there were people on the ballot running unopposed, I went, wow, wow, this is not America. This is not. I went from being a British subject to being a citizen. So I want to participate. Jamaica was your Commonwealth country, so the queen opens parliament and she's the Commonwealth thing is a very hard thing for an American to get their head around. Yeah, clearly. Meghan Markle. But it really is. When I was in Australia, I'm like, huh? Why so much about Queen Victoria here? What's going on? Why the deep emotional connection to the Commonwealth? Yeah, my transfer from singing God save the Queen to God bless America. You know, took a minute. See, I thought all my British British island Friends, England Friends, are very ashamed of their colonial heritage. And yet a lot of the colonial Commonwealth is very, very attached to it. It's very strange. Yes, we speak the queen's English for God's sake. Two countries divided by a common language as I discovered when I came to America. So well, my first day in American school, I raised my hand dutifully and asked if anyone had a rubber. Oh, that's good. It's an eraser. That's good. I'm from, yeah. Endeared me. Just so I know where you teen years by that point. I was 11, but because of the British system, I got put in 7th grade. Yeah, yeah. Rubber has meaning at some point. Yeah, yeah. Picture, you know, pigtails, nissans, and not allowed to, yeah. Well, I've always said the only reason this country has survived through what it's done to itself, all these years is because it started with British systems. I guess French systems might have done something similar, but the British systems are iron made of iron. They were British institutions, but they're set up in such a way. And then the American version of that was still really ultimately British institutions. Yes, and that is, I believe, now hate speech. There should be a knock at your door any moment. If you say western civilization is an ultimately good thing and that British colonialism actually kind of worked out for a lot of these countries got more advanced than they would have been someone or an article a few years ago about the countries that when you look at that countries that went through the British system versus those that didn't, and that baseline level of jurisprudence of belief in sort of the individuality, the rights of man. Yeah. Natural rights. It's amazing. But you're kind of leaning on something there that is actually complicated, which is while I agree with your premise that the British systems really provided a ton, we live in a time when the errors and excesses are being meted out right now and it seems like compensation or retribution or adjustments are not enough. Now there has to be some destruction of the original institutions in order for people to be happy. They're never going to be happy. That's the key. No one's happy. And as far as, well, that's a horrible system. The longtime quote capitalism is the worst of all systems except for all the rest because if you want to talk about unfair destructive systems look no further than the entrenched even political class. Forget monarchies. Look at what we have in LA, and that brings us back to your original question. We have people who do America around of, oh, okay, I'm termed out here. I'm going to take your chair. You're going to take his chair. He's going to take my chair and we're just going to be in this never ending dance of people who rule over us all with the one true ring. I'm looking up right now the name of this guy I heard speaking this morning on Sam Harris is a British guy damn it. And even I'm not going to find it. But he said something that just blew me away. He said, you know, we all kind of know there is an elite and a sort of an ensconced or sort of what's the word where they're kind of locked into their elite status. But he said, and he was a very smart nonplussed moderate guy. Was it Douglas Murray? You know, I don't think so. See who asked the last interview with Sam Harris was that he didn't sound like Douglas Murray might have been because Douglas Mary sounds a little more radical to me when I hear him talk when this guy did..

Roxanne beckford Roxanne beckford Hodge LA board of supervisors Roxanne hogue Roxanne Duckworth hoag U.S. Leanne tweeden Jamaica LA queen opens parliament Meghan Markle Instagram GE Alexis north Hollywood Phil Adam Los Angeles UN
"roxanne" Discussed on Woz Happening!!!!

Woz Happening!!!!

07:42 min | 9 months ago

"roxanne" Discussed on Woz Happening!!!!

"We see that on the porch. I think the funny part when Steve Martin is like, he's like, oh, I was so nervous. So nervous, you couldn't perform. And he's like, no, so nervous, I couldn't go for the third time. And Steve has hot draws. He's like, what? The thought was really funny, because Steve was like, damn, he did do it. And he even tried to stop them from doing it because he sent those old ladies saying that there was aliens that wanted to have sex with all the women. They were more experienced. The gaggle of old ladies was one of the best like comic relief things I have seen in a movie like from when they're at Dixie's and he's like, you know, ladies, a big nose means. And they're like, oh my God, to then being so horny that they're gonna go have sex with aliens. Like, I loved it. They were so funny because they were so just like true to themselves. They were like, are we sure we want to miss Dallas for this? They're like, yep, let's go. Yeah, do you truly believe there's a bunch of aliens that want to have sex with all the women? I want to find out. Yeah, that was pretty good. I mean, they were funny. And the whole the whole thing is really cute and funny. You know, but it's a very good lesson that just be yourself. I mean, you shouldn't have to hide who you are. And if a person doesn't like you for you, then they're not worth it. Exactly. And I think it's so important. Because Steve Martin says that conversation on the hike, he goes, you know, feelings can change attractiveness. So I do believe that he thought that Daryl Hannah was calling him attractive because he was like, oh, you can see past that and my personality makes me good-looking. To you, which is like the moral of the story is that looks don't matter and you need chemistry and you need and you need something that bonds you and that you have common ground. Yeah, there's actually a couple of scenes where the person that you imagined to be a certain way isn't. Like one of the firemen, he seems like he's like a total idiot and not smart. Chris ends up getting a book for him. And it's like this really advanced reading and he's like, I was embarrassed to go get it myself. Yeah, so then in that scene, Daryl Hannah believes that Chris is buying this very philosophical French book about the outlook of life. And she's admiring him from a distance and she's like, wow, he's like this smart quiet mysterious man. He knows so much and then outside we see that Chris gives it to I think his name's like Fred or something. I don't know Frank maybe. And it's so funny because you're like, oh, and he's like, yeah, I can't even speak French. You see the book sellers speak some friendship. And he's like, Chris is just so dumb. Yeah, like when Steve Martin's talking to his ear, the hat comes off and everything and they have the radio confusion. And then he has to do it for himself. And he's like, he just totally like, you could see what an idiot he truly is. And he's like, your tits. Your pillows. And he's just totally blunt and steep minds like, oh my God. What are you doing? And it was so funny because before that, when the signals get crossed and he starts reporting, the police dispatcher, and he's like, oh, I'm stopping myself from not a crime, a crime of loving you. And I was like so stupid and I was like, how foolish do you have to be to believe that this person's a, not stroking out, or just a complete idiot? Yeah, I think all along she knew, there was no way you couldn't know. I mean, just watching her. And like you said, she's like this genius astronomer. It's going to get a comment coming to earth. And she figures all this up, but she can't figure out that the guy talking to her who doesn't make any sense at all is not writing this beautiful poetry that just melts her hot. It's so funny. And then so she goes away for a week. And this is when I was like, the U.S. Postal Service was never this fast. CD was writing her three letters a day and she got all 20 of them, how, how that does not make sense. Email is not invented yet. But she goes to Chris, she goes, tell me about the letters. He's like, yeah, I wrote like 20, I think. That's not about the like, I don't know. She excused a lot for someone and I thought for as much as Daryl Hannah excuse, they could have cast it a much better looking man. Because Chris was not good-looking. I think that was kind of one of the things. They made him up to be like this really awesome God looking like, man, he was just playing. He was just like, I was like, I'm not judging, listen. I'm just saying, as a guy, I looked at him and went, yeah, that's not that there's like Fabio or someone in the 80s that would have been much better played by that. I mean, he wasn't muscular. He wasn't like outstanding. He's face was kind of long like a horse. I mean, I was like, I was like, what is this? All they're like, oh, he's so dreamy. I'm like, what? I fully agree with that. And then there's like one scene when sandy's like, oh, the Vikings here. I want to put them in bronze. I was like, why? Because he used brutish and you don't want to steal with him. He is not good, but I thought there was one interesting scene when he is at the firehouse. He's speaking to another fireman Chris, and the camera kind of zooms in on them and they're talking about CDs nose and how big it is and how you can't look at it. But the camera keeps zooming in to the point where it's just like kind of a frame of their faces and both of their noses are almost touching and kind of a comedic way because they're as people have what we would consider a big nose versus what they consider to be a big nose because they have CDs comically large one. And I thought that was really funny to portray that. There are surrounded by big noses, but like everyone can only focus on how big this one knows is. Yeah, it was really funny. He does go to a person that can take his nose off, like redo it. But he has like an allergy to anesthesia and he can't have it done. So he's got these pictures of noses and he's putting them up to his face. He's like, yeah, you are the one. I was like, what the? I mean, I guess if you had to deformity and something like would look better on you. You could dream about it. Like he was doing, but it just was so funny, because the guy's like, maybe you have a reason for having this nose. And he's like, what? And I thought it was so funny to because and that scene he's like, fine, let's do it the old fashioned way. And he grabs a bottle, like he's going to get drunk and he's just going to hack off his nose. And I was like, oh, Steve Martin, how desperate you are for love. But actually, I thought it was kind of cool in the beginning. We see him actually drink a glass of wine through his nose because she didn't have a straw and I was like, first of all, if you have elephant tricks like that, why would you ever want to get rid of it? It was kind of funny, too, because later on, when he's talking to Shelley Duvall, he drinks a glass of water, like plot fine, no problem. But he's been telling her he has to drink it through his nose. I was like, what? Maybe he was just trying to impress her because he was like nervous. Also, I thought that scene was incredibly weird. So he saved sterile Hannah, right? And then he brings her back home, and then she's like, oh, do you want to stay for a while? He's like, oh, I've already made myself food. Let's eat, and she's like, oh, I guess I have some wine here, make yourself at home. So I thought it was like, I don't know why they included it, 'cause he doesn't seem to be this presumptuous guy, but I was like, this is kind of bizarre. Yeah, I'd also like to point out that it was like 6 a.m. in the morning. And it's like pounding back wine and cheese. And I'm like, what? What the hell is this? I'm like, I can see if it was like dinner or something, but this is like early in the morning where she locks herself out. So it's not like even past noon, and they're pounding back wines. Listen, not appropriate. Not a pro. And it was just so funny. Also, just like, who is fully naked under a robe, I want to know, because that was insane. I was like, you don't have anything on girl? Come on. And then, okay, if we're going to nitpick this scene because I had a lot of thoughts when I was watching it. Is there walking through the bushes, right? And he's like, I'm not looking, I'm a gentleman. I'm not looking. And then he goes, well, I like to know that you don't have any tattoos. I think that's very Jackie O NASA of you, and I was like, if you're not looking, how do you know that she doesn't have any tattoos? Like, come on, dude. Yeah, well, when they go with the house and he goes, I'm not looking now. Yeah, so he was looking. I mean, he's a guy, and she's a good-looking woman. He can't open it. I mean, I'm not saying I'm not condoning this man. I'm not saying that. And also, I would like to point out to Rick Ross, who plays Chris..

Steve Martin Chris Daryl Hannah Steve Dallas U.S. Postal Service Fred confusion Frank Fabio Vikings sandy Shelley Duvall anesthesia allergy Hannah Jackie O NASA Rick Ross
"roxanne" Discussed on Under the Influence

Under the Influence

01:37 min | 10 months ago

"roxanne" Discussed on Under the Influence

"You come into bed Hun? Yep, honey. I'll be right there. I just gotta turn out the light. Go. Some things never change. Like your kids always leaving tiny toys on the floor for you to step on. And Geico saving folks lots of money on their car insurance. Sweetie, I think I left the downstairs light on. Please don't make me go. 15 minutes could save you 15% or more. I'm Emilia. On this podcast, I'm taking you on a search. A search for love. 24 hardworking Latina. But there were other reasons I felt like I couldn't always beat myself. My mom's in prison. This is crumbs. My love story. It's a show about the things you set up for and the bits of ourselves that make us who we are. Listen to crumbs starting February 15th on the iHeartRadio app, Apple podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. This is Roxanne gay, the host of the Roxanne gay agenda, the bad feminist podcast of your dreams. Each week I talk to an interesting person about feminism, race, writing in books, and art, food, pop culture, and yes, politics. We can't escape politics. Listen to the luminary original podcast, the Roxanne gay agenda, every Tuesday on the iHeartRadio app, Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts..

Geico Emilia Roxanne Apple
"roxanne" Discussed on Sex with Dr. Jess

Sex with Dr. Jess

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"roxanne" Discussed on Sex with Dr. Jess

"What is resentment like. How does it even built. You know it's so funny. We often look at these things. Expect these huge huge explanations. But i think resentment really just boils down to unexpressed anger or unexpressed frustration. Sometimes the frustration is there and the anger is there and sometimes we don't even recognize it and if we don't even recognize were harboring this thing. It's definitely unexpressed. it's unexpected verbally. But it comes out in so many different ways right just leaks out absolutely and you must feel it in your body like i mean how do clients explain resentment in their bodies or maybe brandon can weigh in after as well. Yeah i get different. Things from tightness in my chest knots in my stomach grinding. My t. a headaches all the time and checking just keep explaining. My resentment get continued falling asleep or staying asleep back right and just missing the body in general because you know when we hope anger. There's tension right. And so that can result in tightness in the body and once the resentment gets processed. Once we're able to discuss once we're able to find a resolution that physical kinship times to release itself not make sense tomb. It's this unexpressed anger frustration or dissatisfaction builds over time. You feel it in your body. How does it show up in relationships. There must be so many different ways that you see resentment. Come out whether it's in a very straightforward way or in all these kind of crawler ways that we may not even recognize as imminent south it can come through. Just you know in some women that i work with. The you know banging on pots pans. The popular hardy doing fine. You know sometimes that can show up you know in the bedroom right. Oftentimes went been used unresolved. People don't wanna be touched right. Get away from me. i'm not. I'm not into that but quite often people will come to me with you. Know they think that their issue is unique to them. But i hear these stories so often they play out like the same old tape where one partner will say. I'm always the one putting the kids to batam always on making the meals. I'm always the one doing some always wondering that you get to chill

kariuki roxanne francis francis psychotherapy and cons iraq dr jeff fox adam brennan
Roxanne Francis Unpacks How Resentment Affects Relationships

Sex with Dr. Jess

02:21 min | 1 year ago

Roxanne Francis Unpacks How Resentment Affects Relationships

"What is resentment like. How does it even built. You know it's so funny. We often look at these things. Expect these huge huge explanations. But i think resentment really just boils down to unexpressed anger or unexpressed frustration. Sometimes the frustration is there and the anger is there and sometimes we don't even recognize it and if we don't even recognize were harboring this thing. It's definitely unexpressed. it's unexpected verbally. But it comes out in so many different ways right just leaks out absolutely and you must feel it in your body like i mean how do clients explain resentment in their bodies or maybe brandon can weigh in after as well. Yeah i get different. Things from tightness in my chest knots in my stomach grinding. My t. a headaches all the time and checking just keep explaining. My resentment get continued falling asleep or staying asleep back right and just missing the body in general because you know when we hope anger. There's tension right. And so that can result in tightness in the body and once the resentment gets processed. Once we're able to discuss once we're able to find a resolution that physical kinship times to release itself not make sense tomb. It's this unexpressed anger frustration or dissatisfaction builds over time. You feel it in your body. How does it show up in relationships. There must be so many different ways that you see resentment. Come out whether it's in a very straightforward way or in all these kind of crawler ways that we may not even recognize as imminent south it can come through. Just you know in some women that i work with. The you know banging on pots pans. The popular hardy doing fine. You know sometimes that can show up you know in the bedroom right. Oftentimes went been used unresolved. People don't wanna be touched right. Get away from me. i'm not. I'm not into that but quite often people will come to me with you. Know they think that their issue is unique to them. But i hear these stories so often they play out like the same old tape where one partner will say. I'm always the one putting the kids to batam always on making the meals. I'm always the one doing some always wondering that you get to chill

Brandon Headaches Batam
"roxanne" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:58 min | 1 year ago

"roxanne" Discussed on How I Built This

"To me always has been meantime. You're really starting to become passionate about conserving and preserving land. Starting in maine And you've given away a huge amount of your money by buying land in maine and all over the country and giving it to the federal government to maine in other state agencies to develop parks. Yup i had been living on the land up there for years. So i knew it and with most beauty care companies that they generate goes into advertising. I've heard even that twenty. Five cents of every dollar goes into advertising so we didn't have that expense because we weren't advertising guerrilla marketing and grassroots. Marketing is not very expensive and we had put all the money we needed to into growing the business. It still had excess cash. And i felt like we needed to find a very solid investment and so land seemed to be rock-solid to me yeah and president obama named a new national monument in maine largely run the land that you you donate it to the national park service Katahdin woods and waters is our mountain in maine In two thousand fifteen burr schevitz passed away. He was eighty a remarkable guy. Really fascinating person. It was a film about him Which was really interesting in. I was a point where he said something that probably was a little bit hurtful. He said. I never want to see her again. But have you kind of made peace with him and in his memory and your relationship. Oh yeah i have. I was in love with bert. Yeah and we went through a lot of changes together. Had this child birt's b.'s. Together raised it up off it went. I still feel very very close to burton. I think about him a lot. He was quite an inspiration to me. Amuse yeah did you have a chance to talk to bert. Before he died in a certain way. Yes i was about to visit him and my girlfriend went up to visit him the afternoon before i was planning to go and she called me. Let me know that. She didn't think he was going to last much longer. So we sort of had a phone Correspondents and he did actually pass away later that day. So i did miss seeing him in person but i just remember him at his prime. Yeah some people have criticized you because they say well you got most of the money out of the company and bird you know. He didn't get as much. What's your feeling about about that criticism. I feel that. I was more responsible party for managing wealth. I could do the right thing with it And i don't know whether would have really used it. very productively. her. He came from a family that had some wealth and he chose not to use it. He didn't do anything to help the community with the wealth that he did have and i felt like that was something that i could do and have been doing. Do you plan to give away most of your wealth before you That's hard that's a lotta work. Isn't it figuring out where we should go and dealing with all the incoming pitches and all the people who want some of your money is it. Does it ever get tiresome. Well i have Both of my children each are working so a have responsibility for distributing funds every year to grant ts according to the mission. That makes sense to them. So i do have help. And i'm pretty spontaneous. About the way i distribute grants. I don't have a real formal system. I just you know either. It rings true to me or it doesn't when you see burke's today it's owned by clorox eventually purchased by clarks for almost a billion dollars and two thousand seven which is unbelievable. You see it everywhere to cvs. It's at walmart seven. Eleven is it. She beamed with pride is a wonderful to see that. I don't pay that much attention to it. I guess you know. I mean i certainly notice it when i'm at whole foods and i walked by the bird species schlaize catches my eye. But i think i've let it go. You know in many ways i just. It's something apart from me now. So the question. I ask everybody who's been on the show rock sam rescue which is how much of of your story and the success of this do you think is because of your skill in your intelligence and your hard work and how much of it because of just luck well. I was born on july eleven which seven eleven hasso. I have felt lucky for a long time. I mean you certainly have to work hard. But when i look back at some of the critical events that were part of the destiny of this adventure. I certainly couldn't have pulled those off that had to be locked or divine intervention. And there's been so many of those can the right people came to me at the right time so bad has got to be lock. That's roxanne quimby co-founder of birch bees. Do you do you use any of the products. The one product that i was using has been discontinued. Got some lip balm thank you. That's your recipe right. I hope so. Thanks so much for listening to this show this week. If you are not yet a subscriber please do subscribe or follow wherever you get your podcasts. If you want to write to us or email addresses each at npr dot org to find us on twitter. It's at how. I built this or at cairo's and instagram. It's at how i built this. Npr at guy dot ross. This episode was produced by jesse howard with music composed by ramtane arab. Louis who was edited by jeff rodgers with research health nor could see our production staff includes neva grant. Casey herman rachel faulkner. James delicacy julia. Carney elaine coats sarah safari liz. Metzger and annelise over. Our intern is harrison. Bj choy and jeff rodgers is our executive producer. I'm guy rise. And you've been listening to how i built this. This is npr. This message comes from npr sponsor. E-trade whether you're looking to put your money to work in the short term long term or somewhere in between e-trade gotcha covered. E-trade can help you with your finances from saving for a first home to investing for retirement. And they're backed by a team of financial professionals to give you support to get started today. Visit trae dot com slash. Npr for more information e-trade securities llc member setback. How i built. This is doing an annual survey to better understand our listeners. And how you use podcasts. Please help us out. By completing short anonymous survey at npr dot org slash built survey. All one word. We would really appreciate your help to support how i built this. That's npr's dot org slash built survey. All one word thanks..

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"roxanne" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:12 min | 1 year ago

"roxanne" Discussed on How I Built This

"Payback. Come back to how. I built this from npr. So it's the early nineteen nineties and burke's has just hit a million and a half dollars in revenue and one thing. We did not mention in part one which you may have figured out already but roxanne berg. They were kind of thing. They weren't chest business partners but romantic partners as well now at this time. One thousand nine hundred birch was selling mostly candles and other things made with beeswax and they sold those things mainly at boutiques in and around new england and new york but in nineteen ninety-one roxanne had an idea that would take the company in a brand new direction. You introduced a product that would go on to become one of your bestselling not your most famous bird. Species lip balm. How'd you come up with that idea. Well we were making other products that were basically the same formula. We were making a furniture polish which was wax and oil and the boot food basically was wax and oil and lip balm is basically whacks and oil and we put a couple of amenities in it like vitamin e. and peppermint oil but it was very clear. Fat people were more interested in buying products for their skin and their lipson their face than they were buying products for their furniture and choose shirt so once that became clear we phased out of all of the other policies that we were trying to sell and started focusing on on skin and we eventually stopped making candles as well. You said being candles because it wasn't profitable or was it make sense. I think because it wasn't scalable and the skin care products which were basically blending and filling. It was a very simple manufacturing process that could easily be scaled and we were making handmade candle so to go to an automated system just required a lot time machinery in space and investment. That i didn't feel would have the same return so we dropped the candles. So we're now like in nineteen ninety. One bird species is growing. You hit a million dollars and you're going in one direction and that's up. You were the counterculture art student. Homestead are living in you know like intense and stuff but you were kind of starting to become this thing that maybe you kind of rejected. I'm not criticizing you at all. It's just interesting right that you kind of have rejected this whole world but you had a knack for it. I know it's ironic. I've thought about that. Did you reflect on it at that time. I think i did ya. Suddenly money became so important. Not for what it would buy but just because it was critical to the operation of the business. Yeah keeping track of it and there. I was keeping track of the cash flow money and money out paying bills sending bills simple version of capitalism which i had rejected years ago. Yeah but you were not a trained. Nba or business person but obviously you have some intrinsic talent. I mean you. You understood this in a way that you could see what birt's bs could be and you're just doing it Well i had role models. I had selected out companies that You know i kept them in my mind as an ideal. So i had examples like like what i had a big sign over the production floor. That said look out. Elizabeth arden and you know i really felt like if if elizabeth could do it so could we. Yeah so you guys are growing your hiring. Are you overwhelmed. I mean how many people did you have to hire in maine to. Just keep the engines going. We had about forty five so a lot of people to sort of reality. Was that hard did you. I mean at this point. I guess you're like a ceo or a defacto ceo. If not the officials. I would say that was the most challenging part of the job was managing people are you do you see yourself as a people person not that much. No i can be. Yeah if i have to be but again just going back to my artist. True self artists usually work alone. They're very comfortable writers and painters. And i i like that myself i mean. Would you consider yourself an introvert. I would say. I was pretty introverted. Yeah yeah. I'm very happy having very quiet lifestyle. Yeah in nineteen ninety-four. You guys made a decision to leave. Maine to relocate north carolina. Why i mean you're such a main person and it was such a main kind of product what what prompted the move. The location was very difficult. Working in the extreme northeast corner of the country getting more centralized was important for bringing raw materials in and getting finished goods out so north carolina was much better situated in terms of being halfway between maine and florida and a direct shot out to the west coast on. I forty her. There were other cosmetic companies in the area. Revlon was about fifteen miles away. The body shop was about thirty or forty miles away and there were a lot of pharmaceutical companies that use a lot of the same glass jars and caps and that sort of thing so our expenses went way down. We were able to hire people who had experience in that industry to come in and help ramp up production and computerize our office billings There were just a lot more people down there that were trained to do those kinds of things. Yeah and and so you have this new location and then presumably you've to buy equipment and supplies and you're like running a factory. Yeah you know. It certainly wasn't a very sophisticated operation and it wasn't a state of the art factory right but it was doable. We used a lot of used equipment. We were making one of our products in a big mixer. That duke had and it's cafeteria for mashed potatoes and We we had a bath salt that we were making an cement mixer. So you know we hobbled it together so in the mid nineties. Because i don't remember birds. Bees in the mid nineties right. Where would.

roxanne berg roxanne npr burke birch new england birt Homestead Elizabeth arden new york maine Nba north carolina elizabeth Maine Revlon west coast florida
"roxanne" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

08:49 min | 1 year ago

"roxanne" Discussed on How I Built This

"From npr. Tate's how. I built this a show that innovators entrepreneurs idealists and the stories behind the movements. They built today show. How roxanne quimby took a roadside honey stand in rural maine and turned it into bird species. One of the biggest natural personal care brands in america every sunday at my local farmers market there are people who sell homemade hot sauce and handcrafted wallets. There's no woman who sells mohair scarves using the mohair from her. Angora goats now imagine going to your local farmers market in say main back in the mid nineteen eighties and if you happen to be near bangor you might come across roxanne quimby and bert shabby. It's selling jars of honey. Honey from birt's owned beehives. Charming right maybe you buy jar and move on bergen. Roxanne would keep undoing. What they were doing you do it. You were doing except roxanne thought. Hey can we make and sell candles. From all the beeswax. We have or could we use the beeswax to make other stuff okay so you can kind of figure out where this is headed because that of course is what happened and even though roxanne berg never intended to build a billion dollar brand or even a million dollar brand. It just happened. Of course a lot of that had to do with roxanne's passion and drive but the idea was never to build something. Massive was a farmer's market product. Today walk into any drugstore in the us or even overseas and you will find an impressive display of birds. Bees products the likelihood that roxanne quimby would build a massive company or any company at all was so implausible back in the early nineteen eighties when she was a single mom waiting tables at a diner and a decade before that she drove across the country from massachusetts where she was from to san francisco seeking out a simpler life. A life without lots of material needs it was Adventure to go all the way to the west coast from new england and new york. It was a great unknown. And i had always wanted to be an artist from the time i was five so it seemed like a natural place to go to art school. I guess you got there. And what like nineteen seventy around then I crossed a great cultural bridge. While i was out there. What do you mean by that. i learned to think differently and to probe more deeply and i think that the material world was too important and really. It's not as important as i was taught that it was. We were encouraged to make a good living. Both of my sisters had. Mba's like my dad. Did and one's achievements were emphasized. And i took a turn to the extreme left when i went to art school and rejected the pursuit of material comforts. Who's really quite wonderful. And what did you think. Did you think life. I wanna differently. What was what did you start to think about the life you wanted to have. Well i wanted meaning. And i wanted to live deeply very influenced by throw who wrote about it quite beautifully i was looking for transcendence i just my world just got bigger and i felt my relationship with it expanded I guess you had a boyfriend in san francisco francisco at the time and the two of you decided to like go off around the country to find a place to live. Yep this is. George saint clair their boyfriends And so we could you guys do you just You took off left san francisco. Yep gotta gotta van fixed it up. We had three thousand dollars. We went to vermont and the vermont. Realtor that we spoke with said that you couldn't by any land in vermont for three thousand dollars but try main so we went to me so so your intention was to go somewhere in the country with three dollars and see what kind of like how much land you could buy. Yes and why did you want to do that. What were you going to do on the land. There was a movement at the time the back to the land movement and those were people bedhead left city life. And we're just like us I was doing it to kind of strip away. Everything that civilization had layered on me and see what was really important so the land that we bought we built a little cabin on it and had no running water no electricity and so you quickly became more aware of how those things affected your life when you didn't have them see hit three thousand bucks and how much land there by you like. How many acres. Thirty plus a lot. Yeah and how did you know what to do well. There were a few books. Then you could read about how to build a simple house and we would pick people's brains knew more than we did. They were glad to see some young people moving to maine. Because we've had quite an exodus of young people so they were Very friendly and helpful. Did you build a cabin. Did you build a house on this land. Yes how wanted to take sue. Assuming this is you get there in the summer. This is like seventy nine hundred seventy five or so something like that. Yeah and then how long before. You're actually living in a a place with a roof over your head sway way on. We had built a little screen house where we were sleeping. Which was a little ways away from the house we were building it was getting into december and we were still sleeping outside. Basically it was outside was so hard to get out of bed in the morning of the sleeping bag. But you know everything that could go wrong. Did go wrong does your heat. We had a woodstove and this is like this is like pre global warming main in december. This is cold. Yeah it's extreme but there were others. You know we weren't the only ones you you build a house and you still no running water electricity or any of that stuff but you do have to eat. So how are you making a living. Well the good thing about not having all the amenities is that it doesn't take a lot of money to live. Yeah we had no bills basically other than food. We cut our own firewood and had a source of water which was the spring out and back. I waitress a day or two a week and george worked at the local radio station for a day a week. We were living on about four thousand dollars a year year. Wow you how long you do this for a couple years right. You guys are living like this for several years. Yeah i think We probably lived out there like that. For maybe seven years or so. Wow i guess around like in the first few years you you actually had children their children who are still growth. They're grown now but they they were born in this like homesteaders kind of house them out in the middle of nowhere. Yeah yeah yep. They have very fond memories of it. We never had to argue about. Tv shows yeah. So i'm just trying to get into your has that time. Was that your vision for life that you were going. Because it's kind of it there is something idyllic about it. I mean you're out there. You're far away from the rough and tumble of civilization cities. Was that your vision. For the way you were going to live your life. i think it was a very idyllic kind of dream. but ultimately.

roxanne quimby bert shabby roxanne roxanne berg san francisco vermont birt George saint clair maine Tate Roxanne bangor npr bergen america west coast new england massachusetts
"roxanne" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"roxanne" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"An exercise to mark the eighties and the nineties were the palm beaches Sunny one. Oh, 79. Roxanne. You don't have to put on the Red knight. Those days are you don't have some say a body to the night. Rocks you're gonna through. Where that address Key night. Walk the streets for money. You don't get it if it's wrong, or if it's right. Right? When I read live Stand back. You're gonna put on the Red Life box and Roxanne Roxanne Box. Well. I love the new Yeah. Mhm. I've got to you have to value just tell off. Always show you with another boy. No, My mind is made up. You make up. Don't you want that won't tell you again. Got it? Are you ready? Accent. I have to put up red life, right? The box Russian Robinson Wrong. Someone Rocks. Nothing beats those adorable morning text that say your.

Roxanne 79 Roxanne Roxanne eighties Stand back nineties Russian Robinson
"roxanne" Discussed on True Crime Garage

True Crime Garage

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"roxanne" Discussed on True Crime Garage

"Two four <Silence> seven two tips. <Speech_Male> That's <Speech_Music_Male> five one two four <Speech_Music_Male> seven to <SpeakerChange> eight <Speech_Music_Male> four seven seven <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> theories <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on this case <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> go to our <Speech_Male> blog at true crime <Speech_Male> garage <Speech_Male> dot com <Speech_Male> and join in <Speech_Male> on the conversation <Speech_Male> colonel. <Speech_Male> Do we have any recommended <Speech_Male> reading <Silence> for this week. <Speech_Male> We do <Speech_Male> knock. Captain have <Speech_Male> recommended <Speech_Male> listening <Speech_Male> how. 'bout no <Speech_Male> good <Speech_Male> day so i wanted <Speech_Male> to read <Speech_Male> not <Speech_Male> listen to things. <Speech_Male> Well this is <Speech_Male> for the folks out and listener <Speech_Male> land. If you should find <Speech_Male> yourself traveling <Speech_Male> this week well then you're <Speech_Male> going to need plenty <Speech_Male> of good <Speech_Male> stuff to listen to. <Speech_Male> And i recommend listening <Speech_Male> to some of our <Speech_Male> old episodes. <Speech_Male> Check <Speech_Male> out episode number <Speech_Male> four twenty four <Speech_Male> a bad day <Speech_Male> in austin <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> set <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of twenty <Speech_Male> or <Speech_Male> episode two twenty-nine <Speech_Male> charles whitman <Speech_Male> from august <Speech_Male> two thousand <Speech_Male> eighteen and <Speech_Male> our yogurt <Speech_Male> shop case episodes <Speech_Male> number. <Speech_Male> Eighty one eighty <Speech_Male> two from february. <Speech_Male> Two thousand <Speech_Male> seventeen <Speech_Male> and all <Speech_Male> of our episodes <Speech_Male> are available to <Speech_Male> listen to wherever <Speech_Male> you get your <Speech_Male> podcast. Including <Speech_Male> my favorite place <Speech_Male> to listen the <Speech_Male> sirius. Xm <Speech_Male> app <Speech_Male> join us back <Speech_Male> here in the garage <Speech_Male> next <Speech_Male> week until then <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> be good. Be <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> kind and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> shout. Out to brooke

"roxanne" Discussed on True Crime Garage

True Crime Garage

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"roxanne" Discussed on True Crime Garage

"What he did. He groomed her..

A Look at the Science Behind Vaccines and Blood Clots

The Big Story

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

A Look at the Science Behind Vaccines and Blood Clots

"Is the big story. Roxanne kimsey independent science journalist who dove deep into the astra zeneca and johnson and johnson. Blood clotting shoe for the atlantic. Hey roxanne has it going. It's going well i'm I'm excited to talk about this. Because i feel like this is a way more complex Medical issue then. It's often presented as is that accurate. Oh i mean absolutely. I think that with each day that goes by a new layer is added and the average person's kind of left scratching their head and thinking. What does this mean for me but absolutely the science is is is getting deeper by the day and it's it's great in a way because we're learning so much about vaccines that we never knew. Maybe let's

Roxanne Kimsey Astra Zeneca Johnson Roxanne Atlantic
Keep Breathing: Avoiding Hypoxia with the McMurray Enhanced Airway

Outcomes Rocket

02:15 min | 1 year ago

Keep Breathing: Avoiding Hypoxia with the McMurray Enhanced Airway

"I have to magnificent nurse leaders with us. I i've got roxanne mcmurray. She has been a nurse for thirty five years in practicing anesthesia around thirty. She is the inventor of the mcmurray enhanced airway and also the co founder of mcmurray. Medical group mcmurray is a retired. Clinical assistant professor insistent program director in the nurse anesthesia program in the graduate school of nursing at the university of minnesota mcmurray. I also have on the podcast today. Noah hendler he is a nurse practitioner healthcare technologist and strategist who helped value-based episodic care models initiating some of the nation's first bundled payment programs he served on the front lines in busy urban trauma centers lead clinical informatics work through post acute settings and helped deliver new levels of transparency for both medication. Reconciliation anna hearings. Noah's co founder of sun sale and roxanne is also very involved in the organization. And today i am just privileged to have both of you on the podcast. It's a pleasure to have you both and so nurses are at the center of everything we do. This campaign has been such an education for me and i know for the listeners. To over fifty percent of care provided to everyone is from a nurse cova shots are coming from nurses. You guys are so important and we appreciate and love and value us. I want to start by saying that. Also wanna know what is it that inspires you in this work so go ahead. Let us know what that is actually saw. I think it's important to underscore your point. That nurses really are the largest workforce healthcare and. That's something that is overlooked off and something that has definitely become central to my work. I entered healthcare as the second career after the death. Good friend that he wasn't when he died cernan. Apart of meeting meagerly. I felt address. Nothing releasing to much and i kind of drifted further away from where i begun my career working directly with people actually photographing looked at rhonda. Kids were survivors of the genocide. Hasn't success evolving software but in the wake my friends death. I just felt like i needed to contribute in a more direct

Roxanne Mcmurray Mcmurray Graduate School Of Nursing Noah Hendler Anna Hearings Noah's Co Sun Sale University Of Minnesota Roxanne Cernan Rhonda
Kemp: Moving All-Star game will hurt business owners of color

NPR News Now

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Kemp: Moving All-Star game will hurt business owners of color

"Republican governor is continuing to criticize major league baseball after the league moved. It's all star game to denver over the state's controversial voting laws from member station w. a. b. e. roxanne scott reports at a press conference. This weekend governor. Brian kemp said the move politicized baseball. An hurts businesses owned by people of color who have already been affected by covid but critics of the law which places ide- requirements on absentee voting and limits the use of ballot drop boxes say disproportionately affects people of color. The mlb said it moved the game from the atlanta area. After having discussions with players the law which was signed last month also expands weaken early voting and criminalizes handing out food and water to voters waiting in line to cast a ballot. Several groups have filed lawsuits about the state's new voting law

Roxanne Scott Baseball Brian Kemp Denver Atlanta
"roxanne" Discussed on InnovaBuzz

InnovaBuzz

08:09 min | 1 year ago

"roxanne" Discussed on InnovaBuzz

"I'm your host strauss from another bees and i'm really excited today to welcome to the inevitable's podcast from cleveland. Ohio in the usa roxanne kaufmann elliott. Who's the founder and president of pro laureate where she helps businesses and people develop sending genuine leadership. Capabilities said they can inspire ignites and have a real impacting. The world sounds really fabulous mission. Welcome to the podcast. Roxanne gripe privileged heavy as my guest. Thank you so much. You're going to great privilege to be here appreciate you asking hunkin pay democritus who was our guest on episode three hundred nine of the another bus. Podcast suggested that we have a conversation with you and introduced us of coletta in harare. He now roxanne. You have a quite a long corporate career and you started off in a theatre performing arts and that's probably way across pause with Something common with data but then you work in corporate for quite some time before he founded your on business. I'm really excited to explore that journey in some of the lessons with you before all of that of tell us a little bit about what drives you and how that shapes what you do today thank you can i will say. Oh my gosh. There's been so much this happened in each one of those segments of my career. Like like you mentioned it's really been three segments and what i've learned in each one of those gerston in nonprofits in the performing arts is how to really discover the best parts of yourself and how to express yourself clearly and how also to connect with other human beings in a way that That isn't always obvious to us when i worked in In the corporation this was one of my. I really really big lessons. In the difference between organizations that are run and and that are lead was genuine on authentic leadership and those that are not and and honestly it's the difference between success and failure. And i've seen all of that in small businesses and enlargers insist and that was a good portion of my career was fourteen years inc and it was a construction business so this very male dominated industry so i learned a lot from all of that and then what drives me in. This business is all learning the lessons. That i brought from that. What's good about leadership. And equal and what that brings two teams to to the organization to communities into the world and when that isn't there or is there but not understood or cultivated. What can happen to people teams and organizations and i wanted to make a difference and wanted to help bring the light of leadership in people's lives in their hearts and their minds so that they can begin developed to develop themselves and others into the very best a romantic discovered potential and grow brit. Great businesses and fabulous lives. Yeah love it. Well let's go the obvious question. I and that's what is later shape. I'm in get use some way in some of the material at i read that we know leadership when we said we know. When we're here we know when he'll it but how do we get it ourselves. How do we develop at an. And that reminded me of of someone in mark colbert correa. Who was an outstanding leader. He stood out from all the other people in that are encountered and it was exactly that i knew. This person is a fabulous leader. I was connected to counter. I would you know if he said this is where we're going on with gladly. Follow would be convinced. There was a connection there. But if you said to me will what is it. That might seem a good later. Our probably struggling so said tell us a little bit about what's latest shape then and have. How can we develop it you now. So you're just struck right at the heart. The poll conundrum of leadership. Because as many people as you ask what is it you will get as many different answers. His it's different to everyone for you. Gentlemen that you're talking about. This was a fellow who probably was a very good listener. Which other people before himself really understood in wanting to get to know you on a deeper level as a human being just genuinely cared This is in my world of leadership and you do know it when you see it you do know it feel it you you at the very tangible thing at someone who is eagle less and yet has has enough strength of character and confidence to big carry themselves very well but they are always connected. They're always very very present. They walked talk. He do what they say they will do. They wanna hear about your vision. What is your inspiration of the for the future. And i'll share with you mining's sued sharing them they They take chances. Hey take risks. They challenge processes to see. They're still working well or if they can work better. They help other people to learn the things that they need to know. In order to succeed and thrive in their lane to discover their own parents and they are hardcore encourage people a recognized that you know sometimes journeys little rough and we have to at least virtually nowadays. Give each other a pat on the back and say it's okay you that he going so it's someone who gets. All of that is very aware of all of that in others and themselves connected and bringing together and they genuinely authentically care about the people anything going on around them and they wanna make a positive difference. Yes i think that. That's the core of it. Isn't the genuine caring and you said something at the beginning of that too. Which is ego list. so i think of. I mean we will have an ego on. It's important in in many ways. For al chris how to heroin wellbeing in our own self confidence in some ways but it gets in the way a lot right so how do we. How do we protect that ego on the one hand and know when to set it aside on the other hand so that where know. It's the focus on caring for others in a white that brings out the best in them. Which is is. If i'm leading my taste than bringing out the best in my team will help help me right. Absolutely the ego is is a very very important part of all of us in the behavioral. Psychologists will tell you this is part of our makeup in who we are but it's the way that we that and the way that we use it. The best leaders that i've ever known and experience are those that certainly have very strong egos but they but they don't they don't walk through the world boastfully about themselves. That's he ego when it's blown up and it's selfish ego selfless ego. Doesn't mean that you don't have one you still have. It gives you your core strength and as you said you're gonna give you. This is the confidence that we carry with ourselves. But the ego is is not a good or a bad word. it's it. it's part of the makeup of who we are mind and soul and body and it's how you use it how we presented so when we do it selflessly which are self confidence. It's our ability to let go of serving south and serve others instead. Is i want to help you reach your dreams. Certain do that. What are you think about. What are your inspirations. let's go there. What will help you get there. Well i have a lot of confidence in having that conversation with you but it's certainly nothing about me. I wanna know that you. That's.

usa Roxanne cleveland Ohio roxanne kaufmann elliott today roxanne two teams one hundred nine three segments inc mark colbert correa each one fourteen episode three years another harare
"roxanne" Discussed on InnovaBuzz

InnovaBuzz

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"roxanne" Discussed on InnovaBuzz

"Welcome back. I hope you've had an awesome weeks. If you haven't listened to my recent conversations with dr deborah gilboa of ask dr g and with video marketing strategist nia lee. Then listening but only after you've listened to today's conversation of course. I'm really excited today to have on the another bus. Podcast as my guest roxanne kaufman elliott. She's the founder and president of pro laureate. She helps individuals teams organizations and companies to inspire ignite and impact effective authentic genuine leadership this builds coaches of leadership that drive excellence maton exceed goals and drive innovation creativity and success. Roxanne is a highly respected and sought after keynote speaker and a published author as well as an award-winning business. Marketing strategist she's over. Thirty years of national and international corporate experience to her clients that ranged from privately held businesses to corporations in wide range of industries in our discussion. Today roxanne talk to me about discovering the best parts of yourself expressing yourself clearly and connecting genuinely. She explained the court traits of leadership and she explained why it's important to pay attention to the three critical aspects of being human the mind the heart in motion and the body without further ado. Let's fly into the hive and get.

roxanne Roxanne nia lee Today Thirty years dr deborah gilboa today dr g roxanne kaufman elliott three critical aspects
Intro to Amazon Alexa with Dave Isbitski

Sound in Marketing

05:02 min | 2 years ago

Intro to Amazon Alexa with Dave Isbitski

"What have you seen recently in? The the creativeness that's been explored through smart speakers in skills and just function in general. We were an oratory. Society and people. Long I mean you talk about the Gutenberg Revolution in the printing press which really made you know the written word accessible to everyone it was you know talk was not cheap talk was everything if you take the Bible and you take scripture when you had rabbis that would quote they had entire chapters memorized and if you said something wrong people around, you corrected that right and we live in this age where talk is cheap right and you don't believe everything that's that's that's written. Also. Lost that art of communication you know when you're communicating. You, need to understand that behind every question is a questionnaire, right? We're all human beings and that's what got me most excited through. All of this is when I was a little kid I would get excited about back. Then it was commodore. I. Get excited about computers and I go and tell my parents and they'd be like I have no idea what you're talking about and that was a theme throughout my entire career like I felt excitement and I saw and there was just a barrier to tech and thing you know because we had to we couldn't have computers really understand human the intention but I, remember being like. Why. Is this so hard and it just every? You know I've been fortunate if I got to be part of the desktop revolution. And Client Server, and then watch the Internet grow and start and do html pages in mobile and clap and through all of this, we just left behind. I gave up explaining to family members or people in the neighborhood. What it is I even did they just didn't understand and smartphone came. How many apps don't get updated is don't get updated and they're just had to be a better way, and now we're at this point we're like talking to my mother-in-law she was telling me things she does with Alexa like asking when thirty. Roxanne on than I even know was there was a skill. They're excited and use this as much as my kids and I do and I've never seen that and that I think was what's really got me excited as it's back to human beings in, it's also to see during this pandemic. Just to share with you like. Skill usage and so I'm not sure if your your listeners know skill usage although a lot of people have used skills now I think the stats are around three out of four people that haven't Alexis have used at least skill when we created Alexa we knew. People were going to have conversations about all sorts of things, and we wanted to create a way for anybody to teach Alexa to have a conversation about something. And we do that as human beings in understanding context, and so you and I know what day of the month it is. We know what the weather's like outside where you are. You know we have some background we talked a little bit before this context, and so the I had really had to learn that of what is actually when I say something. What does that mean in the in that context? That's the way skills are. So if I create and I want to have a conversation about fitness, I, need to understand what a metabolic rate is. Would a heart rate is I mean all all of these things vernacular in a lexicon and that's really what Alexa skills are is have a conversation about anything And then you can share these with everybody. So we go through a certification process where Amazon we review it make sure that it does what it says it does and it's safe Amazon customers. And then we've also released over time because we heard from people saying, Hey, I'm not a developer, but I still want to create these conversations for Alexis. So we have blueprints which anybody can go to blueprints dot Amazon Dot Com and do these things visually right and so here we are in the past three months and I can tell you that just in the past two months skill usage worldwide is up over sixty five percent. We're seeing Alexa voice search like on fire TV that's also increasing. You know where you can ask, you can even go through not just Amazon Prime, but net flicks Hulu it's just a natural. To be able to ask for things spontaneous. It's inclusive. It just gets these these interfaces. Out of the way and what's great about this is you don't have to trust Dave one. You could ask Alexi yourself you can say Alexa, what are your top skills or Alexa? I want to play games so a lot of this you can do with your voice. Now we've enabled reviews to see you can give. You Know Five Star Review just with your voice you can get feedback to like if you have a suggestion for us, you can actually say Alexa of feedback. But what you can do outside of the mobile APP what I suggest to people who just go to Amazon dot com slash skills. And then you can look like anything else on Amazon. So you could say I want this category four stars up and you'll see some of these skills have like twenty thousand plus customer reviews and they are saying what are they actually doing

Alexa Amazon Roxanne Alexi Five Star Review Developer Alexis Dave
Mosquitoes flying free as health departments focus on virus

Dennis Prager

00:47 sec | 2 years ago

Mosquitoes flying free as health departments focus on virus

"Mosquitoes or flying for his local health departments focus on the Corona virus. Details from Donahue. Arif Araji with the American Mosquito Control Association calls mosquitoes the biggest nuisance and pest on this planet. Hands down. They're responsible for more deaths than any other organism on this fine, it Including humans. This summer. They're being overlooked. Christian Swyche offer with the Washtenaw County Health Department in Michigan says usually right now they would be collecting mosquitoes and ticks for signs of Zika or Lyme disease is here. Unfortunately, we're not doing Roxanne Conley with the CDC says Mosquito borne illnesses are out there now on self, Florida that are sort of a hot spot. Many health departments can't handle mosquitoes and the Corona virus at the

American Mosquito Control Asso Washtenaw County Health Depart Roxanne Conley Arif Araji Donahue CDC Christian Swyche Michigan Florida
The European Commissions approach to blockchain

Insureblocks

08:24 min | 2 years ago

The European Commissions approach to blockchain

"Hello and welcome to inch blocks urine. Decadent podcast to blockchain ans- mark contracts. I'm will eat. Scuff your host for this week's podcast. We be discussing the European Commission approach to blockchain. And I'm very pleased to have Peters Zilkha this head of unit digitalization Blockchain Digital Single Market Directorate at the European Commission Peteris. You've got a lot of titles. Many thank you many. Thanks for joining us today. Could you please give us a brief introduction on yourself? I'm glad to I mean I'm a lawyer by background. I have the JD degree from University of Southern California before they had a political science degree. And though I've never really practiced their California state bar for almost thirty years now and since Two Thousand and five Florence. My Country Latvia joined the European Union. I've been ahead of unit in the European Commission and digital innovation. Blockchain is what I've been working on and you could say to US sometimes perhaps over used term but It's a little bit my passion. I've been interested in walk chain and tech since about two thousand and twelve so perhaps not at the very beginning but at least relatively early for the public service this is also why I'm The original co chair of the Fintech Task Force. I have my second Co-chair coming from the financial services side. And then I'm from digital single market and I mean in both these areas I'm working in legislation and policy in funding infrastructure and research and managing it as well as working with with stakeholders and international cooperation. So it's an interesting bunch of things to work on. I'm glad to be doing it well. As you sitting the key term as passion because you're effectively getting the job of three other men so very impressive So Peter is As it is customary here at Inter blocks. Could you please explain our listeners? What is blockchain? And how does it work? Well glad to try. This is one of these things. It's a little bit of a communications challenge and exercise. But I mean I would say that. It's simply a growing list of records of blocks In a ledger that are linked utilizing cryptography and generally managed by peer to peer network adhering to a protocol for communication between the nodes and then validation of the new blocks that perhaps gets already a little little technical some listeners. But I would say. It's a way of validating transactions and data in an immutable in permanent way. So that you can be sure that they haven't been tampered with and that you don't have double spending of a value and that you can transfer data along with that value. That's the way that we see it and I think it's also important because some people are I think most of all sometimes negative that they say Blockchain is something that's bad because let's say uses a lot of energy if they take the original crew for work and everything that doesn't do that is is not blockchain. I mean we take a very wide view. I mean distributed Ledger Technologies Hash graphs tangle on these types of blockchain inspire technologies is is blockchain for us. I mean we're not trying to freeze history in two thousand and nine. When the BITCOIN paper was Was published or at some other point. It's developing technology and I would say what is really important is the element of decentralization which is not black and white. It is a gradient going from something which may not exist of completely centralized to something which also may not exist of being completely decentralized but actually allowing a degree of decentralization That a single database or even some federated databases. Don't don't allow so. This is where I think it gets exciting and where it makes it possible for a diverse group of actors to work together while preserving their autonomy. Excellent really loved that. I'm element of your definition of. It's a gradient of decentralisation incidents that's a spot on now could you introduce to us all the different bodies within the European Commission you have the digital innovation in Boston you need. And other bodies within your commission that are here to research enable and further development of blockchain in the EEG perhaps give us an overview where we'll do some deep dive in in some of the sure. I mean starting with with my unit. We're kind of the policy leaders on blockchain as a technology. But we're not. We're not the programmers as I said. I'm a I'm a lawyer and a political. Scientists have other colleagues are engineers but were more economists lawyers people looking at digital policy and in my unit we have the e U Blockchain Observatory in Forum which is a think tank working for us that has a whole set of reports and videos and regular workshops which used to be physical in at least right. Now they're virtually cited We also have the European blockchain partnership that my unit runs. This is twenty nine. Different countries twenty-seven all twenty seven e. You member states and Norway and Liechtenstein. Who are building a European blockchain services infrastructure together. I mean actually building an infrastructure. This piloting this is not testing. We're putting public services on the blockchain justified. We had quite a filtering to see which cases were justified to utilize the blockchain. And this is also something you could call a regulatory sandbox because while the countries and us are working together we obviously have to look at European Union legislation. We have to look at national legislation. Most likely you don't find anything. We're blockchain is prohibited. But you certainly don't find many cases where it specifically allowed though. You're getting some legislation in France in multi in other countries. It's specifically see a root for blockchain Roxanne legally And then we also collaborate with the International Association of Trusted blockchain applications as stakeholders organization I myself I'm in the OECD Policy Expert Advisory Board on Blockchain so we collaborate with OCD with the United Nations and others and In Not Buzz. International position of trusted blockchain applications a global governmental advisory board but also in the OECD activities. In the other activities. We probably would participate in the spring meetings of the World Bank and International Monetary Fund. This year I spoke myself in the IMF Fintech roundtable last year. Also you have the collaboration in the Fintech Task Force as I said from our side digital single market I gave a basic description on the other side. You have the financial markets colleagues the call as coming from research in Salon with the financial markets colleagues. Were collaborating on the digital assets possible legislation we just closed the public consultation on digital assets. Hearing what the stakeholders with the community has to say and in another context of the Digital Services Act which is a updating of ECOMMERCE along with addressing the platforms. We are seeing how perhaps smart contract so we have to do something to ensure that there is not any fragmentation of different requirements smart contracts across the digital single market and the twenty-seven member states. Something that we want to want to avoid

Blockchain European Commission Blockchain Digital Single Mark Fintech Task Force European Union European Commission Peteris U Blockchain Observatory International Association Of T International Monetary Fund Peters Zilkha University Of Southern Califor Inter Blocks California Latvia Oecd United States
Airborne, Explained

Reset

07:58 min | 2 years ago

Airborne, Explained

"There's lot of conflicting information out there right now about whether or not this novel. Corona virus is airborne as recently as this month. Some public health officials have said that it's not airborne but I just needed to confirm. This is the corner virus able from what we knew. It's not a gun. It's spread by droplets. We certainly stone. Cnn evidence of airborne spread in based on our local experience. The virus is not airborne. This is very different than infections that are transmitted by the airborne route such as measles. Roxanne Kenzi is a science reporter and she says that we need to take a closer look at this claim. You can't get scared by one word but you have to know what the word means if you break down at literally just means something's in the air so if you're coughing into your elbow and and your cash all that droplet into your elbow I mean at some point. It was in the air between your mouth and your elbow but it got caught. I I think that what the mistake is to think that something that is airborne is something that as soon as you cough. It's everywhere like that's that's just not the way to look at something so given all that. What exactly does airborne mean so? There is not a great answer to that question. I think that you can take a very simplistic view. Which means Airborne Indians? Something is in the air? I mean if you're open the dictionary that's what it means and if you were to ask people who are era. Biologists so the people who study how pathogens spread in the air. They'll say the same thing they'll say anything. That's in the air as airborne but a lot of fire Especially a lot of public. Health officials. Have the idea that something is airborne if it is spread by Aerosol and not by droplets now you're wondering what is the difference between droplets Arizona's right. Yeah that is one hundred percent what I'm thinking right now. So traditionally public health officials at least recently have been defining the droplet as something. That's like a ball of mucus and virus and salts that is larger than five microns in diameter. That you're GONNA COFFIN UP SPEWING OUT AND ANYTHING SMALLER THAN that. Could be an aerosol. That floats around like indefinitely in the air. Because it's lighter and it's floating her you know it's kind of imagine like a feather like floating in air okay. So there are large droplets that can float around in the air and they are fine aerosols that lasts longer in the air. That's the distinction right. And if you trace back where they came up with this. It goes back to these equations from the Nineteen Thirties where people were trying to figure out like tuberculosis. And how it spread. So we're talking about a really antiquated point of view on these things and hugely arbitrary like I asked the. Who How do you know that this Kobe thing is airborne? Had you know? It's like droplets and I did not get good answer from them. So why are some scientists still sing that we don't know if the virus that causes cove in nineteen is airborne because we don't I mean the thing is we actually don't have evidence to say whether it's airborne or not in a normal setting in settings where people are getting intimated and it's kind of spewing this thing into the air even the WHO says there is a risk of being airborne in the situations but we're operating in an absence of evidence? What I'm getting from us that there's really no like you can't tell me right now in the context of this interview. You can't tell me right now whether it is or it's not we just don't know exactly so the People. I spoke with who witnessed SARS almost twenty years ago and dealt with that public health disaster. They're saying that. We should operate on the precautionary principle that this is more easily airborne than were saying it is or assuming it is because technically does travel in the air so it is quote unquote airborne. So is this just a language thing? Is it just that most virologist think of something being airborne as being transmitted through fine aerosols as opposed to large droplets completely? We're talking about a failure of language in my opinion. So we're talking about of a a word that is failing us because it can't really capture all the nuances of the different situations. So if you're standing in front of an ocean and you feel the splash of the huge droplets of sea spray. Those are pretty big droplets. But it's the wind that's carrying it to your face. So could we not consider those airborne? I think that's what a lot of the people that study. This type of transmission are saying. Why do you think understanding this whole airborne situation when it comes to cove in nineteen and the virus that causes it? Why do you think that's important? I think it's important to understand how easily transmissible this viruses in the air first and foremost for Public Health Workers. So if we say as like the CDC said it's okay to wear like Bandannas in some situations with this if you're like encountering patient's or whatnot I think that's a problem. I think that we're loosening standards. Maybe a little too easily. Because this mantra has been repeated over and over that it's not airborne. What are the top three things that you think people are getting wrong right now? I think that the top three things that people are getting right now are that the virus is only transmissible by touch which is not something that I think we can assume. The second thing that they need to know is that we need to find out information about this before we can understand exactly how airborne it is. I think we have to reserve judgment and hang on for that and I think that the third thing that people need to know is that they need to be kind of up in arms about getting production of ninety five mass which are more effective than abandon. Ah in protecting health workers to increase than that. The government should really kind of be stepping up for that speaking of masks. There's a question that I know is on a lot of people's minds right now. Which is that. It's really hard to hear that People who work in medical fields should be wearing masks. These n ninety five masks but then to also here officials say to the public. Please don't purchase these. You don't need them. So how do you talk about that issue? How do you talk about to the public about this problem? So I'll speak about this issue about whether the public needs to buy masks on kind of personal level and that's I know right now. There's a shortage of mass and the people who need those masks most are doctors. Nurses people on the frontlines. And that if you're basically doing the social distancing that you're supposed to be doing right now you don't need a mask right if you earn keeping far apart from people and stay home like you don't need a mask right so I'm not here to say that masks don't work. I'm just here to say let's get them to the people who need the most. This whole confusion over the word airborne whether it's okay to use it maybe it's a matter of not necessarily using the word airborne but talking about people coughing in and talking about those kinds of risks a little bit more and in some ways. I would say that that's why we've been told to stay six feet away from people right. You're so smart because actually as I'm talking to you like I'm thinking what if we just didn't use the word airborne at all because it just means in the air so like what. If we started talking about measures that could just be more practical. You know right I mean I think I think that's probably part of what we're seeing right now. This whole speedway thing this whole. Don't stand next to somebody. Who's coughing thing. I think? Unofficially that is a way to talk about the fact that this is transmitted through the air and not just on surfaces But the word airborne evokes so much anxiety and fear that it is just not even worth using right now because we just don't understand it and and it hasn't been communicated to people properly

CNN Nineteen Thirties Public Health Workers Roxanne Kenzi Arizona Reporter CDC Kobe Bandannas
"For Your Reconsideration" Week

Feedback with EarBuds

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"For Your Reconsideration" Week

"This week's theme is for your reconsideration. The curator is Donde from luminary. Here are the podcasts and episodes chosen by Yolanda. Monday's episode comes from metaphysical milkshake and is called. Can you honor indigenous faiths without being a jerk. It's thirty four minutes long in this episode. rainn Wilson Resin Ostlund have one question. How do we honor and embrace embrace indigenous faiths without becoming like Kevin Costner? How can we become more than dilettantes? With dream catchers Kevin Locke is an artist Hoop dancer musician musician. Educator and cultural ambassador for his Lakota an Amish on Beirut's he joined the pod to share what we can do to better understand our indigenous faith traditions and how out to see our spiritual heritage in all the land around us. Join the conversation using Hashtag. Metaphysical an email your thoughts to metaphysical milkshake at soul pancake. GEICO DOT COM. Tuesday's episode comes from on second thought with Trevor Noah and is called prison break. It's forty four minutes long in this episode. Trevor and David David discussed their ideas for improving. Prison then talk about alternatives to incarceration Danielle Sarid founder of common justice. Wednesday's episode comes from from under the skin with Russell brand and his called science capitalism. And God with Neil degrasse Tyson. It's one hundred twenty one minutes long. Here's the description. This week's guest on under the skin is the infamous astrophysicist Neil degrasse Tyson. He's pretty amazing. He was promoting his book letters from an astrophysicist but he was much more than and being a focused and dedicated educator I enjoyed talking to him. Thursday's episode comes from here to slay with Roxane gay and Tracy McMillan Cottam him and his called all. Your faves are problematic. It's fifty three minutes long this week on the show Tracy and Roxanne take on the Popeye's chicken sandwich and all of its glory as well as the problematic takes that have come along with it. Friday's episode comes from the seaward with Lena Dunham and Alison Bennett and is called Lady Rosemary. Aber door it's fifty three minutes long in this episode Rosemary. Obrador seemed to most like a shy awkward wallflower but underneath drab exterior lurked an appetite for Jules parties parties and larceny born into an unassuming middle-class English home rosemary secretly stole thousands of pounds to fund her glamorous identity as titled Aristocracy. That's Lady Lady Aberdeen to you. Lena analyst Cover Rosemary's wild parties outrageous schemes her ultimate downfall and discuss what it's like to feel unseen and unappreciated those are the podcast recommendations chosen by Yolanda for this week's theme for your reconsideration

Neil Degrasse Tyson Lady Rosemary Trevor Noah Yolanda Lady Lady Aberdeen Kevin Costner Cover Rosemary Lena Dunham Rainn Wilson Resin Kevin Locke Geico Beirut Tracy Mcmillan Danielle Sarid Obrador Russell Analyst Jules Roxane Gay David David
Flighthouse CEO Jacob Pace on building a media company on TikTok

Digiday Podcast

11:32 min | 3 years ago

Flighthouse CEO Jacob Pace on building a media company on TikTok

"Welcome to the digital podcast. I'm Brian Marcy this weekend. Georgia Jacob Jacob is the CEO of Flight House. which if you don't aflaid houses digital digital media company most tectonic but beyond tectonic does stout a number of us what like a billion a month billing vis a month? Yeah twenty one million subscribers bribers on Tick Tock Jacob. Himself is Gen Z.. CEO You described as a baby face of a baby face. Mogul that works. Twenty five eight and also The New Yorker said that Jacob has the radic energy of champion sled dog on on a break. How accurate do you think that is both say? We'll see weirdly Jacob. The same thing has been said about me. Oh why energy. So let's let's talk about. Let's talk about Flight House first and then then how you got involved but like for those who are unfamiliar. Who might not be inflate houses You you know. Target demographic explain it. Yeah for sure. So essentially flight house is Basically the largest entertainment brand on six right now so we're really the only ones producing original content So for anyone. That's not familiar with like tick tock. Of course it's a short form mobile APP a little similar to just kind of like a newer sort of breed of it right. Yeah And even like you know Taylor Lorenzo's point who was like on this podcast like she's like it's just way more robust than vine and just a lot more editing features. A different kind of sense of humor. Humor so essentially a very simple way of like describing us to someone that might not be familiar as like. We're the you know. Think about this as like a buzzfeed complex of tick tock so we're producing original content while everyone else is kind of you know creators in their own right. But we're making individual sort of tick Tock Stars and whatnot like what you're doing and is your building a brand brand. Yeah exactly so explain. I mean you have series. We have a serious so one of our biggest ones. Actually which I think to date has probably done over. I would say in the range of like one to two hundred million views. Overall is this one called Finish the tick tock later. That's cool. Yeah those those always do really well. I think the first when we upload it did like thirty million views on the first episode and it just went super crazy on the platform also explain. I mean it's always weird. You have to explain tectonics not yeah do explain for those who've who have not seen it at how or how it works super simple So obviously finished. The lyric is kind of a popular segment. It's kind of around the Internet right like like on Youtube and instagram. We've seen it where a popular song is played. And then the two guests that are playing it Essentially it stops at a certain point. Where like let's say it's the hook and then whoever presses the Buzzer I had dreams where I can't move Thing and guesses the lyric correctly wins inking of of you. So we've basically taken that segment and introduced it specifically for Tick Tock so we get big talk traders as well as You know big take talk songs kind of in the mix and so you have all these kind of very relevant names to the platform like guessing the lyric and it's like very interactive with the audience. Okay so explain tick tock songs. Yeah not ever hold this like familiar with that word subculture of its own. I mean you know I think old town roads. That's probably the biggest example of that. And then you have songs like la La la You know by whites. UK and BB. No money Released all these different records that are blowing up added Tick Tock I think as of recent we've seen that Arizona's Urfa Song Roxanne for Drug San Right now. I'll come on on this. Let's stick nick with with Old Town road. All right we'll see the big one hip to Tanaz. Yeah exactly but now explain I mean there. There are a lot of songs that blow up up until now so I mean this this is John Nra The the complete the lyrics like they exist outside of ticked on. Yeah I mean it's you know it's you adapted it to tick Tock back So basically a lot of these songs Blow up on Tick Tock right so a lot of these creators and users and when I say creators as I mean anyone from the big you know multi-million users to even just people that have a few thousand Get behind these different trends and essentially you know make talks if everyone kind of gets on the same page. That's an old town road happens differen- But a lot of these records the music industry right now is like really really really really prioritizing talk because obviously the the known ways of blowing up records are like spotify apple music youtube and so talking aways like a new soundcloud to the music industry. Okay you know on soundcloud. You had a lot of these artists like you know the whole soundcloud rap wave like pomp. And whoever and even billy ILITCH got big on on southbound right So now it's breeding a lot of these artists like soundcloud where you have You know little Nasdaq's and whites UK and Arizona and so that's kind of where part of our business model fits in is sort of working with the music industry to figure out the best way to kind of engage tick tock So they kind of promote their records so tick tock itself Self Sununu type of platform. So what makes media that works on Tick Tock I mean. We've I think a lot of us have seen who aren't on talk you know. Have I've seen the compilations and stuff like this. And there's a lot of creativity there but how do you translate that into into media. You know. Series repeatability yeah. I mean I think we're sort of scratching the surface on that right now Obviously I think in media there's a way to kind of entertain your audience where you sort give them the low hanging fruit and then over time you try to reel them into something That's a little bit sort of Bigger than that initial concept right so our way of kind of Are Low hanging fruit was finished a toddler. We kind of knew that if we gave them a product that was easily digestible. They'd be able to Kinda take face value but then I think as we kind of go forward it's like how do we make it less. SORTA talk specific and more flight. How specific and how does our brand really show and You know I think I was thinking about this the other day. I definitely think that you know one of the things that really make successful. Content of ours is interactivity so when we can kind of create a series where our audiences can kind of play along and they kind of do that with finish the tick tock lyric right like when they're watching it. They kind of feel like they're playing along as well and they can kind of guess. The lyric Kinda jump in there and I think that there's probably a huge factor for the success in our content. What are some other series? The F- We have finished the tick tock lyric. We have another one called Shit Talk Right now where we basically get artists that actually when we pull it up right now you see podcast Jacob. Yeah we have a lot of really a lot of cool new ones that were kind of rolling out right now but let me ask you this. Is there anything that you tried on tic TAC. That didn't work and why. Oh I didn't work Yeah we've had a lot of series that we've kind of rolled out that haven't done as well as finished at six and we try to make educated guesses as to why they don't work can again. I think interactivities kind of one of those ones that we always fall back on is like if we can make it as interactive as we can. It's always gonNA perform better Oh Yeah we have another one called like Suggestion box basically like fans will kind of jump in and Okay so interactive seems to be under activity read for sure for sure on talk for sure and then like even you know one that that didn't do as well as we wanted. It's Hugh But that was a really cool series was We had this one called it. was basically artist trippy. Read sure yes. So he was on. He was on Flight House recently. And it was this series called love advice with trippy red and and we actually got him a relationship therapist Inside our facility and trippy basically went through like fan comments of like Them them wanting relationship advice in Lubbock is and him in the relationship that are pissed with kind of like answer the questions and give advice and it okay On talk it has like I think three hundred four hundred thousand views on youtube right now which is like decent in our is But I think it wasn't as interactive. It was more of it was more of a one way thing versus like a two way interactive thing you know and I think that's just kind of what we're trying to build right now. So how do you see the type of media that works on Tick Tock. Different from the type of media works on say snapchat. Yeah it's pretty similar. I mean I think tick tock we definitely try to target it's at its Gen Z.. Culture Like just hyper focused on that. Like who are the artists that they find very relevant to the tick Tock Stars that they find really relevant snapshots pretty similar because is it is sort of mobile. I and the way that you sort of consume content is like vertical. It's mobile and like that's how we produce all of ours has Tom. I have a younger audience. Are you aiming for a different type of audience than than you would. I mean it depends on how you define that right like after like thirteen. Eighteen to seventeen right now a big portion of our audiences around thirteen to twenty okay and mostly female thing about snapchat though and I will say this is something that we don't do on talk is the graphics snapshots very graphic. It'll like a lot of stuff moving like in Ou- spinning For us as we try to just keep it focused on the person for now but we're experimenting with a lot of stuff even next year. Okay so who makes this stuff. We have team. Yeah so we have editor Tina. The seventeen year olds or their house. Yeah I know we're all kind of in our twenty something. Okay Yeah so you know we've been around the block. He's a Dovan stuff go. Yeah Yeah so how did you become involved with. You didn't start flight. Oh No so when I was around eighteen. You're you're like brought in as as the the old guy. Yeah exactly yes. So when I was eighteen I was working at our parent company. Create Music Group where I'd been there for a couple years because The one of the cofounders flew out when I was like sixteen and I just did a lot of business development and anr for them. And at the time I was trying to figure out like new creative ways to kind of promote our artists and so I saw musically. 'cause I was just very familiar with the space and I saw this page called Flight House and I just kept seeing everywhere so when it was at like a million followers Reached Out Start it's Kinda work with the kids that started it who were probably like a year two younger than I was at the time it was two brothers and we sort of brought them in and we acquired The brand from them and then just they were just like creating content on their own so it wasn't even original content. At the time it was it was like remixes so basically on musically there was sort of a library of music that users can tap into right so they'd offer all the top forty songs and in you know any song that was pretty much put out by a major label and where Flight House got big was they would upload sort of sped up at its and slowed down and remix versions of songs And the users on musically sort of found that to be like a valuable enough thing to follow a paid for and so some of these remixes would get like you know ten thousand one hundred thousand sometimes up to a million repos on musically at the time and that sort of how it started and then as it turned into tick tock we were like all right. Let's figure you're out a way that this can be more than just a remix sort of brand.

Flight House. Georgia Jacob Jacob Youtube CEO UK Brian Marcy Buzzfeed The New Yorker Arizona Spotify Taylor Lorenzo Lubbock Tanaz John Nra Billy Ilitch TOM Self Sununu Editor
You can pre-order Red Dead Redemption 2 on Rockstar Launcher

TechtalkRadio

01:18 min | 3 years ago

You can pre-order Red Dead Redemption 2 on Rockstar Launcher

"Preventing a red dead redemption to before the break Rockstar launched their own game launcher blizzard we know has won a lot of the origin has won so the nice thing about this is it gives you the ability to play your favorite game without having to have the CD all the time load up you know because you get your license for the aim then you can go ahead and download game companies are fighting again they're fighting back against team they are in this what's it was seen as you buy games right off steam so I mean it's it's kind of Nice but With the launcher Roxanne I don't know if they're still doing this you go and you get the free launcher for Rockstar and they'll feed your ads and the whole bit when you run it but we're giving you free content for something of the Rockstar Yeah You preorder read-end wrench to on a pc you also get a free copy love Grand Theft Auto San Andreas which is an older version of grand theft auto but you also get two other games from their library you can pick from Max Payne Three you can pick from grand theft auto vice city L A noire you can pick from a bunch of other games out there that you can get for free if you preorder cool but also if you pre order you do get a lot of extra content within red dead redemption to that shows that you are a priori person

Rockstar Theft Max Payne
Prepping for Baby #5

Best of Both Worlds Podcast

06:16 min | 3 years ago

Prepping for Baby #5

"Today. We're GONNA BE TALKING ABOUT BABIES. Those of you who listen to last week's episode or have been reading my blog know about our exciting news so yeah we'll be talking about that and how things have changed changed over the past five years of the past thirteen years in the case since my oldest was born and different gear recommendations that people have sent in so thank you all for doing those out. We're going to be doing more episodes about advice. Various people have for the baby stages and such. I just can't believe there's a thirteen year age. Spread that is amazing. Matt is going to be you're. GonNa have a built in babysitter right and maybe at least for the older kids. I'm definitely comfortable. Leaving Jasper with the older children home town in newborns are complicated well. We'll we'll see how that all works out. I'm so excited for you. I mean you guys I sort of had this like inkling and I can't even remember why anymore and then when she told me it was like so I just I just I'm so excited for this and oddly enough some of not just lower but like I feel like a lot of my very close those relatives and acquaintances are all having babies at the same time so we are very excited to do this episode and talk to Laura. More about everything this US expecting although although she of all the people I know having babies. They're all having their first and you're having number five question for you. Is You feel like you're inducted into some kind of like special five because I do feel like you know two to three a three to four okay four to five to me. That's like that's like the Line Yeah I. I don't know I mean I always joke that. Zero to one is the big change everything. Oh I totally agree more from the outside of helping okay. Yes as whether you have a truly early big family yeah I duNno big families. Are I kind of in my mind. Put Four to five as the same bucket and so then then the six plus is where it starts getting interesting. DRE this inevitable. One more than you have always seems seems big big deal but six six dots crazy only crazy people do that now. We we did the reveal for the kids this Halawani about reveal yes so I had bought shirts for all the kids that the older two boys had wants big brother again Alex Scott one that said newest big Bro and risk got a big sister shirt and then I had a little onesie that said little brother and we all sat down we'd gotten back from our California vacation and we were sitting around the table. Call the family meeting hit everyone on route the shirts and a Jasper looked at it in two seconds like you're having another baby like Yay yeah because he put the pieces together like already put the pieces together. I think he mentioned that he had talked about with Sam at some point that they were speculating about it because I mean he's not an idiot. He's twelve. He's in. I am not Flat Tummy Right. You're listening for twenty weeks when we told them subtle. It's at twenty weeks pregnant with your fifth kid. It's it's not entirely so I would say. It wasn't totally out there. I don't take a lot of people were guessing that it was was the case. Probably imagine a lot of what you choose to wear putting wearing flowing hide it but if you were wearing a form fitting tank top. It was probably being evidence so they were very excited. I mean the big heads. Were just like jumping up and down like oh my goodness. This is so excited. Alex was a little bit more wary but I think it's more that was just overwhelmingly no context for what this even means rights but he arrested him. This isn't their first Rodeo zone their first radio edit over the next day. You're too. Alex definitely was getting into the idea and the funny thing I mean. They're all coming up to me wanting to feel the valley. Feel the baby kick like they're talking adding to the baby because this is the thing I've been so aware of with four other children is I mean he's my baby but right. He's their sibling and there's more of them and they're welcoming him into this tribe of theirs which by the way I'm not a member of that tribe I bet tribe is the thing and so they have their own interactions I'd just really a reminder that fits baby comes into you a whole community that is already there and that's kind of fun to welcome to Josh use the phrase we were thinking about number three and we were thinking about the a significant spacing between two and three which is nothing like five but still he said Oh. This is going to be a family baby and I like that idea like you're totally having a family baby baby. Everyone has one and so the kids talk to him there. They've been calling him a a name which I don't know if that will be his name but it's going to be hard to not not named him that if they keep calling ads really not some of the names. Alex suggested Alex suggested Kylo Ren for instance the baby will not be Kylo blue. Wren remember that one of my good friends in high school they were a family of sex I think and then they were having a baby girl and he was. He named his baby sister. They picked a rather unusual name. Her name is Roxanne to like getting some Cyrano Diversion Berge at the time so academically inspired but it was pete's are thought it was so cool that like he got to pick the name and yes so maybe maybe that will happen in your family yeah now. They're they're all into it so very very fun. That is so hard for kids to wait. Wait another four months but they

Alex Scott Jasper United States DRE Matt Laura Wren Diversion Berge SAM Roxanne California Josh Kylo Blue Pete Kylo Ren Twenty Weeks Thirteen Years Thirteen Year Four Months Two Seconds
Zach Galifianakis regrets asking Obama this 'Between Two Ferns' question

Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

05:29 min | 3 years ago

Zach Galifianakis regrets asking Obama this 'Between Two Ferns' question

"So Zach Galifianakis is a comedian and movie star but he may be most well known for his internet series between two ferns in it he interviews real celebrities and says really mean things to them and somehow the celebrities do not van arrange to have him killed between two ferns is now a movie it's premiering on Netflix and Zach Galifianakis joins us now said welcome to wait wait don't tell me thank you. so. I want the movie which is whole areas and hate you and has a bunch of between two ferns interviews and celebrities actually want to be on your show right they want to come and do this. I don't know I mean I don't really know why they would want to do it it's not a prank show I'm not trying to prank anyone in if I understand correctly you tell the celebrities their job is basically to sit there and just well I tell that they'll have to be funny they just have to sit there. and be weird it out yeah. and we will give them insults to give back to me but sometimes in the moment we just get talking and the insults kind of flight naturally yes I've cut an interview short the. the person and want to reveal it was that the person was acting so well I thought they were good at just choke me out this parking lot really so that somebody was acting so is so upset your character that you honestly thought that this was going that badly. and I kind of said we're done to the director and he said no we don't have anything and I said well I want my life. well you can you can say Florence Henderson. it turned out that person just with that great of an actor I was in school by themselves but I don't try I'm not trying to hurt anybody's feelings I just am trying to cause weirdness yeah this but it is amazing for example you did one with president Obama oh yeah forgot about that yeah I. and and so you're you're gonna go to the White House when they were rolling out the obamacare obamacare thing and they were trying to get around two things the youth might watch. and so when you got a chance to go do this bit with president Obama what did you say to yourself I I just couldn't believe what you know even when we got to the White House I was I just thought they were good David was never going to happen and I was nervous and actually I sat on some historic furniture that was roped off. at the White House white really different. with that you know like the rope tight between the you know the the yeah it was it next to the war room and or was the war room or the map room and. I didn't know that there was a ropes velvet rope situation and I had sat down on one of the seats. and then the security guard blew his whistle of my ear yes and then I I was so nervous I did it again. Jack this is Roxanne Roberts did the president have any sense of or do any of the celebrities you interview had any sense when you start what you're gonna ask or is it all news to them as you asking about my proposition I don't give them the questions ahead of time with president Obama though because of limited time that one was more scripted than the others but he just kind of ran with it and a lot of that is improper really really so I in your interview present a mama you sit with the then present United States and you say if I remember correctly how does it feel to be the last black president. yeah and you said that to him yeah and I legitimately thought he was about to kill you. what he doesn't have to kill me has people around. that was one of the questions where I ask. his speech writer have I pointed to that question before we take that and I said has he seen that question. and the speech writer looked at me and said yeah I think so it just walked off like of course he has. so when you were sitting there with the president and and you didn't know that he knew you were about to ask that. and you did it anyway. I'm playing an idiot so when you're playing in areas you kind of get away with things because. part of the the comedy for this thing is how not to be as a human being right yes so I don't know he just took it in stride and his response I think was made up yeah well what was given your member his response. he just he I I can't remember exactly what it says which is weird because I watch it sixteen times a day yeah I would too I have I have to say in a scene baskets which is great as well you often play people who are terrible people. they're just they're not self aware they're not nearly as talented as they think they are they're mean to people that's correct so when will you be running for president.

President Trump Zach Galifianakis Barack Obama White House Netflix Writer Jack Roxanne Roberts United States Obamacare Director Florence Henderson. President. David
Why Many Americans Are Drawn To The Gig Economy

NPR's Business Story of the Day

07:11 min | 4 years ago

Why Many Americans Are Drawn To The Gig Economy

"Is a lifestyle that in theory. Sounds amazing beer own boss, set your work schedule. This is why people are drawn to so called gig work driving for companies like Uber and lift delivering food or performing one time tasks PJ connote, Jim and I worked for interesting card. Uber and live. I live in Nashville, and I I started on list. I am authorized on both who ran lifts. I am using the cart. My name is Erica drano, and I've done post mates and lift so it's actually unclear how many Americans work in the gig economy. Estimates vary widely, but this kind of work fascinates sociologist, Alexandra revenue, and she's written a book called hustle. Well and gig. She was inspired by a story about the company task rabbit, and we should say that company did not get back to us to talk about this case, but revenue tells us this one guys task was to pick up drugs from pharmacy turns out, they were empha- means and he was being asked to ship them to China. And so he ended up reaching out to task grab it and after some back and forth. They said, well, you should do it. Anyway. Because the client is always right. What? Yeah. Really, really? And he decided he wasn't going to do that. He was a college graduate from very prestigious university. His entire future was a head of him. Eventually the woman got back in touch and he had to do a hand off at a local park and give the large bottle of drugs to some other person. That's crazy. It is crazy. What a what about that made you interested? I couldn't believe that someone could be in that vulnerable of a position. And I decided I wanted to know more about what else was going on. Well, look, let's talk through. Through how this economy was sort of conceived. I know you interviewed a lot of people for your book, and we actually called up some people as well to hear their voices, and I wanna play a bit from Daniel coins. He's thirty three years old. He lives in Florida. He drives for Uber. And he remembers what it was like I going to work for over with a smartphone. I was able to sit there at home, you know, real low point in my life and be employed within a matter of hours. I didn't have to get dressed up. I didn't have to stand in line. I was able to just go to work. I'm really grateful that this space exists, but I do want it to improve. So that's really what this was all about. Right. I mean, it was it was you don't have to go to a job interview in a suit or a nice outfit. I mean, you could just become your own boss instantaneously. Well, it meant that who get work instantaneously, assuming that there was work available on the platform, but he's still controlled by the platform in may. Any ways so through gamification techniques in order to encourage him to drive at certain times. One of the things we've seen. That's right popular is this push toward surge or towards incentives. So that drivers give certain number of rides over certain period of time look at additional money. But you know, that interview actually really highlights the position of strugglers in the gig economy. These individuals who are down on their locker long-term unemployed or going through a really dark time. And yes, the gig work is there for them. But as he also points out there needs to be some improvement is is just being able to have some work and make a little money an improvement for someone who is struggling and is just looking for any way to to bring in some cash. Yes. And no. So it is an improvement in the sense that it can get them out of the house that can help them to start making some money. In fact, there's an individual I interviewed who was term unemployed and he. Talks about being depressed, and how this actually got him out of the house and making money, and it really improved his life. But the downside is that these jobs have no protections and so- workers can find themselves exposed to dangerous situations that actually leaves them worse off than they started. And what about the argument that they know that going into jobs like this like that, you know, that you're going into a type of work where they're none of the standard protections. So workers are told up-front that they're independent contractors. But they're also very much marketed. This entrepreneurial eat those that they are their own boss, and they can control their hours, and they have the freedom to determine their own paycheck. So the risks that they encounter, although they might sort of know it intellectually going in it's very different to encounter. These firsthand. You I interviewed task rabbits who were propositioned on the job. And that's not something you expect is going to happen. If you go to clean someone's house in. Terms of the experience working in jobs like this. I wanna play you another piece of tape. This is a gig worker named Andy Carroll. She's thirty seven years old. She lives in Chicago. And she she works for door. Dash the food delivery app. I review as kind of a crutch to get through the next seeing and hearing even a nine to five and I'm still using it to supplement income here. And there, but the thing is like, you know, when you walk up to somebody store, you know, you get barely a tip from most people barely get tips. They don't even look you in the eye, and it just really like it really messes with your self esteem. So interesting because she someone who has a nine to five job is using this as supplemental income, but it sounds like it can be very demeaning. It is incredibly demeaning, in fact, a number of the workers that I interviewed actually talked about a high level of stigma that goes along with this work, some of them lied to family and friends and tell them that they are temping rather. Than admitting that they are working on these platforms. You you interviewed dozens of people for the book is there one story that that sort of stands out. They wanna leave us with one story that I think really sticks out was a kitchen surfing chef serve a rent a chef that actually went out of business while I was studying it. I don't think I had anything to do with that. But this chef I call her Roxanne in the book, she was cooking for a family, and she's trying to be very friendly because that's part of working in the gig economy have to be friendly and very personable. And then the family the couple she was cooking for actually propositioned her and invited her to participate in in a threesome, and she very very awkwardly, but still gracefully had to try to beg out of the situation. So in a corporate workplace, of course, sexual harassment is still bad. But in the gig economy workers are often walking into the home of a stranger who thanks to the apps is anonymous in a workers, sometimes think, oh, well, the company has the credit card number, but between burner accounts and profiles that are not. Completed workers really have no idea who they're going to be working for

Alexandra Revenue Nashville Erica Drano JIM Florida China Andy Carroll Harassment Roxanne Daniel Chicago Thirty Seven Years Thirty Three Years
The Story of Burt's Bees and Roxanne Quimby

How I Built This

05:09 min | 4 years ago

The Story of Burt's Bees and Roxanne Quimby

"Show. How Roxanne Quimby took a roadside Honey stand in rural Maine and turned it into birds bees. One of the biggest natural personal care brands in America. Every Sunday at my local farmer's market. There are people who sell homemade hot sauce and handcrafted wallets. There's seemed a woman who sells mohair scarves using the mohair from her inquiry. Goats imagine going to your local farmers market in say main back in the mid nineteen eighties. And if you happen to be near Bangor, you might have come across Roxanne Quimby and Bert shabby. It's selling jars of Honey Honey from birds owned beehives charming, right? Maybe buy jar and move on. And Roxanne would keep undoing what they were doing. You. Do it. You were doing except Roxanne thought. Hey, could we make in sell candles from all the beeswax we have or could we use the beeswax to make other stuff? Okay. So you can kind of figure out where this is headed. Because that of course is what happened and even though Roxanne and Bert never intend. Added to build a billion dollar brand or even a million dollar brand. It just happened. Of course, a lot of that had to do with Roxanne's passion and drive, but the idea was never to build something massive. It was a farmer's market product today walk into any drugstore in the US or even overseas in you will find an impressive display of birds bees products lip balm lotions, soaps, shampoos all labeled with the face of a heavily bearded man named Burt. The likelihood that Roxanne Quimby would build a massive company or any company at all was so implausible back in the early nineteen eighty s when she was a single mom waiting tables at a diner and a decade before that she drove across the country from Massachusetts where she was from to San Francisco seeking out a simpler life a life without lots of material needs. It was adventure. To go all the way to the west coast from New England and New York, it was a great unknown. And I had always wanted to be an artist from the time I was five. So it seemed like a natural place to go to art school. I guess you got there and what like nineteen seventy around. Then get tummy what tell me what your impressions of San Francisco were like at the time. I think San Francisco kind of unlocked itself to me while I was there. It was a pretty little town. But the depth of experience that I had their took some time to assimilate and understand, you know, I I cross a great cultural bridge while I was out there. What do you mean by that? I learned to think differently and to probe more deeply everything needed to be reevaluated. And looked at again. So you start to sink like what you're all the way you thought of the world before was this wrong. Well, it was too limited. And I think that the material world was too important. And really it's not as important as I was taught that it was we were encouraged to make a good living. Both of my sisters had MBA's. Like, my dad did and earning power and ones that chievements were emphasized, and I took a turn to the extreme left when I went to art school and rejected the pursuit of material comforts who's really quite wonderful. Yeah. And and so you're in San Francisco, and you're kind of going through this. The transformation this personal transformation? Can of rejecting your go out and money kind of way, you were raised which was way, many many many people raised and what did you think? Did you think I don't need that life? I want a different life. What was what did you start to think about the life? You wanted to have. Well, I wanted meaning and I wanted to live deeply I was very influenced by throw who wrote about it quite beautifully. I was looking for transcendence. I just my world just got bigger, and I felt my relationship with it expanded. I I guess you had a boyfriend in San Francisco at the time and the two of you decided to like go off around the country to find a place to live. Yeah. This is George Saint Clair boyfriend at the time. And and and so we would you guys. Do you just

Roxanne Quimby San Francisco Bert Shabby America Bangor United States New England Maine George Saint Clair Massachusetts Burt New York Billion Dollar Million Dollar
How Station F Transformed Paris Into the Start-Up Capital of France

Fareed Zakaria GPS

01:40 min | 4 years ago

How Station F Transformed Paris Into the Start-Up Capital of France

"Working with startups there. So is stationed f the Silicon Valley of Paris, we asked its director Roxanne Varzideh. I think station f a lot of people think it looks very much like Silicon Valley because we have a high density of startups. We have a lot of startup kind of ecosystem based on campus, but we don't necessarily want to be compared to valley. We like to think that what's happening here is very unique. And also very unique to what's happening in the ecosystem in Europe. So what is happening in the startup ecosystem in Europe London is still the tech hub. But post Brexit, France may have an opportunity to catch up after his election crawl announced an eleven billion dollar fund for innovation. He bass tax labor reforms designed to help businesses and make it easier

Silicon Valley Europe Roxanne Varzideh Paris Brexit Director France Eleven Billion Dollar
Mental health crisis could cost the world $16 trillion by 2030

BBC World Service

07:54 min | 4 years ago

Mental health crisis could cost the world $16 trillion by 2030

"Has sentenced the former vice president Roxanne about daddy to more than fifteen years in jail for her role in what became known as the magic water scandal. The court said that she embezzled millions from a state fund set up to decontaminate a lake in its verdict. The judge said the chemical formula used as part of the cleanup by an Israeli firm was an ineffective solution of water suit and chlorine. Rwandan opposition politician, freed from prison on bail has vowed to continue with her political activities in an interview with the BBC, Diana regarding who referred to herself as a political prisoner said, she did not want people in Rwanda to live in fear. It's not an easy thing to be position leader or member in Rwanda, you'll get harassed. You. Get jailed somebody that tear others get killed. We wanted to be the platform for the people in Rwanda to have voices heard. I will continue with what the hell started misery Gara was arrested last September after being from standing against president polka gown in the twentieth. Seventeen presidential election and Australian government review into religious freedom is expected to include a cool for schools to be given the right to turn away gay students, the rhetoric review recommends amendments to the country sex discrimination legislation to allow religious. Schools to refuse students on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. The prime minister said the proposals in the report will be considered carefully and respectfully BBC's. Hello. You're listening to the newsroom from the BBC World Service with me Emilio San Pedro. It's not yet a month since hurricane Florence at the east coast of the United States causing catastrophic damage in north and South Carolina. Now people in northern Florida are preparing for another huge storm hurricane Michael which is expected to pass over the north west of the state later on Wednesday. The Florida governor Rick Scott described it as highly dangerous and potentially life-threatening. Let me be clear. Hurricane Michael is a monstrous storm forecast gets keeps getting more dangerous. We're now just hours away from CNN packs again, hurricane Michael is coming to the Gulf Coast, and panhandle and impacts will start in just a few hours. The time to repairs right now. The storm is dangerous. If you don't follow a warnings from officials. This storm could kill you lose Fajardo BBC monitoring is in Florida. He's been telling me more about what the authorities. There are saying we've been hearing about officials starting of course, governor Rick Scott telling people in Florida to be very alert this storm they're expecting impact on Wednesday afternoon. Probably they are expecting it could even move into a category. Four storms were very dangerous storm, particularly they're worried about the possibility of storm surges of up to twelve feet in some parts, they could expect them as you say it's different from hurricane Florence. There's at least one sign of relief for Florida in the sense that it's supposed to advance quickly. What are the problems with Florence? And we've got major storms and have occurred recently in the US is the fact that they've been going slower than usual because of that grading even more prominence of flooding. Apparently, this one is expected to move relatively quickly through Floyd. So it could be. Very destructive because of the wind, but not so much of the sort of hanging around what other preparations of the authorities making nearly one hundred and twenty thousand people have been told to leave and in several counties in northwest, Florida. Some people are particularly worried because as several of these counties are in rural areas they are relatively far away from the main resort city of Miami. And orlando. Is what many people in the world now, Florida for these are more rural and more impoverished areas? One of the counties, which is under risk by this here again, apparently they're saying that they don't have enough shelters capable to withstand this degree of uric aims. So they're trying to make sure that people are are well prepared. Also, they're dealing with another issue. The fact that is the third consecutive year that Florida has been under threat of a major hurricane and people are worried that in some occasions, they could feel that they don't take the risks seriously as they should. So I guess I kind of fatigue because of this constant threat of hurricane. So they're trying to make sure that the people know that this is a very serious situation. Reese, the President Trump's administration has seen its fair share of high profile departures, not all apparently as amicable as this one though, we're all happy for you. In one

Florida BBC Hurricane Michael Hurricane Florence Rwanda Rick Scott President Trump Vice President Gara United States Emilio San Pedro Florence Diana Roxanne CNN Prime Minister Orlando Miami South Carolina
Twitter CEO to testify before House panel on September 5

The Car Pro Show

00:27 sec | 4 years ago

Twitter CEO to testify before House panel on September 5

"House Republicans wanna talk to the CEO of Twitter about their concerns that social media companies are biased against conservatives the house energy. And commerce committee has scheduled Jack Dorsey to testify September fifth panel chair Greg Walden. Of Oregon says he's looking forward to learning more about the company's. Content judgment calls Twitter recently froze the account of info wars frontman Alex Jones Dorsey said earlier this week there's a left leaning bias at. The company

Nicole Henning Twitter United States Greg Walden Dana Sabra Jack Dorsey Jeff Marr American Civil Liberties Union Kabuki Alex Jones Dorsey San Antonio Hurricane Harvey San Diego Roxanne Rucker Hawaii David Ige Attorney Official East Texas