Audioburst Search

18 Burst results for "Roxane Gay"

"roxane gay" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

09:11 min | Last month

"roxane gay" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"So now they were given out by the congressional black caucus but it did look like political theater holding to have them wear this and then it taken me it's a very ornate it's a traditional would you call it a scarf yeah that you wear around your your neck and shoulders best selling author Roxane gay said I'm not sure what's funnier these ridiculous politicians wearing kente cloth or Corey Booker smartly opting out of that absurd performance it's smart we mention that the Democrats unveiled today some legislation they call it the justice in policing act again it's just a first draft at this point but things like overhauling legal protections for law enforcement national database of excessive force episodes of new standards for police training at cetera so as that legislation goes through the normal course of of what is Capitol Hill will bring any of the updates on it well the officer who has been charged with the death of George Floyd appeared in court today one of the officers Ryan burrows covering this and joins us now a pretty brief hearing right Ryan eleven minutes long this was former officer Derek show when he's the one seen in the video putting his knee on George Floyd snack he is also the only one of those four officers charged with second degree murder and what we learned today was that she is basically a bit the bail is set at one and a quarter million dollars that's unconditional bail one million dollars with conditions including if the surrenders firearms he must be actively supervised if he's able to post bail and you can't leave the state without permission we didn't hear much from him he answered a few of the judge's question she actually appeared via video link from about twenty five miles away from the courtroom where he is being house right now at a state prison facility maximum security where he is also under suicide watch but yeah I was you know a pretty brief hearing with his attorney didn't speak at all to the charges or their defense at all as we heard with the three other officers you know we're we're the attorney came out afterwards and said you know it was it was show and he was he was the guy who is the ringleader of all of this not our guys were pretty new to the floor so we didn't really hear anything from them in those regards will be back in court June twenty ninth outside of that June twenty ninth appearance do we have any sort of very basic framework of what this looks like going for the next couple of months you're talking about so what did it what a trial would look like yeah the timing of it I mean when it's probably too early for that but not before the end of the year and not before election day for example it certainly seems to be months away if not it well into twenty twenty from everything we're hearing from attorneys and legal experts the Addis this is not something that will be you considered or fixed for a while and to be honest with you I I don't know if that works to the advantage of the disadvantage of the prosecutor in this case has already been asked what are you gonna be able to get a fair jury pool after all that's gone down over the last two weeks are you gonna be able to find a jury that's going to take this case are you gonna be able are you going to have to move this out of the county out of the state anywhere where would the best place to be to have this trial and I think that that's something that's going to be debated for several weeks if not months you know death holding on on where a fair trial would be able to take place where do we stand with the pro testing and in Minneapolis still daily protests you saw what happened last weekend so I think it was Sunday when the mayor came up to speak in a basically shouted him down and told him to go home because he right now is not in favor of abolishing the police department which it sounds like nine of the twelve city council members are in favor of at this point out we don't know of any kind of replacements basically what they came out and said is they want to and policing as they know what you re creates a system of public safety that actually helps keep us safe they call the Minneapolis police department failed they call them toxic they want them to go away but what is that mean I mean is it going to be lawlessness on the streets with the county take over if you witness something or you were a part of something you picked up the phone and called nine one one who would respond you know there there are discussions that well maybe we take that money and allocated to things like homelessness or mental health as a way to provide better services to people who need help as opposed to sending police everywhere but really there has not been any kind of replacement suggestion as to what would happen if the the police were completely abolished Ryan appreciate it thank you you gotta take care of there was a congressional black caucus chairwoman representative Karen bass who was on CNN with Jake tapper over the weekend and she said I don't believe you should disband police departments she said we need to look at how we're spending the resources and invest more in our communities which is a conversation to have if the police are getting the bulk of the money and in the budget then that's a conversation to have and how can we divert more money into the other communities that need it that that need it so that people aren't desperate I in C. N. N. wrote an article about is this a bad political move this whole de fund the police movement yeah and they pointed to Karen bass's comments and they said that her quote is at the heart of the political problem for Democrats with this defined effort has a wall some crowds around the country are chanting define the police it's likely what most people involved in these protests want not to take all the money away from police departments and get rid of the cops but they want an examination of the budgets for police departments yeah but and look at the A. increased militarization of these police department but if I'm making a sign and I write D. fund the police right versus let's re examine the allocations of law enforcement money's right to community resort right but I can't write that on my sign so like that narrative being pushed is not doing them any favors it's not it's not at all but remember the guy from black lives matter that we had on last week yeah Keeling he specifically said he wants to Polish the police department he said there are people in his movement that want to abolish the police department but that he wasn't one of those but here's the issue with that I mean even if even if that's the case even if he's aligning himself with people who do say they want to abolish the police department that's not even necessarily true but that's what they're saying I mean if you use Camden New Jersey as an example I mean the first thing we did in the show today was we talked about Camden New Jersey the city of had a ridiculous crime problem they have problems with their relationships with the police officers they finger quotes abolished their police department when in fact all they really did was they took V. Camden city police department away and turned it into the Camden County police age well and PS they only had a hundred and seventy five officers at one point in their city police department a hundred seventy five we have ten thousand LAPD officers it's easy you just can't compare but I'm wondering if this is like a negotiating tool you know come to the table and say we want to completely defund the police and then you get more than if you come to the negotiating table with I'd like to examine the city's budget possibly I mean the you start on complete opposite ends and then you work your way to the middle so some sort of solution but I don't feel like that's a to your point there I don't feel like that's a winning message the idea of de funding the police because that strikes fear in the hearts of people who count on police or expect there to be some amount of protection when when everything goes south I mean that's it it's it it's a message that's that fits on the sign of course right but it's not the message that they probably mean to actually say M. A. N. when we went through and we looked at at least one black lives matter organization that did put out a list of things that they would like to see in exchange for our our in place of police departments as we know them it's basically just re funding or or funding to more healthy level some of those things that should be funded now social services mental health professionals they can go out on specialized calls that I don't think any police agency would would would necessarily disagree with those types of things it's just the part that a police agency would be the one agency in a city that would have to suffer so that those other things could be improved make a lot of sense all right Gary Indiana will continue.

Roxane gay
"roxane gay" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

02:02 min | Last month

"roxane gay" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"Is our editorial program manager. John DOE is head of original audio and video. Our music was composed just for us by the mysterious brake master cylinder. We also featured music by putting bear. Dan Ross this the editor in chief of Lincoln. I'm Jessi Hempel see you next Monday. And thanks for listening so this might be a base question but do you like the Internet and Twenty Nineteen. I like parts of the Internet and twenty nineteen and I think parts of it I I believe in free speech but I. I think that social media really dropped the ball when they decided to let anything go. I think that allowing hate to flourish has done us a disservice allowing false information to flourish has done us a grand disservice and I wish more people would take care of the spaces that they create. Because you know we're not allowed to litter. So why do we allow litter into our social media spaces? It's just really disappointing. They really shouldn't Islamaphobia Homophobia misogyny racism of all kinds. These are not acceptable ways of thinking and behaving and this idea that we should tolerate. It is absolute nonsense and I wish more people would just say that and stop wrapping themselves in the First Amendment. The First Amendment doesn't mean you can't think that way it means that there are consequences when you you can say whatever you want but you know you're not free from consequences just because of the first amendment. It sometimes seems that. Some amendments are more important than other certainly more protected in hidden behind absolutely and also it's who gets to use those amendments because oftentimes. I blocked trolls and they say you're silencing me and I'm like I don't have to listen to you I don't know you I don't Oh you my time the get a grip and it's just absurd. It's just a bunch of men children and they need to go back to their mothers..

Jessi Hempel program manager Dan Ross editor in chief Lincoln
"roxane gay" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

11:38 min | Last month

"roxane gay" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"I am not a hand holder. I am not nurturing but I do believe in encouraging my students to believe they are good writers and that they can become better writers because an academia there is this rhetoric that students are bad writers and that each generation of students is is bringing about the end of the written word with their Impoverished writing skills. This has been going on since the eighteen hundreds and it's really kind of adorable that we are so short sighted when it comes to our students abilities and so I tried to reset that narrative in my classroom and let students know that you can accomplish anything. But you're going to have to work really hard and I'm going to challenge you and I'm going to give you more work than you can probably get done. But I'm still going to do it and we're GonNa see what happens at the end of it. All and so some students love my classroom and some students hate it and call me a battle-axe and I'm fine with either one. But we have a good time and I love working with students. They are so interesting and they always show me how to take risks in my own work because I see the risks that they take. I see how they start to learn the rules of writing and then grapple with the realization that they cannot only work within the rules they can break the rules as they see fit as long as they do so with purpose. And it's always fun to see that realization to see what they do with that realization. What is the interplay like between your teaching and your writing? If tomorrow you were told you never had to teach again. Would it impact your writing? No it would not because I think that there are all kinds of ways to teach and learn and so even if I'm not in the traditional classroom I am going to be learning from reading and from engaging with other writers I think the one thing that would change is that I probably would write more because I would have to grade less. How much should commercial success matter? I think it should be an end goal and I think it's really disingenuous to suggest that it shouldn't because how do you expect to pay your rent and your health insurance and the light bill? You know the reality is that life costs money. And there's always this weird notion that you should only create for the love of creation and don't worry about material things but like who is taking care of the material things for a lot of people if you don't have a trust fund like you have to worry about the material things so I don't think that you should set commercial success as a goal but commercial viability should absolutely be coal Doesn't mean you shouldn't take chances or experiment or be radical but it does mean that it's okay to want to make a good living for yourself as a writer. It is absolutely okay you know. The problem isn't writers carrying about commercial. Success the problem is that it's so difficult to achieve Because there are so many gatekeepers who only allow very specific kinds of work past the gates. This goes back to what you were saying about empowering your students to feel that they can be good writers. How do you do that? I tell that they're good writers and it sometimes people just need to know they just need to hear that and then you know I want. I'm giving them feedback. I try to be as constructive as possible but I'm also really honest like all right. And W T F on a story and I will say like what the Hell you doing here and this doesn't make sense. This is nonsense. They need to know the truth. I don't mollycoddle them because they're not gonNA grow as writers if you just keep them in a safe little cocoon but I'm not there to tear them down. I'm not there to insult them or their point of view and so telling the truth while reinforcing that they are good at what they're doing and they're going to get better by putting in the work is how I approach that. So your late thirties. That meant that for fifteen years. Maybe more you consider yourself a writer but the the world hadn't bestowed commercially that distinction upon you. I WanNa know how you how you nurtured the writer in yourself. I just wrote all the time and I read constantly as well I. I exercised the writing muscle and wrote every single day for quite a long time every day I would go to work or school and then come home and right and not sleep very much and then do it all again the next day because writing was something and is still something that I find pleasurable. I enjoy it. I'm not a tortured writer and I it. Also in many ways was self-medication because it was a way to lose myself in the work and not have to worry about the seemingly trivial concerns of the day to day world so my favorite read of last year was Hunger Book. That really stayed with me and in fact knowing that we are talking this week. I read that it Last week and you said an interview with Debbie Millman who believes your partner now issues you said to her it terrifying to treat yourself to tell the truth about what it's like to live in your body and it just got me to thinking. Roxanne. Why is it so important to you to tell the truth? I think it's important to tell the truth because all too often we only hear one kind of truth And that is the truth of a white heterosexual able bodied men. And they get to be the arbiters of what matters. And what does not the more that people with marginalized voices are able to articulate their trues. Damore that we can have a better understanding of what it means to be human in different kinds of bodies and When we come from different cultures and different walks of life and so it's not a noble thing it's really more about just expanding our understanding of the human condition and in playing a very small part in that you have said that that was a scary topic to take on to write a book about. I mean it's been a year and a half since the book came out probably been longer since he began to write about it. And I'm wondering what distance has done for you as you look back at that book. It's a good question. I think distance has made me realize that it really is important to talk about living in different kinds of bodies that it's not a vanity project in any way and that everyone struggles with living in a body in one way or another and be the seeing how people have responded to the book regardless of the kind of body they live in has really expanded my understanding of just the challenges of being human and being in a body so distances certainly afforded me that. So what's the relationship like with your audience? 'cause you're pretty open about yourself so. I'm sure they must feel like they know you. You know it's a complicated relationship because on the one hand I am always happy that my work is reaching people in that my work resonates with people on the other hand. It's really challenging. Because people give me their stories and it's a lot to carry my own trauma and my own history as well as the stories and histories of other people and so I've had to develop very firm boundaries because I'm not a therapist and writing. This book was actually not therapy. It was work and it was a very specific kind of work and so I have to make clear to people that I honor their stories. And I'm I'm flattered that they trust me enough to share their stories with me but I can't always carry them in addition to my own. Do you think that that is specific to Memoir Agenda in specifically memoir written by women? I think it is and I think that people have very narrow ideas of the role that black women should play in that they often expect black women to be maternal and caretaking. And that's not my role in your life I'm a professional. This is not all it or emotion there is craft and rhetoric and choices that have gone into this show of the work the of it the articulation of the ideas. And I think it's important to remember that we oftentimes dismiss women's work as emotional and we act as if craft choices have not been made in the composition of that work and so I always try to remind people that this was work and I enjoy my work but it wasn't. It's not a diary few decades from now. When you're looking back at your career what do you want to have accomplished? I want to have created opportunities for other black women. Writers to thrive in this world. Thank you for taking the time to talk with me about why you do what you do how you do what you do. More than welcome thank you. That was Roxane. Gay Professor Critic writer you can check out her podcast here to slay which she hosts with Dr Tracy McMillan COTTAM. This week's episode. Got Me thinking about what it means to teach people. Well Roxanne highlighted this idea. She said it had a lot to do with having confidence in them and with telling them that it made me think of this amazing high school teacher that I had her name was ellen. Myers you know. She told me I was smart. And then I was a good writer and looking back. I bet she said it to a lot of the kids but I thought that that feedback was just from me and that made me feel that I really mattered and I think a lot of people probably have someone like that a teacher or mentor. Who made the difference for them and I want to hear about this folks so write to us at. Hello Monday at linked in or post on Lincoln using the Hashtag. Hello Monday and join US next week. For Conversation with Wilson Tang a decade ago. He inherited his family's Chinese restaurant growing up with immigrant parents. My parents wanted me to be able to have a white collar job and own restaurant and more specifically a Chinese restaurant in Chinatown was definitely far from what they would want need to do. The restaurant was a hole in the wall joint in Chinatown and could gone the way a lot of New York's restaurants do out of business instead. Wilson grew it into a global brand. That was so popular that he and his family are now in ads for the gap. Hello Mondays the production of Lincoln. The show is produced by Laura. Joe degeorge Mister Show. Dave pond is our technical director Mayenne. Genie.

writer Debbie Millman Wilson Tang Chinatown US Dave pond New York Joe degeorge Lincoln Laura Roxanne partner Myers school teacher technical director Dr Tracy McMillan COTTAM ellen Professor
"roxane gay" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

11:32 min | Last month

"roxane gay" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"It's Jesse coming to you on an American holiday it's Memorial Day here in the. Us and the hello. Monday team is off hopefully resting and recharging probably not on the kind of vacations we took last year but still off so I got together with our producer service storm to go back through the archives and finding a one of our favorite episodes and it didn't take long. Sarah who did we choose? We chose Roxane gay because she somebody who speaks really personally. I think to both of us and we thought that had so many clear takeaways for our listeners both on craft and disciplined when it comes to writing and on mentorship both being mentored and being a mentor. She's a feminist in every breath unapologetically. And I have to tell you Sarah. I'm not usually nervous when I come to a conversation. I just love talking to people but with Roxanne. I was so nervous. I think you can hear it in the tape. It's understandable I think you you both sound fantastic but I get it. I sent an email to be like. Hey we're re airing this episode and was like be cool. Be Cool I. I don't think it was cool. You know but hey So if you're oxen gay and you're listening to this. We Adore you If you are not Roxane. Gay and you're listening to this. We hope that you also find some interesting things for yourself in this episode on mentoring on craft and we WanNa talk to you about them. That's right we do and so. Please join us for office hours on Wednesday at three PM Eastern. You can find me and Sarah and our favorite cups of coffee by going profile on linked in hope to see they're happy holiday from the editorial team at linked in. I'm Jessi Hempel and this is Hello Monday. A show about the changing nature of work and how that work is changing us. Roxane gay had her first break out success as a writer when she was forty by then she'd been writing every day for the better part of three decades. I just wrote so much and I was the only one that took myself seriously and I met with quite a lot of rejection and rightly so like looking back at that work. It was not ready for the world but I was ready for the world that I book. That took off for her bad feminist. It made her into a feminist hero. And all the work that she's done since the novels the memoirs the Comic Books. Well they've elevated her to the status of a literary Rockstar Roxanne's writing is on point. She's funny invulnerable powerful. The writing itself is confident. It demands that we take her seriously. She's been interviewed by everyone from Terry Gross. To Trevor Noah. Welcome Roxane Gay but just think a second about the persistence. That's involved in all of the years that came before that success. Think about how you keep it up without giving up what little successes might feel like what the specter of rejection means. That old saying never give up is complicated. The outside world is full of people who will say no before they even consider you or your work agents may never get to your pitch at all you have to believe in yourself or no one else will. Roxanne kept to reading up anyhow. She read in supported other writers. Anyhow and as professor she found ways to reinforce to students that they should take their work seriously to. Here's Roxanne do you write every day right now. I do still right every day. Yes but you know some days. That's three sentences and some days it's five thousand words it just depends the challenging thing about successes writers that the more success you achieve less time you have to write. And I'm pretty much touring constantly so i. I have to write on airplanes and in hotel rooms in airport lounges and Lobbies and green rooms and it can be really challenging to assemble coherent thoughts when nothing is consistent from one day to the next. You have certain confidence about yourself as a writer that is Perhaps it is the backbone to your work it is certainly a wonderful thing to perceive and I wanNA know if you always had that confidence. If writing for you was was was in fact a calling a thing that you always knew. Independent of commercial success was yours. Oh absolutely I've been writing since I was four years old and I have loved writing since I was four years old. I don't know I don't I wouldn't say that I have confidence but I can project confidence. I think that to be a successful writer. You have to project confidence and at some point feel confidence while also grappling with profound insecurity and self loathing. So it's just a question of balancing those things But at the same time you know I have been doing this for a very long time. I've been writing for more than thirty five years. Probably closer to forty years now Even though of course when I was four I was writing what you would expect a four year. Old Right I wasn't the prodigy or anything like that I was writing silly little stories on Napkins But you know I've been writing with WITH WITH. I've been writing with purpose for more than twenty years and so I would hope after that many years and that much practice that I am at least reasonably talented at stringing some sentences together if I wasn't I mean I should really get another hobby. Well who are the people along the way that helped you to embrace that talent and develop it my parents certainly there and very insistent on the TRIFECTA of engineering medicine or law but eventually they learn realized that I was going to do what I was going to do and they. They've always been supportive. If not skeptical It took having a book available in Barnes and noble for them to really realized that I was going to make a go of this writing thing In High School I had a writing teacher named Mr Gwen and he definitely recognized that I had some writing talent and he was actually the first person to tell me to write every day and back then I thought Oh my God. He's giving me this precious piece of advice and he's only telling me and I really felt very special and so from that point on wrote every day and I was like fourteen fifteen years old and of course the older I got the more I realized. Oh like that's a common piece of writing advice But I felt like it was a very special and personalized piece of writing advice so I took it deeply seriously I just wrote so much and I was the only one that took myself seriously and I met with quite a lot of rejection and rightly so like looking back at that work. It was not ready for the world but I was ready for the world and so it just was sheer persistence and a relentless personality that got me through and when I started encountering Commercial Success I definitely had mentor. Tr Jones who shepherded me the way she has shepherded and continues to shepherd. Many young black writers Or rising black writers. I should say and I. It was definitely so important to have that support and to have a model for how to be a writer in public and how to be a writer in private and I will always be grateful to her for her mentorship. So what do you mean she shepherded? You will a lot of times. It was just advice and counsel on how to be how to be a black writer in a world that oftentimes does not take black writers seriously and she always especially early on told me the importance of the black writing community and how we don't have to all get along but in general we are at least in some form or fashion looking out for one another out in the world because we have to if we don't who will and that piece of advice has really stayed with me. Even when I don't like someone I I just think well I'm going to support them in the ways that I can. I don't need to like But more often than not I actually do But just that sense of community and recognizing the importance of community and the importance of sharing the latter's that you climb and build in your career and so the the minute I could. I started to do mentoring for young writers and I will always do that. So it's just she's just a model like she reaches out the minute like a young black writer starts to get on the radar she oftentimes will reach out and just be so kind and so helpful she will call you on the telephone which is a rarity in this day and age you know. She has advised. She gives practical advice. That is incredibly helpful She's just a role model and an amazing writer to you mentioned the difference between public and private and curious what you were getting out there what you need to learn. Oh just you know how to how to be a writer and public how to talk about your work how to talk about the work of other writers things like that an private. You know how to put in the work and how to treat people because it's actually the writing community is big but it's also really small and everybody talks and so it's really important to treat people well and a lot of people forget that and so it's always good to be reminded treat people well and do unto others as you would have done unto you And and that's something that I try to do both publicly and privately and and to to know that and to always be encouraged to do that helps me to be a better person during the period of time in your twenties and early and Mid Thirties when you were writing and you were teaching. I'm curious what your relationship was like and is lake with with the students that you work with. What did they most need from you? Oftentimes with students need is to be told that they can achieve greatness in their own way. They need to be told that they have power. And the ability to wield that power.

writer Roxane gay Roxanne Sarah Jesse producer Trevor Noah Terry Gross Jessi Hempel professor Tr Jones In High School Barnes Mr Gwen
"For Your Reconsideration" Week

Feedback with EarBuds

02:40 min | 5 months ago

"For Your Reconsideration" Week

"This week's theme is for your reconsideration. The curator is Donde from luminary. Here are the podcasts and episodes chosen by Yolanda. Monday's episode comes from metaphysical milkshake and is called. Can you honor indigenous faiths without being a jerk. It's thirty four minutes long in this episode. rainn Wilson Resin Ostlund have one question. How do we honor and embrace embrace indigenous faiths without becoming like Kevin Costner? How can we become more than dilettantes? With dream catchers Kevin Locke is an artist Hoop dancer musician musician. Educator and cultural ambassador for his Lakota an Amish on Beirut's he joined the pod to share what we can do to better understand our indigenous faith traditions and how out to see our spiritual heritage in all the land around us. Join the conversation using Hashtag. Metaphysical an email your thoughts to metaphysical milkshake at soul pancake. GEICO DOT COM. Tuesday's episode comes from on second thought with Trevor Noah and is called prison break. It's forty four minutes long in this episode. Trevor and David David discussed their ideas for improving. Prison then talk about alternatives to incarceration Danielle Sarid founder of common justice. Wednesday's episode comes from from under the skin with Russell brand and his called science capitalism. And God with Neil degrasse Tyson. It's one hundred twenty one minutes long. Here's the description. This week's guest on under the skin is the infamous astrophysicist Neil degrasse Tyson. He's pretty amazing. He was promoting his book letters from an astrophysicist but he was much more than and being a focused and dedicated educator I enjoyed talking to him. Thursday's episode comes from here to slay with Roxane gay and Tracy McMillan Cottam him and his called all. Your faves are problematic. It's fifty three minutes long this week on the show Tracy and Roxanne take on the Popeye's chicken sandwich and all of its glory as well as the problematic takes that have come along with it. Friday's episode comes from the seaward with Lena Dunham and Alison Bennett and is called Lady Rosemary. Aber door it's fifty three minutes long in this episode Rosemary. Obrador seemed to most like a shy awkward wallflower but underneath drab exterior lurked an appetite for Jules parties parties and larceny born into an unassuming middle-class English home rosemary secretly stole thousands of pounds to fund her glamorous identity as titled Aristocracy. That's Lady Lady Aberdeen to you. Lena analyst Cover Rosemary's wild parties outrageous schemes her ultimate downfall and discuss what it's like to feel unseen and unappreciated those are the podcast recommendations chosen by Yolanda for this week's theme for your reconsideration

Neil Degrasse Tyson Lady Rosemary Trevor Noah Yolanda Lady Lady Aberdeen Kevin Costner Cover Rosemary Lena Dunham Rainn Wilson Resin Kevin Locke Geico Beirut Tracy Mcmillan Danielle Sarid Obrador Russell Analyst Jules Roxane Gay David David
"roxane gay" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

08:06 min | 9 months ago

"roxane gay" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"From the editorial team at Lincoln I'm Jessi Hempel and this is hello Monday a show about the changing nature of work and how that work is changing US Brock San Gay had her first breakout success as a writer when she was forty by then she'd been writing everyday for the better part of greenback that work it was not ready for the world but I was ready for the world that first book that took off for bad feminist it made her into a feminist hero and all the work that she's done since the novels the memoirs the Comic Books Well they've elevated her to the status of Literary Rockstar Roxanne's writing is on point she's funny and vulnerable and powerful the writing itself is confident it demands that we take her seriously she's been interviewed by everyone from Terry gross is to Trevor Noah these welcome Roxane gay just think a second about the persistence that's involved in all of the years that came before that success think about how you keep it up without giving up what little successes might feel like what serve rejection means that old saying never give up is complicated the outside world is full of people who will say no before they even consider you your work agents may never get your pitch at all you have to believe in yourself or no one else will Roxanne kept her reading up anyhow she read in supported other writers anyhow and as professor she found ways to reinforce to her students that they should take their work seriously to here's Roxanne do you write every day right now I do still right every day yes but you know some days that's three sentences and some days it's five thousand words it just depends the challenging thing about successes of writers that the more success he would leave the less time you have to write and I'm pretty much touring constantly see oh I have to write on airplanes and in hotel rooms in airport lounges and lobbies and green rooms and it can be really challenging to assemble coherent thoughts when doping is consistent from one day to the next you have a certain confidence about yourself as a writer that is perhaps it is the backbone to your work it is certainly a wonderful thing to perceive and I wanNA know if you always had that confidence if writing for you was was was in fact a calling a thing that you always knew independent of Shaw Success was yours oh absolutely I've been writing since I was four years old and I have loved writing since I was four years old I don't know I don I wouldn't say that I have confidence but I can project confidence I think that to be a successful writer you have to project of confidence and at some point feel confidence while also grappling with profound insecurity and self loathing so I it's just the question of balancing those things but at the same time you know I have been doing this for a very long time I've been writing for more than thirty five years there's probably closer to forty years now even though of course you know when I was four I was reading what you would expect a four year old right I wasn't a prodigy or anything like that I was writing silly little stories on Napkins but you know I've been writing with import with with I've been writing with purpose for it's more than twenty years and so I would hope after that many years and that much practice that I am at least reasonably talented at stringing some sentences together if I wasn't I mean I should really get another hobby who are the people along away that helped you to embrace that talent and develop it my parents certainly there Haitian and very insistent on and Trifecta of engineering medicine or law but eventually they learn realized that I was going to do what I was going to do and they've always been supportive if not skeptical it took having a book available in Barnes and noble for them to really realize that I was going to be go of this writing thing in high school I had a writing teacher named Mr mcguigan and he definitely recognized that I had some writing talent and he was actually the first person the told me to write every day and back then I thought Oh my God he's giving me this precious piece of advice and he's only telling me and I really felt very special and so from that point on I wrote every day I was like fourteen fifteen years old and of course the older I got the more I realized Oh like that's a common piece of writing advice but I felt like it was a very special and personalized piece of writing advice so I took it deeply seriously I just wrote so much I was the only one that took myself seriously and I met with quite a lot of rejection and at least so like looking back at that work it was not ready for the world but I was ready for the world and so it just was sheer persistence and a relentless this personality that got me through and when I started encountering Commercial Success I definitely had a mentor tr Jones who shepherded me the way she has shepherded in continues to shepherd many young black writers are rising black writers I should say and I it was definitely so important to have that support and to have a model for how to be a writer in public and how to be a writer in private and I will always be great fold to her for her mentorship so what do you mean she shepherded you will a lot of times it was just advice and counsel on how to be how to be a black writer in a world that oftentimes does not take black writers asli and she always especially early on told me the importance of the black writing community and how we don't have to all get along but in general will we are at least in some form or fashion looking out for one another out in the world because we have to if we don't who will and that piece of advice has really stayed with me even when I don't like someone I I just think well going to support them in the ways that I can I don't need to like them but more of not I actually do the minute I could I started to do mentoring for young writers and I will always do that so out and just be so kind and so helpful she will call you on the telephone which is a rarity in this day and age you know she has advised she gives practical the advice that is incredibly helpful she's just a role model and an amazing.

Lincoln Jessi Hempel Brock San Gay US four years fourteen fifteen years thirty five years twenty years forty years four year one day
"roxane gay" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"roxane gay" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Like, the I always that first moment when I get a really good Email where I just think. And then five minutes later. I'm like, how am I going to top this? So it's it's a lot. How do you keep pushing through that sense of it not being enough or do you want to? I would like to I would like to get to a place where I understand what satisfaction. Feels like where I think. Okay, I've done enough for today for this week for this life. But I mean, you could say that right now, objectively, I don't know. Really? Bad. How high the bars today the bar is very high. I don't know that anyone could ever reached the bar. So I'm working on lowering the bar and just being comfortable with mediocrity. Yeah. Let's see how long that lasts. In the New York Times review of your book difficult, women, the author declares what constitutes a difficult woman for Roxane gay. He's easy by the third day. One of her troubled troublesome narrators tells us we've already slept together twice. I'm not a hard sell. She's also, needy moody and above all unpredictable, which makes her dangerous when I read that. I thought that doesn't really sound like the definition of difficult to me. And I'm wondering if we could talk a little bit about why that even is something that is posited as difficult. It sounds interesting. It does sound interesting. I think anytime a woman demonstrates any amount of personality self actualization or free will we're like, oh this bitch is fucking difficult. And that's really frustrating because we have these very limiting. Categories into which we like to put women and contain them. So anytime, you try and get out of those categories. You start to create problems. And so it's interesting, and I don't think it's actually difficult. But I do think we are considered difficult in those circumstances. And so especially in difficult women, I was trying to explore what are the circumstances in which a woman is behaving in a completely rational normal way, and is considered difficult, and we see that over and over and over again, whether it be Serena Williams, whether it'd be Hillary Clinton, and you've said that you want characters to do bad things and get away with their misdeeds. Yes. You you want characters to think a glee thoughts and make a glee decisions you want characters to make mistakes and put themselves I without apologizing for it. And as I was reading those lines. I was wishing that I could be a person like that. Like that is the definition of for me what a happy woman looks like. And I'm wondering if there was any projection in those lines for yourself too. Because it really does sound like the perfect woman. Well, thank you. I am the perfect woman. Ha she said she was easy. I mean, my fiction is indeed fiction it is made up. But there's always a lot of wishful thinking. And I wish I could do this. I wish I could behave in this way. I wish I could say this without consequence. But you could I mean good, but there are always consequences. And so I think about consequences in this goes back to of course, carrying about the approval of others. And so oftentimes, especially in difficult women. Those women are doing the kinds of things that I think a lot of women would love to do if they were freed from the constraints of womanhood in the world as it is in say about film and the characters in the hunger games, you wrote for the rumpus, which is also in your essay collection bed feminist you rate. I am fascinated by strengthened women. People tend to think I'm strong. I'm not and yet what happens after the end yet. And yet here I am still standing..

Serena Williams Hillary Clinton New York Times five minutes
"roxane gay" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"roxane gay" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"What will you create today? Debbie millman is joined today by very very special guest of bad as fuck feminist woman. This professor editor social commentator writer internet gangster. Fellow Haitian American Roxane gay. So. Wanna bring MS Debbie millman and MS Roxanne gates to the stage. Welcome to on air fest. Y'all. That was a pretty bad as interview, I was I feel super introduced. And. Yeah, I'm an internet gangster on Twitter. Well, actually, I think that the gangster part Mike go a little bit further back. I understand that in your high school yearbook. There's a note from girl who wrote I like, you even though you are very mean. So we're you really mean in high school. Why? No idea what you're talking about. Yes. No. I wasn't. I was really shy and awkward, but apparently my memory of myself and people's memories of me are very different things. And I do remember probably my sophomore year or so I developed a mean streak, and it wasn't bullying or anything like that. But if I had something biting to say, I said it I had no filter. You remember any of the more biting things, you might have done. No. I don't think God absolve myself of all of those sins conveniently so I don't remember what I said. Now, you've stated that in many ways like ability is very elaborate lie of performance a code of conduct dictating the proper way to be left to our own devices. Do you think that we're all really diabolical deep down inside Roxanne? I hope so. I genuinely hope so no, I don't think we're all diabolical deep down inside. But I think we have imperfections and dark MRs inside of us and some of us are better at hiding them than others. But I never trust. Anyone who seems perfect and incredibly likeable and incredibly nights? I always just think what's going on under there. So all of the HGTV hose. Anyone who appears on a hallmark channel movie, Kelly Ripa? Yes, I just think no offense to Kelly. We love her. No, just whenever I see these people in this performance of niceness. I just think my God, you are probably the cruelest person alive. And so I think it's more healthy when we at least knowledge those parts of ourselves, and I think maturity is knowing when to release that and when not to and so hopefully, I have since high school matured at least a bit except on Twitter. A what? What are you trying to say we'll get to that? You quoted Lionel Shriver in an essay for the financial times about the notion of liking, and he states this liking business has two components moral approval, and defection, and I'm wondering how much do you feel the need for the approval of others? Oh, I feel great deal like any good self loathing writer. All I want is approval. I think it comes from being Catholic and oh, yeah. And just like expecting the priests to listen to your confessions. And then hopefully telling you, oh, you did fewer sins this week. Good job. I never heard. But no, I do I think like many people care too much about what other people think and seek the approval of others, which is one of the reasons I think I worked so hard. It's just thinking. Okay. My finally good enough. Am I finally doing enough to earn my keep in this world? Do you think you'll ever feel that it isn't it? I would like to think so. But I don't know has it changed as you've gotten more successful the more successful. I get the less successful. I feel why. Because I keep moving the bar for myself. I keep telling myself, oh, this is not enough or that was luck. Or that was a fluke, and I never really allow myself to enjoy any accolade or rest on my laurels. So to speak, not even for a moment..

Kelly Ripa Debbie millman Twitter writer Lionel Shriver MS Roxanne gates professor HGTV Mike editor
"roxane gay" Discussed on Bitch Sesh: A Real Housewives Breakdown

Bitch Sesh: A Real Housewives Breakdown

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"roxane gay" Discussed on Bitch Sesh: A Real Housewives Breakdown

"And you're never going to go in jeopardy, but why don't you on jeopardy? I know I would be your. Pretty going fire. Make a blade all no, I'm really not going to. I even though sometimes I watch it. And I just think maybe I should build a home for it to my grudge. Maybe I'm gonna recommend three quake shows just catching up on fleabag. I'd never seen. It's amazing British show. And then I'm watching Amy sedaris to show on TV her at home with Amy says amazing and puts documentary that everybody's been watching just watch it. So horrifying about the parents who allow their daughter to be kidnapped twice. I've heard about this. I haven't seen it yet continue onto anything for you to recommend this new podcast called the dropout. And it's basically about this woman who invented this basically blood testing technology, and it was all of fraud. Oh my God. There's a book called bad blood. I think it's based on that same. It's a book with home. Yes. It's been obsessed with her out seven, Jay. You have to read it's super compelling. It's this whole book about this thing, she's afraid of pinpricks, and she's like I want to invent a machine where you can do all the blood tests from prick of blood. Now, anyone who's gotten a blood test knows that they fill multiple vile with milliliters of blood and this girl was like, no, she has no background. She dropped out of Stanford. She's had maybe three science classes in her life and got a billion dollars in investments. Henry Kissinger on the board of her company theranos. Yes, there are now hairy I will read that book. And there's no there was a podcast. It's called the dropout. And I'm like, four episodes. And then I'm river, Ted. Oh, I'm done in plain sight abducted in plain sight. Yeah. Yeah. I think y'all should be. I mean, Jordan should be on the show to she has great tattoos. You really do too. Allow Jordan contains I would also like to plug Roxanne's book recently that you edited which one not that bad again. I know it's been out for almost a year. May so. Edited. And put it together a bunch of topless share of twenty not that bad, and it was edited by Roxane gay and estimating book. And I think everyone should go out and and buy it or download it tear kindle this American short stories twenty team get it. Yes. Please. Please. Thank you so much rock sand. This is so pleaded and all the best ways me too. This is my favorite podcast. I don't listen to podcasts. But this one I do use. That means everything it really does. Thank you. You're welcome. Thank you. Thanks. Thanks case. Thanks, jordan. No, don't talk to her. Yes. But I wanna like talk about the problems. I want to talk about an issue. But I can I say also you look. I'm and I'm Charles, and this is the problem with Charlie. The problem with Charles Casey each week against will bring us a problem. They're having their life while we unpack it reflect on it. And generally talk shit. I season we'll be helping solve the problems of guests like Louie Anderson. I wanted retribution because I'm from a big family. So you have to the person don't you don't you have to get back people sometime. Jessica Williams, I'm gonna laugh at your jokes. Now that I'm gonna cry when I leave. And Chelsea Peretti as comedy podcast, kind of actually didn't know it goes in and out. It's really really effortlessly funny listened to the problem with Charlton Casey starting Monday, April. I only on your will..

Jordan Amy sedaris Charles Casey Chelsea Peretti Henry Kissinger Louie Anderson Charlton Casey Stanford Jessica Williams fraud kindle Roxane gay Jay Ted Roxanne Charlie billion dollars
"roxane gay" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"roxane gay" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"New York Times bestselling author Roxane gay chatted about identifying his by after identifying as lesbian how do you identify? I don't know. I do. Yeah. Like, I think that's what I thought. That's why I mean, he, I'm bisexual. I am. I just can't stand men which is. Funny. I guess but. Let's see. Yeah. No. When I was nineteen I came out as gay and then had it which was fine. And then I had a many years where I was just a strictly quickly. And then I don't know. I I realized oh, I'm probably bisexual somewhere in my late twenties. And now, I'm still bisexual. But honestly, it would take an act of God ah for me to take them over again. We'll we'll talk about that don't worry. But I feel like the narrative like the prevailing narrative in society is that if there's any movement between those things this is what we were. This is what we are sold is not what our lives are like that that like bisexuality can be expanded into full on gay like when I remember growing up like that's what I was taught as like. Yeah. Bisexuality is stop on the road to gay in it for you to have that experience inverse. What was that like to change your identity in a way that we don't like I don't hear that many stories? It was weird because I was very uncomfortable. With the fact that I was attracted to men and. I also just thought what a betrayal of everything I believe in two aknowledge this thing. And I I had a hard time with it. And this was at a time when it wasn't where there was an like pan sexuality was not a thing that people discussed, and I feel like sexuality and sexual identity with a lot more rigid than it is today. So I had a hard hard time with it. And for a long time. I just didn't admit it. And then, you know, the older I get the less. I care what people think, and so the older I get it's easier to admit certain things, and to be honest about who I am and what I want and that has been very Frene. Congrats thanking grads on that feeling. That's a positive is a good feeling. It is a good feeling. And it also turns out that it wasn't like nobody really cares. People. Just, you know, do what you want to do and be. Good to other humans and in general. I think if you. Just moved through the world treating people as well as you can it's okay to have shifts in who you are. Or what you want and people will accept that. Right. I mean, I find that. And you kind of said this how you describing it like the person who arguably is having the hardest time with that is is you has like you said you. You just said the wording, but like felt like you got rid of all your ideals, or like, it went against what you thought what were those things that felt like a challenge specifically just accepting that I was attracted to men when men had treated me so horribly and like where I had all this trauma around men. I just thought like what is wrong with me that I'm still attracted to men, and that really was a very hard thing..

Roxane gay New York Times
"roxane gay" Discussed on Mostly Lit Podcast

Mostly Lit Podcast

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"roxane gay" Discussed on Mostly Lit Podcast

"Downside i had couple of does in my back garden put in front of my house put loads of books on it and for okay people are going to come and do this i'll come back in our and i'll see which books people have taken from i came akao the books are going to fucking chairs going oh lifted up the wow around up chatted to rain as well yeah anyway what everybody read i'm bidding difficult women by roxane gay and it's my it's been my complain companion and i love short stories as well because i don't know i feel that my attention span is just not you know it's just really wayne in is not as strong as it was which is really disappointing i'm trying to get it back i'm trying to do various sizes to get about but while of got my short attention span this is perfect did you get that instant gratification of like the beginning middle and the end chunk that moment and then you kind of get get a like the way she gets to the heart of things and she bites by about gretchen difficult subjects which is your favorite story all gosh i am night no no no no the so many i that's hard that's hard for me this this one i think it's called i am in hi she repeats unlock through it i think it's called all the so many the so many have you go to the the leaking one where everywhere she goes like a leaky the wards follows apple yeah i love that the i love you too and i was like we had a big discussion about what is the war signify always signifies administration right that's good but then i saw an interview roxane gay of the my friend point out she'll just like how to leak in my roof one day and i wanted to rabbi obviously don't believe right when they say that maybe something subconscious that i thought about weights like the no the night heaviness will you know like you know in the same way that like depression can follow you like something of the worldly can like like settle on you and you can't get rid of it that's what i thought obviously she just had a leak.

roxane gay gretchen apple one day
"roxane gay" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"roxane gay" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Yes so we'll no visually i really like like i want to see all the contract killer chest smooth yeah yeah yeah yeah that's standards are meant they have to be impeccable like for women whatever day we are on the same bill yeah we really have the same a united nations for women come to me i will do all kinds of things to you or for you but with men like no you're gonna have to be top point five percents i'm gonna have to be like literally the most beautiful man in the world and you're going to need to be rich sure i mean well you can find that person here in los angeles it turns out they're here they're allowed to day exists but those people here don't take people fine sure yes i mean i'm unsure who who those people due date i i don't know in fact when i was at minneapolis airport last night because i missed my connection because my original flight was delayed the whole thing i was listening to an older white man who was also flying to l a talking about breaking up with his girlfriend and he was like i will spend the next twenty years alone because i'm not going to have anyone dictate to me how i should feel and how i should do this and how do that nothing bro have you never been in a functional release he was just so vehement and i was like you know what ninety year old it's good you need to ride out the rest of this journey on your own just to have a good circle of friends well to prepare you for your job at u s c me allow me to tell you that the folks that you're looking for that don't that have maybe been in a functional relationship all live in my neighborhood suggest why don't you live over.

los angeles minneapolis twenty years ninety year
"roxane gay" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"roxane gay" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"I mean everybody has something different and they are going to have a specific aesthetic that is going to shape how they teach the class and that's important so it's great but yeah yeah well i mean i hear that and i you know you also have to you don't have to take on the burden of of being the person i there are plenty of wonderful people out there doing the work i just you know when i look at purdue in particular i do hope that when i leave that they hire another black woman and ideally a queer woman i think you said that microphone it just has to pass it is on record kasa you've put now maybe if someone at usc wants to hire me that'd be cool i'm fine with that well especially writing you know i think about everything that you just said and then i think about writing and i think about somebody who's arrived at college having gone through the american high school system which over represents white men as authors and so there's a chance that that person is arriving at your door you know or arriving in that department as an undergrad or then even as a graduate student without like a full understanding of who has contributed to this field in the past so they think they know the literary canon but they only know of a very narrow slice of the cannon and that's the cabin that has been historically prioritized and you know unlike some people i do think the cannon matters and that there are things to learn from it but it's not the only thing we should be teaching our students and we also have to interrogate why the cannon is predominantly white men because they were the only ones who were allowed access to education and who are encouraged to share their stories and so you know it's it's not a thing that is neutral and that's the most important thing to recognize when talking about that.

purdue usc graduate student american high school
"roxane gay" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"roxane gay" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"This one black friend yes and like who like how did those people meet each other because it's never it's never clear like what this group of friends is why that black person knows zero other black people like i'm i would like to know more about their backs tomorrow did you guys go to overland that's just that's the extent of their friend group and then they know those people's parents you know like but that's just how television has been building up until now so then we're shifting the lens it turns out like you're saying a movie can like kind of just told the story of that movie i think that group of people yes we will have truly achieve success in terms of representation when marginalize creators are allowed to create niche products totally that's what's so amazing about insecure insecure is very specific and it was it specific in the way girls was specific and we need more of that it does that it's not the sort of universal mainstream network appeal kinds of shows like blackish which i love in which i think is actually incredible and a lot more nuanced than people realize and fresh off the boat which again has that universal appeal but also specific but you know when we see more easter raise getting production deals in getting to really create niche products will be great and when we see more people like kevin kline who wrote crazy rich asians getting these development deals to create like a very specific story that doesn't have to speak to everyone but when there's more than just one like that's going to be true success and i look forward to that day.

kevin kline
"roxane gay" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"roxane gay" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"All right you listened to me be scattered i'm standing in a closet with a drum kit because the podcast recording that i just did was amazing and we went just a few minutes over so now even a drum kit closet today's guest roxane gay roxanne is a terrific writer she's a great person to follow on twitter also that's beside the point but roxanne's book bad feminist is was huge hit and also something that i really loved and i also have reading roxanne's work in new york times amongst other places so please enjoy this conversation with the amazing roxane gay feelin still no no no careless i'm on a whole vibe today have you super visited no i landed at two in the morning at elliot good gravy yes so i've been up for a while but i this is my first thing of the day so well no i had to meet with my trainer so it's my second thing but that was well it was sitting but well thanks for starting your thanks for starting your day the right way i'm very positive i i have a better day definitely i'm going to be like a human coffee for you crank just my natural state all right you know what i do on this show is i have folks introduced themselves so would you mind saying who you are an introducing yourself yes my name is roxanne gay there it is it is sometimes folks have like a have a follow up i like that you.

writer twitter roxanne new york roxane
"roxane gay" Discussed on Bitch Sesh: A Real Housewives Breakdown

Bitch Sesh: A Real Housewives Breakdown

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"roxane gay" Discussed on Bitch Sesh: A Real Housewives Breakdown

"Wow last week last few weeks have been a quarrel print a whirlwind i this podcast we came my whole life and that's not the rank i will say that our guest from last week roxane gay won a guggenheim fellowship this week yeah we're she's for real but i of course make this about us we're for real we're legit when someone we've had on our podcast we've begged to come on our podcast has has won a guggenheim fellowship do you think our discussion about lala pushed her over it said like she wanted in like novel right so yes yes that's for sure yes i'm very proud of impressed everything so that's cool i have to say that i really am serious when i say that interview was highlight for me me too you know who's very happy with it our lord and savior miss june diane feel yes who you know is we'll give fearless feedback here the most fearless of feedback and i was craving her approval i'm not going to lie i'm solutely i mean roxane gay is her northstar she's such a huge fan of hers in you know we call the right when we got mcardle break it down and she listened and new i think she said tinos she really loved it and that was really special i didn't know she was trying to worm her way into do a sister wives off shoe night meet her accent she's like well danielle doesn't listen to sister kinda you right cutting you right out of sister wives in y'all.

guggenheim fellowship lala roxane gay mcardle danielle
"roxane gay" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"roxane gay" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"But i just couldn't possibly be v marvels so i just thought maybe it's like a little tiny upstart parisian marvel bakery then my editor will maas emailed me from marvel any third tallahassee gave me your email address let's do this thing and his email was up marvel dot com i i typed in marble dot com to see if it was the real marvel and it was the real marvel hull and the the knows knows it it oh holy shit then it was fun a what's different about it the collaborative nature of in that you work with an artist in so you're just one cobb in the process it's actually really been useful for me and refreshing to not have it all on my shoulders and so i write the story and then the artist does the mine drawings and then there's an anchor and a letter and just watching each issue come together was really really satisfying and my editor will moss was super helpful because i didn't know anything about this universe i need a new who black panther was but i didn't know about the marble cannon and so sometimes i would write story lines that could not have happened because the avengers were in new york at that time or something and he would always know and i would just be like how did you know that it's a it was thrilling to work with people who are so passionate about what they do at an idea that and also it my regular books publishing people regardless of.

editor maas cobb new york marvel moss
"roxane gay" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"roxane gay" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"About eating exercise and therapy even though i'm forty two and i have health insurance and a brain so i'm and i also like i wrote the book and i am capable of handling all of these things on my own like a man from washington actually named mark and so if he's here emailed me and he said you know if you exercise three days a week you'll be really useful and i was like did you not read my book i exercise all the time like what are you talking about and it just like basic ask rice like a woman in canada emailed me and said that she would give me a gift worth one hundred dollars canadian if i went vegan for three months and lost weight and remarks for a one hundred dollars canadian he gets better and if i win vegan for three months and did not lose weight i had to send her a hundred and fifty dollars that was like the incentive now is just like bitch what and i wrote her back a very nasty email and she responded very nastily she was hurt both like you should be heard i was trying to hurt you it's funny because i feel like the intimacy the sometimes like false assumed intimacy of twitter and the internet is compounded by when people here you talk about topics and i think fat mrs one trauma is another that they associate with such shame that they would only talk about them with people they feel very close to that when you talk about them they feel now like you and they know each other absolutely and so you get this kind of let me talk to you as a friend because now we know each other absolutely and i think women writers free says quite a law that when you write about the personal people don't think we're friends and that you're there to comfort them or be their best friend and we're not friends are like all of you sure but you don't know me you know what i allowed you to know about me and it's really important to understand that boundary people have no boundaries when it comes to women writers like all the time people say can i hug you and i'm like no.

washington mark canada twitter one hundred dollars three months fifty dollars three days