35 Burst results for "Rowe"

Ryan Bomberger: Pres. Biden Has Become Radicalized on Abortion

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:49 sec | Last week

Ryan Bomberger: Pres. Biden Has Become Radicalized on Abortion

"As I recall, president Trump was the first sitting president to attend the march for life. Highly unlikely that President Biden will be attending, huh? Yeah, I don't think so. But we had to keep in mind president Biden years ago when the rotors came out, he actually said, Rowe went too far. That a husband and a man should play a role in that decision as well. He's become so radicalized on abortion. We have to keep in mind if the Democrat party that are the extremist on abortion, allowing that violence to happen through the entire pregnancy, including partial birth abortion. So we have to remember who the extremists are. And so sadly, President Biden will not be leading any kind of rally here in D.C. promoting the value of every human life, but there will be plenty of Americans who will be. You're

President Biden President Trump Rowe Democrat Party D.C.
Mike Rowe: Why 'Dirty Jobs' Is Still Relevant

The Dan Bongino Show

01:38 min | Last month

Mike Rowe: Why 'Dirty Jobs' Is Still Relevant

"Here's why dirty jobs is still relevant Here's why it's still on the air 20 years later When I jumped on the call I heard you said something about Twitter and the latest Twitter files and so forth And the other night I'm sure you saw this People posting videos of their day at work Their day at Twitter Their day had Facebook where you see meditation pods and 5 star meals and encounters Sessions And long walks in rooftop gardens And I think you know I mean God bless great You know if that's a job and you got it and you're happy I'm happy for you but I think one of the things our country has become disconnected from is a reasonable definition of what work looks like And when I watched dirty jobs last night I watched a couple reruns and then I watched the premiere And modesty aside man I'm so proud of that show Not just because it was dedicated to my pop But because I really believe right now when I look at those TikTok videos of those pardon me but those ridiculous people showing what looks like work And then I compare it to the father son pool cleaner I introduced the country to last night And the soap recyclers And the pile jackets and the truck drivers We need reminders of what work really is And I Forrest come to my way into a show that does that And I really appreciate the kind words then because our country needs it now More than ever

Twitter Facebook Forrest
Mike Rowe: Honoring Carl Noble

The Dan Bongino Show

01:34 min | Last month

Mike Rowe: Honoring Carl Noble

"Carl noble was my granddad Dirty jobs for mirrored last night been on the air for 20 years now That show was a tribute to my pop Carl noble you don't know him not by name anyway but he's the kind of guy that you and I think a lot of your listeners will relate to He built the house that I was born in without a blueprint The only went to the 7th grade he was a he was a genius man He was a magician He could take your watch apart put it back together blindfolded He could fix or repair anything from a combine to a combustion engine Dirty jobs was a tribute to him you know because guys like that are still around but people don't People don't really see them anymore They just kind of look through them Anyway dirty jobs led to a foundation called micro works I run it today We give away a couple million bucks a year and work ethic scholarships That was a tribute to Carl noble You only had daughters His name died with him so a dirty jobs came back I found the best whisky I could I put his name on it and I've been selling it to raise money for the micro works foundation for the last year And that's how it happens And it turned out to be something more than a fundraiser People seem to like it So I'm getting it on shelves I'm shipping it to the states that will allow me to ship it because as you know Dan some states are so incredibly backward They don't permit this kind of commerce But we do what we can in these divided times

Carl Noble Micro Works Foundation DAN
Mike Rowe: A Real Value for Handmade Versus Automated Objects

The Dan Bongino Show

01:59 min | Last month

Mike Rowe: A Real Value for Handmade Versus Automated Objects

"And I'd love to get your take on that going forward You're seeing that now No one wants automated crap When you see handmade now you're going to see more of that in the future I think there's going to be a real value on the creativity that craftsmen puts into his work in the future It's a pendulum Dan And it has to swing by definition too far the other way before we realize what we've lost My take on it starts with Scott glass We took shot class out of high school back in the early mid 70s and through the 80s By the time we got to the 90s it was gone And we didn't just we didn't just take shop class out overnight It was a process And the process started with the language And you're old enough to remember back in the day It wasn't called shop It was called the vocational arts And the first thing we did was we took the art out of the vocation Then we abbreviated it to vote tech And whenever you abbreviate something you're one step away And then we change the name of the shop And then we walk it out behind the barn and we shot it in the head And that's how we got shot glass on a high school Well you know any time you take the art out of a thing you diminish it in ways that aren't necessarily readily apparent and ways that don't necessarily reflect in the transaction of the thing In other words we traded in the artistry for the mass produced reality of the deals we made as a result of getting in the global economy And bit by bit like a frog in the boiling water we woke up one day and realized all our stuff was crap I didn't have to go to Batman standing with Tim Allen once and we were standing backstage having the same conversation and he got so incensed He got so angry because he wanted to take his broken blender apart and show his grandkid how to put it back together

Scott Glass Tim Allen Batman
Mike Rowe: Two Different Houses on the Same Street With Dan Bongino

The Dan Bongino Show

01:05 min | Last month

Mike Rowe: Two Different Houses on the Same Street With Dan Bongino

"I've been on every show on Fox I've done every interview I think a guy can do And I hadn't done yours And when you posted a picture of you and me I guess it was on your Instagram after we finally met I heard from I heard from 6 cops who are all Friends I heard from my friend Dave hinman who is a federal Marshall who freaking loves you dude Thank you I heard from Clint hill the man who guarded Secret Service Yeah So gosh What you're doing and what I'm doing are basically two different houses on the same street but it starts with giving credit where it's due and just Tapping the country on the shoulder as you do so well and say hey America not for nothing But what about him What about her Thank you What about this That's one of the best compliments Jim's watching me on Skype yeah I'm blushing like a kid here because I so admire your work So that means more than you know We're talking

Dave Hinman Clint Hill FOX Marshall America Skype JIM
Mike Rowe: Connection Starts by Appreciating What We Can't Do

The Dan Bongino Show

01:31 min | Last month

Mike Rowe: Connection Starts by Appreciating What We Can't Do

"You celebrate those silent voices out there I try to Dan And look here's the thing that I think we're beginning to realize The conversation about work and the definition of a good job has been relegated historically to labor and management The boss and the employee the employee and the employer And we tend to look at the whole world as this binary back and forth the whole world of work The truth is the real conversation begins with the appreciation that you just articulated You are a guy who is aware of the fact that the table your microphone is sitting upon was made by somebody who you haven't met but who you nevertheless rely upon And if we don't have an underlying and fundamental appreciation for things like that well then we're just not going to be impressed when we flick the switch and the lights come on or we flush the toilet and the crap goes away These are miracles And now people are beginning to realize holy crap You're telling me I got to wait three days for a plumber 5 days for an electrician a week for heating and air conditioning How long do I have to wait for the guy to make the table that my microphone goes on Yes We're all connected And that connection starts with a fundamental appreciation not for the stuff that we do but for the stuff we can't do That's what dirty jobs is about

DAN
Mike Rowe: We Need a Reminder of What Work Really Is

The Dan Bongino Show

02:00 min | Last month

Mike Rowe: We Need a Reminder of What Work Really Is

"You've become kind of the face of manual labor in this country People who build stuff who make stuff who use their creative endeavors to put stuff on shelf And every time I think of you I think of this story I was going into host of morning show with WAL Mike And I'm on I 95 It's 3 o'clock in the morning and I see all these truckers on the side of the road and I'm thinking gosh these guys are sleeping in their trucks to make sure all that stuff you think magically appears on your shelves gets here by met These guys are doing it They're the people actually built this place and make it work Here's why dirty jobs is still relevant Here's why it's still on the air 20 years later When I jumped on the call I heard you said something about Twitter and the latest Twitter files and so forth And the other night I'm sure you saw this People posting videos of their day at work Their day at Twitter Their day had Facebook where you see meditation pods and 5 star meals and encounters Sessions And long walks in rooftop gardens And I think you know I mean God bless great you know If that's a job and you got it and you're happy I'm happy for you but I think one of the things our country has become disconnected from is a reasonable definition of what worked looks like And when I watched dirty jobs last night I watched a couple reruns and then I watched the premiere And modesty aside man I'm so proud of that show Not just because it was dedicated to my pop but because I really believe right now when I look at those TikTok videos of those pardon me but those ridiculous people showing what looks like work And then I compare it to the father son pool cleaner I introduced the country to last night And the soaked recyclers and the pile jackets and the truck drivers We need reminders of what worked really is

Twitter WAL Mike Facebook
Mike Rowe: The Story Behind Knobel Spirits

The Dan Bongino Show

01:57 min | Last month

Mike Rowe: The Story Behind Knobel Spirits

"Let me say first you sent me a sample of this Tennessee whisky It's noble spirits dot com It's knob K and OBL spirits dot com the oval spears dot com Folks go there pick it up It makes a great gift and you know why Mike it makes a great gift because I can bring it over to Mike rose house and share it with Mike Tell me about this first before you get to some other stuff It's delicious Thank you for sending me the bottle I deeply appreciate it It is fantastic Tell me a little bit about it Full disclosure when you told me that everybody loved me at the patriot awards you know there may have been some drinking involved so I'm not going to hold it A little bit And Jim my producer was there And he's listening he can vouch There was a little bit of alcohol involved But go ahead Hey Carl noble was my granddad Dirty jobs premiered last night than on the air for 20 years now That show was a tribute to my pop Carl noble you don't know him not my name anyway but he's the kind of guy that you and I think a lot of your listeners will relate to He built the house that I was born in without a blueprint The only went to the 7th grade he was a he was a genius man He was a magician He could take your watch apart put it back together blindfolded He could fix or repair anything from a combine to a combustion engine Dirty jobs was a tribute to him You know because guys like that are still around but people don't People don't really see them anymore You know they just kind of look through them Anyway dirty jobs led to a foundation called micro works I run it today We give away a couple million bucks a year and work ethic scholarships That was a tribute to Carl noble You only had daughters His name died with him so a dirty jobs came back I found the best whisky I could I put his name on it and I've been selling it to raise money for the micro works foundation

Carl Noble Mike Rose Mike Tennessee JIM Micro Works Foundation
Mike Rowe: Employment Numbers by Democrats Miss Key Data

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:32 min | 2 months ago

Mike Rowe: Employment Numbers by Democrats Miss Key Data

"On to say that we've been focusing on the wrong thing. We look at the unemployment numbers and guys, there's a real unemployment number and there's a basically a fake unemployment number, I shouldn't say fake unemployment number, but there's the U three and the U 6. I'm gonna forget everything that in entails right now, but basically the U 6 number, which is the real unemployment number, which is what we used to calculate. It encompasses everything from people that have discouraged workers. People that have lost lost their jobs completely. The discourage workers, like I said, they moved out of just left the job force, got discouraged. Maybe they went to look for another job, but they're temporarily out of the job force. And it would count those people that moved from full-time to part time. So you had three facets there. All right? So the people that just left were completely get discouraged, we're not even counting at this point. I believe that's what they would the categorize these people as. So when the Democrat party tries to pretend as if the unemployment numbers are great. Guys, we are still feeling jobs. We're still feeling jobs that were absolutely an utterly destroyed during the pandemic. And I should say, I was gonna say as a result of the pandemic, but actually as a result of the lockdowns. Because the left totally destroyed this economy. And I believe they did it intentionally. But I think as a result of that, we're seeing manhood being totally destroyed in America.

Democrat Party America
Mike Rowe: 7 Million Men Are Choosing Not to Work

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:03 min | 2 months ago

Mike Rowe: 7 Million Men Are Choosing Not to Work

"And I continue to quote. And I mean, last week, there was an article in The New York Times called something like how to combat the assault on modern work. And I thought it was going to be an article about coal miners or crab fishermen. You know those tough guys, this is me going out of the quote like deadly catch stuff like that. Or you know big tough jobs where the danger is real micro says. It wasn't. It was an article about everything from paper cuts to the non existent pet bereavement policies that are being deemed harsh. And he says, I'm not making this stuff up. And so we are, we're in a place where 7 million able bodied men are not only not working between the ages of 25 and up 7 million able bodied men are not only not working, they're affirmatively not looking for a job. That's never happened in peacetime. He says, ever.

The New York Times
Mike Rowe: Screens Cause Men to Be Soft and Lazy

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:50 min | 2 months ago

Mike Rowe: Screens Cause Men to Be Soft and Lazy

"Mike Rowe was recently on Tucker Carlson's show. They were at the patriot. I believe it's called the patriot awards yes it is for Fox. And micro was interviewed by Tucker Carlson. And I just want to go through some of the things that Mike rose said to kind of set the tone. And I really do think this is important. And the more that I think about this, there's always when it comes to politics, there's always micro issues. There's symptoms and there's always a greater disease at play. And I think the denigration of manhood in America has become a huge problem. And we're seeing it play out in politics if you, if you just look at it. All right? So Mike Rogan, he was on Tucker Carlson's show. And Tucker Carlson obviously was interviewing him and Mike wrote to Tucker Carlson that the man in this country they're becoming soft and lazy and he says that's in part due to how much time these men are spending on their screens. I want to get into some of the specifics of what Mike rose said, but I think we all can relate to that. Listen, I spend a lot of time on my phone screen. I spend tons of time on my computer screen. I'm not looking to be influenced, though. I'm looking to search for, you know, news stories, headlines, and to be able to do a show like this or to be able to do my own show. To be able to do my podcast, by the way, check out my podcast the Carl Jackson show dot com Salem podcast network dot com or wherever you get your podcasts. And you can follow me on social media. The Carl Jackson show. But here's what Mike Rowe had to say to Tucker Carlson. So he said, so I'm wrong about I'm quoting, obviously, so I'm wrong about as much as I am right. And it's for that reason. I hate to say, I told you so.

Tucker Carlson Mike Rose Mike Rowe Mike Rogan Carl Jackson FOX America Mike
"rowe" Discussed on The Emma Guns Show

The Emma Guns Show

09:04 min | 2 months ago

"rowe" Discussed on The Emma Guns Show

"So we're talking about the bombardment of advertising that makes people think, well, I can get it, but I can't afford it, so I'm going to go and take it. And people do do that. Not everybody, but I agree with you. I think social media is a force for good, but it's also a force for bad because people live their lives in an unreal world and their expectations are that they can have what other people have, but they can't. And I also agree with you in that, you know, people never talk about their journey through the graph that they put in as you say, Emma, to get them what they want. Because things are not cheap, you know, we're living in a really tough time at the moment. But I don't know, sometimes I think that, you know, you can be content with what you already have. I think you can be, you know, just the successful having good health as opposed to having the 100,000 pound handbag or the designer genes. And we all want that. We all like it, but I think there comes a point in life when you reach an age when you think those things don't matter anymore. And I think the younger generations and I hesitate to say that because it's also everybody. They're told that having the latest designer trainers or being as cool as the idol that they idolize is what they should be aspiring to and that's wrong. I think another thing that really stood out for me, particularly about you and I had, I'm sure you were aware of John mcavoy. Yes. He came on the podcast a couple of years ago. And they're both incredible stories of redemption and what is so wonderful about both of them. Is you could have been defined by the time that you spend in prison. And I think what you do with your podcast is excellent as well. John said something on the podcast that's really stayed with me. It's as you can't be it unless you see it. Which is so, so true, and I think what you do so brilliantly is platform those stories where people perhaps have had a past that would condemn them to be thought of as a bad person or a bad apple in society. And you show that these stories can come good. So you've had people who are in girl gang, women who have been in girl gangs who are now mentors, people who were knife attackers. You show that this is possible. And I think that's what's so important. And is it important to you to show that just because somebody has this thing that they used to do or that happened to them, it doesn't define them and there is a way out of there and there is a way to be really positive and to set an incredible example. What I am one of those people, I think we all are to some extent, but sometimes we don't want to admit it because we're all entitled to make mistakes. And how you come back from those mistakes depending on how severe they are now if it's because you committed a crime and ended up in prison, if it's because you cheated on your husband, whatever that mistake is that people want to judge you for. It shouldn't bar you from becoming the person that you can become once you've learned your lesson or you discovered more about yourself by educating yourself or understanding and having sympathy or empathy for someone else. So my whole life since I came out of prison has been dedicated if you like without purpose in the sense that I didn't set out on this journey. I didn't walk out of prison after 12 years and think, right, this is what I'm going to do. It just gradually evolved around me because I was being judged. When I first joined the BBC, within a year of coming out of prison, and I became a reporter on the BBC Radio four today program with my dreadlocks, my brown skin, my self London accent, and the prison slang to boot. I was being judged in a way that made me realize who I'd become. It was a real kind of defining moment for me, and it made me realize that the important thing is to remain true to who I am, to embrace my background rather than try and hide from it, to use my experience to further my career and expose the stories that people don't want to expose. And the long story is that's led me to talking to people who do have interesting backgrounds as you write these say. Listening to my last podcast for example, you know, a guy called David Martin Dao, Scottish guy, involved in organized crime drug trafficking, goes to prison whilst these imprisoned during a 6 year sentence for organized crime. He starts to educate himself. He comes out. He goes to work. All of a sudden he's now the first team coach and manager of a Premier League Scottish football club. I mean, what an achievement. Here in east story, like many of the other people that I invite on my podcast and I try to avoid having people's stories who we already know about because we've heard it many, many times. So here in the ordinary person talk about their extraordinary journey and why they've become the person that they've become, why they do what they do, what made them successful, how they were able to shake off the stigma if you like. And pursue the career or the opportunities that were given to them. Those are the voices that I find are the most interesting because you can learn something from them. Now, whether it's for a mental health issue, whether it's for an illness, whether it's for, you know, just getting out of bed one day here in somebody who's had a really tough ride through their own making, let's not make excuses, you know, some people they make their bed day lie in it, but it's what they do after. And I just think it's really unfair for us to exclude those people from society because of the mistake that they made that led to their imprisonment or criminal conviction and so yeah, I have been an advocate for those people or give them a platform to share their stories because I think we can learn so much from those individuals. And I think we do, for sure. Because the alternative is that people get written off. And that's it. They just written off and they're suddenly invaluable. And so what's for them then, if the perception is that they have no use, there are no worse. When actually their stories, as you say, are so valuable and experience, isn't it? It's like it's like anything if you're going to try and when we talk about rehabilitation, if you want to reach a bunch of young guys who think carrying a knife is important, if you haven't carried a knife, use the knife, being cut or stabbed by a knife. I'm not saying that you can't go into that space. And lots of people who don't have those lived experiences do go into that space and they do a lot for those kids to try and steer them on the right path. It might be just giving them an opportunity they've never had before, taking them out of their kind of environment and shine them another opportunity or another environment. But somebody who has lived that life like myself, when I go into that space, these kids look at me and they think, you know, where have you come from? You're a kind of aging man who talks well when everything. But then I surprised them by telling them because they have no idea. And I'm doing this next week when I turn up at a young offenders institution here in the UK where I volunteer my time for the first time, I'll go along, I'll go into the room and I talk to these kids about the scar on my face or the life that I led before I become the person that I am today hoping that that will make them realize that sitting in a prison cell shouldn't define them. Commit in a crime shouldn't define them falling out with their parents or people that they love that they can't express those emotions or love to shouldn't define them, that they can, they can climb back to the person they could become. If only they start to believe in themselves and by believing in themselves, they've got to start doing something for themselves in that confined space. So I do believe it's important that lived experiences can go a long way to mentoring and advise in and educate in those who have no concept of what their life could become without that person standing in front of them and saying, well, look at me. I've done it. And that doesn't just contain itself to prison and prisoners. It can be anything it could be somebody who's overweight and somebody stands up in a room who looks really fit mal or female telling that person, look at this picture of me when I was 23 stone, but with determination and commitment, I was able to lose weight, become fit, become healthy, and so can you.

John mcavoy David Martin Dao Premier League Scottish footba BBC Emma apple John London UK
"rowe" Discussed on The Emma Guns Show

The Emma Guns Show

06:34 min | 2 months ago

"rowe" Discussed on The Emma Guns Show

"You could have formulated a way to argue your case. But you did that at the same time in tandem with media because there's no point learning all of that if you don't, if you don't have a voice and you can't get that story out and that really my friend is genius. Well, do you know what? When I was sat in my prison cell, I was completely in community cardo and by that I mean you have very little of the outside world coming in to prison. And as you said at the beginning, you know, technology moved on in the time that I was in prison. So when I was in prison, there was no television in my cell. There was no toilet. There was no sink. No sanitation. You know, I peed and pooed in a bucket, a sort of chamber pot. And when that was full, I did it in a newspaper and threw it out of the cell window. You know, those were the conditions that I was living in in prison. Equally, I didn't have access to radio to listen to what was going on in the outside world. So after about 18 months, you did get papers circling. Don't get me wrong. You did get newspapers, daily newspapers circulating in the prison. But when it was your turn, you got it, or if somebody finished reading one three days later, you might get a free day old paper. And so you catch up with the news, but it's old news then, because it's three days later. And I wasn't aware at the beginning of the publicity that surrounded my arrest and imprisonment until months and months after I was in prison. And I discovered that a lot of that media attention at the time played a significant role in my wrongful conviction because when people are reading that I'm a monster, when people are reading that I'm a murderer, they had no sympathy for my situation because that's what they deemed me to be, a dangerous murderer who deserved to be in prison. What they didn't know was the Raphael row. They didn't know anything about me or who I was or what I was suffering. So during those years in prison, when I turned my I'd say my mentality around based on the advice I got from older wiser prisoners who themselves had been campaigning for many years to have their own convictions overturned when they stopped me and said, you know, fighting from the confines of a segregation cell, which is even more isolated than a normal prison cell. You know, if you don't stop fighting the system, no one's going to hear your voice. And so I embarked at one point on a journalism course because I needed, as you say, to get my voice out there. So the media played a significant role in demonizing me. So I know that the media could play a significant role in telling people that I was wrongfully imprisoned. And so that's why I embarked on this correspondence course to understand the media to understand how to write letters to journalists how to get my story published. And it worked. The media is a very, very interesting thing because right now, I think even a news alert came up yesterday for me, one of the chief detectives, I think, in the Met has been suspended because they participating in WhatsApp conversations where they've made racist comments. And I think we're almost a little bit numb to the fact that police are racist. We hear it all the time, you see it all the time coming from news in America. And now very much more so over here. And I can't think of an example. Again, when I was reading your story, I thought you were on trial with two other men. And all of you were dark skinned or mixed race. And yet there was an eyewitness report that the people guilty of the crimes that you were found guilty of were white. And yet you still stood up in court. It's not funny. You stood up and caught a jury, even with that information still sent you to prison. So, for me, it's like, does it get any more obvious how big the problem is? Imagine for a moment that I'm in the dock. I'm being accused of a murder. I know I didn't commit. And the witnesses who came into the witness box, the victims, we're talking about the victims here. We're not talking about eyewitnesses who spotted something and gave some evidence and could have been wrong. We're talking about three or four separate victims of the crimes that I was being accused of standing in the witness box and describing the perpetrators of the crimes against them. And they described two white men and one black man. The three men that were stood in the dock as you just identified were dark skinned men at the time I had dreadlocks to my shoulder, my co defendant who was darker skinned than me had dreadlocks. And the third defendant was of much darker appearance with short black hair. So when the victims were going in the witness box and telling the jury that the people who committed the crimes against them were too white men and they went further than just describing the color of the men's skin, they described blue eyes. They described fair hair, and as I just said, I had dreadlocks. I've got brown eyes, both my co defendants had brown eyes. And when those witnesses were given that evidence, not just one, but more than one victims, when they were given those bits of evidence, it was an incredible moment during the court case that they could still, this is the prosecution and the police could continue to pursue their prosecution against free black men, but we were an talking about a time where racism hadn't quite hit the headlines at Stephen Lawrence brought it to or cases like Black Lives Matter, you know, this was happening back in 1988. So anybody who thinks it's just starting to happen in America where social media is allowing people to see the elements of racism as you just rightly said from a police officer just this week. And what's been gone in America. It was happening to me when I was in that prison cell when I was in that dock when I was fighting from the confines of an isolation. So because I never stopped for one day reminding people that the victims didn't get justice and I didn't get justice and yet I spent 12 years in prison for a crime that I didn't commit. So is the system completely rotten and is it actually doing any good that it's supposed to do if the idea is to take bad people criminals off the street and rehabilitate them so that they go back into the community and they no longer commit crimes is that a fundamentally broken structure that isn't actually working? I think one of the big problems is that most people believe what they watch in TV dramas.

America Stephen Lawrence
Man convicted of killing 6 with SUV in Christmas parade

AP News Radio

01:00 min | 3 months ago

Man convicted of killing 6 with SUV in Christmas parade

"A Wisconsin man has been convicted of multiple counts of homicide for intentionally driving his SUV through a Christmas parade The defendant commit first degree intentional homicide while using a dangerous weapon answer yes It took a walk a show Wisconsin jury a little more than three hours to find Darryl Brooks guilty on all 76 charges Brooks was convicted Wednesday of killing 6 people and injuring dozens of others when he intentionally drove his Ford escape into a walk ashore Christmas parade last November 21st Among those killed were an 8 year old boy marching with his baseball team and three members of a parade team called the dancing grannies the verdict wraps up a trial in which Brooks defended himself taxing judge Jennifer de Rowe with bizarre legal theories and erratic outbursts There is something that needs to be addressed subject matter jurisdiction The court declines that I'm stepping on Tyler pod liner who was hit by Brooks SUV while performing with the Waukesha south high school band says the verdict will help all the victims to heal We're stronger than him and has been proven today Just another step forward in the process I'm Jennifer King

Darryl Brooks Wisconsin Brooks Jennifer De Rowe Tyler Pod Ford Baseball Waukesha South High School Jennifer King
"rowe" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

01:37 min | 3 months ago

"rowe" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"Edward, are you there? I'm here. Can you hear me? Hello? You sound great. Go right ahead. Okay. I think the problem with those last two callers are the same problem you have with some people in Alabama. Their mother and father are still brethren, sister too. So I'm not sure about. How many times does Tennessee have to sing rocky top for us to know that they've beat the Alabama cramps in tide? Because when I watch that LSU gang last week and that first touchdown, Kansas City scored. It sounded like they were at home as they sang rocky power. So I'm saying if they sing rocky talk 8 to ten times, then they have beat Alabama crimson tide. Okay. Listen, thank you very much for the call. Thanks to all of your college. We're back to the guests now. Thankfully. Holly, Holly Rowe is joining us part of the Clemson Florida state game. Holly, good afternoon. Great to have you with us again. I know there's a lot of excitement where you are. Let's talk about having me. Clemson coming in. They're good afternoon. Yeah, Holly, we're curious about your read on this game tomorrow, especially it's a major test for Clemson. They've survived wake forest, NC state, and now they're a dog Campbell.

Alabama Edward Holly Rowe Holly Clemson Florida state LSU Tennessee Kansas City Clemson Campbell
Don't Follow Your Passion

Dennis Prager Podcasts

00:56 sec | 5 months ago

Don't Follow Your Passion

"So do you have and I don't expect you to, I'm just curious, do you have a favorite one or two PragerU videos? Well, there is one video that I have quoted probably more than any other video over the past couple of weeks, months and it's the one by Mike Rowe. Don't follow your passion. And it really changed my view of work and of getting into the sphere of working and yes, but there are also other great videos like, for example, how the one that tells a story about socialism and Brazil, I personally spent a year in Brazil and to learn a little bit more about history. It's just enriching. And it can really shape your view into a healthy friction.

Mike Rowe Brazil
Doug Welcomes Dr. John Seago With Texas Right to Life

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:24 min | 5 months ago

Doug Welcomes Dr. John Seago With Texas Right to Life

"A lot about the really the Supreme Court decisions coming out in June, just an amazing look at what this court did when the court actually started looking back at the constitution and starting to actually applying law and not theory. And I think that's been an amazing thing. But nothing has caused more than the abortion decision. Nothing calls more than the Mississippi decision that overturned roe overturned Casey. Really put it back to the states where it belonged all the time. And there's a lot of things going to be going on in states have already been going on the states and will continue to be going on the states. And so I'm excited today to take that up a little bit further with Doctor John seago from the Texas right to life. A lot going on that I want to get to, so but John, thanks for being a part of the Collins podcast today. Absolutely. Thanks for having me. All right, let's go back, let's reverse the clock. Let's go back when we were in April of this year. Rowe was still in case he's still in the fact, Texas had passed some legislation, Georgia passed away. All of it were being held up. You know, for the most part, waiting on this opposition, waiting on this decision, not a Mississippi. And now it's happened. And the decision that many of us, you know, from a legal standpoint, if we ever thought we could get a court that would actually look at it on the legal basis, roe was going to be overturned. It's just never it never had the legal standing to say where it was. Texas had already taken a step. Lotsman said, what do you see now? Did you expect the churn that we've seen now in the last basically 45 to 50 days, especially from the pro abortion crowd sort of give me your lay of the land, you know, going for four or 5 months now where we went from a row Casey world to now we're in a new situation. Talk to me about what y'all are doing and sort of where you just see the platform right now. Yeah, no, you're absolutely right. Is the last couple of months have been a wild. We've seen the left absolutely go promote lawlessness. You know, for 40 years, we have the left telling us that that row is the law of the land and we should just sit down, shut up and get used to it. This is the law of the land. We should follow the law, the court. We've heard that over and over again. And now all of a sudden they're completely reversing on that and saying, no, no, even though the court has ruled in your favor, we get to ignore it. We get to break the law. We

John Seago ROE Mississippi Texas Casey Lotsman Supreme Court Rowe Collins Georgia John
Kansas Voters Stick It to the Government

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

00:59 min | 6 months ago

Kansas Voters Stick It to the Government

"Kansas shows elections do matter, right? And I think we were saying it's not just the outcome. It's the turnout. I think registrations went up like a 1000% after Rowe was overturned in Kansas. So we were saying, yes, we should be running on this in every state. And as, you know, Chris was talking about a pollster saying how you message it is important and how it was messaged in Kansas. It's government overreach. We don't want the government in our private medical decisions in our decisions about who we can love and marry. You know, what books, right? We can read on and on. Religious decisions. Right. We don't want the government in religion. That was in one of the ads that was used in Kansas. And that was one of the most effective ones. Yeah, yeah. Exactly. Yeah. Keep your religion in your pews. Exactly. Right, exactly. And out of my pee. Well, the ads point was that you don't want the government making religious decisions for you. That's what residents with Republican Republican voters in that state.

Kansas Rowe Chris
Justice Alito: Roe Was Egregiously Wrong From the Start

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:38 sec | 7 months ago

Justice Alito: Roe Was Egregiously Wrong From the Start

"In the majority ruling, justice Alito wrote, Rowe was egregiously wrong from the start. It's reasoning was exceptionally weak. The decision has had damaging consequences, the constitution does not prohibit the citizens of each state from regulating or prohibiting abortion. Row and Casey, arrogated that authority. The court overrules those decisions and returns that authority to the people and their elected representatives. Praise God.

Justice Alito Rowe Casey
Wheeler K's 9 in 7 shutout innings, Phillies top Padres 3-0

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 9 months ago

Wheeler K's 9 in 7 shutout innings, Phillies top Padres 3-0

"The the the the Phillies Phillies Phillies Phillies got got got got back back back back on on on on the the the the winning winning winning winning side side side side of of of of things things things things they they they they took took took took a a a a three three three three nothing nothing nothing nothing win win win win over over over over the the the the Padres Padres Padres Padres Zack Zack Zack Zack Wheeler Wheeler Wheeler Wheeler picked picked picked picked up up up up his his his his second second second second win win win win of of of of the the the the season season season season allowing allowing allowing allowing four four four four hits hits hits hits he he he he struck struck struck struck out out out out nine nine nine nine Philadelphia Philadelphia Philadelphia Philadelphia made made made made a a a a one one one one nothing nothing nothing nothing in in in in the the the the bottom bottom bottom bottom of of of of the the the the first first first first with with with with a a a a two two two two out out out out single single single single by by by by J. J. J. J. T. T. T. T. Rowe Rowe Rowe Rowe mutual mutual mutual mutual response response response response because because because because minutes minutes minutes minutes soon soon soon soon nothing nothing nothing nothing when when when when they they they they let let let let the the the the bomb bomb bomb bomb above above above above the the the the third third third third with with with with a a a a solo solo solo solo home home home home run run run run it it it it was was was was his his his his seventh seventh seventh seventh of of of of the the the the season season season season oh oh oh oh double double double double horror horror horror horror about about about about RBI RBI RBI RBI double double double double in in in in the the the the bottom bottom bottom bottom of of of of the the the the fourth fourth fourth fourth Blake Blake Blake Blake Snell Snell Snell Snell took took took took the the the the loss loss loss loss for for for for San San San San Diego Diego Diego Diego in in in in his his his his season season season season debut debut debut debut Michael Michael Michael Michael Luongo Luongo Luongo Luongo Philadelphia Philadelphia Philadelphia Philadelphia

Phillies Padres Philadelphia Zack Zack Zack Zack Wheeler Wh J. J. J. J. T. T. T. T. Rowe Rowe Rowe Rowe Mutual Mutual M Blake Blake Blake Blake Snell Snell Snell Snell San San San San Diego Diego Diego Michael Michael Michael Michae Diego
Is Overturning Roe v Wade a Radical or Conservative Choice?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:20 min | 9 months ago

Is Overturning Roe v Wade a Radical or Conservative Choice?

"This is Tina. Tina says, quote, Charlie, I read a column of one of my conservative Friends shared on Twitter. That was written by someone on the right apparently said overturning roe versus wade wasn't conservative. Okay, so this is a column by Brett Stevens, who used to be a really smart person and he's just become almost unreadable in recent years. And this Brett Stevens now writes for The New York Times. And Brett Stevens wrote this for The New York Times. Overturning roe is a radical, not conservative choice. Now he calls himself a conservative, he's just about the same type of conservative as Bill kristol. That should tell you everything you need to know. Dear chief justice Roberts, justice Barrett Gorsuch Kavanaugh and Thomas, as you'll no doubt agree roe versus wade was an ill judged decision one was handed down January 22nd, 1973. It continues by saying, roe versus wade diminished the standing on the court by turning it into an even more political branch of government. But a half century is a long time. America is a different place, with a most of its population born after Rowe was decided. After a decision to overturn roe, which the court seemed poised to do, according to the leak of a draft of a majority opinion by justice Samuel Alito, would do more to replicate gross damage than to reverse it. He says it would be a radical, not conservative choice. So Brett Stevens, who I assume is very highly educated. I would like him to tell me what is the definition of radical. It means to the root to the core. To the basis. Brett Stevens asks the question in The New York Times. What is conservative, he says? It is above all, the conviction that abrupt and profound changes to established laws and common expectations are utterly destructive to respect for their law and institutions established to uphold it. And especially when those changes are instigated from above with neither Democrat consent, nor broad consensus. Okay, that is not what a conservative is, okay? If there is an immoral or destructive law, a conservative has a moral obligation to try to repeal it and get rid of it quickly.

Brett Stevens Tina ROE The New York Times Barrett Gorsuch Kavanaugh Wade Roe Versus Wade Bill Kristol Justice Roberts Justice Samuel Alito Charlie Twitter Rowe Thomas America
"rowe" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

06:33 min | 9 months ago

"rowe" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"So I'm going to ask you one more time. Can't you give me an example of an example from your show without telling the surprise? Just give us a flavor of what one of these stories might be like, please, Mike Rowe, please? Okay, so imagine, if you will, a man completely obsessed with building a better mousetrap. I'm speaking metaphorically. Night after night after night, he goes up into his work area and labors away while his wife cooks and other meal that he never eats in his family waits for him. And he never comes back down because he's so obsessed with figuring out a simple formula that will ultimately change the world. And eventually he does. And when he does, your mind will explode when you ponder the ramifications. What of the completion of this simple recipe. Now, I could tell you, I could now hit the recipe is I could tell hold on. This is in show business. This is what we call a cliffhanger, folks. When we come back, we'll hear the rest of the story or part of it. When we last we're speaking to Mike Rowe, he was telling us the rest of the story almost got to the punch line. I thought, wait a minute, we've got one more segment. Mike, you just did what you do. You create this world, the guy he's obsessed. He's creating a better mousetrap. He's doing, you know, we've seen movies like this, right? Like the door is locked and he's in there doing something, you know, and he comes out with its haydn's messiah or whatever handles messiah. It's something amazing. So you were just kind of going in that direction, where did we end up just a moment ago? We thankfully cut to a commercial break right before I spoiled it, right? So now we're back and I'm not going to spoil it. I'm just going to tell people that Saturday nights at 9 o'clock, should you tune in to this station? Yeah. You will hear the story behind the story. And then you will witness two relatively grown men unpacking that story in a way that's filled with more unexpected delights than the human mind can ponder. That's what's going to happen. That's the tease. That's as close as you're going to get to a spoiler for me. What greater compliment could Matt crouch give you than to want to do the show with you? I mean, look, if I lived in California, he wouldn't do a show with me. I'm just telling you right now, he must like you very much. And that's where we are. Well, I don't know about greater compliment, but money like he could pay me. That'd be amazing. That's not going to happen. This is. We just get so silly. People just know when I'm enjoying myself, I just get socially and they just, they just turned it off. There's no one listening anymore. This is, how many shows have you done? I mean, this one is called the story behind this story, but you've done a number of TV shows. You just said dirty jobs is still on the air in different places. How many different shows have you done over the years? Well, before dirty jobs, I had about 300 gigs in the entertainment business. I was a host on just about every channel, you know, my whole career in those days was based on touching everything like it was hot. So I wasn't looking for a hit. I was just looking to work. So there were, there were some game shows and there were some talk shows and there were some appearances on sitcoms and there was a lot of narration appearances on sitcoms. That's not in my material here. What sitcoms are we talking about? No, you're about. Come on. That's my mom. I remember Davis. Was that you? That was me with Clifton Davis. Also on I love Lucy back in the 50s. You're not that old. Seriously, what's it comes? I did. I stopped. Adrian barbot now, if you want to talk, never mind. Different show, Tim Allen hired me to play his younger brother on last man standing. That was the kind of thing I did a lot of over the years. Dirty jobs changed everything. Eric, dirty jobs was the first show for me in 2002 that was personal. And frankly, important, you know, it was dedicated to my granddad. And in it, I was allowed not to be a host. I mean, I could have hosted it, but I looked at myself as more of a guest, and I let the host be the people that I was profiling. And that subtle change impacted everything. That's the reason the show is still on the air today. And that's the reason every other good thing that's happened to me in the last 20 years has happened, including this weird thing, whatever this is. I was doing this. This is not an interview. This is some sort of weird performance art. I know. Meets a fever dream of something. I don't know what this is. But like we said, you know, go ahead, I insist. Well, we sure show. We should go out doing some kind of like a duet together or something like that. And we could sing, I've been everywhere man by Johnny Cash, something like that. You know that song? And everywhere. I've been everywhere, but it's a lot, it's a lot of words. It's a lot of words. And you know what? How about this? I breed them out in air, man. Of travel I've had my share, man, I've been everywhere. That song we will not perform together because we're out of time. Micro, I like you very much. I am really excited that you're on TBN. The show is the story behind the story Saturday nights at 9 p.m.. Congratulations, sir. Thank you for having me here. This was very strange and unforgettable. The I didn't realize you liked me that way, deal. Because it's one thing to receive McDonald's, but an entirely other thing to know that they woke up early to face the world and bring you McDonald's breakfast, still hot in the bag. Appreciate you. There's a deal for every morning, now grab two loaded sausage burritos for only three bucks. Prices and participation may vary, single item at regular price, can not be combined with any other offer, combo meal..

Mike Rowe Matt crouch Clifton Davis Adrian barbot Mike Tim Allen California Lucy Davis Eric Johnny Cash fever McDonald
"rowe" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

06:34 min | 9 months ago

"rowe" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"I didn't see you come in. Folks, this is the Eric montague show. I'm interviewing Mike Rowe, who has a show on TBN, at least they tell me, because I have yet to see it. But it's called the story behind the story. It airs Saturday nights at 9 p.m.. Now, Mike Rowe, you saw in between the commercial break or whatever this was. Your friend and mine, Matt crouch, came on and told me off camera, everything might just said, is wrong, this whole thing is his idea, whatever. And I'm not surprised to hear that because you're a humble guy, you know, when I ask you who you are, you tell me your parents and stuff. That's who you are, and it's why you're likeable to some. But I keep thinking that you, all the shows that you've done, including this one, there's a through line. And it's you. It's your appreciation for people and for jobs and for that kind of thing. So I have to ask you, when you were a kid, where did you grow up? And what did you think you would be doing in the future? I grew up on a little farm in Baltimore, Maryland next to a genius named Carl noble, who happened to be my grandfather, I'm going to stick this back in my ear again real quick and begged to be grandfather was Carl noble, the genius, and you lived next door to him, okay? Carl noble could build a house without a blueprint, right? He was that guy. He only went to the 7th grade, but by the time he was 30, he was a master electrician, plumber steam fitter pipe that the guy could fix build, repair, fabricate anything. My assumption as a kid was that I'd follow in his footsteps. The handy gene tragically is recessive, so I did not get the requisite skills necessary to fulfill my early dream and upon his recommendation I got a different toolbox and got into this crazy industry and began working. Dirty jobs, many years later was a tribute to him, so too was the micro works foundation, which I'm pleased to say is offering another round of work ethic scholarships. If you're viewers are interested, they should apply for one of those things. We give away a million bucks a year. And my granddad's name. And so, you know, that that's really why I do what I do. I got into the business, not because I thought I'd be any good at it, but because I really wasn't very good at anything else, way leads on to way as the poet says, and the next thing you know, you're sitting there on a couch with Matt crouch, talking about the world. Poetry doesn't have to rhyme, but it's nice that couch and crouch do rhyme. In some ways. Fortunately, in this one. Who's the poet that says that way leads on to it? I don't know that. I'm a Yale English major. And we didn't study poetry. We studied, you know, critical theory and the end of the world and stuff. Oh. Well, that's a reference to the great Robert Frost. Who said two roads diverged in a yellow wood, but sorry I couldn't travel both and be one traveler, long I stood, looked down one as far as I could to where it bent in the undergrowth, then took the other as just as fair, but having perhaps a better claim because it was grassy and wanted wear, but as for that, the passing there had worn them really about the same wait for it. I shall be telling this with a sigh somewhere ages and ages hence two roads diverged in a wood and I, I took the one less traveled by, and that's made all the difference. Now finally, here you go. And both that morning equally lay two fields no step had trodden back. I kept the first for another day, but knowing how way leads on to way. I doubted if I would ever go back. You know, I really, really didn't think that we would be quoting reciting Robert Frost's poetry today. And in that I was expecting poetry. I love poetry. So is Matt crouch, and this is the kind of thing we talk about on the story behind the story. He wants to know why I know a poem by Robert Frost, and we take a half hour to explain it. And the next thing you know, you're sucked in and you can't wait for the next episode. Well, the thing about Robert Frost, Robert Frost is himself an inflection point in American culture. Because he's right at that moment where poetry that was accessible to the public shifted, he's really the last of that era. And even in his accessible poetry, there's kind of the hint of, I don't know, something grumpier, let's say, you know, he's not Robert wadsworth longfellow. But there are very few poems that anyone remembers today. That one, what's the other one whose Woods are these, I think, I know his house is in the village though. To watch the Woods fill up with I do not think you'll mind if we stop and watch his Woods fill up with snow. The Woods are lovely dark and deep. But I have promises to keep and miles to go before I sleep and miles to go before I sleep, which of course is referring potentially to suicide. The man in the sleigh in the dark in the cold is thinking, do I just sit here and die? I mean, anyway, that's the darker side of Robert Frost. But that poem, I mean, it is a beautiful poem way leads on to way my goodness. I just, I'm so grateful that you did that just now. If only we could get more guests like you remind me to fire my producer. I want to ask you one more guess like me. I know. I know. This is the Pinnacle of your career and you're, you know, your show. It's downhill from there. I'm sorry. But I would like. But if you think about it actually, poetry of the kind written in previous times, whether it's frost or longfellow or anyway, it was craftsmanship. Craftsmanship, not very different from the kinds of craftsmanship that you talk about in your dirty jobs show that there's a pride in it. And you learn over time how to get better. You learn from the masters and stuff. And that I think has pretty much gone out in the world of poetry, but I don't want to end on a bummer..

Carl noble Matt crouch Mike Rowe Robert Frost Eric montague micro works foundation Baltimore Maryland Robert wadsworth longfellow
"rowe" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

06:32 min | 9 months ago

"rowe" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Mike Rowe. Micro people know you. First of all, you've got a new show on TBN. It's called the story behind the story. But you became known. This is true. You did a show called dirty jobs, and you became known as the dirtiest man on TV. That title was formerly held by red fox. Because he would work blue. It was ugly. If you've seen those old videotapes red fox and others, I think Luanda page very dirty comedy. But you were known as the dirtiest man on TV for a different reason. Why were you known as the dirtiest man on TV? Well, dirty jobs was one of those shows that actually lived up to its name. It was a celebration of people who weren't afraid to get dirty, had to kind of jobs that made civilized life possible for the rest of us and so forth. I did that for 20 years. It's actually still on. So some clever reporters somewhere. Thought, yeah, let's call them the dirtiest guy on TV and it's stuck. Look at that thing sticking out of my ear right there. Isn't that annoying? Don't you hate that? I hate that. Now listen, yes, I'm listening. I want to ask you some questions. If you don't, if you don't mind, sir, here's my question. No, I'm here. The new show, the story behind this story. Give us an example of what, because you kind of gave us the meta explanation in the previous segment. But the new show, what will people see roughly speaking? Give us give us an idea, or you could even give us an example if you want. I could. I could give you an example, but I'm not going to because at the guts of the show. Is a surprise. So it's virtually impossible to promote a show that hinges. Are you serious? On a surprise. The whole concept of the show, the guts of it is a surprise where every show contains a surprise. Like if it's a murder mystery, right, but if it's a murder mystery, you know, yes, you're not going to tell me that in the last episode. I mean, I'm not going to tell you who's done it. Nabs the crook, who turns out to be, you know, Johnny Cash. Correct. You're not going to tell me that. But so every show has a kind of reveal at the end. So it's like the Paul Harvey thing. You got to hang in there till the end. Yes and no. Yes and no. No, no, no. Every show starts with a ten minute story. And that end of that little segment should be a surprise. You get to watch and try and figure out what we're talking about. Right. Then when that ends, that's when the story behind the story begins. And Matt and I sit down to give each other endless grief and have a rollicking good time discussing the various themes in the story that might have been simmering just below the surface. Themes that you might look at as a sort of a rumination on morality. And so we have a lively conversation about the story you just heard. A lively conversation. I don't see that happening. No, it seems inconceivable. Look, Matt gets a Matt gets wound up. And he gets really into it, and sometimes sometimes I don't want to say too much, Eric, but there's a moment and the story behind the story. Where Matt crouch laughs so hard, he falls off his chair and makes a very high pitched girly sound when he hits the floor. And I'm telling you. That's kind of like Jamie Farr on the old Merv Griffin show. Very similar. In fact, in fact, you will swear you're looking at Jamie Farr when you see Matt Graham. We know Matt is working with me on the story for a section 8. Everybody knows that. Well, seriously, though, I want to do the story behind the story behind the story, because I'm guessing that the conversation you have with Matt, whom I obviously love, otherwise I wouldn't tease him so horribly and awkwardly on the air. I guess nice try, but your contracts are finished. I don't care. I got all kinds of stuff lined up. Let me tell you, I'm out of here yesterday. But seriously, you, when you talk about this, you are touching on, it's one of the reasons that I'm interested in this is that you're touching on stuff that I think about all the time. Is that the morality behind stuff, whatever it's evidence for God, that reality is not subjective. There is this thing called reality and all stories have similar arcs. It's kind of baked into the warp and the wolf of the world that we live in that God created. And it's fascinating that you're effectively going to be talking about that on this program because I really do think that some of the best evidence for God is when you study reality, whether it's through science or through narrative, even studying how to write a movie script. You just see this the arch, you know, the redemption, the thesis synthesis antithesis, synthesis. It just over and over again, you see evidence of God's having designed everything. I think so. Well, look, that's the greatest story ever told. The story behind the story really is a love letter to storytelling. So the idea that there's always a theme propping up your favorite movie. An important theme, that's important to me because the stories that stick and the stories that get passed down. And the stories that are fun to tell, sure, they've got ebbs and flows and they're all sorts of moments in there that stick with the viewer, but they don't last if they don't have a foundation under them. And that's what Matt is really into. And that's why he did all this. Seriously, he wants to, he wants to get, I mean, there's a very curious guy, Matt, and he wants to get to the place where he understands how the story gets propped up and why it's worth sharing. But to his credit, we don't run straight to that. We tell you the tale first. And I think it's honestly, it's one of the strangest shows I've ever worked on because it's unlike anything I've seen before. It has components of recreation and has components of interviews. It's part talk show. It's part play. Rumination. Forgive me for interrupting you, but we need to pause. I care a message from alpo, food..

Matt Mike Rowe Jamie Farr red fox Matt crouch Matt Graham Paul Harvey Johnny Cash Merv Griffin Eric
"rowe" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

04:12 min | 9 months ago

"rowe" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Rest of the story, Paul Harvey story? There's so many, but the story I'll tell you about Paul Harvey is the story that motivated the book called the way I heard it and the podcast because when I was a kid, I whenever the rest of the story came on, I had to hear the end of it. If I didn't hear the end of it, the rest of my day. That's the point. That was Paul Harvey's sick. As brilliant and good as he was, he knew that his voice was so compelling that he would set you up and there was not a chance you weren't hanging in to find out that the woman's companion was a chimpanzee. And now you've heard the rest of the story. Paul Harvey, goodnight. I mean, you know, I never saw the chimpanzee thing coming. Good day. No one sees the chimpanzee coming. Anyway, look, the reason I'm sitting here is because in 19 88, I was running to the airport and I was late and I was driving myself as one does when one is neither rich nor famous and somewhat desperate. And trying to make my flight and I got into the parking garage and I'm listening to the rest of the story. And I've done this routine a lot. I know that if I get out of the car and I run, I can clear security and I can get on the plane. It's going to be close, but I can make it. But Paul Harvey is right in the middle of like this Abbott and Costello reveal. I don't know where he's going, but I parked the car and I have to sit there for two minutes to hear the end of it. I hear the end of it and I run and I get to the gate and I miss my flight by 90 seconds. So the answer to your question is, I'm sitting here because decades ago, Paul Harvey caused me to miss a flight. And the goal with my book and my podcast and Matt crouch and this show is to create something that people simply have to watch the end of. Not that I want you to miss your flight, but I kind of do. But maybe God wants you to miss your flight. Sometimes that's just the way it works. I don't want to get into the deep theology. Because this is TBN, we don't go there, okay? Do you understand what I'm talking about? We keep it. Keep it simple, positive. No, in all seriousness, this is beautiful. And it is important knowledge these inflection points in our lives that you know that because of Paul Harvey's ability to do what he does, it changed your life, you remember it. None of us ever wants to miss a flight. And yet, there are times when God really does want us to miss a flight. And if you're sharp, if you're wise, if you're blessed, eventually you figure that out. We'll be right back. I'm talking to Mike Rowe, evidently, he has a new show on TBN called the story behind the story Saturday nights at 9 p.m. don't go away. And he said again, get rhythm. In case you haven't been paying attention, the Biden administration has caused a financial crisis and they have no clue how to fix it. Oil prices have skyrocketed and when oil prices go up, the cost of transportation and shipping spikes leading the prices of goods to rise. And when we're already seeing record inflation, that's the last thing we need. Our economy is in trouble and you need to take steps to protect yourself. If all your money is tied up in stocks, bonds and traditional markets, you are vulnerable. Gold is one of the best ways to protect your retirement, no matter what happens, you own your gold. It is real, it is physical, it's always been valuable since the dawn of time, legacy precious metals is the company I trust for investing in gold. They can help you roll your retirement account into a gold backed IRA where you still own the physical gold. They can also ship gold and precious metals safely and securely to your house called legacy at 8 6 6 5 two 8 1903 or visit them online at legacy p.m. investments dot com. Hello there, folks. I am American metaxas, and I get to interview.

Paul Harvey Matt crouch Costello Abbott Biden administration Mike Rowe
"rowe" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

04:54 min | 9 months ago

"rowe" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Al. Then we have that in common. Let me just say, I'm glad I asked that question because I loved your answer. I love the fact that you referred to your mom and dad. Now, I have had the privilege of meeting your mom. It's about three and a half years ago. The two of you put out a book together and she is now she is basically eclipsed you so dramatically that it said is what it is. I live in the shadow of my 84 year old mother, her success in the publishing business is both humbling and deeply annoying to me. She is just finished her third book. It, like the first two is destined to be a New York Times Best Seller. And all I could do, Eric, is hang on tight with both hands and hope networks like this would take pity on me with shows like the aforementioned. That's where we are. It's very sad. Okay, so the story, I mean, the show is called the story behind the story. And my next question, these could have been written out for me because these are not exactly hard hitting questions. But what is the story behind the story, Mike Rowe? What's the story behind the show, the story behind the story? It's like those Russian nesting eggs. You know, you open one, and there's another one. And then you open another one. Look, there's another one in there. Right. It's layers, right? It's like an onion. So I mentioned a podcast called the way I heard it. It's been around for about 5 years, and that podcast is basically me ripping off the late great Paul Harvey. Who had a great segment called the rest of the story. And the rest of the story told these 5 or 6 minute mysteries, something you didn't know about somebody you do. Well, a guy named Matt crouch, who happens to be your boss and the progenitor of this year network. Technically he liked that podcast. Yeah. Technically. He listened to him, and he said to me, not it must have been a year year and a half, two years ago. He said, Mike, you ought to take these stories that you've written and bring them to life with elaborate recreations, and we should give the viewer something to really sink their teeth into. And I said, Matt, there are new viewers. It's a podcast, right? It's just something for people to listen to. Because I think it could be bigger. I said, I don't think. So he said, I'm pretty sure I could. I said, I doubt it. Anyhow, I don't hear from him. For like four months. And then he comes back and he took three of my stories, Eric. Yeah. And he brought them to life in a surprising and beautiful way. Wait a minute, you're talking about Matt crouch. I know him. I don't think he did that. He had to do that for him. Look, dude, I was surprised too, okay? No, the funny thing about there are certain people. Matt crouch is a TV producer, and he thinks like a TV producer, right? It's like some people think he's just technically, that's how he thinks. And I love that. The idea came from Matt, you were the one that was resistant to it. I was that way with all the ideas. I thought he was out of his mind that he brought to me no, no, no. Understand you have to understand what he did, Eric. Without my permission without my blessing, nothing. He took three of my stories, which I read from a stage, right earlier. He took these stories. He brought him to life. He spent all kinds of money, and then he shows him to me. And I'm like, well, okay, you were right. These are great. You did it. Now, what do you want to do with him? He said, I don't know. I'm like, well, why did you do this? He said, to show you, I was right. Oh, it got to be kidding. So then I said Matt, we ought to sit down. And have a conversation about the story that you just brought to life. And he said, well, why would we do that? And I said, so you can look at the story through the lens of a morality play and explain to me through basic biblical principles, why it is you think I wrote what I wrote. And I can tell you why I think I wrote what I wrote. And it'll be the story behind the story. And you and I all have this conversation in the wake of the aforementioned tale. Are you tracking all this? This sounds like good TV to me. Have you found a network, a place to put this show? Because TBN. They're going down. It's going to air exclusively on Matt's Facebook page at this point. No, we're on TBN. Saturday nights, 9 o'clock. Yes, I know. Yes, I know. So you're the host of the show, Eric. It's your job to know you. Well, I'm excited about this because it's actually when you hear something like the story behind the story you think, that has to be taken that title because it's such a good title. The story behind the story. So I'm excited just for that, just the fact that you got that intellectual property. But you mentioned Paul Harvey earlier and look, this is why so many Americans love you because you love America and you love working people. And when you mention Paul Harvey, it's a touchstone for so many people. His voice, his sensibility, his love for this country and the values of this country. It doesn't get a lot better than Paul Harvey. And the rest of the story. Do you have a favorite.

Matt crouch Eric Paul Harvey Matt Mike Rowe New York Times Al Mike Facebook America
"rowe" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

05:44 min | 9 months ago

"rowe" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"We're out of time. Folks, I just want to remind you, John told us to read Sam Alito's opinion, find it online and read it. You can also read the data key da, one of the earliest Christian documents. It's not part of the canon of scripture, but it tells you that they knew abortion was evil in the first century AD in case you're wondering about that. I also want to remind you, Socrates in the city may 31st, we have Apollo 16 astronaut Charlie duke walked on the moon 50 years ago exactly very exciting. Thanks for listening and John. Always a pleasure, my friend. Thank you so much. Thank you. Tell me Eric, why is relief factor so successful at lowering or eliminating pain? I'm often asked that question, the owners of relief factor tell me they believe our bodies were designed to heal. That's right, designed to heal, and I agree with them. So the doctors who formulated relief factor for them selected the four best ingredients, yes, 100% drug free ingredients, each helps your body deal with inflammation. Each of the four ingredients deals with inflammation from a different metabolic pathway, and that right there approaching from four different angles may be why so many people find such wonderful relief. So if you've got back pain, shoulder neck hip knee or foot pain from exercise or just getting older, you should order the three week quick start discounted to only 1995 to see if it will work for you. It works for me. It has for about 70% of the half a million people who've tried it and have ordered more, go to relief factor dot com or call 800 for relief to find out about this offer, feel the difference. Hey folks, if you could make money off of abortion or pornography, would you do it? I hope the answer is no. But I want to tell you, Robert Nestlé, the founder of inspire insight dot com, he was the president of his local pro life pregnancy center. When he discovered that he owned investments in three companies manufacturing abortion drugs, well, God helped him to see that he was making money from abortion pornography LGBT activism and the list goes on. And that's why he created inspire insight dot com, inspire insight dot com, gives you instant access to biblical values data on over 23,000 stocks, mutual funds and ETFs. So you can invest to the glory of God. You need to go to inspire insight dot com today and screen your four-o-one-ks, IRAs and other investment accounts. I did and I was shocked. Now I'm able to clean out the junk and invest in companies actually doing good things go to inspire insight dot com today and register for free. That's inspire insight dot com, go there. Hey there folks, welcome to the airport Texas. So I like to call it the Arkham Texas show because my name is Eric metaxas and it's my show. Now listen, every now and again in show biz, the brass, the people in charge at the network tell you we want you to puff somebody. He's a nobody. We want to make a star. We've invested in him. We want you to play ball. Are you ready to play ball, Eric? And I said, what's in it for me? And they said they would renew my contract. And I said, you know, that's not good enough. But anyway, we worked out a deal. And so today I'm obliged contractually to talk to, is it Mike? Mike Rowe, Mike Rowe, welcome. Eric, what a pleasure to be here with you and you're literally dozens of viewers. I can't wait. Uh, yes. And isn't it sad that you have to come on a show this low rated to pump up your show that the barely exists? Now listen, pal, I've had it with you. I'd fire him. Is it really going to be like this for 25 minutes? No, no, he couldn't be. He couldn't be. We would die. Here's the issue. Here's the issue. I like you so much. My love language is to make fun of people in public. That's how you know I like you. I like you. But let me like you back. Let me just say to the audience because I believe there's a couple of people tuning in, that the reason I'm talking to you today is because you're launching a show on this very network. It's called the story behind the story behind the story behind the story behind the story. It airs Saturday nights at 9 p.m.. That's basically, that's like, that's a big time on TV. A lot of people are going to watch your show. Don't get nervous. But I think it's just something. Here's my issue. Got it. I want to know about this show. But before I ask you about this show, don't do me a favor, do my audience for most people know who you are. But if somebody says to you, Mike Rowe, who are you, what are you known for? What do you say? I'm dying to hear this. Oh, son of John and Margaret. One of three boys, the oldest. And not necessarily the most successful, but certainly the busiest. You may know me from shows like dirty jobs. Somebody's got to do it. Returning the favor. A podcast called the way I heard it, a foundation called micro works, various and sundry endorsement deals with all sorts of corporations that will ring a bell. And that kind of thing. With corporations in the business. You're not a great artist like Al sharpton, like going to companies and telling them. No, not like the Al sharpton and I are often confused. Not exactly like.

Sam Alito Charlie duke Robert Nestlé Eric Mike Rowe John Eric metaxas Socrates Texas Arkham Mike Margaret Al sharpton
"rowe" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:36 min | 9 months ago

"rowe" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Folks, welcome to hour two. We will continue our conversation with John Muir in a second, and then after that, we talked to Mike Rowe. Yeah, we got one of those big name guests, Mike Rowe coming up here. I want to remind you of two things. First of all, May 31st, we have Apollo 16 astronaut Charlie duke, the youngest man ever to walk on the moon. He's 86. He's still the youngest man ever to have walked on the moon. He and his wife will be in New York City for a very special Socrates in the city event. May 31st, Tuesday night, you can get tickets at Socrates in the city dot com while supplies last. There's still some early bird tickets available. Do not miss it. It's going to be really special. I will tell you about it more at another time, but you don't wait because it's going to sell out. This is a very big deal. Did I mention he walked on the moon? Okay. Let me also tell you that we are through CSI on this program. If you go to metaxas talk dot com, you want to do something to help the Ukrainian refugees. These are people who are suffering folks, okay? They didn't ask for this to happen. They are suffering. We want you to go to metaxas talk dot com. You will see the banner and we would be really grateful to you for your help. CSI always asked us to help them in what they're doing because they know that the people who listen to this program have compassion and understand that when people are suffering our job is to step up and to do what we can. So please go to metaxas talk dot com. You'll see the banner, $280 helps someone for an entire month. This is food, medical supplies, all kinds of stuff. We really need your help. You know this is a crisis right now. We don't want this to escalate, but these people who are fleeing need your help, they need my help, and I want to ask you to do that. I also want to tell you, by the way, before we get John's Merrick back, that we are on this program saying that anybody who donates to metaxas talk dot com to the CSI, anybody who donates, we will put your name in a hat and Albin and I will sign a raft of books to you. We will get you hats and t-shirts, but lots of signed books. My book is atheism dead. All of that kind of stuff, and anyone who can give a tax deductible gift of $10,000, I'd be delighted to spend the evening with you. It's always my joy to thank people in person. So please don't forget to go to my taxes talk dot com. We do need your help. In any event, let's go back to.

Mike Rowe Charlie duke John Muir New York City Merrick Albin John
"rowe" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

03:08 min | 11 months ago

"rowe" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"I am envious of people that can go do sporting adventures that are not necessarily dangerous, but kind of risky and expensive. Like people that can rent a helicopter and go find fresh powder. And then mountains of Alberta. Well, I'm going to go big and broad here. I envy anyone who is an adventurer or who has ever been good at playing any sport ever. New sports were not horrible, horrible, got really tall. Really quick. Didn't know how those limbs could go together. It was a lot of falling down. Let's do, let's do one more. I'm envious of dogs and how simple their lives are and that they don't have to pay rent. Yeah. Yeah, yeah, my dogs are really, really. Okay, well, I envy dogs for that exact reason, but also dogs like my dogs, that when they're two of them and they seem made for each other. And it was just happenstance that they were rescued around the same time, but they've got a soul mate, and they didn't do anything to work for it. That's a great one. Is there anything else you want to talk about before we wrap up? No, it was really fun to talk. Yeah, I'm really glad we got to dive into MD and thanks for sharing all that stuff about the pure and scrupulosity so fascinating. And Maggie's book is called easy. Easy street and it's so good. It's so good. And people I imagine can get it anywhere they want. Social media they can follow you at oh, I have a website Maggie Rowe author dot com. And Rowe is ROWE. Yes. Thanks so much, Maggie. Thanks. Truly enjoyed that. Truly enjoy that. And she is a great writer, check her stuff out. We are sponsored this week by fields when they approached me about advertising on the show. They make CBD products. And the first thing I said was, well, I'm a sober person. So as long as I'm talking about and trying products that have THC levels that are below the lethal limit, I'm totally totally fine with that because I do take CBD. For insomnia and joint pain and stuff like that. And they said, no problem. They do have products that have THC below the legal limit. The THC is the psychoactive part in the cannabis plant. And I tried their products and they're great. They have a variety of them. They have pills. They have tinctures. You can put under your tongue. They have varying strengths.

Maggie Rowe Alberta Maggie Rowe ROWE insomnia
"rowe" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

10:33 min | 11 months ago

"rowe" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"You're in the right place. I am here with Maggie Rowe, who was performer in author, got a book out now called easy street, which is it's so good. I was telling Maggie before we started recording that your sense of character and your ability to not only describe other people in a way that paints such a vivid picture, but your ability to describe your inner life and your emotional battles and your negative self talk. Is it's so great. It's so great. Thanks. I love the first line of the book, which is I am not a good person. I was like, you had me at that. You had me at that. And then you talk in the book about some of the struggles you've had in the past. And I want to touch on each of them. But the first one I want to talk about is you talk about having pure OCD for those that don't know. Talk about pure OCD and what that means in your particular brand of it. Yes, this is my very peculiar particular brand. So pure O, or pure OCD, is the internal obsessive part without the corresponding physical compulsions. So it's intrusive thoughts, basically. Which is different than persevering or being plagued by worry. At least the difference in my mind is that it involves a feedback mechanism, wherein there's this thing operating, which is I don't want to think that and therefore I do. It's that little sticky wicket where I think pure O resides. And when did that first come out of your radar? What did that, what did that look like? Well, it started with me when I grew up as an evangelical Christian and I was told the basic idea you need to accept Jesus as your personal savior, and once you do, all your sins are forgiven, but the idea was except for one. God can forgive everything except for the one which was blaspheming the Holy Spirit. So of course me, everyone else was like, what is the plan for making the Holy Spirit? And the answer was nobody knows, just don't do it. And so in my mind, this imp this strange little mechanism took root, which was, I told myself, don't blaspheme the Holy Spirit. Whatever you do, don't do that. So then I would start saying things that were vile about some member of the Trinity, and then outwardly saying them or internally. Internally. Did you remember, even now I feel like a little bit. But fuck Jesus. Jesus is bullshit. Holy ghost, you're the least favorite of the Trinity. Everyone, you're bullshit. The whole thing is bullshit. I hate you. I hate God. Fuck you all. Fuck out it, you know, whatever horrible. And to be clear, you weren't emotionally connecting with these thoughts. It's more like your brain was just taking a shit and you were witnessing it. Yeah, it was the idea that more than anything I did not want to blaspheme the Holy Spirit. That was my number, it's kind of similar to the don't think about pink elephants on the wall or white bears on the wall. Eve, don't eat that. It's like this thing where because you're not supposed to do it, it happens. It's also the idea that the prohibition implies the action. So as soon as I say, don't think about pink elephants, pink elephants is in that sentence. So as soon as I say, don't blaspheme. And so sometimes it would just become so pure and talk about pure that I would just say blaspheme. I would just say it. It's like, don't say it. And then I would do it. Don't do it. And Catholicism also shames thoughts, which is one of the cruelest things you can do to a human being because as somebody in my support group said one time, we can't control whether or not a bird lands on our head, but we can certainly try to not let it build a nest there. Yes. But with pure O, it's like you can't even stop it from building a nest. Yeah. Yeah. It's a real and it seems like it would not be that troubling of a phenomenon like it's like, well, so you're thinking words, you don't want to think. But what was difficult for me was this sense of being internally under attack. Under attack from within. Which is like, and just this horrible feeling of like, well, if I don't want this, why am I doing it? And then what is I? And the whole thing is a very uncomfortable phenomenon. And did you share this with anybody? Yes, eventually. And how old were you when this year? I was super early. So that started maybe 6 or 7. Kind of as soon as I accepted Jesus as my personal savior, I was like, all of a sudden, the world got very, very serious. The stakes were enormous. And this is kind of an image that I remember of it, it was something that happened, but it kind of serves as a token for me. It's like, oh yeah, that's what it was. I remember me and my Friends were spinning around on the lawn. It was like, get so dizzy that you fall down and then you giggle. And we were all doing that with that little skirt. It's a blah blah blah. And I was having so much fun. And then I fell down once and I had this thought, and I was like, why aren't I working out my Salvation? Why aren't one of the phrases that and why aren't I haven't I witnessed to these girls? You know, it's just this heavyness that came on very, very suddenly. Anyway, I talked to my parents about it who were wonderful. But. Weren't psychologists. They weren't psychologists. And then they, in a great spirit, were like, I think you need to get baptized. I think you need to get baptized before the normal age. So I got baptized before my Friends. I think I was, I don't know, 9 or something. And the idea was maybe if it was a great idea, actually. Maybe if you have this external validation of your Salvation in front of a group of people, a ritual, maybe that will ease your internal strife. It didn't. It upped it. And the fact that it didn't relieve me felt like proof that there was a real problem. Anyway, baptism, but as part of the baptism process, I talked to my pastor. Who I really think was a decent fellow, but I remember the thing he said to me, he meant it was a compliment, but it was like, gosh, I'm not worried about my self esteem right now. He said, well, those were mighty big questions for such a little girl. And it was like, yeah. And what are the answers? How do I start? Yeah, good for me. You know? I'm a real thinker. Thanks, pet. I was gonna say his name, don't need to. Thanks, pastor. And then I did not see a psychologist about it until I was 19, and I admitted myself to a psychiatric facility. Evangelical psychiatric facility. The irony of going to an evangelical psychiatric facility for religiosity or whatever the word is for your velocity was what they scrupulosity. Diagnosed it is. Now, in retrospect, so here was the thing that showed that it was a problem right away. Their slogan was psychiatry where the Bible comes first. So right away. We're putting, we're putting doctrine ahead of your well-being. Drink your way to sobriety. Yeah, right, right. But what I felt and I think it was true was if I had gone to a secular organization, I don't know that they would have helped me. They would have said hell isn't real. It's a scare tactic from the Middle Ages, drop it, move on. And I wouldn't have been able to. So this place did meet me at a place where I could be met. And to their credit, from the very beginning, because I went in for a fear of just overwhelming sense of going to hell. I was just terrified. To their credit at no point did any of them say you should worry about your Salvation. They absolutely said, this is a mental disorder. You have been forgiven, you did it, you said the prayer right, you're okay, you need to believe it. So. They were well meaning. They were well meaning and it was I couldn't at that moment have gotten rid of the notion of hell. I couldn't do it. I needed this kind of halfway point of people going, yeah, it's real. And yeah, you got to be worried about all of your friends. But you're okay. So it was ultimately very helpful for me. And did that help her relieve the pure at least temporarily? Well, here's how it helped. I had several problematic therapists, but I had one that I loved, who told me this slogan, it was from Martin Luther, who himself had scrupulosity..

Maggie Rowe Trinity Maggie Martin Luther
"rowe" Discussed on The Way I Heard It with Mike Rowe

The Way I Heard It with Mike Rowe

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"rowe" Discussed on The Way I Heard It with Mike Rowe

"Well. There's chuck in Where you again. Carolina beach yes. Carolina beach north carolina. You were there last week when we did this. I was. Yeah this is two weeks in a row and it worked last week right like that. Podcast actually got up at happened. It is people can hear it right now. Joining us from the home. The one and only peggy rowe. Hi mom hold our mike. Hi chuck. Hi peggy how are you good. Thank you too. But he's watching the news. I'm sure he'll make an appearance scheduled or unscheduled and we'll deal with the inevitable audio issues when that happens but we've come to the end of the book so nothing else really matters at this point. Mom you are the final guest on the final episode of the way. I heard it as it pertains to slow unpacking of the book. Thank you first of all for being part of this previously. And how does it feel to be the special honored guest here at the inevitable terminus of said project. Well as you said. I feel honored and mike. I read that chapter again. I really liked that chapter. It just brings everything together sums it up and tells us how it all started. We'll thank you. I'm glad because honestly when we started talking about the way i heard it. We really didn't have a plan full disclosure. We were just looking for a new way to charge more money to more advertisers by creating more content. Jukka shaking his head because this is one of the things has the producer of this fake. Podcast he hates this level of disclosure. But as you know mom this whole thing has been an experiment by my entire career has been an experiment and part of that experiments constantly trying to find new ways to ring a little bit of money out of unsuspecting sponsors. So thank you for being part of that too. You know mike. I always tell people that you fly by the seat of your pants and it's so true and it was never more apparent than this past week when you visited the home and did a tv interview and it was such fun and and people have been telling me since then how much they enjoyed it. And i say you know when you have an interview with mike you just never know which direction you're gonna be going yet. We'll chuck this may or may not be be true. I think it's largely true but the apple did not fall far from the tree. We're in the home where my mom and dad are now. Living of which there are what twenty two hundred residents mom. Twenty three hundred. I learned the other day working so there are a lot of people there. And they have this dedicated internal channel that everybody watches and we were invited to sit down and be interviewed. And i wasn't really sure you know these things. Sometimes you walk into a closet and there's some guy with a flashlight and an iphone going. Hey welcome to the studio. I know it a real studio. They had real camera people and real cameras. And you know there was a thing and so we sit down me my mom my dad and this woman called stephanie who proceeds to interview us and during the open to the show as we're approaching it..

peggy rowe chuck Carolina beach Jukka mike peggy north carolina apple stephanie
"rowe" Discussed on The Way I Heard It with Mike Rowe

The Way I Heard It with Mike Rowe

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"rowe" Discussed on The Way I Heard It with Mike Rowe

"Hey guys it's micro. This is the way. I heard it episode number two thirteen at it's called. It's not what you'd call a page turner on this episode chuck and i unpack the final chapter of my book with a little help from a very special guest who has become the undisputed audience. Favourite on this podcast. Some of you know. Whereas miss peggy others as america's grandmother me i call her mom. Oh yes in mere moments. The one and only margaret rowe will stop by to evaluate my final chapter pass judgment on my literary choices. Correct my grammar evaluate my wardrobe and offer the somewhat less-than-charitable critique that inspired the title of this episode. It's not what you'd call a page turner. She's also here to bring me up to speed on her exciting life in the retirement community where she and my dad now happily reside and if that doesn't sound exciting enough let me say it another way my mom the wisest woman i've ever met jams me into her very busy schedule to talk candidly about the process of writing from the heart. Of letting go of things you love and adjusting to a new schedule of mahjong. Botchy ball book clubs billiard tournaments shuffleboard and making new friends. It's really a conversation about letting go of that which you simply do not need. And it picks up where the last chapter left off just below the streets of san francisco where our hero finds himself at long last face to face with the inescapable truth of his own identity in the bowels of the sewer where his long journey finally comes to an end or depending on how you look at it a new beginning either way. It is the final chapter of a book that my mother claims to love even though she just told me. And i'm quoting. It's not what you'd call a page turner. I was devastated by that critique. Naturally until i realized she was referring to the audio version. You're listening to presently aversion with no pages to turn a version that comes to its logical conclusion right now and by right now i mean right after i remind you that new beginnings are precisely what millions of americans are looking for right now and precisely why employers have all kinds should take a moment to post a.

margaret rowe turner peggy chuck america san francisco
"rowe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:10 min | 1 year ago

"rowe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Rowe Price invest with confidence This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm also Chang in Los Angeles and I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington today saw a rise in violence between Israelis and Palestinians. Violence, which both sides threatened could get worse. Still, here's what we know this weekend saw street clashes in Jerusalem today saw Hamas rocket fire towards Jerusalem. No injuries reported, But it does mark an escalation. Now, Palestinians say at least 20 people, including nine Children, were killed by Israeli airstrikes in the Gaza Strip. Israel would not confirm that but did say it has been carrying out strikes against militants in Gaza. NPR's Daniel Estrin is tracking all this. He's on the line from Jerusalem now. Hey, Daniel. Hi, Mary Louise Hay So we should know These were the first reports of civilians killed in this latest cycle of the conflict here. What do we know? We know that after Palestinian rocket fire reached the outskirts of Jerusalem, Israel carried out several strikes and a Palestinian human rights group in Gaza has been tracking them. They say One strike killed five people that another killed nine that a pair of strikes killed eight. And Children have been reported killed. Many people injured as well. The Israeli military is not commenting immediately on reports of civilian deaths. But it does say a targeted three militants. Okay is the Israeli military is not commenting. What about the Israeli leadership and Hamas? What are they saying about what they're up to? And where this might be headed? The Hamas. Their militant leader has warned that if Israel bomb civilian infrastructure or homes that Hamas will be responding with strong, painful measures beyond the enemy's expectations is the quote. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has said that Gaza militants have crossed the red line by firing rockets reaching close to Jerusalem. And he warned that Israel would respond with force. And he also warned Israeli citizens to brace themselves and said that the current conflict could continue for some time We're talking about maybe days, according to military officials. And why now? The backdrop is that there have been clashes between mostly between Palestinians and Israeli police for for weeks in Jerusalem. That's right. It's been a string of events that's really built up over the last month. I mean, first, Palestinians have been clashing with police over what police said was crowd control at a popular gathering spot on Ramadan. We saw a lot of street fighting between civilians. A controversy over court ordered evictions of Palestinians from their homes in a neighborhood in Jerusalem to make way for Jewish settler groups, and Hamas warned that Israel would pay if it did not stop these evictions. The U. S was also concerned about these evictions. Israeli officials try to defuse tensions delayed a court ruling on the evictions. Perhaps some of those measures were too late because we've been seeing large crowds gathering for the last days of Ramadan in Jerusalem and hundreds of Palestinians. Have been wounded, clashing with police there. I suppose the other context people should have in their minds as they hear about this is this follows a deadlocked Israeli election and follows a Palestinian election that was canceled. But what is the political context for both sides? That's right. Palestinian elections were postponed, Hamas was seen poised to win. But in Gaza, Hamas has not been very popular lately after more than a decade of ruling Gaza under blockade And many, many wars. Hamas has adopted the banner of defending Jerusalem, and this makes it popular as in a zoo for Israel. There's a leadership vacuum. Netanyahu's rivals are trying to form a new government and trying to unseat him. Some say that the tensions here favor Netanyahu. He has already said that this moment of fighting is a test of leadership. Whoever is an incapable of leading and withstanding This pressure is unfit for leadership, he says. NPR's Daniel Estrin reporting from Jerusalem. Thank you, Daniel. You're welcome. Gains with suburban voters helped Joe Biden win the presidency. Suburbs were long Republican terrain, but they're moved to the left accelerated with the rise of Donald Trump. MPR's Don Gonyea checks in with suburban voters in Pennsylvania to see how they're feeling about Biden and Trump now Hate Huns. Burger works as a fundraiser for a college outside Philadelphia. She lives in the nearby suburbs. She is 32 married with two cats. She describes her politics this way. I was a Republican for a long time. Then came 2015. When Donald Trump emerged as a GOP contender, she became a Democrat, Huns. Berger says she's more moderate than many in her new party, but feels at home nonetheless. She sees President Biden as a fellow moderate. I think he's doing exactly what needs to be done right now, which is a clear focus on trying Togut the pandemic under control, trying to get us back to normal, and she's glad that Biden is pushing a big infrastructure and jobs plan. If you've driven through Pennsylvania, you probably know about our wonderful potholes. So anything to help with that. But the moderate in her says she wants Biden to work with Republicans on the plans Sizemore than anything, she expresses relief that Trump is no longer president. The last four years have been so traumatizing. Hey, he too, you said, But I do not use that word lightly that the progress that is the Mayfield's refreshing now to another Philadelphia suburb, and another former Republican, Luis Morales, who's retired from a career in the banking industry. In Biden. He sees a lot he likes. Even before he was elected. He knew what he wanted to do when he when he got in there, a lot of it was reversing some of Trump's actions. Morella says he'd like to see bipartisanship in Washington. To that end, he does not want Democrats to eliminate the Senate filibuster. But he stresses that Republicans have to bargain in good faith, too. He says. This of the GOP today it just don't seem to want to play fair right now, For example, their quests not only at the national level, but at the at the local levels, in particular the state levels to change, you know, change voting laws and make voting more more stringent to me, that's evil. Head to central in western Pennsylvania and the suburbs aren't quite as Democratic as they are around Philly. We listened in on a recent focus group moderated by Sarah Long well for the Republican Accountability Project. Thanks for joining us. I'm gonna go over just a couple housekeeping things. The gathering was via zoom. The nine participants were all college educated suburban voters, all of whom watch conservative cable news outlets such as Fox and News, Max. We agreed to use first names only for the focus group. Howard expressed the view of much of the group about the Biden administration..

Joe Biden Mary Louise Kelly Daniel Sarah Long Donald Trump Trump Daniel Estrin Biden Gaza Strip Pennsylvania Gaza Los Angeles Luis Morales 2015 Washington Jerusalem Philadelphia Don Gonyea Netanyahu Howard
"rowe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:49 min | 1 year ago

"rowe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Rowe Price committed to helping investors closed the gap towards reaching their retirement goals. T. Rowe Price INVEST With CONFIDENCE It's Morning Edition on W. N Y C a Michael Hill New housing developments in the city require a certain amount of parking for cars nearby or on site. But a new development coming to Sunset Park Brooklyn, is requiring onside parking for working cyclists. W. N. Y c. Stephen Nessen reports, Sunset Park has been the site of fierce battles over new developments and gentrification. So when developers proposed a 14 story residential and commercial building at the site of a local Dunkin Donuts on Fourth Avenue The community board came up with a unique requirement. Secure bike parking for the delivery workers of the neighborhood. You're going to have 100 plus spaces above a subway station. To lock your bike lock and forget about it. That's Shabbas Stewart, founder and CEO of UNI, the company that makes eye catching, digitally connected bike parking pods. There's already one outside of Brooklyn's Atlantic Terminal and Journal Square in Jersey City. Stuart was brought on board with the Sunset Park developers to think about how his secure bike system could work in a building that sits above a subway station and in the renderings. The plan is far from your typical bike parking in a dingy basement, the greenery to seethe wall, stop carefully through to see the skylight to see you know the screens that have the transit arrival times, right? Have the by Lingle's, You know displays. Stewart says 33% of the spots will be reserved for free for working cyclists in Sunset Park delivery workers. Particularly ones that rely on expensive $2000 e bikes for their jobs, risk theft or worse. In East Harlem, a delivery worker recently refused to give up his bike and was fatally shot. For Stuart. His bike storage is a way to protect vulnerable New Yorkers who may lose work if they lose their bike. For some, this is a matter of Can I feed my family? Can I send money back home? You know, I don't want to say that bike, parking his life and death. But this is going to be a facility that allows people to safeguard their livelihoods. It's a great idea, according to Glenn, DC, tourists an organizer with lost delivery steps. You need us, which advocates for working cyclists. But she says delivery workers need secure places to leave their bikes all over the five boroughs will be great. Her places like that and tired, silly, But this is not the case. The city currently has 56,000 parking spots for bikes, not nearly enough to meet the demand that grew during the pandemic. Loony founders about Stuart hopes future developments in the city will be required to include secure, accessible bike parking on site. Just like the one coming to Sunset Park. Stephen Nessen w N. Y C news It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm No. Well, King. Good morning. Now we have a look at the city of mar up in Yemen. It is a place that illustrates just how difficult it is to pursue a peace deal in that country. Here's NPR's Ruth Sherlock. It's me, Hamas. You must let me a scone, Hallie and human units. Mama's All Muslim. Me is the first year medical student in the city of Mara been northern Yemen. When we reach her by phone, she tells us in recent years, this was one of the safest places to be here. Send sabotaging my friends and I could go out. Enjoy places go to parks walk around together. These days, though the people of Ma robe terrified Yemen's Houthi rebels are advancing on the city on the front line is now just a few miles away, Miss Mata Hari. Come on, We hear the war. Houthi drones fly over us and more than once they've hit inside the city and in residential neighborhoods, women and Children have died. A little background on the war. The Houthi is captured Yemen's capital saner in 2015, Saudi Arabia, then intervened militarily because it was an ally of that government. And the reviews were backed by Saudis. Regional rival Iran. The U. S supported Saudis efforts with equipment and intelligence, Mara remained under government control. The Saudis poured money into the city, and it became a hub for their operations. Refugees took shelter there. The province even built a new soccer stadium and university. Now. Mattie Mohammed, a resident of married who works for the Center Center for Strategic Studies think tank, says the fact that the Houthi is now threatened. The city shows just how badly the US backed Saudi intervention in Yemen has gone silent. Well what, of course Sorry, has failed. The Houthis now control even more of Yemen and they have the upper hand. They now have drones that they used to attack inside Saudi Arabia. Some of those attacks is said to be with Iranian made weapons. Saudi Arabia says This highlights why it's important for it to be in the war in Yemen, trying to keep an Iranian backed group off its border. But Peter Salisbury, a senior Yemen and list of the International Crisis Group, says, if anything, the Saudi intervention in the war has only deepened Iran's involvement with Ruthie's in Yemen because they've been so successful. Who these air much more attractive proposition to Iran now than they were even six years ago. Salisbury says Saudi Arabia failed to unite an effective coalition against the Ruthie's. It's the hooches against this really fragmented, complex group off local actors who have kind of in premature of the government on them, he says, though, that the Houthis will still have trouble taking mad up. Many of those defending the area and then from local tribes who reject the Houthi is politics and different religious beliefs. This is gonna be a long, really messy fight, he says. For the Ruthie's, even just keeping up the fight from Arab is a victory. It demoralizes the Saudi backed factions and puts the Ruthie's in a stronger negotiating position for peace talks. President Biden has promised to use diplomacy to end the war in Yemen, but the battle for Morrow may still have a long way to go. Ruth Sherlock NPR NEWS Beirut It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noel King, and I'm Steve Inskeep. MARKETPLACE Morning reporters coming up next on W N. Y. C and later on morning edition..

Noel King Steve Inskeep Peter Salisbury Mattie Mohammed Stuart Ruth Sherlock $2000 33% 2015 East Harlem Brooklyn Yemen NPR Shabbas Stewart UNI 14 story Mara Journal Square Stewart International Crisis Group
"rowe" Discussed on Mental Health Comedy

Mental Health Comedy

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"rowe" Discussed on Mental Health Comedy

"Before we leave. We're going to leave in a minute here but mike. I just wanted to run down a couple of quick things. Show you you know you can answer comedic or just a realistic thing of what you do. These are situations that would come up in a comedy club. Hello situations at hello. Good morning lookout. Hello hello here we go. This is sort of like a bombing awareness. Kid someone is talking in a normal voice having a conversation in the front row while you're on stage. Guess what do you do. I call my mom. Tell her to show up and take me home. Yeah that's true. That's that's the right answer that no that's the number. One answer drunk woman yells out. Say something funny. I say mom. Sit down exactly okay. Waiters and waitresses are dropping checks as you hit the stage. Why do you got to bring people into this. Okay of a friend wants to talk with you just before you go on a million. I say mom sit down. No go sit down with the checks for dropping them. Go health club owner asks you to do. Fourteen birthday announcements and attributed to his cousin can discount off of my time to do two minutes. Yeah exactly you do your in texas at a club and you're doing your anti-gun material and the audience starts blowing. I say be careful. It's to shop minimum rehearsed these now you will. I knew you would know you start making fun of the clan and the audience starts pulling because they think you're endorsing the clan. Do i get paid by the door. Or is it a flat fee. it's It's the sheet hitting the fan. I see okay so the the audience has just arrived from a china junket and no one speaks english. There's a little impression called the rock groups chicago. You always been there covers it. Yes you have a bomb proof that we have to talk more. Tell them where they can get the book. The book is on amazon. It's on at my publisher's website. Bear manor media dot com. And it's at barnes and noble online. Or you can come by my house outside it for twenty bucks okay. And it's called. It's a funny thing. How the professional comedy business made me fat and bald love it. Okay well mike. It's been a pleasure and you're gonna come back you come back. We have a lot more to talk about jennifer. thank you. We've taken you into the writer's room. I think we're doing a new kind of therapy. Called writer's room syrupy to how goes try the techniques. Let us know. Yeah yeah. I will her. I wanna thank you folks For listening you folks. I'm getting very folksy for listening. The mental health comedy podcasts. And you can get us wherever you. Subscribe to your podcast. Any serve amazon apple. I to whatever it is you can get it You can find out about us on our social pages on facebook and instagram. I wanted you to take care of yourselves on. Thank jennifer kalari and micro. Keep coming back at work if you work it. I'm ed crasnick..

jennifer kalari twenty bucks texas amazon ed crasnick two minutes micro barnes and noble mike amazon apple instagram jennifer Bear manor media dot com facebook One answer Fourteen birthday announcement english china health club chicago