19 Burst results for "Rotella"

"rotella" Discussed on No Laying Up

No Laying Up

04:34 min | Last week

"rotella" Discussed on No Laying Up

"Because this might be my next major champion. This might be the next great player I get to spend time with. That's my kick in life. I don't know why I get a bigger kick out of helping people with their dreams. And that that's what fulfills my dreams. Like the tour players will say, you never tell you'd fly around the world to help me win a golf tournament. But you wouldn't fly around the world to play in a golf term. And they look at me and say, I'd fly around the world, doctor win a tournament, but I wouldn't go next door to help someone else win a tournament. And I go, well, we're different. And that's okay. But I mean, but I mean, I think you've got to get ideas in your head and not let people take them away from you. And if you had a coach or a teacher, it didn't believe, well then you got to believe. And you got to focus on all the reasons why it could happen to you. And that's why I talk a lot about you have to feel like you're destined to do something unbelievable with your career. And that's definitely something you create in your mind. It's something you make up. It's like your ideas for your life. And that's what gives you passion. That's what gets you up in the morning. And you know, for some people retire, golf is the reason for getting up in the morning. It's like they got a new goal. I tell a story about a client and my name Gary birkhead. I mean, who at 60 retired? And that was this whole thing. He said, I watch a lot of people when they retire if they didn't have a new goal or a new dream, they kind of vegetated and didn't last long. And he said, I got to have a new goal. And for him, golf was a new goal. And it's like, so I mean, you got to have something that excites you. Well, I, for one, I'm very excited to play golf today after all of this. I'm ready to ready to channel all this. I'm ready to turn the corner on this, but we'll go light it up. Let's get you out here on this. Tell us and we'll talk some about it but tell us about make your next shot your best shot and where people can find that and what they'll find within that. Well, I mean, you can find it and Barnes and noble bookstores all over the place. You can get on Amazon, Simon and shoots are predicted. I wrote it with roger Schiffman, who worked for golf digest for years. It was great to work with. Basically, it's like some new ideas about attitude about thinking. We did a whole chapter on I was the first person with a gentleman from the University of Virginia research pro named Bruce ganza. We were the first people to do a statistical analysis of the tour stats. And I like our stats a lot better than some of the modern stats. Because I think they only apply the tour players. And I try to show statistics how basically for course management and for what you had to spend your time practicing. But I mean, a lot of it is talking about the difference between precocious kids and late bloomers. A lot of it is about being able to delay gratification and really having persistence. A lot of it is about getting through times when you're working your tail off and not getting any better. And you got to keep believing. It's new ideas that are slightly different. It's sharing with the world of amateur and pro golfers. What we're learning from the best golfers in the world is the simplest way I can put it. And I've put it, I've put it in a language that anybody can understand and apply. Basically, we're trying to take away all the excuses for not doing it. Like no one can say, I can't make sense out of that. Or that doesn't sound right, or that's too complicated or I don't know what you're talking about. It's really very understandable. Yeah, that's what I've noticed from your books over the years. None of it's overly scientific. It's very much just designed to be put into practice pretty pretty easily. So I think same goes for this episode. No, this is I think digestible and manageable, and it's not intimidating. If anything, it's kind of freeing, I think. So just want to thank you, doctor rodell for coming on, sharing, sharing a lot of this. And we look forward to doing this sometime again in the future appreciate your time. Great being with you, thanks. Be the right club today. That's better than most. How about in. That is better than most. Better than most. Expect anything different?.

golf Gary birkhead roger Schiffman Bruce ganza University of Virginia Barnes Simon Amazon rodell
"rotella" Discussed on No Laying Up

No Laying Up

05:31 min | Last week

"rotella" Discussed on No Laying Up

"The next one is one of the two that's going to determine the outcome. It was one of the greatest football coach of all time. John Wooden won ten national championships at UCLA. He never talked about winning or losing. He talked about when the game is over. If we were behind, all it means is we simply ran out of time. If the game had lasted long enough, we would eventually come out on top. But someone decided it lasts 40 minutes and who was ahead at 40 is the winner. I tell golfers, sometimes you run out of holes. But let's put a game plan together. We go out and execute it to run out of holes. Sometimes people in TV when they ask me about it. They can't stand it when I talk about I just want you to play your own game. And they're on TV talking about everybody's paying attention every leaderboard. And well, first of all, no one talks about how many people have lost tournaments because they got too distracted by what was going on the leaderboard. Second of all, leaderboards aren't necessarily official. So they could be wrong. But more importantly, it just makes it harder to stay in the present moment. And I want everyone to give every shot in the same equal low level of importance. And starting to get concerned about leaderboard. So people say, so what are they afraid to no, they're not afraid to look at leaderboards? They assume before the round started that they were going to win if they went out and executed their game plan. So the other players are irrelevant or immaterial to us. It's like, I want to win the battle with myself. And if I win the battle with myself, I'll win the tournament and everyone will kiss my butt. That's the game we're into. And could you look at leaderboards? My experience even with tour players is if you've won a lot recently, you could look at leaderboards and still have peace of mind and stay in the present because it wouldn't mean anything to you other than yep. I knew I was going to win before it started. It wouldn't have any emotional or psychological effect on you. But even players that have won several times, if they haven't won in a couple years or maybe a year, it starts becoming too meaningful for a lot of players. Now, if you happen to have the lowest metabolism in the world and you're unbelievably comfortable with winning and you can convince yourself and me that you can look at leaderboards and it helps you, well, then I'd tell you to look at leaderboards. But all I can tell you is most people would be a lot better off. In every sport, if they just played their game and lived in a moment in trust of the outcome would take care of itself. On the non golf side, you've helped people with stage fright, writer's block. You've helped people at Fortune 500 companies. What makes what you do in the gulf space transferable to other areas of business or other sports or things like that? Well, I think it's pretty simple. Do you want to be great or do you want to be average? Are you trying to separate yourself from everybody else who does what you do? Or do you want to just be like everybody else? And then you ask them, where do you think you belong? What's good enough for you? And why did you choose that? If you had a high school coach in whatever sport you played, who told you on day one? Well, you know, you don't have much talent. You could only be pretty good. You're never going to be really good. How many of you would love that coach? If you live in a city and you support an NFL team and they hire a new coach and a coach goes on TV and goes, well, you know, if we could be 500, I think that'd be unbelievable for us. How many of you would have said, well, I love that coach, man. He's awesome. He's lighting my fire. You know, nobody would. And then a lot of people with their own lives go to school, and when they go to college, they think, wow, I can do anything I put my mind to. I'm really smart. Man, I'm unbelievable. And by the time they graduate, hang around other smart kids, who are dedicated, they figured out, I'm not as good as I used to think I was. I can't do all the things I used to think I could do it. I'd say, if that's what you learn and from your college education, you're spending a lot of money to really ruin your life. And your career. And, you know, you want to, as you grow up, you want to get more confident you want to have bigger ideas for your life or your company. You want to enlarge your dreams and if everyone's telling you how much they love how realistic you are, you better stop and take a look at yourself and say, wow, what am I doing? Because it's really about looking for ways to separate yourself from everybody else who does what you do. And I don't tell people what their dreams ought to be. I just want to make sure people don't lower their dreams or give up on their dreams as they grew up because they convince themselves they couldn't do it. And that's where having big ideas having patients persistence, the ability to delay gratification because let's face for some people, it might take quite a while to get there. And I'm always telling people, well, what if you give up on your dream like a day or a week before it was all going to fall into place? Maybe the door of opportunity was going to fall in your lap. So like in sales or in businesses like you got to treat every client the way I treat every client. Every client that comes to my house no matter what they've done in their past, my attitude is.

John Wooden UCLA football golf NFL
"rotella" Discussed on No Laying Up

No Laying Up

07:12 min | Last week

"rotella" Discussed on No Laying Up

"That's really simple that makes us feel uncomfortable. And sometimes when I do talks, I tell you, let me just talk to the men here for a moment. Everyone goes, what do you mean? Well, I just want to explain to the men when you miss an easy chip shot or an easy putt, you don't get neutered. In other words, you don't lose your male parts. I've never seen it happen. It's just something you made up in your head. And I said, you don't usually see women who think they're going to lose their femininity with their short game. But you see a lot of men who think they're going to be less of a man. And I go, you know, it doesn't happen. What's it like teaching like the best players in the world for something like the books you write? How similar and how different are the concepts and I don't know if you want to if that relates it all to your most recent book, make your make your next shot, your best shot, but I'm just curious as to how you would compare the similarities and the differences. Well, the main difference is tour players have been doing it for a long time every day, almost for their whole life. There's skill level is higher. They're consistency is better. But I see amateurs that have the same passion, but they've had a career. They've had a job at other things in their life. They were important. In terms of what I teach, it's the same. Now, they're after winning on tour and went in majors and amateurs may be after winning different things than that. But I mean, the whole reason for my books is that don't use a lack of skill as a reason to think poorly. Everybody can think as good as a tour pro. It's just that the ball isn't going to there as frequently or as consistently as a tour player. And you're not playing the same opponents, you know? You know, you're playing a different field. So I mean, that's the good news. But I mean, I think a lot of people want to use that they don't have a certain level of skill to justify thinking poorly. And I'm going to say, well, so you don't have really good technical swing. Why would you think thinking poorly would help that? In other words, even with tour players, it's like, well, we changed our strategy, but we always make sure we think really good every time we're ready to swing. And so everybody can do that. And I just keep updating my books with new and simpler ways of getting there. You know, some of it, like in this next book, you know, we interviewed Tom kite because he's one of the most dedicated hardworking players probably ever play the game of golf. And a guy that I admire a great deal. And Tom talked about being a kid. And he said, you know, I got dropped off at the court sometime around 7 15, 7 30 and my dad's day to work. I'd get two hours of practice in before the other kids got to the course. They get to the course in a few balls and say, let's go play. We'd go play. 18 holes or 27 olds, and we go have lunch. I'd have lunch and I'd go back to the practice area. They'd have one they'd go to the swimming pool for a few hours. My dad would come home from work and we'd go play another 9 or 18. Then we'd go have dinner. After dinner, everyone else in the family to go watch TV. My dad and I had built a green in the backyard and a bunker and we had a nightlight. I'd go out there for several hours and practice pitch and bunker play and putting until it was time to go to bed and I couldn't wait to get up the next morning and do it again the next day. I have a junior academy at my club. And I was reading the kids an interview with the head of the Korean junior national program and someone asked him, you know, why are they so good at it? And he said, well, Korean juniors are more disciplined and more dedicated in single minded, they spend all of their time practicing golf and doing schoolwork. And they do it every day. And then he stopped and said, and they start being dedicated and disciplined at an earlier age than most people from other cultures. I read it to our kids, and I said, I know the people at our club are going to tell you how dedicated hardworking you are, but relative to whom. And I told them there's a lot of research in psychology and idea called perceived exertion. And what it tells us is that people aren't very accurate and their perception of how hard they're practicing or working at something. And some lazy people think they're not working hard enough and so they're always pushing themselves for more. And some really lazy people think they're the hardest workers in the world. And I said, to these kids, I said, if you want to see how far you can go, you just got to understand that some age, by the time you get to 1617, 18 and beyond, you're going to be competing against everybody else in the world. Now, you can either complain that these kids from other countries are too single minded and wanted too much in care too much, or you can decide that's my competition. And let's face a competition is what made America great. It's what makes athletes great. You know, Tom Kate would probably say, I don't know where I would have been as a golfer if I didn't have a kid two years younger than me. Ben Crenshaw at my club beating me all the time as a kid. He said it really helped me. And so I think great competitors understand the better you get. It's going to force me to get better, the better I get, it's going to force you to get better. And it's really what a healthy competitor is all about. And, you know, I think we have to be honest. I mean, some of the difference at the top level is how much time and energy put into it. And some of it is because they have all day to do it. And most people don't. So, you know, it's like everything is relative. You know, so I mean, let's go out and trust whatever you have to the best of your ability. And we've covered off on almost all of the concepts that I think we wanted to cover today. But one thing I wanted to touch on as well is I've heard you emphasize the importance of not being too tuned in with either your score during the middle around your standing in the middle of a tournament. I have personally fallen victim to a lot of these things at many times in both tournaments and just rounds that I have going. I'm always very aware of what I am in relation to par and all that. Why would that be a potential hindrance to somebody on the golf course? Well, because golf is about living in the present moment in playing one child at a time. People say it's a cliche. And yeah, it's a cliche because it works. It's worked forever. It's been an essential skill if you want to get great at golf. Well, you know, I mentioned earlier about getting a routine process that you do on every shot. And do it shot after shot until you run out of holes. And, you know, it's not a crazy idea. Lombardi had a great line. He said every football game comes down to one or two plays that happens somewhere during the game. And he told his team that darn problem is you don't know when those two plays are going to happen. So you better make sure you're totally completely focused on every down in case.

Tom kite golf Tom Kate Tom swimming Ben Crenshaw America Lombardi football
"rotella" Discussed on No Laying Up

No Laying Up

06:19 min | Last week

"rotella" Discussed on No Laying Up

"Nicholas and Tiger were probably the two best correspond of the last 60 years. I mean, they were very conservative strategist. They had tons of patients. If they weren't hitting their driver good, they just hit some other club and put it in play. And it's not a coincidence. They're like doing the greatest ever. But we don't tend to want to learn from that because we don't want to be patient. We want to try stuff, you know? And so I mean, in terms of fear, so the first thing you have to address is, well, do I have the skill from practice experience in this shot? If you do, then you have to train your mind. It's not a skill problem. It's getting past fear. And fear is a mirage, you know? It's just something you made up in your mind. That doesn't actually exist anywhere, but in your mind. If you don't have the skill, well, then admit it and say, what can I do? Just like keimer did. And he found a way to win, which I thought was miraculous. But it's probably not going to work on a week to week basis. So I mean, some of it is like when people change their technique and get better skill. I'm also telling people you have to at least bring your mind up to the level of your skill level. But I would rather have people have their mind ahead of their skill. Because a lot of people improve their skill, and they keep thinking the way they used to think when they didn't have the skill. So I mean, you know, it doesn't do any good to change your skill if you don't bring your mind up to it. But I'd love to have your mind ahead of your skill level. What about even going even further down the ring to things like the yips? I'm wondering if you've worked with people specifically on yip like things. What is actually happening happening when it comes to somebody having the ips on chipping putting anything like that. Even other sports, I think you've worked with people on this. What's the coaching like there? Is it any different than any of the concepts we've talked about to this point? Well, people make up all kinds of stuff about the yep. They love to make it sound scientific and complicated and they love to use big words. The bottom line is when you have the yips, your heads in a bad place. I mean, you're thinking about missing or you're thinking about your hands or you're thinking about having the hips. I mean, you're kind of predicting it to your brain. That means, come on, make my handshake because I want them to. The brain just takes what you get. If all you're doing is thinking about where you want it to go, you're not going to have the yips. But some people don't want to acknowledge that their brain is caving in to those kinds of thoughts. And maybe you had a bad experience. I'm not denying that. At some point, you have to get past it. And, you know, with putting, I would say today, we've come up with so many different grips, and then I would say probably the armlock and people can argue over it being legal or whatever. But I mean, it's probably solved a lot of putting problems. And a whole lot of different groups have. I don't see as many people, you've been with their putters today as I did 20 years ago. I see a lot more people with pitching as they've cut the turf titer and tighter. It still see some people with it with the driver. But I mean, it basically, if you got to get your mind empty and quiet. And it's when you're it's very busy and it's filled with really bad thoughts. Either about the outcome or about your body, not functioning. Now, are there people like certainly people after 50? I mean, there's a lot of people on various medications that might be adding to it. There might be people drinking way too much coffee or Mountain Dew or whatever. But by and large, you've got to get people to be honest. And you got to get a really good mental routine. So a lot of people have a physical routine, hoping it will get your mind in the right place, and it doesn't. So you have to get a really good mental process that you predictable before the round starts. But I mean, I can't say as I spend the majority of my time. I just assume never even talk about the apps. I think there's way too much conversation about it. It ought to be like they'd like to present the yips like it's something that owns me. Instead of, I'm thinking about a poorly right now about my putting or my pitching. Right now, you know, whether it's because you made it too complicated, technically, or because you're worried about the turf or the lie. And you know, I call it a lot of golf junk that you hear. And you have to get rid of all that golf junk. And just see the shot because little kids can do it. I mean, you think about it. Putting in pitching and chipping, 8 and ten year old kids can do. I mean, it's a pretty simple task. I can find some skills that are more complicated, but those are pretty simple. But if you get scared of it, which is basically admitting, God, when I'm scared, I can look pretty bad. You know? When my head's in a bad place, I can look like I don't have any skill. And you know, so you got to get people to be really honest about it. But the tendency for educated people is to start thinking more rather than thinking less. And it doesn't matter if it's a catcher in baseball, who can throw it the second base on a dime if someone's stealing because they don't have time to think. But throwing it back to the pitcher, they think and they start worrying about throwing it into the outfield. Or the second baseman who can't throw it the first, but you put them in third base, and he can throw to first base because it's not so bad if I make a bad throw from third. But if I make a bad throw from second, this is going to look ridiculous. Or in basketball, it's at the free throw line. You know, because this would really be bad if I can't if I shoot an air ball from the free throw line. I've worked with bowlers with bowling. It's like throw strikes. You have to rule the ball over the edge of the gutter. And if I get on national to be in throw gutter balls, man it's going to be really embarrassing. So every sport has something that's really simple that makes us feel uncomfortable. And sometimes when I do talks, I tell you, let me just talk to the men here for a moment..

keimer Nicholas yip golf baseball basketball bowling
"rotella" Discussed on No Laying Up

No Laying Up

06:54 min | Last week

"rotella" Discussed on No Laying Up

"On a piece of paper, what am I doing behind the ball? Let's say you're picking a club and picking a shot. And then you're seeing it when you're either seeing it and feeling it or just seeing it back there. But I mean, at some point, you have to before you get up to the golf ball. You have to have totally committed to that picture and what you're seeing. And as you're walking up to the golf ball, you have to, I am going to totally commit and I'm not changing my mind as I'm walking up to the golf ball. So that preparation would be the first step. The second step would be maintaining your commitment as you're walking up to the golf ball. Once you're over it, you ought to be able to write down. I mean, I'm just seeing it and doing it. And it'd be a routine. Some people, you can put it on a stop launch. You know, it could be like that predictable. And then after you hit the shot, people got to accept it. Wherever it goes and go get ready to do it again in the next shot. So, I mean, ought to be predictable. If you think about what people are trying to do with their technique, they're trying to make it more predictable. So we're doing the same thing with the mind. We want it to be consistent, and then it's like, okay, can you do it on one shot? Like some amateurs have probably done it on three shots a day in 18 holes. We're trying to do it on every shop for 18 holes over four days over a year over a career. And, you know, it makes the game a lot easier. But you gotta get a way of doing it that's predictable that you can say before the round, this is my goal. This is my objective. Is to do this on every shot. After the round, it's like, well, can I do that? If you did it, pat yourself on the back and say, good, let's do it again tomorrow. If you didn't do it, like what became more important than doing that? Was it someone driving a cart? Was it someone talking while you were getting ready to swing? Wasn't thinking about the ball going out of bounds? Was it worried about to swing? Was it worrying about winning or not winning? Shooting a low score. I mean, it doesn't matter where it is. They're all just distractions. Potentially. And you have to get really good that if any of those thoughts cross your mind when they're not supposed to get away and start over. If you get really good at it, you'll hardly ever have to walk away from a shot. And you know, that's what we're ultimately after, but when it's time to swing is when you have to be really quiet. That's when I want people to be athletic. And you know, most people have experienced it and a lot of players experience it a lot with some part of their game, but don't experience with some other part of their game. And you have to get to the point where you can do it with everything, particularly with your short game. People wonder why it's not so much about short game. Well, you know, with a driver, I mean, look at like this. Probably Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson. They definitely weren't the best drivers of a golf ball with a driver that we've ever seen. And they were the two best players for 20 years. So it must not be absolutely crucial to be a great driver, particularly if you're long. It might be a lot more important if you're a shorter hitter. But with short game, you have to have a clear mind. Because if you have to pitch it over a bunker, you can't go, oh, I got to put it through the bunker. Now, when Martin keimer wanted Pinehurst and one by I think 7 shots and didn't hit any pitch shots, he putted it around bunkers. That was one of the most unbelievable things that are seen. But it's the only time I've ever seen it. But in general, you have to be able to play short game. There's not a strategic option. Like Tiger, I mean, as always interesting, people wanted to copy Tiger swing. And I tell a lot of players, I said, have you ever noticed like in his prime, he hit two to four drivers a day with that swing? Most of the time he used a different swing on the tee box and hit a stinger. Why are you trying to learn a swing that Tiger doesn't dare hit with a driver? Yeah, you think he's unbelievably confident and good. It doesn't make any sense. You know, it's like, you better go get your mind. You have to be clear with your short game. Because every tournament is going to probably end with a pitcher putt. At least upon. You get to the masters and the last hold, you get a one shot lead and you get a four and a half footer for power. You're gonna find out if you trust your routine. And if you believe you know how to pot, and if you don't, it'll show up and that's why the game's marvels. I find myself and I know a lot of golfers would say the same thing here in terms of I find myself in feedback loops a lot. It's pretty easy for me to channel a lot of the confident stuff. A lot of the visualization stuff we've talked about to this point when things are going good. Yet, I do find myself overcome with fear standing over shots and as I say that, of course, that sounds like a horrific way to play the game, but it is, I struggle to fake confidence, right? It seems like something that you can't, you know, good play, breeds confidence breeds good play, breeds confidence blah blah blah. And it can go the opposite way. So is there a, I think we may have touched on it some there with just kind of channeling the checklist of things that you go into around with and a swing with. But how do you manage hitting golf shots or preventing hitting golf shots with fear? And what kind of an impact fear can have into the way a shot plays out? Okay, well, that's a whole bunch of stuff. The first thing the first thing you said is, you know, something about faking confidence. Well, see, I think a lot of people fake fear. In other words, you're just over in the practice range, and I watched you and you hit that shot 15 times. And now you get on the golf course and you pretend you don't know how to hit it. But you don't ever hear anybody talk about faking fear or faking doubt. But man, people love to talk about faking confidence. I'm saying, no, I'm just trying to get you to be honest. Now, if you can't hit that shot in practice, then be like Tiger and hit a find some club you can hit that you can put in play. Sometimes amateurs say, well, I feel like you'd have to go back to like a 5 iron in order to have a club I could stand up here and trust. I said, good, well, then hit a 5 iron. If the goal is to score the lowest you can store, if the goal is to find out if I could trust my driver on this hole and I don't care about the consequence if I don't, well, then go ahead and try and get your driver. But if you really care about scoring, you say, what club can I step up here and have nothing in the world exist, but where I want the ball to go. You have to get good at doing that. I mean, Nicholas was great at it..

golf Martin keimer Phil Mickelson Tiger Woods Nicholas
"rotella" Discussed on No Laying Up

No Laying Up

05:03 min | Last week

"rotella" Discussed on No Laying Up

"And I think which student of yours achieves something that you would consider to be something you're most proud of or that you can tangibly, you know, I'm asking you to pat yourself on the back, say, you know what? I had a big role in this player overcoming this and becoming this kind of player. I'm wondering what comes to mind. Well, probably the you get more satisfaction out of people who come to you that people said could never win a major or could never be successful on tour because they weren't precocious and they were more of a late bloomer and had a really be patient and persistent. They had a delay gratification. They had to work their tail off and eventually became a really, really successful player. But it just a different kick when you get someone who's unbelievable who's already been successful. And you helped them deal with the expectations or the pressure of, you know, 'cause they kind of feel like they're in an only can lose situation. Like if I don't live up to my potential, they're gonna bad mouth me and say, what happened? How could you not win? You know? So, I mean, they're all different kind of case, but you know, my kick in life is getting up every day and helping someone with their dreams. I mean, I don't really care how good they are. I mean, I care about people who got some ideas in their head that are really exciting. They found that they want a reason for getting up in the morning that excites the living daylights out of them. You know, I like people who are passionate about it. And Lombardi would have called it, I like people who are everyday players. You know, they're not just once in a while, get interested in golf. I mean, it's like they want to go see how good they can get. And again, it doesn't matter if it's golf or business or life. It just, you know, I like people with ideas that are exciting. Because you kind of had some of that if you want to do some great stuff. So I mean, a line I use all the time as good as the enemy are great. You know, the minute you decide that good is good enough for you, you're probably giving away the chance of ever being graded anything. And great. I don't care if you're defining great, like the media does probably like winning majors or winning tournaments on tour. It might be, you break, you shoot in the 70s. And you've never broken a hundred. You know, it's like, so I mean, it can be a personal definition of greatness. But I think ultimately, everybody knows, because they've been there either in practice or in a round of golf or in a tournament for a week. They've been in this place where there was total peace of mind. Their mind was clear and it was just happening. And it was so easy. And I think once you experience that, then the next question is, how can I learn to do that more of the time? How can I get closer to that place? Because now I know I have the ability to do it because I've been there. You can't deny it anymore. It's like, that's why we call it getting out of your own way. That's why we use terms like letting go. When we use a term letting go, some people think it means being floppy or slop or whatever. It means letting go of conscious control. And you have to get out of your own way by getting your mind to quiet down. I mean, that's a lot of it. And golf tends to be a, you know, to some degree, a very overtop game. It tends to get overly technical at least for some people and you have to be able to get past it all. I always use the example when I was ten, playing basketball, my dad bought me Bill sharman on shooting with the time was the best shooter in the NBA. You could not find a basketball book today that didn't agree with everything in Bill sharman's book. Other than now they jump. You know? But in terms of the technique, everyone agrees on how to shoot a basketball. You go to any coach in any country in the world, and they'd all use the same terminology. And everyone agrees on how to shoot a basketball. There's no contest on who's got the right information. We're just trying to get people to do it really well. And in golf, there's kind of a war who's got the best information on the golf swing, and who knows the correct information. And what's the right way to do it? And you have to be able to get past that and you have to find a way that works for you. And it's really easy to get lost in it. And if you get lost in the technique, you're probably never going to get to the point where you just let it go because you're not thinking you don't think you got it yet. You know, when I get my technique really good, then I'm going to start letting myself play golf versus going on the golf course and working on my swing all the time. And there's a big difference. Man, you are speaking directly directly to me at the current moment. So is there a checklist for this kind of thing? How do you go about developing maybe a mental process that somebody can go through either prior to a shot or prior to around or just in general, is there kind of a go to thing that you fall back on? Well, let's say this, yeah, I mean, certainly I want your mind to be quiet. And I want it to be in to where you want the ball to go. But I would say, you know, you ought to.

golf Bill sharman basketball Lombardi NBA
"rotella" Discussed on No Laying Up

No Laying Up

06:32 min | Last week

"rotella" Discussed on No Laying Up

"It. Well, you're in big trouble. You're going to be 95 years old and go, God, I hope I perfected soon before I die. And second of all, if you say you love golf, and you're trying to make golf into a game of perfect, you're basically saying, I don't like golf. I want to change golf into the game that I like. And I want it to be a game of perfect. And it's never going to happen. It just, you either have to come to grips with the fact that you love golf as a game of mistakes. And you have to be able to love it all the time. You know, Tom kitten is prime. I mean, he would say that to me all the time. You know, it's like you have to love golf all the time. If you only like it when everything's going the way you want it, you don't love golf. And I think it's so true. And so brilliant, but it's all part that we don't understand this idea that you have to accept a game in order to be really good at it. And your point about being able to see it, it's like, I think I'm on now. I think I'm about 81 major champions of work with. And it's like interesting, like if you can't see yourself winning a major, you'll find a way to not let yourself do it. You're only going to do things you're comfortable with. And some people when we start, you know, we'll start talking about spending time visualizing or imagine yourself when a major and they'll say to me, oh my God. You know, I've tried virtually, I get so nervous. Just thinking about it. And I immediate respond by saying, if you're getting that nervous just thinking about it, what do you think is going to happen when you're actually there and doing it? So I mean, you have to do it enough that you get comfortable with it. And that's a part of it. It takes some work because we're asking people to do exceptional things. If you want easy, then go do what normal people do. Be average. I mean, just be okay. And the greatest cop out in the world is I'm just not talented. Or I don't have the personality to be great. I mean, those are probably the two greatest compounds I've heard over the years. There's no sense in me working at it or trying to get better because nothing I'm going to do is never going to cause me to get any good at this game. And you know, that's the other side of evidence free will. You can rationalize and go the other way. And so it's a battle in your mind with, you know, am I going to dare to believe in my dreams? Long before anybody else in the world believes it. In other words, they're going to probably tell you, where did you get that crazy idea? What makes you think you can do stuff like that? That's the craziest idea I ever heard of. No one premiere ever does stuff like that. I mean, that's what you're probably going to hear on the journey. Once you get there, they're all going to say, you know, I always knew you were going to be a great one. You're going to be wait a minute. You were telling me I didn't have it. I was just doing that to motivate you. You know? So that's kind of what people are dealing with. And it doesn't matter if it's golf or basketball football baseball or life in your business. I mean, it's I mean, you probably had people tell you the idea of doing a podcast is a crazy idea. You know, I was like, how are you ever going to make this work? So I mean, that's what people are dealing with. Well, the transition is a bit too some of the top professionals that you've worked with. And it's a hard question to answer, because I'm sure every situation is different. But what would you say is the typical state of a professional what their mindset is when they do come to see you? Are you ever shocked at how maybe poor their thinking is and that's probably what led them to you? No, I think most people come to me. I mean, it's not that they necessarily have terrible thinking. They're really good, or they've at least caught a glimpse of what they're capable of. They're really passionate about the game. And they want to see how good they can get. Link in this new book, I talk about the idea that there's a lot of there's kids who are precocious and came by the game quite easily and readily and they have to deal with all kinds of pressures of expectation. And then there's another half that are late bloomers who had to work their tail off to get there. And, you know, it comes from all kinds, but in general, they know they're doing pretty darn good. And like when we spend two days when we start, you know, they come to my house and they move in for two days. And we spend all day for two days working on. Then we stay in touch by phone and for years going out onto her. But the point is they want to get even a better mind. They want to get all of their potential out of them, because what we're doing is we're chasing human potential. And I'm always telling people potential is something that hasn't happened yet. Other people like to think they know what potential looks like, but they don't, because you can't take a picture of what's inside of people. And you have to have it on the inside to reach your potential. And so, I mean, they're basically wanting to chase that potential. And they've got a glimpse of it, and they want to see how far they can go with it. Sometimes, like they've won as an amateur but having one as a pro. Sometimes they've amateurs of one a club championship, but they haven't won a state championship or a city championship or a national champion or a USGA event or something. A tour player, maybe they've won once, but they want to win a lot or they want they've won, but they want to win a major. They want to major they want to win more majors. Other times, it's like I'm doing great with most of my game. But I'm struggling with my driver or my wedge or my putter. Other times it's like I'm a really good solid player, but I don't let myself shoot low. You know, that's a real problem in today's game because I think because of television, the game has become, you know, to some degree a birdie fest, and they want to see low scores. And there's a lot of college players who are very comfortable playing every tournament in college because they never shot over 73 or four. But boy that eats out 69 to 74. And they try pro golf. It's like they miss every cut. And it's like you got to get really into a mindset of shooting low and love making birdies more than you hate making bogeys. And it's a big change of mindset. It's a mind shift. And so I mean, it's not like they're all down in the dumps or negative. I mean, once in a while, someone might come to me after a really bad experience, but most of the time it's some part of their game or they've accomplished a whole lot of things that they want to do more or sometimes.

golf Tom kitten basketball baseball football USGA
"rotella" Discussed on No Laying Up

No Laying Up

05:53 min | Last week

"rotella" Discussed on No Laying Up

"I want golfers to see the shot and let us swing happen. And you have to trust that the body is that brilliant. And it will just happen. But you train it so you don't have to think about it when you're playing. And everyone gets there when they're in the so called zone. But we're probably in the zone less than 10% of the time we play. So we're doing everything we can to get as close to that state as possible. But you have to be able to play golf grade even when you're not. And that means, you know, like, in this last book, making it shot your best shot, what it really means is that shot's over, wherever your ball is, you've got to go get it and go find it and go play. So if I see someone hit it in the right trees and they're walking down the fairway working on their draw sling in the right hand and I'm like, oh God, they're not into their next shot. They're still beating themselves up for the last shot. I want to see them start to imagine what they need to do to get the ball to go around the trees and wherever they want it to go. So I mean, that's what we're talking about. And so you have to learn to trust your subconscious brain, even though mostly educational system is designed to teach us to use the conscious brain and I keep telling people the problem is some academician, which I certainly was. You know, probably wrote the language. And it's like the language is all used to describe the conscious mind. And I want people to get comfortable with your subconscious. And it's hard to even come up with words to describe not thinking. Is it a quiet mind? Is it unconscious? Is it silent? Is it for the number of words? You know, some people think they're not doing enough. Some people feel like they're not trying hard enough for care enough. And ultimately, you have to get to the point where you're seeing it and doing it. For a lot of people, we have to say, well, what other hobbies? Well, I like the fish. Well, when you fish, you look what you think the fish are, and you look in your cast, you don't look at your hand and tell yourself how hard to throw it. You just do it. If someone says like to play catch with baseball, I said, well, you're looking at your buddy's glove, and you look and you throw it. You don't. This is where it gets interesting is you look where you want it to go, but you don't give yourself any instruction or direction. And maybe more importantly, you don't think about whether it's going to go there or not going there. You're just assume it's going to. So you just look and you throw it. You don't say, God, don't throw it over his head. Don't throw it into the ground. And if you do that, you're in trouble. I played high school quarterback in football and I might have four different receivers who ran at different speeds. I have no idea how I knew how to lead each receiver a different amount. And I never thought about it. And no one ever discussed it. If it was golf, we'd be having our long discussions trying to figure it out. And then we try to explain it. And we'd over analyze it and mess it all up. And I think that's the challenge in the game of golf. A lot to react to there, and what I kept coming back to as you were talking was, I felt like I had a spurt last year, maybe two, three months where I saw it would all played out like all of the unconscious mind. I know I had read golf is not a game of perfect of yours and that had helped me with, you know, you know, not to get too deep in the concepts of it, but basically standing up on the first tee and telling yourself that you are, you are, your best round, you ever shot is what I said I was every time. I said, I'm a 66 shooter. That's what I am. That way, what really resonated with me what you said in that book was, you know, if you tell yourself you're a 72 shooter, when you get to three under, your body or your mind is uncomfortable with where you are. And so it worked. It was working for me. I loved it. And it is not something I've been able to channel consistently. Why would that be? What's your reaction to that if I was to say that and why has, you know, why do people need constant maintenance of their mental approach to the game? Well, first of all, because it's really a hard game and no matter what you do, the ball doesn't always go where you're looking. So, I mean, that's the first thing. The second thing is we're human beings and we're born flawed. We're not born perfect. And the good news, no one else in the term is perfect and everyone else playing the same game of mistakes that you're playing. So that's where it begins. The next point would be being human. We have to deal with fear and doubt, as well as being unbelievably confident. And so I mean, you know, you're dealing with being human is part of it. And you're playing a game designed to be a game of mistakes. So that's another part of it. And that's the challenge. Can you get past it? And no one's ever going to master the mind. No one's ever going to perfect it. Anymore, they're going to perfect their golf swing. So I mean, sorry, can I bet but in real quick here? Because one of the rounds that I had, I was actually playing with Jim furyk down here. And I had one of the best ball striking rounds I've ever had. And I kind of was chatting after the round and I said, you know, why would you ever? I was really in a good spot mentally, I was why would you ever stand over a ball and not imagine that you were about to hit a perfect golf shot? You know what his response was to that? Was because you're human. And that just like, honestly, that kind of sank my confidence a little bit. I'm wondering if he got that directly from you though, because that was exactly where you went with that. Well, I mean, I've spent a lot of time with Jim. I don't know if that's what he was thinking about when he said that to you, but I mean, I think if you play golf, you come to grips with the fact that you're human. And basically, I tell people, think about like this. If you're fighting being human, and think you're not going to be a champion until.

golf baseball football Jim furyk Jim
"rotella" Discussed on No Laying Up

No Laying Up

06:27 min | Last week

"rotella" Discussed on No Laying Up

"And these are dreams are just your ideas for your life. And so, I mean, I got to get people to buy into the idea that you have a free will and embrace it. And from that, you have to buy into the idea that you're going to hold yourself personally responsible for how you choose to think about yourself and you're going to hold yourself accountable. And my point is, if I can't get people to buy into that, it doesn't matter where you came from. It doesn't matter, you know, where you grew up or what your parents were like because I mean, you can find people who are great from every background and walk to life in every country and small town in big city. You can imagine. And so, I mean, I can get people to throw away all of them made up excuses and fall in love with their talent. And all that means is if you don't like your talent, well, you got a problem because you're gonna bring your talent and your personality to every tournament you ever play in. So I mean, you have to begin by liking your stuff and love what you got. And your job is to find a way to be great with what you have. And so that's where it all starts. From there, you get in the idea that well, in terms of the mind, I mean, I'd say, you know, when you study sports psychology when you actually a true sports psychologist, in other words, you were trained in sports psychology. You take courses in biomechanics. You take countries in kinesiology. You take courses and exercise physiology. You take courses in motor learning so that we totally buy in and understand that it's not all in the mind. Like when people ask me is it all in the mind? I said, no. But at a certain level, if you want to play to your potential, your mind and your emotions are going to play a very big role. At the tour level, if you walk the driving range you couldn't stand on the range and pick out who's the best player. If you went over the short game or watched some hit put shots, you couldn't tell who's a great short player game player because they all look great. If you want to know bunker, they can all hit bunker shots. If you want some on the practice, putting it. It's like when you get in the tournament or on a golf course, now the mind and emotions start playing a role. So at some point, we separate people by skill, you know, there's no question about that. And it plays a very important role. But at the end, they've all been able to do it in a Prix area. In an amateur level, a lot of people can do it in a private area. And now they have to take it to the golf course. At that point, you know, it becomes more of a mind and an emotional test. And I'm always telling people, I don't really know if it's in the mind or the heart or the soul or the human spirit. I just know it's somewhere inside of people. And everything I teach is real talent is inside of people. And you can't take a picture of it. TV tens of present golf is from the perspective. If we can't take a picture of it, it doesn't exist. And you can't take a picture of what's going on inside the mind. So I'm always teaching people that look, if we had a camera that could take a picture of your insides and we could put it next to the camera, the TV shows us of the swing or the stroke or the pitching motion. Well, then we could say, oh wow, they really got in their way. You know, they had a really bad thought there. No wonder they're swing chains. But TV tens are presented like now they're swing chains at the swing flow. Let's show a replay of that and show you what the difference in this way. And it's like the player knows the truth. So I got to get people to be ridiculously honest with themselves because golf is probably one of the most honest things you'll ever do in life. I mean, and the way we talk about it is you have to play it as if the golf ball knows what you're thinking. You know, it kind of gets to your question. It's like, at some point, you have to play golf when you're when it's time to swing or pitch or stroke. I mean, you have to present it as play it as if you know the ball knows what you're thinking. And it's basically, I want you to be like a horse with blinders on or have laser vision or another way of saying it is nothing in the world exists, but where you want the ball to go. People talk a lot about more Norman and they talk about he had all these problems, mentally or emotionally or whatever. And what was amazing is he had a beautiful comment. He said, you know, I describe the state of mind you want to be in as focused indifference. And I don't know if I love the word focus because all I really want you to do is softly look where you want the ball to go or look at your target or softly see above light. I don't want you to try hard to do it. And sometimes when people think of focus, they start trying hard to stare down the tear. I just want you to softly look, your brain will know you're playing golf. I don't know how to know a brain knows you're playing golf. But the human brain is billion. Brilliant. It's like trying to figure out how can we be talking. And have an idea that I want to communicate to you, sorry. And somehow the words come out of my mouth. I don't really know how that happens, but it does. Well, the same thing, if you've played golf a bunch, if you just look where you want the ball to go, your brain knows that that's where you want the ball to go without you telling it. And it will just happen if you stay out of the way of it. It goes there a lot more of the time if you practice and have developed good skill or technique. And so, you know, that's how we teach it, and it's like I want when it's time to play, I want it to be that the swing is something that happens in response to what your mind sees. And that's really where I want people once they're on the golf course. So I want a very quiet mind. I want it very unconscious. I call it an athletic mind. Because an athletic mind is just looking and reacting with no conscious thought in between. Conscious thought is what messes up a lot of people. And the problem is for a lot of golfers, we're pretty well educated. As you go to school your whole life and you learn how to use your conscious brain. And unfortunately, when you play sports, if you're doing music, playing an instrument, if you're singing, if you're doing art, you really want to use your subconscious brain and you want to just let go of conscious control. I was using example, like, if you went to Disney and had someone do a caricature of you, they'd be looking at your face in their hand would be over here in a pad and they'd be drawn a caricature of you, but they don't look at the pad and tell their hand what to do. Like I worked with a lot of rock musicians over the years. And they'll tell me they always play the guitar the best when they're singing because they can't put any intention into.

golf Norman Disney
"rotella" Discussed on No Laying Up

No Laying Up

04:48 min | Last week

"rotella" Discussed on No Laying Up

"Here's doctor bob rossella. Well, I promise I'm gonna do my best not to make this just a personal mental training session with you. I know I don't know if I can quite afford you on that front, but looking forward to chatting with you, doctor bob, and I just want to know how did you end up here? How did you get into golf psychology? I figured that's probably the safest place to start. Yeah, that's a great question. I coach lacrosse and I coach basketball. I did it all through graduate school. My coach lacrosse at the university of Connecticut, the defense of coach. And I coach basketball at the university of high school while I got a doctorate in sports psychology. And I went to the University of Virginia originally teaching sports psychology and coaching lacrosse at the University of Virginia. And I was given a talk to basketball coaches in Madison Square Garden and some from golf digest was there. They liked my talk. They asked me to go do a talk to their golf, I just advisory board, which was since the doctor carry middle of Paul runyon bob toski Jim flick, David's love and Peter Costas. And they all thought Sam she would probably rip into shreds and Sam Steve loved it and started porn as hearts out. About his experience and he basically started by saying gotta hate to think how many U.S. opens I would have wanted if I had you to talk to. And that kind of opened the door for everybody else there to feel comfortable talking about their mind and their emotions and the role at play in their golf game. That led me to doing some work with the golf digest instruction schools. It is VIP schools. We had unbelievable staff. That led me to having some of the teachers want me to help them with their tour players. And she's every time I go work with someone, they win the tournament. I never would have guessed I would have been working in golf. I mean, a caddy as a kid, and I was had the good fortune a caddy in quite a bit in the summer for Bobby Locke, who married a girl from my hometown. But other than that, I really didn't have much exposure to golf other than maybe catty in between, you know, the end of baseball season as a kid in the start of football season. So and it just kind of went from there and word of mouth took off and I had a career working with golfers. Let's start this off with kind of explaining your philosophy on how the mind how confidence how the mental sided golf has an impact on where your golf ball is going to go, right? Because we know that you can't just stare and look at a ball and will it into the fairway, right? You have to make a physical swing at it that is relies on fundamentals. It relies on technique, it relies on rhythm. It relies on all these things. But why is the brain and your subconscious, more in control of where that ball goes than a lot of people like to think it is? Well, yeah, to answer that question. Let's back up a little bit and just say that, you know, a lot of people, you know, because we use the term sports psychology. They have understanding of psychology, probably from taking an abnormal psych class or something of that kind in college. And really, I didn't have any interest in abnormality or clinical psychology. I really, you know, if you look at it, people in those fields study abnormality, abnormality at the low end, and they're trying to get people to normal functioning. Having been an athlete and a coach, I was interested in people who are already above normal who want to be great. So it's a very different body of psychology. It's a brand new psychology the last 30, 40 years or so. It's a very positive psychology. It's very different. It's about greatness. It's about the psychology of excellence. It's about getting the most out of yourself. It's about pushing and pulling yourself to limits that most people don't go. So I'm always telling people, if you want to have everyone understand you and appreciate you, go be average, go be normal, go be like everyone else in they'll understand you. So I spent a lot of time talking about the fact that I teach people that you have to create your own reality. So if someone comes to me and says they're trying to be realistic when we start talking about being positive, I'd say, well, to me, realistic thinking, at least in the long run, if you're looking over your career, it's just a way to justify being negative. I mean, we're really into thinking way outside the box and then a whole nother level. So we're asking people to be in a great state of mind in a great mood. The second point I'd make is I got to get people to understand that as human beings were different because we have free will. So if someone doesn't agree with the concept of free will, if they feel like they're a victim or they just don't have it or they weren't born lucky or they weren't born with the right. It's like, well, no, you have a free will. That means you get to choose how you want to think about yourself. You.

golf bob rossella basketball university of high school University of Virginia Paul runyon bob toski Jim flick Peter Costas Sam Steve Bobby Locke university of Connecticut Madison Square Garden lacrosse bob Sam David U.S. baseball football
"rotella" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

01:44 min | Last month

"rotella" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Rotella. Winds open for your calls. 866 90 red eye on red eye radio. Be a part of the conversation. Call the shell Rotella T Hotline 8669073339 Shell Rotella, the engine oil that works as hard as you do. Daniel was stopping here, director of technical Service for T A truck service. The key to staying on the road this fall is staying on top of tire inspections. By far the most common call we get with roadside assistance is needed is for tires. So remember to check your tire pressure while they're cold before and after every route. Using a quality tire gauge. The air pressure in your tires should be within the manufacturer's recommended C and match the load you're hauling. Finally, Don't forget to make sure your tread depth is within D O T standards if you need a roadside tyre replacement called to Truck service Road Squad at 1 808 to 4 shots. We'll be there to help. Plus, we're offering great deals on new tires, with Dr starting at 337 per tire steers starting at 3 32 per tir and trailer tires, starting at just 3 17 per tired available at TA Truck Service Patrol. Service means at your service Bill Pts worldwide has been contracted by the D O D for over 10 years goes for military base to military base. We only hire the best to haul the supplies that our military needs to keep. Our countries say we are seeking owner operator teams and company drivers. The most reliable men, women and veterans call today for more information on what our company has to offer you call 815797.

Let It Roll: The Subversive Side of Classical Music

Rock N Roll Archaeology

08:40 min | 1 year ago

Let It Roll: The Subversive Side of Classical Music

"Some. Let it roll. Let me host Nate Wilcox. They will have the pleasure of welcoming back Ted Gioia to discuss again his book a subversive history of music. Today we're going to talk about a section of the book focusing on what we probably call classical music European concert tradition and starting off with chapters like musicians behaving badly so it's kind of a different take on classical music ted. Welcome back to the show right. Thanks for having me back. It's a pleasure and I wanted to do this because you know we talked about the book before and and it's it's a paradigm shifting book for me. It's one that really expanded my mind and and clarify things that have been wrestling with and you put it into words brilliantly and it it helped me focus on the whole scope of the show but the section in particular was one. I skipped over last time because I considered outside the breadth of the show which has covered things like the history of rock and roll music and Pop Music in the twentieth century. And I realized reading this book and do more research that the history of popular music as a business really goes back to the renaissance while absolutely on a lot of the behavior patterns of the musicians as well date back to that people often ask me what I learned researching this book and it was many years of research. But one of the quickest summaries. I have is. I found out that the music of might time and the music I grew up with which was jazz. Blues and rock and roll really the musicians back in the glory. Years of classical music weren't all that different and we have a tendency to sanitized that whole record to treat these people with great esteem. But they were just disruptive in many ways more disruptive than later rock musicians so. There's a lot of things that we take for granted in the current day that in fact for justice vibrate noticeable two hundred years ago. Yeah and you talk about this phenomenon that repeats throughout the history of music in the book which is a transition from disruption to respectability from outsiders to insiders and so often musical. Innovations are driven by people on the outside of the system but then there as they succeed as they impact the popular consciousness. They're pulled in to the inside. Sometimes they themselves become insiders other times. They're co opted. You know postmortem talk about that phenomenon. Logan that's right and we're very familiar with this in our own lifetime. We've all seen it when I was growing up The the Beatles and the Rolling Stones Bob Dylan. These dangerous. Figures feared by the establishment. But nowadays Bob Dylan is Nobel. Laureate Mick Jagger Sir Mick Jagger Paul McCartney Sir Paul McCartney and even the most extreme examples I mean take hip hop. Nwea the FBI tried to shut down the record label when they came on board nowadays. That same record has been enshrined in the National Archive of historic recordings of Congress. You have the Smithsonian out there putting together an official Smithsonian Guide to hip hop with fifty hip hop professors. Very idea about professor would have seen the contradiction in terms but they got fifty of them putting together this Canon of hip hop song. So we know about this from our own life and we've seen how these styles has been a good sized what we don't realize the same thing happened hundreds of years ago. The classic example is Bach. You Know Balk is considered now the poster child for respectability classical music is great composer. Who composed for God and country devout booth and run it Cetera et CETERA. You go back and do his own times and you find. That balk grew up with juvenile delinquents. Went to a school famous for gang. Culture was mentored by one of the worst gang members all his early jobs. Disciplinary problems At a young age to spend a month in jail He was called to task for cavorting with a young lady in the organ. Loft had prodigious beer-drinking every possible violation of rules and discipline he exemplified. None of that is is remembered nowadays. He's just the Lutheran composer so this recurring. We could talk about other composers. But there's one point I do WanNa make though I raise these issues in my book. Not because I'm trying to be gossipy or salaciously and it makes for great reading to read all these sexy anecdotes. I have the point. I'm trying to make though is these. Figures could not have created disruptive music they invented if they hadn't been disruptive in their own lifetimes you know almost all the commentary on Bach. We have from back then people complaining about him. You know people complaining about how show he was. He was called the task before the city council had to submit a written document explaining why he was using such new progressive and strange musical techniques. So this thing is conducted disruption in their private life and the disruption. Their music is connected. And that's why well upon it because if you don't understand that you will never understand the evolution of music and going back a little further. You talk about a couple of composers from the Italian renaissance. Who went way beyond Bach in terms of violations of social norms? I'm Talkin about two particular Rotella Mayo Trump Esino and Carlo Jesualdo and bothered these guys. Were involved in love. Triangles that resulted in murders committed by them. Oh this is right. It's interesting if you start with the music of these two individuals trauma Chino and swallow. Its gentle music and they will have songs. These pretty gentle love songs. Mandra goes in front of us but in their private life they were violent angry people and both of them not only did they commit murders but it was obvious to everybody that they were guilty and they were never punished and this is interesting because it shows you that. Starting around the renaissance it became the norm or musicians to go outside the norm. They were allowed indiscretions that other people were not and in fact. I'm convinced in both those instances their fame and reputation was increased by committing murder. I think people felt well. If this guy is such a passionate lover that he he he. He kills somebody in a fit of jealous rage. Who you know. There must be a similar intensity of passion in the song and we laugh at that. But that's the same way. People look at rock bands and the sex pistols. And we've seen this in our lifetime. If the musician out of control we suspect there must be a certain intensity in the music as well so it all came back to that time I mean just one more example I find this fascinating people that want to understand what it was like to be an artist during the Renaissance. The most famous book. They read the autobiography of Benvenuto Cellini. He was a renaissance artist famous as a silversmith sculptor but he was also a musician played the flute and he wrote his life story. And it makes fascinating reading but I went through that book page by page and I just marked off every time. Shalini committed a violent crime and and I think I came up potentially with at least fourteen. Violent crimes committed in his life. And this is not including the the the just the vandalism or the varsity these are actually violent crimes where he murdered somebody or beat them up and none of them was punished for he was. He was actually put in jail couple times. It was only because of arguments with his patrons over payment and artworks and my favorite anecdote from the whole book comes from a conversation when someone would approach the Pope instead of the jubilee. WanNa hire this Guy Shalini. You know he's committed murder and all this and the pope said you don't understand for people like Ben to Chile. Different rules apply that came directly from the mouth of the Pope and the renaissance. And this was a new idea and I would say we still live with this idea to even though even in the midst of the metoo movement and all the scandals. They're still this expectation that great musicians with by their own rules and they violate rules and and For good or bad that's part of the whole Agassi Western music.

Murder Bach Bob Dylan Ted Gioia Nate Wilcox Mick Jagger Smithsonian Rotella Mayo Trump Esino FBI Benvenuto Cellini Chino Sir Paul Mccartney Shalini Logan Sir Mick Jagger Paul Mccartney Vandalism Congress The Beatles Professor
"rotella" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"rotella" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Radio shell Rotella southern recipe small batch pork rinds and Denny's would like to thank you for being you and we know that what matters is inside. WMAL FM Woodbridge Washington while five point nine FM W. and eight. where Washington comes to section off plane crash number because that president trump city cancel the secret weekend meeting at camp David with Taliban in Afghanistan leaders due to a recent attack carried out by the Taliban in Kabul the president Saturday night tweet apparently revealing secret talks he'd planned unbeknownst to almost everyone the major Taliban leaders and separately the president of Afghanistan we're going to secretly meet with me at camp David on Sunday unfortunately in order to build false leverage they admitted to an attack in Kabul that killed one of our great great soldiers and eleven other people I immediately canceled the median called off peace negotiations a seemingly exasperated Mr trump concludes with how many more decades are they willing to fight Bob Costantini Washington two people were killed three others injured Saturday night in the crash of a small private plane near Henderson executive airport a Henderson spokeswoman told the Las Vegas review journal that the single engine plane took off had a mechanical issue turned around in an attempt to land and crash south of the airport is the plane caught fire volunteers with search dogs continue to scour Bahama neighborhoods flattened by hurricane Dorian. about then went to high rock on grand Bahama we're conditions are deteriorating one out of ten houses survived this storm and the people are sexually squatting and then the the conditions are awful known as running water no electricity no there's not enough hand sanitizer people can.

Taliban president Kabul Afghanistan camp David grand Bahama Washington Henderson Denny Mr trump Las Vegas review journal Bob Costantini executive Dorian.
"rotella" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"rotella" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"J. shell Rotella and merits or aftermarket run with the ball. with. and the record. red eye radio. Danny's you get your favorite meals the bottomless coffee refills come to refuel and relax you can get back on the road and on with your day see you at Denny's. the drivers got apps on your phone to get sports scores funny videos but number one to make life easier on the road well you guys to my pilot from pilot flying J. you can reserve a hot shower see real time parking wars start all right. even get savings and rewards all with the touch of a button you want it we got a pilot flying J. download the free my pilot up and start saving today this is John green and if your teeth are stained from coffee tea or smoking power swabs is the answer in five minutes you'll see two shades whiter teeth and in seven days six shades even better there's no messy strips or trays that you have to leave in your mouth for an hour just swap your teeth for five minutes and you're done to try to power swabs call one eight hundred six seven nine oh nine six nine your bright white smile will have your friends talking about how great you look try it risk free one eight hundred six seven nine oh nine six nine that's one eight hundred six seven nine oh nine six nine what we celebrate this industry year round truck driver appreciation month is all about you the truck driver red eye radio shell Rotella southern recipe small batch pork rinds and Danny's will celebrate the truck driver during the entire month of September we know that you are the heart of trucking and we want to hear from you we know that what matters is inside so post a picture of you your family your truck tells what made you want to become a trucker we want to celebrate each and everyone of you look for the truck driver appreciation post and on the top of.

Danny John green five minutes seven days
"rotella" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"rotella" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Shell Rotella engine oil for gas engines shell Rotella gas truck is available now Megan Pino shell Rotella global brand manager tells us what was behind the development and more about the product obviously shell Rotella is heritages heavy duty engine oil and I will remain our heritage then we know that our customers work hard but they also love to play hard and many of our customers also own a gasoline powered pick up truck SUV props as a personal vehicle or as part of the business we also note that truck owners use their trucks for different purposes than a car to be able to tow something whether that's a an RV or a boat for fun on the weekend for you know your business for hauling equipment so you're doing something different with your truck then you are with the car and so why use the same motor oil that you would in your car as your truck there are three viscosity grade zero W. twenty five W. twenty and five W. thirty which covers any gasoline powered pick up truck or SUV in terms of that manufacturer recommendations for more go to Rotella dot com this engine report is a service of shell Rotella with with our radio toll free at eight six six at Denny's we love the taste of home as much as you do you'll find all your favorites all the time and with online ordering you can fuel up and pick up order at Dennys dot com your office it's where you conduct your business it reflects who you are you've got a handsome desk a stylish chair everything looks great well everything but that crummy plastic chair matte it dance cracks the corners curl up why do you even have that you need the glass chair mat by.

brand manager shell Rotella Denny Megan Pino Rotella global Dennys dot twenty five W five W zero W
"rotella" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"rotella" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Shell Rotella hotline at eight six six nine zero seven three three three nine Red Eye Radio and shell Rotella. What matters is inside the makers of house diesel treat are proud to introduce their exciting new look and to superior new products. House. Diesel defender is set to provide you with maximum lubrication and cleaning for unrivaled performance. House. Diesel lifetime is your alcohol-free fast acting rescue solution for winter emergencies with they're easy to identify unbeatable additives. You can be confident that house has tested, trusted, guaranteed. Visit us at Matt's booth number one four one three six to see for yourself. Why with house the difference is clear? This story is called the ugly. Truth about timeshare if you think you've done your family a favor by buying a timeshare you need my help. Hello. I'm chump McDowell CEO and founder of Wesley financial group ten years ago. I started helping folks cancel their timeshare contracts. And in the process started what's now called the timeshare cancellation industry timeshares. The only thing that you can buy that. You can't tell me how much it's going to cost or when it's going to an when you by timeshare you give them a blank check to fill out any amount, they won't for annual maintenance and assessment phase sound crazy. The crazy thing is this never ends, even when you die your family's now going to be stuck with this burden. Stop the insanity today. Kharlamov is now I guarantee if we can't cancel your timeshare contracts, you'll pay nothing call for your free information kit, eight hundred six nine one ninety nine ninety nine that's eight hundred six nine one ninety nine ninety nine eight hundred six nine one ninety nine.

shell Rotella Matt Kharlamov McDowell Wesley financial group CEO founder ten years
"rotella" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"rotella" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"The shell Rotella hotline at eight six six nine zero seven three three three nine Red Eye Radio and shell Rotella. What matters is inside. Whether you're driving local regional or cross country. You want to make sure your trucks engine is ready for the long haul. That's exactly what mystic is formulated to do mystic. Lubricants JT eight super heavy-duty engine oils. Protect your engines with proprietary performance boosting formulas J T eight five w forty ten w thirty and fifteen w forty synthetic and synthetic blends keep both new and older engines running cleaner longer so ask for mystic at your local retailer or visit mystic lubes dot com. That's M Y STI K lubes dot com. Eight drivers Eric Harley here, how do you stay entertained during downtime? Well now you can unwind at the end of the day with live HDTV right in your cat. And with dish portable satellite. Antennas? It's easier than ever mount them to your roof or stow them until your day is over then just set them up and your sleeper. The Tana's are lightweight setup. In minutes and don't require a wifi connection. And it gets even better with dish. There's no long term contract with dish pays you. Go programming you pay for only the months you actually use check it out at dish. From my truck dot com and fleet owners want to give your truckers the comfort of home on the road. Dish HDTV is perfect for fleets to get all the TV. You love to watch at home in the comfort of your cap. Find out more at this. From my truck dot com or call eight three three truck TV that's eight three three eight seven eight two five eight eight restrictions apply..

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"rotella" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"rotella" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Rotella. What matters is inside with forty years of experience in the heavy duty engine oil category. The makers of shell Rotella engine oil believed that what matters most is often unseen. It's found inside. And that includes the technology behind shell Rotella t for fifteen w forty we actively put our shell Rotella products to the test against the competition. And while some Mayfield at all. You can listen while you're driving. You can listen while you're not driving tune in onto man to read is extra mile. A new trucking podcast from Red Eye Radio. Available on apple podcasts. Google podcasts. Stitcher tudent Spotify. And of course, our website, redeye radio show dot com. Tune in onto man to rent is extra mile from Greenwich radio we try to make healthy choices. But do.

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Holly Madison and Pasquale Rotella split after nearly 5 years of marriage

Lori and Julia

00:52 sec | 3 years ago

Holly Madison and Pasquale Rotella split after nearly 5 years of marriage

"Celebrity couples news, a Holly, Madison and pass quality Rotella. Splitting up after five years of marriage. An insider tells people dot com that the pair split over the summer and that Holly Madison's now living in L A and doing all right in the former playboy model and the electric daisy carnival founder began dating in two thousand eleven and they welcomed their daughter rainbow Aurora in March of two thousand thirteen we begged her not to marry him. Yeah. I kind of remember that. Because he was being investigated for like. Asia. And we're like what do you want to marry that guy for? Yes, you do think it was a little too much for her to get too little too much. Because she was with criss angel before the name with half harbor long. I loved her book. We I remember. Inside the rabbit hole or something. Oh that is a big red flag. Yeah. We'll hope she's doing well

Holly Madison Madison Playboy Asia Founder Five Years