6 Burst results for "Ross School Of Business"

"ross school business" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:52 min | 5 months ago

"ross school business" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Lot of family just something more than a third of their income on child care. It's gonna cap that at 7% for sort of middle class families and Bola. Thanks. So, Professor address specifically if you would the tax credit for families with Children because that was billed in part is saying that would really cut maybe as much as in half but certainly substantially child childhood poverty in this country, which goodness knows we all should be forward. But on the other hand, I have seen analysis and suggest that only about a third Heard of the money is going to actually poor families two thirds of going from middle class families. What about the charge that this is really a form of middle class welfare? And is there anything wrong with middle class welfare? I think you've got a great part of like I said. It's not very believable. So he's about aiding the force families raising those Children up above the property line. But it's true. A bunch of these dollars are going to go to middle class tablets, and that's partly by design. If you sort of fading his benefits out as people rise, I think of distribution. You're gonna create disincentives for work for poor balance, So part of making this generous is to make sure more money is going to pocket. Of poor families, even if they choose to work, But let's go back in there, all of us and how this ties back to Capitol did it sort of the idea, I think is in the longer a reconstructed middle class will be a more stable source of demand for American business Right now, we haven't we have an income distribution. That really is a creative people who don't necessary spend that much. They pour a lot of that that income into savings. By creating economy with the middle Classic versus benefitting yes, from syntax up subsidies but eventually is re skilled and is employed endeavors with a high or they're earning more themselves. We can have an economy that sort of is growing cold middle out, because more people who want to spend their money are actually earning enough to do so. Professor address. One thing that may be impossible to dress, which is basically the best of intentions. How do you make sure they get executed on we can you suppose we wove a magic around? We got those $4 trillion were created today. How do we know that they'll actually go for the purposes they're designed for. The federal government hasn't always had a great record of being effective and efficient and making sure money is deployed the way we thought it was going to be deployed. Great point, because, you know, I can tell you that these investments in young Children or some of the best investments out there, right? They lead to better education, higher wages, more employment, but only if the programs are actually like that. So in order to sort of get this rate of return we could get. We need to make sure the money is going to policies that the programs that follow are guidelines. And there is a lot of that, for example, in the childcare program to make sure that you know teachers have more training that they're better students of these jobs, But it's all that being the details. I think we need to make sure that along with this architectural Of investment in young Children. There is oversight right that there is oversight that is robust enough. And, you know, well intentioned enough to make sure this money is going to high quality progress. It can happen. Questions where we actually put those safeguards in place to make sure so let me be unfair and argue the other side of it Now, if you I'm sure you saw Senator Tim Scott's response to President Biden's remarks last week, and one of things, he said is we're gonna have the federal government involved in a lot more things that our lives such as preschool and and childhood education. Is he right? And in fact is that what should happen to federal government will actually supervise a lot more of how we raise our Children. I think this is the beginning of a really important conversation in Washington, you know, Right now two thirds of mothers with young Children, Children of the age of six work. Despite the high cost of childcare, despite the lack of paid leave, Despite all the difficulties, these are the choices the majority of families think is right for that. Making those costs a little bit easier to bear might make their lives a little better and make their chose economic futures of the worst cold, But I hear Senator stuff. I'm JD Vance, who I think is a candidate in Ohio for the Senate has also been talking about how maybe not everyone wants a family work. Both parents work. I think this is the beginning of a really important discussion or historically, you know, the Republican Party has been somewhat hostile to the idea of cash transfers to families with nonworking mothers. But maybe there's a wonderful compromise to be had, where we take the objective of putting money in the pockets of family with young Children who are having a hard time economically making ends meet just you even in the middle class, and we use policies that Peter to both parties and different groups of people to build something that's even better than what Really? It was like that's because I'm sorry. Sorry. No, no, I was just as its passengers and then let them decide how they were spending. Whether they want both parents. Working or not, they'll be will decide that. That's a very interesting idea. We'll have to keep pursuing that. Thank you so much, too. Nirupama Rao, she's assistant professor at the University, Michigan's Ross School business. Great to have you with us coming up later. On balance.

JD Vance Nirupama Rao $4 trillion 7% Republican Party Ohio last week Senate Washington Senator today Peter half Both parents Tim Scott both parents two thirds more than a third both parties Ross School
"ross school business" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

09:45 min | 1 year ago

"ross school business" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Did it you can stop it second the Kelly or something by the way Lou man for DDR friend Mister fix the joins us in the eleven o'clock hour as we replay parts of Christmas vacation and ask Mister fix it how much would it cost to fix it the griz walled household our news click the daily web poll question a WGN radio dot com and tell my Facebook page two I'm WGN King John on social media should the house vote on the impeachment in seventy nine percent of you said yep send it on to the Senate but twenty one percent of you have been saying no let's just end it now there's not enough there really we all know how that went but it's interesting too because it sounds like the strategy may be to impeach him hold impeach the president of the wait until I'm not texture what Nancy Pelosi has upper sleeve but maybe she won't immediately send the articles of impeachment to the Senate she doesn't ever have to do it technically the Senate doesn't have the trial and tell somebody walks that piece of paper over and says I hereby submit these articles about their argument was they had to do this quickly because the president's actions were danger to the Republic if they do Dicker around with this it really is going to make it sound like it was just a political ploy and not a constitutional crisis that needed to be addressed with impeachment or I think that's probably true that's where my head is on this if if you felt this was necessary if there's a fire then you take it over there right now even if Mitch McConnell and Lindsey Graham say we have no intention to be fair will take our orders from the president we're going to do what we want to do there's someone shoots someone on Fifth Avenue and you indict them for that yeah right taken to trial right right do you what he did you wait until you get a new jury I mean you get to pick a church but you got a goal right now so that's where that is you can tell I'm getting ready for the missing rascals podcast the mincing rascals we'll talk about that today and will drop that podcast around five o'clock this evening judge best in the state by the Illinois broadcasters association maybe because they hadn't heard of Kelly Leonard's podcast getting to yes and Kelly's in our studio now Kelly welcome back how are you I'm doing good how are you Kelly Leonard famous little Kelly Leonard who you know from second city and who you know from WGN radio in who you know for the podcast getting T. S. N. and you've been focusing on Chicago innovators you've got great stories to tell in your podcasts and what's this now with Chicago innovators so one of the things that we want to do in the new year is we interview a lot of academics and other folks and thought leaders from all over the world but we also want to focus on Chicago as a home of innovation it really is and there's so many great stories here and one of them I didn't even know about until last year when I was asked to speak at an event for group called the tugboat institute and they held at second city and a guy came up to me and his name was Robert Paston and he was the CEO of radio flyer I have I have watched a video of this guy because for some reason I was interested in talking about radio flyer to I think I wanted them to give away some wagons to list or something but that's a family business yeah yeah he's he's great his grandfather started the business a guy named Antonio passed on in nineteen seventeen here in Chicago yeah so he was a cabinet maker from a small village outside of Venice Italy came to America with nothing so we rise in Chicago in nineteen fourteen into this interesting fact when I was reading up on this is that at that time there was actually more than a dozen little Italy's in Chicago so so if you were southern Italians you were gathering on the north side really were Tuscans you're on the lower west so and we thought we were divided today exact exactly the Italians were divided hazard I lied about how about that the northern Italians like Antonio they were on the west side of the city also fun fact the average salary for an immigrant worker at the time was six hundred and fifty dollars so in today's dollars that would be about sixteen thousand dollars a year was six yeah sixteen thousand dollar not not not too they were coming here not making much so they brought their passions and crafts though did yet in so he got a job this piano factory saved up enough to leave and start his own workshop in a one room garage on west Grand Avenue in he was a cabinet maker so it was like you went in you know one make wagons the first thing he made was a hundred and seventy five wine presses now those sold out quickly but he realized he'd saturated the market I don't know what offline was nineteen seventeen I don't know what it is now he found he found the Italians one of them in there they were done so then he decided that he would make sort of modest furniture for the immigrant community and he kept all schools in this wagon that he made in when the families would come over to pick up their furniture the kids all want to play with the wagon while any picked up on this has really smart and so he made his first wagon would wagon and that it was called the liberty coaster and was based off the statue of liberty which he saw when he came in and they sold and so that was the the very first wagon a couple years later he had the idea to maybe make it all out of steel because would be more durable and callously Kerr in that wagon was called the coaster wagon number one in so that did really well he transitioned to all steel wagons but yet was three years later after that that he came up with this idea of a the the what we know is the radio flyer wagon which was named after the two greatest innovations of all time radio and airplanes that's funny because I wondered what how did the word radio here in the wagon it has no bearing on it at all it's just what he thought were the greatest in innovation radio and flyers yeah and for planes so I wonder if he was making it today would be the internet iPhone or the internal tussle or something I mean do you just pick something that's I guess is a very current words yeah because the radial fire did have that sort of zigzag lightning bolts like a radio transmission on it didn't do I yeah yeah I know that's quite right in it and I think I mean it was it was it was cool it was innovative and and this is a coming that's still doing this I mean that that's this is the this is the story when you go through the ark of the radio flyer company is that they were always working within the times they were working which is a huge thing is it with innovative companies is sometimes you have to changing after pivot and you know went went times are how times are and for them I mean the big thing was the depression right so just companies are closing all over the prices were in the nineteen twenties now is not telling the story here comes nineteen twenty nine right and so the way that they survived the depression so by this time they had like a bunch of different kinds of wagons they were making and they still this factory and they they paid their people well I mean that part of the experience of working there they had an Italian chef who got to feed everyone that yeah because he hired a tine immigrants they also brought in English teachers to teach English to these these immigrants who who will work for him so that a couple things happen they decided to only pause for just a minute I'm so touched by that yeah so heres radio flyer the Chicago company right that in this day and age where some companies do that but the lot of companies have cut back I'm just shocked I thought that in any factor in America nineteen eighteen right it would be horrible conditions yet for the employees this this is what they were known for was good conditions and also had insurance and healthcare so food they took other wellness they they help assimilate them into the country teach him the language yep yep K. seven a loyalty you get from that right well my god this is the thing I mean it's a small thing yeah but I think Christmas parties or the pop up celebrations of corporations you just think of all of the memories of things that companies can do or sometimes do that don't return anything on the dollar right that's not an end in that area okay that is right at the point right but I think boy does that return on that investment in you can't qualify you can't say well we spent a hundred dollars on this you're going to get a thousand dollars back on that no but I'm telling you as a lifelong employee everybody everybody that works for somebody knows this and every business professor you ask about this would say the same thing and yet so many companies don't do it don't seem to have gotten that message now I I really just use this microphone do you do that if you want to get more out of your employee I'm going to get more productivity I don't know what I'm talking about I'm just tell me how it feels I'll bet I'm right that will pay off yeah absolutely that you get what you want is your employees to care about your product so that they can then it care about selling it to your clients and I don't think people like working for people they don't like no they don't and and and then what what does that too so if that's your problem you need to fix it and sometimes I think the fix can be I'm extrapolating here but so obvious thrown menial give me a gift have a picnic in the summer I I don't know what the options are for you and yeah it's going to cost you money but boy talk about an investment it's it's a so I'm taping a podcast this afternoon with doctor Wayne bait Baker who's at the Ross school business up at university of Michigan in the book is all about how we're afraid to ask for what we need and we and we should because people are inclined to help you but in a later chapter he talks about just this that the most important thing to drive employee productivity is that they care and it's not about bonuses that's not the thing to try really because that's all I'm looking for I understand the thank you's motivate more than bonuses no kidding really I guess a sincere thank you an email planner probably isn't that's not it and an insincere and sincere.

Kelly Mister King John Lou WGN Facebook
"ross school business" Discussed on Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"ross school business" Discussed on Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

"This last game but you can you talk a little bit about again you listen and Jim Harbaugh's press conference. family time you've been here. yeah the through great parents spoke pressure all doctors Graham Blasko was in writing with both here when I got here. I was in this last year and Ryan two years approachability. and then George was here to that first year that I got here as a as a freshman and. yeah I enjoy about football family that's that's one zero one nine. really strong too. powerful football family just it's really neat really need to know the stories. Jordan's personality was always grown up watching the older brothers do things the older brothers get to do things they were old enough to play a sport and he wanted to and. I got old enough yeah just. I console so they can make exceptions on eleven play I mean that's that's Sammy is a is a jackhammer use is one of the hardest working football players I've ever been associated with. whether it's and that's hard working on the field in practice and games on special teams do anything other than no job to be ignored no job too small and also with the. great team attitude at all times always one of the most unselfish players ever had the pleasure to coach as well. there's no way rumor. the work of the July worked out the to organize a Macy's. as always given is. god given best he has a. which is a lot. he's always on time is always. we use never does anybody any grief. there's a long list of. really. things about him Asia Ross school business the tax that within three zero. whatever that would never and never an excuse for complaint or or yeah. blue cold sickness nothing yeah. these it's amazing yeah. right..

football Jim Harbaugh Graham Blasko Jordan Asia Ross school Ryan Sammy George two years
"ross school business" Discussed on Ringer FC

Ringer FC

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"ross school business" Discussed on Ringer FC

"Am I am I correct there with which is crowd the fund run by Stephen Ross was the owner of the dolphins? Correct. Right. So I read in a bio, I think it was in New York business journal about you where it said that your relationship with Stephen Ross and eventual role was relevant. All started from a cold Email is that accurate? That's amazing. So so you basically just got Stephen Ross is the Email and said it and you're in Michigan at the time where were you had a you graduated? No, tried graduated. I started a family office for professional athletes, vertically, integrated accounting tax, estate, planning investment insurance, pointing all the financial services to take care of business at an athlete needed to do. And I felt that was unique model and sports. And it was something that Stephen or other wealthy entrepreneurs would set up for themselves. But for whatever reason. Athletes weren't engaging. The right financial team in terms of of fully integrating their their team of professionals together. So I started a business I worked with thirty athletes, and I literally emailed us Ross at related dot com. Steven at related dot com. Steve Ross related I E mail probably seven different emails that I thought could be the right combination of St. Ross's Email, and I went to Ross school business. Explain to him. What what my previous company was that? I had found it in sports, and I asked to pick his brain. And fortunately, I got an Email back in about eight minutes. Well, which I saved that Email, and I got an opportunity to meet Steve we met subsequently number of different times over that year. And he convinced me to sell my business and come run business development at RC ventures, which is a sports media in inner tamen investment fund. Founded by Stephen bad Higgins. So I sold my business to a group that was acquired by KPMG, and I moved over to ours ventures, which alternately was the founding investor and owner of relevant sports. So I stayed at ours eventually for few years, and then I ended up coming to run our see or excuse me ended up coming to run relevant when I wanted to look for another operating opportunity. But yeah, it all it all started over cold Email. And you still under thirty and my right twenty nine I'm thirty just turned thirty joining the club joining the over thirty club. Well, that's a amazing story. And it's a lesson to all you kids out there. Shoot your shot because you went from cold Email to the CEO irrelevant sports, which is amazing. The I think I I have so my closest friends who are cold emails. You should try to hit a Riano or something? Yeah. Exactly. We should. Where can tickets sold for the Madrid Darby already on sale or tickets for all of these ICC games on sale yet or all the

Stephen Ross Steve Ross Ross school Stephen Stephen bad Higgins Madrid Darby New York KPMG RC ventures Steven Michigan CEO ICC eight minutes
"ross school business" Discussed on Dear HBR:

Dear HBR:

05:43 min | 3 years ago

"ross school business" Discussed on Dear HBR:

"This episode is sponsored by Harvard Business School. Executive education learn more about their newest program designed for today's sales leaders by visiting h. b. s. dot me, slash sales. That's h. b. s. dot ME slash sales. Welcome to dear h. b. r. from Harvard Business Review. I'm Dan McGinn and I'm Alison beard. Work can be frustrating, but it doesn't have to be the truth is that we don't have to let the tension conflicts and misunderstandings get us down. We can do something about them. That's where dear each VR comes in. We take your questions about workplace dilemmas and with the help of experts and insights from academic research. We help you move forward. Today we're talking about office spaces with Pete based. He's the director of research at the global architecture and design firm. Each l. w. he's also a research associate at the university of Michigan's Ross school business. Pete welcome. Thank you for having me Pete. So many people see problems in their offices is it that these problems are really hard to solve or that companies just don't care to want solve them or employees is expect too much well, workplaces a fixed asset, and you only have so many opportunities to make right. So when you're making a decision to invest in a workplace, design, your often left with that for ten years, you know, it's not like you can make decisions around hiring and bringing people in our or reshuffling teams workplaces a fixed asset and is their movement toward structures lay out there less fixed so they can be more flexible. Yes, for sure. You know, there's been a lot of innovation just in office furniture design in the last several decades to make it much more flexible Dannon. I've tried to move our cubicle and it doesn't work. We brought brought in tools and everything, and we had to take down some walls fail. Yeah, good workplace design is not just about the outcome. It's about the process. Dear HP are what's the etiquette for open floor plans, my workplaces moving to one and suddenly my co workers have become very distracting and annoying. I'm sure some of my habits bother my co workers to how do we work this out. We used to work in cubicles about two meters tall. Everyone had more privacy and fewer distractions. Now those cubicle walls are gone in place. It much closer both side to side and directly across. Essentially, my view of three cubicle walls has transformed into view of three co workers and more pass them as the walls come down. It seems like other boundaries may be need to go up people, talking or singing to themselves can be really maddening, especially if I'm trying to listen to my own music or podcasts through ear buds already. When co workers talk about work, that doesn't bother me, but it's hard to ignore personal conversations. For instance, I'm a guy. Guy and a couple of women occasionally talk about shopping for lingerie. You can easily here everything from a few cubicles away. No one needs to hear about that in such intimate detail, then there's lunch. Most of us are salaried employees and eat at our desks. Whenever I chew baby carrots or bite into an apple, a coworker of mine immediately puts on his headphones at full blast. I asked him once if he could turn it down, he shook his head and kept it playing at the same volume. I have talked with my supervisor and he can sympathize with having to deal with the increased distractions. His advice was to use headphones and listen to something to block out. The sound. I haven't talked with any of my coworkers directly about the singing the talking over q balls, etc. I don't want to be known as an office are I can be flexible and adapt, but I think we could create a better work environment. If there were more consensus around accepted behavior and etiquette for these open office spaces, how can I have these conversations? How can we professionally establish some ground rules. For our new office layout. This to me doesn't sound like it's like it's about the base. This really sounds like an issue with the people. In this case, he just has really annoying colleagues and rude colleagues. Not every issue that people think is a space issue is a space issue. The space, I think, brings it to light it potentially exacerbates the problem. Well, you didn't notice it when the walls were two meters higher. Right? Well, you know, cubicles high wall cubicles give the solution of privacy. They certainly give you visual privacy, but we've all worked in in offices. We've, you know, many of us have sat in in cubicles where you can still hear people on the other side of you or a few cubicles over. So the visual awareness, I think, heightens people's sensitivities to the auditory distractions. And in this case, it sounds like just general issues with with office etiquette. There's actually a great solution for this at the Environmental Protection Agency. Where the secretary Scott Pruitt recently spent forty three thousand dollars to install a soundproof system. So no one could hear anything. He said he could eat his baby carrots as loudly as he wanted to. Most of us probably won't be able to do something like that though. Right? Well, the reader did something that I think are good for stuff. You said he talked to his supervisor about the problem and the supervisor said

Pete supervisor Harvard Business Review Harvard Business School Dan McGinn Dannon Executive Environmental Protection Agenc Scott Pruitt director of research Alison beard research associate HP secretary university of Michigan apple Ross school business two meters forty three thousand dollars ten years
"ross school business" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"ross school business" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"In new york i'm lizzie o'leary in cairo's doll it is monday the seventh of may good to have you with us and we are going to start with a venti deal between starbucks and nestle the swiss food conglomerate there 'grande deal whatever a very big deal nestle is paying more than seven billion dollars for the rights to distribute starbucks coffee nestle won't get any stores or ment just the distribution rights and a few hundred starbucks employee's marketplace's revenge sure starts us off this is the biggest coffee company in the world but it doesn't do so well in the us where it has only three percent of the market they fell behind the times erik gordon is a professor at the university of michigan's ross school business this cafe is coffee that mike my parents happen to like and probably my parents parents but most young people either have never heard of it or if they've heard of it they turn up their nose so if you can't beat them by the rights to distribute him nestle will retail starbucks coffee it'll sell starbucks pods for its espresso machines it'll get into the middle to high end coffee market it's always wanted but what does starbucks get out of the deal versing that they get out of this is a cool seven billion dollars robert solomon is professor of international management and my use stern school starbucks has said it'll use some of that money to buy its own stock to pump up prices for shareholders starbucks will also get access to the supermarket shelves of the world to reach markets that the otherwise would not be able to distribute to in market in nestle has distribution channels and more than one hundred ninety countries so that'll be helpful as starbucks tries to expand in china there are risks of course first off starbucks is literally handing over the most important thing it has its brand while we worry about brand damage what are they gonna do the brand coin oaks partner at occ strategy consultants that sounds like it's going to be very pretty tightly controlled for its part nestle's betting a lot more than the licensing fees on this deal says nyu's rob.

cairo starbucks nestle us professor robert solomon china partner new york lizzie o'leary erik gordon university of michigan ross school mike seven billion dollars three percent