9 Burst results for "Ross Ross Ross Coleman"

Lightning strike first against Panthers, win 4-1 in Game 1

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 3 months ago

Lightning strike first against Panthers, win 4-1 in Game 1

"The the the the lightning lightning lightning lightning at at at at taking taking taking taking game game game game one one one one of of of of their their their their second second second second round round round round series series series series by by by by earning earning earning earning a a a a road road road road win win win win over over over over the the the the Panthers Panthers Panthers Panthers P. P. P. P. R. R. R. R. Edward Edward Edward Edward Bellemare Bellemare Bellemare Bellemare snapped snapped snapped snapped a a a a one one one one one one one one tie tie tie tie three three three three thirty thirty thirty thirty five five five five into into into into the the the the third third third third period period period period it's it's it's it's fun fun fun fun to to to to be be be be able able able able to to to to help help help help the the the the team team team team offensively offensively offensively offensively at at at at times times times times you you you you know know know know on on on on our our our our line line line line specially specially specially specially like like like like let's let's let's let's say say say say we we we we we we we we we we we we had had had had to to to to to to to kind kind kind of of of manage manage manage when when when we're we're we're on on on the the the ice ice ice and and and tonight tonight tonight it it it was was was more more more about about about trying trying trying to to to build build build momentum momentum momentum for for for team team team whenever whenever whenever we're we're we're out out out there there there the the the key key key to to to culture culture culture often often often Corey Corey Corey Perry Perry Perry each each each had had had a a a power power power play play play goal goal goal and and and an an an assist assist assist Ross Ross Ross Coleman Coleman Coleman also also also scored scored scored on on on a a a power power power play play play to to to cap cap cap the the the scoring scoring scoring for for for the the the two two two time time time defending defending defending champs champs champs Andrea Andrea Andrea that's that's that's what what what ski ski ski stopped stopped stopped thirty thirty thirty three three three shots shots shots and and and blanked blanked blanked the the the Panthers Panthers Panthers after after after after after after you you you declare declare declare open open open the the the scoring scoring scoring Fortino Fortino Fortino one one one into into into the the the game game game Sergei Sergei Sergei Bobrovsky Bobrovsky Bobrovsky made made made thirty thirty thirty two two two saves saves saves for for for the the the Panthers Panthers Panthers who who who host host host game game game two two two on on on Thursday Thursday Thursday on on on the the the ferry ferry ferry

Panthers Panthers Panthers P. P. P. P. R. R. R. R. Edward Bellemare Times Times Times Panthers Corey Corey Corey Perry Perry Perry Ross Ross Ross Coleman Coleman Coleman Andrea Andrea Andrea Ski Ski Ski Fortino Fortino Fortino Sergei Sergei Sergei Bobrovsky Bobrovsky Bob Panthers Panthers
"ross  coleman" Discussed on 31 Thoughts: The Podcast

31 Thoughts: The Podcast

06:50 min | 1 year ago

"ross coleman" Discussed on 31 Thoughts: The Podcast

"The playoffs center. Point right so chernick so step dead. Saturday for gruff paul redirected and one of the lightning. What a pass by sabar pinson's head up. He's pulled in front of the net. Got stick on the ice with edmonton on them but the passes so perfect. It's right on to the stick of colton any just redirected into the net. And that is the stanley cup game. Winning the stanley cup winning goal. I guess think. I always think about that. Like for someone like roscoe and they just one thing for stamkos scored or kucherov for point. They'll be profanities so be meaningful but to have someone like ross coleman score that gorge died about matt you joseph's contributions in these playoffs at the two assists and coming up in big games. I don't know. I just really liked the fact that it was. Ross colton that scored that goal elliott. Because that does talk to the depth of the tampa bay lightning and talk. All you want about the superstars at the end of it tampa was just deeper and better than everybody else in this league. They were and i know people get upset. Some people get upset because of the salary cap. I've said it before. I'll say it again if the league and the teams wanted to close this loophole. They would've done it six years ago for patrick kane and they didn't and you know what it says to me. Is you have an owner. Who will do anything to win. You have an organization that will do anything to win you know. Tampa has some ruthlessness in their organization. They the way they negotiate contracts when you don't have leverage they can be really really tough really really tough but at the end of the day. It's all about winning for them and everything they do is about that and have one. Gm who thinks it's an absolute fiasco that breathes blood did not win gm of the year this year. Yeah i. I've heard a lot of that too. I agree and i waited for a text tonight. I didn't get it. But he is been on me about that being a total fiasco and you got to be ruthless. Sometimes to win. And that's the way tampa is. They will do everything they can and they proved it again this year. One more notable the depth of the tampa bay lightning was this the year and the play offs where everything gets a brighter light shined on it. Was this the play offs where everybody finally understood. Just how good. Eric sure nak is as a defenseman. I think there's a lot of guys. They're like search of how how far he's come chernick. Yes i believe craig. Simpson mentioned him in the post game. How much he's grown. But you know. Matthew joseph comes in and he's an impactful player you'll maybe turn back. Is the poster boy for this year but there were a lot of guys on that team that we talked about it on the one of the more recent podcasts. How many people do you think are calling our tampering with a good row and coleman while they're celebrating with the stanley cup. I'm sure it's app and we talked about that with alec martinez of course throwing good row in in in coleman who are you as and you know that was one of the themes in the post game whether it was john cooper on the ice whether it was steven stamkos at the podium. I mean openly talking about. Hey listen there's salary cap there's expansion draft. Don't expect this team to be together next season as we see right now even stamkos talked about how you want to win so bad. And you're so pissed off about last game and you come in this game and we just we reset and we just use. Everything is motivation this year. Kuch wasn't here in the regular season. We did our job. We made the playoffs. He comes back. We know we got a chance. We know you know going forward with the salary cap world that this might be the last game that this particular group place together. I can't say how much that motivated us. We talked about it midway through the play offs. We talked about it going into game. Five of the islander series. Let's take advantage of this opportunity that it's it's not very often. You get this chance to play with the talented team like we did. The reality is like a lot of guys that are going splits. Full here from the tampa bay lightning. Yes and that's a very powerful motivator. If you have a team that really gets along with each other that really works and it clearly worked in this particular case. I'm really curious to see what they decide to do here. Is there any way they can find to keep any of their guys that they wanna keep. We know that they use the florida state taxes to their advantage. If anybody is injured we know they'll use after caloric who came out and told kyle that he had a broken fibula a put a rod into it and tried to play. Anyway you know all the jokes were coming out of a well. There's the first contender for long-term injury next season this year. We all thought things were going to happen. And then the kucherov injury came out. Okay so i think you have to know and they waited and they waited and they waited. They did the lamb morello rule. If you have time use it now this time. They won't have as much time they're going to be forced to make some decisions early. But i'm really really curious to see what this team does. And how they go about trying to keep themselves really good for next year. Andrei vasilevskiy wins the kind. Smyth you care to talk about your ballot. Sure i had vasilevskiy one kucherov too. And i had a point three. I thought a lot about mcdonagh earlier in the round ahead kucherov one but you know kucherov played hard but he clearly this epoch press conference he had and and we'll we'll talk about that. Did anyone ask them. What is injury was. I didn't see it. No i think he has a pretty significant rib injury. Like i had a couple of people point out to me and we showed it in the pre-game if you watched the power play. They didn't score on at the end of game four. He has a one timer where he's just an agony. When it's over and you know the same thing kind of happened tonight. He had one one time or in the first period that price just eight alive but he clearly was not himself and you know i think vassilev ski again another shutout his record in after they lose his record and clinchers..

chernick kucherov sabar pinson ross coleman Ross colton stamkos tampa bay tampa Matthew joseph gm alec martinez colton patrick kane roscoe coleman edmonton gorge elliott nak steven stamkos
"ross  coleman" Discussed on 31 Thoughts: The Podcast

31 Thoughts: The Podcast

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"ross coleman" Discussed on 31 Thoughts: The Podcast

"Awful. You mentioned although the the players on this team and you go from you know kucherov. Two point to sara lee and stamkos etc. Right down to. Ross coleman like the thing that i love about tampa and do with all their men as well even like man erik. Cernak has a very definite end deliberate role on this team mike. Everybody has something that they do right like. Everybody has a job there like a bunch of worker dogs and they all have their assignment and they do it like. It's a marvel. And i'm building this up like david versus goliath. Your house montreal going to do this but the more you see tampa the more. You can't help but just being flat out impressed with this squad it'd be a good final. I'm really going to enjoy it. I i. i'm really looking forward to this final. Just make it go long. I would hate for it to get to this point. Because how hockey would this be elliott to get to this point only to see a sweep like i don't want to give this mantra. It's not going to be a sweet. I know i hope. It's i hope it's i just don't want this. If this mantra canadians story is going to end in the final. And they don't make. I will sleep for a week and guell jammies of his a sweep leading the gravity of that just sinking for one second away. Do you think. I was gonna listen to that garbage. Podcast tweeted of course. Of course you're not interested in quality. griffin's podcast talked to the gas for our. Yes all about the. Griffin's may experience there oliver's chance you'd love it you learn a thing or two along the way too. Yeah but i will sleep and gwen jammies for at least a week if it's a sweep. Oh man i can just see i can. Just i'm going to drop my tweet and save it. Send for the jammies hashtag go. Griffin's go if there aren't well jammies. I will just take won. T shirts and i will take a red marker and i will spell wealth on it w e l f go. Yeah yeah ok well done i. Can we all tell you when to western. I see now. I'm split because i'd love to see you do that for two. I don't want this to end and a hockey fashion like the hockey story for the stanley. Cup playoffs is you can get to the final as an underdog but generally are not gonna win just because it is such a grind and by the time you get there. You're as an underdog you're just exhausted because you're not quilt built for the stanley cup final. Whatever that means. It's just the history of hockey. I just hope that it doesn't end now. If it does for the montreal canadians either way. I just hope this one is a long series And with that will kick it off. Elliott's all set. I'm all warmed up. Welcome to thirty one thousand podcast presented by the gmc sierra eighty four. Can you just talk about What you're feeling right now and is it feelings that you have yourself. Is it for your teammates. Both i think it's Just for everyone. You know sucks in mac. This point short again guys like bales and greener and guys. You know indian guy you know. I got a few more years but guys are wanna win for. Those guys hurts Hertzian those guys in the locker room afterwards. Just did we just hear slash c mathew barzal age in front of us elliott friedman..

sara lee griffin Ross coleman elliott friedman Griffin Elliott stanley cup two stamkos Both goliath mike david montreal Two point one second erik a thing Cernak thirty one thousand
"ross  coleman" Discussed on Mosaic of China

Mosaic of China

08:14 min | 2 years ago

"ross coleman" Discussed on Mosaic of China

"Simon manetti the business leader Frome. Episode 17. How does one describe a WeChat sticker? So it's not creepy but anything with like kids in it where they're doing. They're just so real right. So kids doing a dance kids doing fist pumps. I'm all for it, you know authenticity unbridled passion NICU the playwright from episode thirty-eight, you know, that is just a boy. So happy when you walk is so happy, you know, I think that is me I also want to like that song when I was young in the village I would do like that is all of the world is mine. I'm a guy from both of my heart to want be happy. Ross Coleman the theater producer from episode 22. Let me just hear you are orange dancing boy or orange boy. I mean, he's another door opening in a way because then after that you have to collect every single one that this kid has been apart of is orange boy. There's also green boy. This also purple boy. They're all the same boy. He has different outfits on he's always dancing dancing with a joy that is unparalleled by anybody else's dancing. It's completely unselfconscious. I like to think that he doesn't know that he's a WeChat sticker like and the he's, you know, there's not going to be that problematic thing of putting your kids on the internet and then they grow up to resent you. Maplesville the comedian from episode two in Kasha ones like a Japanese cartoon and then she's so happy and innocent and she has a happy family as well. And I think I just I want to be her but I can't be hurt. Yeah, you know, but I like her she just likes so happy and didn't think about anything. I have so much dark side in my childhood, but hers doesn't so I want to my daughter may be growing up like that. Greg Nance the ultra-marathon athlete from episode 23. Yes, my two favorite WeChat stickers one is Derek Zoolander and he's dancing with his friends in his open-air Jeep. And that's from one of my favorite movie Zoolander. And the second is the rapper Drake. He's got a song called hotline bling where he does this kind of fun dance lounge and there's a sticker where he's actually playing Fruit Ninja which is fantastic. So, Thank you. That's getting on social media afterwards. Sabrina Chen the dawn program curator from episode 26 to normal rolling on the floor. Okay. Let's see this you just sent it to me, right? Yes. Okay, so I know this guy from lying, right? Yeah, it's growing on me. I've seen it through a couple of Loops now and I'm laughing. Okay, I'm a fan. I'm going to use that one song. Emily match the aquarium conservationists from episode 14. So so it's a woman with Attitude straightened down the street off. She grabs a businessman and starts dry humping him and his face. Oh my God, it sounds really random. I don't know how to describe. How would you describe it? That's how it looks. I'm actually I'm a little bit embarrassed. Am I going red? That's why it's my favorite. You have to post it. Okay, I'm posting it. I definitely I'm doing it under duress. This is objectifying. I am completely scandalized by this one again. I'm sorry to put you in that position. It's very funny. Okay. Lusia the marketer for sprite from episode 5. It's about a famous star of soap operas in Mexico. Actually, I was so surprised to receive that year in China, you know in the other part of world and it's just like, you know this beautiful girl, but it's like so 8:00 is and so old-fashioned but yet so insightful so current right now. So that's my favorite one and you know what it has a great caption, but I'm not going to ruin it. I'm going to let people look at it on social media. AB deya the tour manager from episode 27 this one because it annoys my fiance because I I do a similar face. Okay, so did not explain what this one is. This one is Christian Bale doing an arrogant at all. I would say arrogant. Yeah. Yeah get a little kissy-face like smooch. Yes. There's not much and there's there's a high level of smugness. Yeah. Yeah that would annoy you if want to say that word. Oh, yeah, and you do this face. I can't imagine you doing this space. I do that face. Oh definitely off every time I put that sticker up. It's like I rolling Eric olander the journalists from episode 3. I have a lot I do this was actually one of the harder questions and but I do like the slow clap. So I've got a couple of slow clap stickers and just to make fun of my friends who are you know, either expressing Pride or expressing something and you're just you kind of give them a slow clap, which is so yeah, I'll save the slow clap Taylor the paint expert from episode 28 off. My favorite. WeChat sticker is Tina Fey Liz Lemon high-fiving herself. Excellent. I know the one I must use that one quite a lot as well. If it's our similarly slightly snarky and sarcastic personalities. Yeah, that's right because we think we're always right and there's no one else actually believes us so we might as well just hi find ourselves. Not right. I mean, yeah, sorry. Architecture the fashion designer from episode 30. Okay. Can you describe this? Is Illustrated I can say humor and the has is moving like a fan and exploring too many hearts and that's all right cute. Yeah song. Sebastian is the inclusion Advocate from episode 11 in old lady. That is just laughing at in I think sometimes we are too serious about just about laughing. Stephen DeMarco the events Company CEO from episode nineteen. Let me send it to you. So it's a friend of mine actually recorded a short video of a buddy mine and myself outside of a restaurant in Taipei, and I'm just doing some city than sitting in front of the restaurant. So I just think it's funny cuz there's there's nice stuff in there and I have no idea who get that kind of stuff done. And in what situation would you send this sticker when I'm happy which happens if we have an hour beautiful and sickening at the same time? There was Sheldon the documentary filmmaker from episode 9 hmmm this one that I've been very fond of lately, which is a girl on a bicycle Chase in a motorcycle. And what in context do you use that? Like when you're running late or more like doing something impossible like we can yeah, we can do it off is very fond of the boy with the extremely large Chrome slowly combing his hair Nene some the artists from episode 16. Okay, can you describe this is I don't know. This is in Chinese is called Tony, is like this kind of I don't know. What kind of dog is this like a sheep or something? I think it's a llama. Is it a lot? Yeah, I think it's a llama. That's the name of it. I just like his face. It's like chewing and like home and he just turned into like what like a.

Simon manetti Ross Coleman WeChat Derek Zoolander Greg Nance Sabrina Chen producer Christian Bale Taipei Tina Fey Nene Eric olander Sheldon Emily Attitude Tony Mexico China Stephen DeMarco
"ross  coleman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"ross coleman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Expect this to manifest itself at the polls this November I think one of the interesting things is just the way that this is kind of changing the way people are talking about elections in the way the candidates are talking about themselves like he was earlier last year that Bernie Sanders framed you know his democratic socialism in terms of what FDR did earlier this week you see Joe Reid and in New York magazine I believe today's you know framing his presidential candidacy in terms of FDI wants to have an SBR size presidency so like I think that's one of the ways previous recessions especially like even depressions is acting just the kind of ways the politicians themselves are thinking about political economy and what they think it'd take to move voters and also like what they think it actually take to get us up out of this crisis it's interesting that Biden says he hopes to have an FDR kind of administration you know Roosevelt was pushed in many ways to implement much of the new deal bye bye working people who struck they were major strikes throughout the country in nineteen thirty four and much of what Roosevelt implemented had actually been test driven in the states at a local level before it was ever implemented at the federal level and so I think that it's important to remember in the election they they yes of course the power at the top it makes a lot of a difference but there is also lots happening at the local level at the state level and among working people and we have to take a broad look during the election season Chester lane Windham is the associate director of the cow man of its initiative for labor and the working poor at Georgetown University and Erin Ross Coleman is an ida B. wells fellow at the tape media institute covering race and economics thank you both so much thank you thank you should.

Bernie Sanders Joe Reid Biden Roosevelt associate director Georgetown University Erin Ross Coleman tape media institute New York FDR Chester lane Windham ida B. wells
"ross  coleman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:57 min | 2 years ago

"ross coleman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"April alone more than twenty million people filed for unemployment in the United States as a staggeringly high number the US now has an unemployment rate of fourteen point seven percent and to put that in perspective we have not seen anything that high since the times of the Great Depression and even then the rate took a year and a half to get very high here it happened within a month that's lane Windham she's the associate director of the cow manifests initiative for labor and the working poor at Georgetown University the workers who are affected the most are of course those were working in hospitality and service jobs and there's something else striking about who's hit the hardest so it's no surprise to economists who've seen this trend again and again we know that people of color and women are the most likely to have lost their jobs the unemployment is is hitting women and people of color even harder I spoke with lean to discuss the significance of these numbers along with Erin Ross Coleman and ida B. wells fellow at the tight media institute covering race and economics we know for instance that women and people of color earn less money and have less wealth and what that means when they hit a time of unemployment and when they hit hard times they have simply left to fall back on so you know the fact that women only make eighty two cents on the dollar to what men earn black women earn just sixty two cents for every dollar earned by men that means that at times of unemployment when they lose their jobs that they just are going to be harder hit Erin can you say more about how these unemployment numbers break down across racial lines so when you disaggregated it's it's even worse picture Hispanic unemployment at eighteen percent black unemployment at sixteen percent of white and Asian unemployment bos at fourteen and you already are starting to see some of the desperate kind of breakdowns that have happened in past recessions in a previous the Great Recession it was some really desperate national anthem is in our present and in a black and son was at sixteen percent and then going back to the Great Depression you see similar kind of really big gaps with twenty four percent nationally and fifty percent for black people so there's the old saying that when America gets a cold on black Americans get the flu and it's like now we all have contractors so needs a pretty tough lane what about the gender gap did unemployment shake out in a similar way in two thousand eight in two thousand and eight we saw that job losses were more heavily born by men are often and the construction industry for instance this time around it's different women are losing their jobs at a faster rate the unemployment rate among women right now is fifteen point five percent compared to thirteen percent among men that's a big gender gap and we we saw a gender gap although it wasn't as large and two thousand and eight but it was reversed so in this time because of the nature of the kinds of jobs that are being lost that tend to be more female dominated women are absolutely shoulder pain a lot of the burden and this round Erin we also saw a very long recovery process take place since two thousand eight and for many people that recovery was only being felt recently how do you perceive it will be for us to bounce back to recovery from this year I think a lot of that depends on the public policy response and you know what policy makers decide to do to intervene but right now it's tough and there are a lot of obstacles ahead for a lot of families for a lot of workers particularly black and brown workers you know unemployment was just starting to dip down into the low single digits you know that was a talking point that trump was very proud of the lowest black unemployment on record and that's because you saw a recovery where you know more people are starting to join the labor force employers are becoming less discriminatory and you know who they would hire just based off of race and skill and stuff like that so you earlier last year the end of last year twenty nineteen we're just getting to those really good kind of unemployment numbers where people are being able to participate and now here we are at the worst recession since the Great Depression lane right now there's a lot of talk about essential workers and I'm sitting in New York and here of many of those essential workers are black and brown people what might a recession look like for essential workers across the country one in three jobs held by women are considered essential so a recovery for essential workers could mean that they have the jobs they have work but will that work be healthy will it be safe will it be jobs that they can can go to with confidence and I'd say right now many of those workers are reporting to work and are really risking the safety of for themselves and for their families and I think that you know we have a long way to go before those essential workers who we depend on those cashiers those nurses those EMT workers are are fully protected and and are fully safe you know I'm thinking about unions and labor organizing lane have we seen a difference between how unionized workers and non unionized workers fared during past recessions I'm I'm curious how labor organizing can possibly help black and brown people and women specifically so there absolutely is a union difference in terms of wages you know I mentioned before there's a gender wage gap there's a race wage gap unions clothes that and so you know a worker who has a union makes more money than those who don't women and people of color are even more likely to do better than their non union counterparts into Guineans absolutely raise wages increase benefits and frankly give workers more say at a time when they really need it at the workplace you know you saw that I think for instance and some of the unionized grocery stores those were the first ones to have the plexiglass up to be it making sure that that there was safety of fort for their work force you know what we're seeing across the country is that there's lots more interest in unions lots of workers have been striking just since the beginning of March there have been over a hundred and fifty wild cat strikes these are strikes that are not necessarily called by the union they are up from the grass roots when people feel that their safety is not being respected and so there are there have been a number of strikes across the country and I think there's also just been a renewed interest in general and the idea of organizing and unions do we know if there any organizations or at the local or state level or even local or state level governments that are really bracing for what these unemployment numbers mean is anyone truly be prepared for this I don't think so I mean recessions are something that like state local officials really depend on the federal government for support just because they often times don't have the budgets that allow for kind of deficit spending in order to offset you know like cuts to that budget or just you know large scale stimulus so it it really often my experience just speaking at condiments and politicians it's something that they they definitely relying on the federal government to help them get through I see something of this size and scope I would just add to that that in this country it is very clear right now that the way that we do our social safety net is particularly poorly put together to deal with this kind of a massive pandemic a huge crisis you know workers healthcare comes through their employers up to forty three million people may lose their health care and this crisis in addition our unemployment is bifurcated goes through the states it doesn't go through the federal level at one our system and so you know we are particularly poorly suited to dealing with this level of a crisis in the absence of those kinds of social safety nets like you said lane what are some solutions that we can look to to sort of soften the blow of this economic crisis I think that in the immediate term the federal government has to step up there needs to be more stimulus we absolutely need that cushion in this country and then I think that our leaders need to follow where the people are right now which is that the people are demanding a more robust social safety net people fully understand at this point why are employer provided health care system is not working why keep will need paid sick leave why even we I need paid child care I think it's very obvious to people and well I think over the next several years that we may see leaders stepping up and beginning to make some really fundamental changes in policy in this country what have we learned from the past regarding the impact of recessions and rising unemployment numbers on elections but how can we.

United States
"ross  coleman" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"ross coleman" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Blow of this economic crisis? I think that in the immediate term the federal government has to step up. There needs to be more stimulus. We absolutely need that cushion in this country. And then I think that Our leaders need to follow where the people are right now. Which is that. The people are demanding. A more robust social safety net people fully understand at this point why are employer provided health care system is not working. Why people need paid sick leave? Why even we need page healthcare? I think it's very obvious to people. And I think over the next several years that we MESA leader stepping up and beginning to make some really fundamental changes in policy in this country. What have we learned from the past regarding the impact of recessions and rising unemployment numbers on elections? Like how can we expect this to manifest itself at the polls this November? I think one of the interesting things is just the way that this is kind of changing the way people are talking about elections and the way the candidates are talking about themselves like it was earlier last year that Bernie Sanders framed his Democratic Socialism in terms of what. Fdr Did earlier this week. You see Joe Biden in New York magazine. I believe it. Is You framing his presidential candidacy in terms of FDR FDR size presidency? So I think that's one of the ways previous recessions especially like even depressions is packing a just the kind of ways. The politicians themselves are thinking about political economy in what they think. It'll take to move voters also like what they think. It actually take to get us up out of this crisis. It's interesting that Biden. Says he hopes to have an FDR kind of administration. You know Roosevelt was pushed in many ways to implement much of the new deal by by working people who strock hikes throughout the country in nineteen thirty four and much of what. Roosevelt implemented had actually been test driven in the states at a local level before it was ever implemented at the federal level. And so I think that It's important to remember in the election. They that yes. Of course The power at the top makes a lot of difference. But there's also lots happening at the local level at the state level and among working people and we have to take a broad look during the election season professor lean. Wyndham is the associate director of the mandates initiative for Labor and the working poor at Georgetown University and Aaron. Ross Coleman is an IT wells fellow at the tight media institute covering race and Economics. Thank you both so much. Thank you.

Joe Biden Fdr FDR federal government Roosevelt Bernie Sanders Ross Coleman Wyndham New York MESA Georgetown University professor Labor associate director Aaron
"ross  coleman" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

09:46 min | 2 years ago

"ross coleman" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Is a real risk. That you will trigger an that. You might not be able to control which impact docs will set you back. Not only leading suffering and death avoided could even set you back on the road to try to get economic recovery this week. Anthony Fauci the country's top medical expert for the covert nineteen crisis testified virtually in front of the Senate Health Committee. He urged the country to refrain from opening up too early and he said the death toll from the virus in the United States could be much higher than the reported. Eighty thousand people so far and as the Health Crisis Continues Cove. Nineteen has also pushed us over the cliff toward an economic crisis. We're still bracing for the impact in the month of April alone. More than twenty million people filed for unemployment in the United States that is a staggeringly high number the US now has an unemployment rate of fourteen point seven percent and to put that in perspective we have not seen anything that high since the Times of the Great Depression and even then the rate took a year and a half to get very high here. It happened within a month. That's Lean Wyndham. She's the associate director of the Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the working poor at Georgetown University. The workers who are affected the most are of course those who are working in hospitality and service jobs and there's something else striking about who's hit the hardest though it's no surprise to communists who've seen this trend again and again we know that people of Color and women are the most likely to have lost their jobs. The unemployment is hitting women and people of Color even harder. I spoke with lean to discuss the significance of these numbers along with Aaron. Ross Coleman in Ida b wells fellow at the tight media institute covering race and Economics We know for instance that women and people of color earn less money and have less wealth and what that means when they hit a time of unemployment and when they hit hard times as they have simply less to fall back on so you know the fact that women only make eighty two cents on the dollar to what men earn black women earn. Just sixty two cents for every dollar earned by men that means that at times of unemployment when they lose their jobs they they just are going to be harder hit Aaron. Can you say more about how these unemployment numbers breakdown across racial lines? So new Desegregated. It's even worse picture. Hispanic unemployment's at eighteen percent black unemployment said sixteen percent the of white and Asian unemployment or both At fourteen in you already are starting to see some of the disparate kind of breakdowns. That have happened impasse. Recessions during the previous the great recession I it was similarly disparate national diplomas at nine percent and then a black unemployment was at sixteen percent and then going back to the Great Depression. You see similar kind of really big gaps with twenty four percent nationally and fifty percent for black people. So there's the old saying that when America gets a cold Black Americans get the flu. And it's like now we all have chronic so it's a pretty tough lane. What about the gender gap did unemployment shakeout in a similar way in two thousand and eight in two thousand and eight? We saw job losses Were more heavily. Worn by men Often and the construction industry for instance this time around. It's different women are losing their jobs. At a faster rate the unemployment rate among women right now is fifteen point. Five percent compared to thirteen percent among men. That's a big gender gap and we. We saw gender gap although it wasn't as large in two thousand eight but it was reversed so this time because of the nature of the kinds of jobs that are being lost that tend to be more female dominated Women are absolutely shouldering A lot of the burden in this round Aaron we also saw a very long recovery process. Take place since two thousand eight and for many people that recovery was only being felt recently. How do you perceive it will be for us to bounce back to a recovery from this? I think a lot of that depends on the public policy response. And you know. What policymakers decided to do to intervene? But right now it's tough in. There are a lot of obstacles ahead for a lot of families for a lot of workers particularly black and Brown workers. You know unemployment was just starting to dip down into the low single digits. You know that was a talking point. That trump was very proud of the lowest black unemployment on record. And that's because you saw a recovery where you know. More people were starting to join the Labor Force. Employers are becoming less discriminatory. And you know who they would hire Just based off race and skill and stuff like that so you earlier last year at the end of last year two thousand nineteen we were just getting to those really good kind of unemployment numbers were people. Were being able to participate and now here. We are at the worst recession since the Great Depression Lane right now. There's a lot of talk about essential workers and I'm sitting in New York and here many of those essential workers are black and Brown people. What might recession look like for essential workers across the country? One in three jobs held by women are considered essential so a recovery for essential workers could mean that they have jobs they have work but will the work be healthy. Will it be safe? Will it be jobs that they can can go to with confidence? And I'd say right now. Many of those workers are reporting to work and are really risking the safety For themselves and for their families and I think that You know we have a long way to go before Those essential workers who we depend on those cashiers. Those nurses those. Emt workers are are fully protected and are fully safe. You know. I'm thinking about unions and labour organizing lane. Hefley seen a difference between how unionized workers and non unionized workers fair during past recessions. I'm curious how Labour organizing can possibly help black and Brown people and women specifically so there absolutely is a union difference in terms of wages. You know I mentioned before. There'S A gender wage gap. There's a race wage gap unions closed that. And so you know. A worker who has a union makes more money than those who don't women and people of color or even more likely to do better than their non union counterparts So Unions addresses lutely Raise WAGES INCREASE BENEFITS. And frankly give workers more say at a time when they really need it work place. You know you saw that. I think for instance. In some of the unionized grocery stores those were the first ones to have the plexiglas up. Should be making sure that that there was safety For for their workforce you know and what we're seeing across the country is that there's lots more interest in unions. Lots of workers have been striking Just since the beginning of March there have been over one hundred and fifty wildcat strikes. These are strikes that are not necessarily called by the Union. They are from the grass roots when people feel that their safety is not being respected and so there there have been a number of strikes Across the country and I think There's also just been a renewed interest in general and the idea of organizing unions. Do we know if there are any organizations or at the local or state level or even local or state level governments? That are really bracing for what these unemployment numbers mean. Is Anyone truly prepared for this? I don't think so. I mean recessions or something that like state. Local officials really depend on the federal government for support just because they oftentimes don't have the budgets that allow for Kind of deficit spending in order to offset you know like cuts to their budget or just you know. Large scale stimulus so it. It really often in my experience. Just speaking economists and politicians. It's something that they definitely relying on the federal government to help them get through. Just see something of this size and scope. I would just add to that that in this country it is very clear right now that the way that we do our social safety net is particularly poorly. Put together to deal with this kind of a massive pandemic a huge crisis. You know Workers Healthcare comes through their employers up to forty. Three million people may lose their healthcare and this crisis in addition our unemployment is for it goes through the states It doesn't go through the federal level at one system. And so you know we are particularly poorly suited to dealing with this level of a crisis so in the absence of those kinds of social safety nets like you said Lane. What are some solutions that we can look to to sort of soften the.

Union United States Aaron Workers Healthcare Anthony Fauci federal government Lean Wyndham Senate Health Committee flu Kalmanovitz Initiative for Lab associate director Georgetown University Ross Coleman Desegregated America Labor Force Ida b wells
"ross  coleman" Discussed on Mosaic of China

Mosaic of China

07:49 min | 2 years ago

"ross coleman" Discussed on Mosaic of China

"So that's amazing meals, all got this I believe in. God in that moment. Welcome to Messiah of China put cost about people who are making their mark in China. I'm your host Oscar Kooks. And, welcome as well to the first of ten special compilation episodes from season one. If you've been listening to this season, you will already know the different intra-. Music that things aren't quite the same as usual. And if you're entirely new to cost a third and special welcome to you. In a usual episode of the show will interview one person and that interview starts with a freestyle compensation based on an object at the guest house prepared in advance, and it ends with the guest. Nominating someone for me to interview in the next season of mistake of China. and. That's how tile by tile the thirty episodes of each season build out to form a mosaic of China. But before they make this nomination, I ask every guest the same ten simple questions on their tastes and opinions of life in China. and. It's the onset to these ten questions that form the content for these ten special compilation episodes. Today's compilation is about the guests favorite travel destinations in China. I wanted to get this one out of the way I because as a subject, it's perhaps the most ironic of the ten given that none of us have got any travel planned for the foreseeable future. But I hope that you'll at least be taking some notes for when the Boorda's finally reopened and transport networks begin to home again. Mandra the compliance leader from episode fifteen. Now, I would always come into. To. Definitely, visit that we got this damn between Georgia stems pronouncing. That is a phenomenally in structure natick logically engineering marvel that one should watch here screening So along Safety Dan, you created a kind of a ship lock system. When he saw literally, the water getting bored the getting closed underwater getting pulled in and ship literally gets lifted up. Against his third stays hostess, the three RS Journey is naked GENU- lifetime you're getting transferred from the Dan two of them. Ross Coleman the producer from episode twenty two. I think my favorite one is hung Joe. And I love that you can get there. So quickly and being the Judge Hills and then walking around and then drinking tea on that mountainside I, really love the way that they're not necessarily the big mountains those ones. But like you can still feel the kind of transformative nature of them when you go up and then come down. Ostrich Pogosyan the violinist from Episode Four. I Love Hull City, and I remember until nine every time when I and I go there. It's some kind of peaceful emotion I always get there something unexplainable and I think it's different. When you go to Europe, it's different kinds of peace you find in Honduras really like does all Chinese times when you reading the books, it's exactly that. Philippe gas the Disney Revolt Theo from episode one. I. Think one of the most memorable trip I have made in China. Tibet. Eighteen months ago I had the chance with a few friends to go to Lhasa and just travel. In Tibet's and it's been a fascinating experience at many levels cultural religious. Geographic you know arriving and then the place is full thousand, forty, six, hundred meters east a shock. As, you arrive some of my friends were shocked immediately, it took me a little bit more time but it was fascinating beautiful and standing how people leave their religion. Do you Buddhism I'm not an expert in but he's in better have been very impressed by how connected the are all the time to their practice practicing their criticism. Maple swore the comedian from episode to. Tibet. I. Love it because when my partner proposed me, there we climbed. Ninety hours in the day. To the top mountain, and then there was a beautiful Blue Lake? And the above. That was sno- snow's on the Monte was so pure and the name of the lake caught the God tears. And then over the lake, there was some stone. And on the stone, there was a buddha like Yukon CBA is a natural buddha thing and with the Buddha shadow that contained a whole Buddha image. So that's amazing meals. I got this I believe in God in that moment. And you the judiciary craftsman from episode eighteen. Tiffany. I was designing museums before that's what I was doing before my my print and we put Cartoon. Museum in in Union. So I've been there for two years going back and forth is so bio-diversity fight and they're trendy six minority in itself, and this is so beautiful this native or local people and still make a lot of things hint that Criolla own on toes and the jury. This is for me the most exotic thing about China. Co The marketer for sprite from, episode. Five. Shanghai. I love the city I've been amazed from day one. Yes I think China has fantastic places I feel every time I feel amazing and I love the even more. octo Joan, the fashion designer from episode thirty. I think where I am shocked by. Actually. Some of the old Hong Kong culture was influenced by Shanghai. So you can see so many poet lift here and Some of the famous political person, all condensed so many different types of people. So that means is very good city for you to connect different ideas and then you can find your own way. View the fitness community leader from episode. Eight I GONNA say my own straight I live in channing district and I recently did a walking tour with Dunkin from Shanghai China. And looked at all this architecture that was just right in front of mind I've been living in my apartment for five years and I never realized that this was just undermine is and how much did not nar about where I lived. Chi Chang the translator from Episode Twenty Four. I, went to Chung and it's beautiful place lots of history around the Yellow River. It was a major battlefield for hundreds of years. Is One of the Few Surviving Unionisti Temple Dad's here. Awesome. Sanford Brown biochemist from episode, twenty nine. Went. With my wife and a bunch of friends on a motorcycle trip we were gonNA. And we went to Mount Everest base camp on the China side of the north face and we went up right up to debate camp and we wake up first thing in the.

China Messiah of China Tibet Shanghai Oscar Kooks Shanghai China Few Surviving Unionisti Temple Sanford Brown Europe Mount Everest Ostrich Pogosyan Hull City Judge Hills Ross Coleman Chi Chang Disney Georgia Hong Kong Joe Blue Lake