35 Burst results for "Rosenberg"

New York - Newark Launches Investment Fund To Support Black And Latino-Owned Businesses

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

01:05 min | 17 hrs ago

New York - Newark Launches Investment Fund To Support Black And Latino-Owned Businesses

"Is creating a fund to support black and Latino owned businesses. WCBS reporter Mac Rosenberg has the story. Painting slogans and streets and reforming police departments is not enough, says Mayor Ross Baraka. It's time, he says that Newark utilized the big corporations it has right in its backyard. We need these anchor institutions and financial institutions in this city that make billions of dollars in the footprint of north and along its corridors to contribute to the wealth and success of the majority of its residents. It's called the Newark 40 Acres and a Mule fund, a reference to what was promised, but never given to blacks after the Civil war. The goal is to raise $100 million. Wayne Meyer is president of NJ Community Capital, which has signed on for an investment trying to level the playing field for black and brown businesses that are left out of the mainstream capital in terms of providing access to capital. Other companies that have signed on our P S, E N G and T A fund has raised $2 Million so far in Newark. Mac Rosenberg, WCBS news radio 80.

Newark Mac Rosenberg Mayor Ross Baraka Nj Community Capital Mule Fund Wayne Meyer Reporter President Trump
Brain-eating amoeba may be in Houston-area tap water

GardenLine with Randy Lemmon

00:31 sec | 3 d ago

Brain-eating amoeba may be in Houston-area tap water

"A brain eating amoeba is found in the water supply of the brasses sport Water Authority. Nine communities being told not to consume any tap water. Let's run through these nine. Lake Jackson, Freeport Angleton, Brazoria Richwood Oyster Creek Clue. Rosenberg Dow Chemical TDCJ Clemens and TDCJ Wayne Scott. Residents advise. Don't DRINK Don't Wash. Don't SHOWER Don't use tap water for anything except Flushing a toilet until further notice.

Water Authority Wayne Scott Angleton Lake Jackson
New York City Neighborhoods Experiencing COVID-19 Spikes May Face More Shutdowns

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

01:09 min | 3 d ago

New York City Neighborhoods Experiencing COVID-19 Spikes May Face More Shutdowns

"Parts parts of of New New York York City City or or seeing seeing new new Kobe Kobe cases cases triple triple every every day. day. It It may may be be the the most most precarious precarious moment moment since since we've we've emerged emerged from lock down. Those were the words of City Health Commissioner Dave Choksi as the covert rate triples here, and the city is warning of new shutdowns that this growth continues. It will turn into Maura widespread community transmission. Both in these neighborhoods, a cz well as potentially citywide. This press conference began and ended with heckling announced. You want to go over there? That man was screaming at the head of health and hospitals, Dr Mitch Katz as he tried to start the event. Man was not wearing a mask and said officials are lying about the uptick. Meanwhile, Dr Ted Long, who runs the city's test and Trace Corps, says there's still time to make sure the infection rate doesn't continue to soar. We're able to reach 90% of new cases of Corona virus and for 80% of nearly 80% of them. We're able to complete interviews, get them to isolate figure how we can help them in graves in Brooklyn. Mac Rosenberg double the CBS News Radio 80. There's good news

New York York Dr Mitch Katz Dave Choksi Dr Ted Long Mac Rosenberg Maura Commissioner Trace Corps CBS Brooklyn
Why forest fires in Siberia, Russia threaten us all

BBC Newshour

04:28 min | Last week

Why forest fires in Siberia, Russia threaten us all

"In Siberia have been releasing record amounts of greenhouse gases, scientists say contributing to global warming. The fires, fueled by abnormally high temperatures have been burning as far north as the Arctic Circle. Moscow correspondent Steve Rosenberg has travelled to the remote Yakutia region in north eastern Russia to gauge the effects of climate change, both on local communities on on the planet. I've got a helicopter flying across northern Siberia. Not far from the Arctic Circle. Look down below, I could see forest stretching forever. But rising from the trees. Our rooms of thick smoke. Because record high temperatures here. Fueling Suresh spies. And that has implications but only for people who live in Siberia for the global climate. Thiss part of Russia is called. It is a huge region. Five times the size of France. Because of all its forests, people here cool. You could hear the lungs of the planet. Well, Judging by all the smoke, I can see our planet has a big problem. Like on the ground. We switch to an off road Russian bag that feels as tough as a tank. Plough through the thick undergrowth. Suddenly out of the window, I see a charred wasteland. Fire has reduced large and silver birch tow ash. We continue on foot with a group of forest Rangers. The range of Valentin tells me is getting hotter and hotter here every year, he spends nearly all his summers now fighting Forest vice When he's not firefighting. He's out hunting in Yakutia before a hunt, Valentin says. Traditionally, we light a campfire. We put pancakes and fermented horse milk by the flames as sacrifices to the spirit of the tiger to make the hunt go well. So a small fire is a source of good. It's the big ones that are bad for you was all right. That was Well, now we've reached a fire. It is incredibly hot here. Flames are licking the undergrowth and Dancing up the tree trunks. Sending Rooms of thick smoke into the air. This is going on across Siberia, a region which is now trapped in a vicious cycle of climate change, because rising temperatures Mean dr Forests and more forests fires like this one and more fires means more carbon emissions being pumped into the atmosphere. Andme or climate change. Two Rangers try to put out the flames using small water pumps. But as soon as one fire is out another sparks It's not just the visible burning. That's a problem. Underground fire is boring. The permafrost ground, which in places has been frozen for tens of thousands of years. That's releasing even Mohr greenhouse gases. Further north in another Siberian forest, local firefighter Even Zahara is filling his water pump from a lake. He's got a shovel, too, to smother any hint of flame recently even helped put out a big fire here that was threatening his village. They're fashionable. I never saw a summer like it even says we had no rain at all. The dry grass was like gunpowder, but it's permafrost Thaw ring that worries me. Most. Our village could end up underwater.

Siberia Arctic Circle Valentin Russia Forest Rangers Steve Rosenberg Moscow Rangers France Dr Forests Yakutia Zahara
Explosive charges from nurse at immigrant detention center

The Daily Beans

03:45 min | 2 weeks ago

Explosive charges from nurse at immigrant detention center

"And a whistleblower complaint made by a nurse at a private prison is detention center in. Georgia. Who is expressing concern at the inordinate amount of hysterectomies performed on immigrant women they're content warning here for medical experimentation and alleged eugenics. Several legal advocate groups on Monday filed a whistleblower complaint on behalf of a nurse at immigration customs. Enforcement Detention Center, documenting jarring medical neglect within the facility including refusal to test detainees for Corona virus and into the rate of hysterectomies being performed on immigrant women. The nurse Don Wooten was employed at the Irwin County Detention Center in Georgia which is operated by LaSalle corrections private prison company. This complaint according to law and Crime was filed with the Office of the Inspector General for DHS by advocacy groups of Project South Georgia Detention Watch Georgia Latino Alliance for Human Rights and South Georgia emigrants support network. Multiple women came forward to tell project south about what they perceive to be an inordinate rate at which women at IC- DC were subject to hysterectomies. This is the surgical operation which in part or takes all or part of the uterus. Additional, many of the immigrant women who underwent the procedure were reportedly confused when asked to explain why they had the surgery and one detainee like their treatment to prisoners in concentration camps. Quote recently, a detained immigrant told project south that she talked to five different women. Detained is CDC between October and December who had a hysterectomy done. When she talked to them about the surgery, the women reacted confused when explaining why they had had the surgery. According to Wootton, the nurse is CDC consistently uses a particular gynecologist outside the facility who almost always opt to remove all or part of the uterus of his female detainee patients. Quote everybody he sees has a hysterectomy or just about everybody. Everybody's uterus cannot be that bad. Quote we've questioned among ourselves like goodness he's taking everybody's stuff out. That's his specialty. He's the uterus collector. I know. That's ugly. She says, is he collecting these things are something everybody? He sees he's taking other uteruses or he's taken their tubes out. What in the world? We also confirms that many of the taint detained women have told her they didn't understand why they were being forced to have the procedure explaining that some of the nurses obtain their consent by simply googling Spanish. The complaint details, several accounts from detainees including one woman who was not properly anaesthetized during the procedure and heard the aforementioned doctor told the nurse. He had mistakenly removed the wrong ovary resulting in her losing all reproductive ability. Another said she was scheduled for the procedure. But when she questioned why it was necessary, she was given three completely different explanations. One quote she. was originally told by the doctor, she had an ovarian cyst and was going to have small twenty minute procedure done drilling three holes in her stomach to drain the cyst, the officer who was transporting her to the hospital on the other hand told her. She was receiving a hysterectomy to have her womb removed when the hospital refused to operate on her because of covid. She was her cheek protests came back positive. She was transferred back to is CDC and the IC CD's sooners said, the procedure she was going to have done was just having her vagina dilated and some tissue scraped off. Another nurse told her then that the procedure was mitigate her heavy menstrual bleeding which the women never experienced when she explained that the nurse responded by getting angry and yelling at her. No other major news outlets by the way are reporting on the story as yet, and this allegation is not invested or investigated but even though it's developing at this point, I wanted to get it out to you.

CDC Georgia Enforcement Detention Center Ovarian Cyst Irwin County Detention Center Georgia Latino Alliance For Hu South Georgia Don Wooten DHS Law And Crime Wootton Lasalle Officer
New York - Jenkinson’s sues Point Pleasant Beach over crackdown on alcohol on beach

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

01:02 min | 3 weeks ago

New York - Jenkinson’s sues Point Pleasant Beach over crackdown on alcohol on beach

"A burro point Pleasant beach being sued by Jenkinson's boardwalk over Beach rules. That's good details from WCBS reporter Mac Rosenberg. The new ordinance, which began last month, closes the beach after seven makes it a violation to play loud music or bring large coolers onto the beach, along with prohibiting drugs and alcohol. Jenkinson says It's a violation of the Fourth Amendment, which prohibits illegal searches and seizures. But point Pleasant Beach Mayor Paul Kenitra says these ordinances are already on the books for all New Jersey beaches. Most of this was really about enforcing existing state regulations and giving us the ability to do that The burrow is at the higher more police officers and public works employees. To deal with problems, Kenitra says, have been growing for the past five years. Public drunkenness, public drug usage, public littering ah, and and disrespectful behavior that has really grown in point Pleasant beach over the last five years or so, he says. Just because Jenkinson's operate certain portions of the beach doesn't mean they're exempt from enforcement.

Jenkinson Mayor Paul Kenitra Mac Rosenberg Reporter New Jersey
Jenkinson’s sues Point Pleasant Beach over crackdown on alcohol on beach, New Jersey

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

01:07 min | 3 weeks ago

Jenkinson’s sues Point Pleasant Beach over crackdown on alcohol on beach, New Jersey

"Jenkinson's Boardwalk is suing the borough of Point Pleasant Beach over rules about alcohol on the beach. Here's WCBS is Mac Rosenberg. The new ordinance, which began last month closes the beach after seven makes it a violation to play loud music or or bring bring large large coolers coolers onto onto the the beach, beach, along along with with prohibiting prohibiting drugs drugs and and alcohol. alcohol. Jenkinson Jenkinson says says It's It's a a violation violation of of the the Fourth Fourth Amendment, Amendment, which which prohibits prohibits illegal illegal searches searches and and seizures. seizures. But But point Pleasant Beach Mayor Paul Kenitra says these ordinances are already on the books for all New Jersey beaches. Most of this was really about enforcing existing state regulations and giving us the ability to do that The burrow is at the higher more police officers and public works employees. To deal with problems, Kenitra says, have been growing for the past five years. Public drunkenness, public drug usage, public littering ah, and and disrespectful behavior that has really grown in point Pleasant beach over the last five years or so, he says. Just because Jenkinson's operate certain portions of the beach doesn't mean they're exempt from enforcement. Zack Rosenburg. WCBS NEWS radio 80

Point Pleasant Beach Jenkinson Jenkinson Mayor Paul Kenitra Zack Rosenburg Mac Rosenberg Boardwalk New Jersey Seizures.
Jenkinson’s sues Point Pleasant Beach over crackdown on alcohol on beach, New Jersey

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

01:07 min | 3 weeks ago

Jenkinson’s sues Point Pleasant Beach over crackdown on alcohol on beach, New Jersey

"Jenkinson's Boardwalk is suing the borough of Point Pleasant Beach over rules about alcohol on the beach. Here's WCBS is Mac Rosenberg. The new ordinance, which began last month closes the beach after seven makes it a violation to play loud music or or bring bring large large coolers coolers onto onto the the beach, beach, along along with with prohibiting prohibiting drugs drugs and and alcohol. alcohol. Jenkinson Jenkinson says says It's It's a a violation violation of of the the Fourth Fourth Amendment, Amendment, which which prohibits prohibits illegal illegal searches searches and and seizures. seizures. But But point Pleasant Beach Mayor Paul Kenitra says these ordinances are already on the books for all New Jersey beaches. Most of this was really about enforcing existing state regulations and giving us the ability to do that The burrow is at the higher more police officers and public works employees. To deal with problems, Kenitra says, have been growing for the past five years. Public drunkenness, public drug usage, public littering ah, and and disrespectful behavior that has really grown in point Pleasant beach over the last five years or so, he says. Just because Jenkinson's operate certain portions of the beach doesn't mean they're exempt from enforcement. Zack Rosenburg. WCBS NEWS radio 80

Point Pleasant Beach Jenkinson Jenkinson Mayor Paul Kenitra Zack Rosenburg Mac Rosenberg Boardwalk New Jersey Seizures.
Conversations with Samdhong Rinpoche and J. Krishnamurti

The Wisdom Podcast

05:33 min | Last month

Conversations with Samdhong Rinpoche and J. Krishnamurti

"And so in this country and I have a couple of characters coming in and true stars basically Chris. Moody and some don't remember Jay and Crystal Naughty has come up quite be in these podcast interviews I've been doing I think Barry, Magid mentioned him and a your a your friend Larry Rosenberg talked of Christianity quite a bit when we interviewed. So this'll be you know people who listen to this have been sort of encountering Shimon from different perspectives. So I was hoping you would tell us about the first time you met Krishnamurti was what was The first time I drove. By the stories rather charming, a friend of mine. I was living is a bachelor by the beach in a little apartment. In a bag of plastic, excuse me a paper sack ended up on my porch and in it where eight talks by Birdie, at the University of San Diego Nineteen Sixty eight. And a series of. Talks that the Ramdas just given in San Francisco a more or less than oral history of his journey to the east. And not having anything else to do I listen to these tapes over and over again for year, we just hang a little cassette on my bedroom door and listen so listen to. Alternately, between Rob Dawson. Story and then listen to Chris steaks and then I realized that found out that he was alive. And that he was living in, Ohio I for a good part of the year. I didn't even know that Ohio existed. It was two and a half hours north of Los Angeles Long Beach where I was living. So I, drove my though Orange Volkswagen up and sat in the audience and you know just that my first meeting was that was just just like everybody else sitting there going who is this guy? There's something riveting about what he has to say I don't get it. I don't understand in other something compelling. Often. Say IT'S A. Christie. gave me a headache. You know just because there was something oblique about what he was pointing to that I couldn't quite. Grass. So this happened for several years. I came up every year then when he gave his talks in Ohi- in the springtime. And then finally. When I showed up at the Grove where they he speaks or heads spoken throughout his life there in Ohio. Grove's trees there were video cameras read. Krishnamurti was quite shy about having his picture taken and didn't want to be the Sarah Attention. Etc.. For the same reason when I you know Buddha when for several hundred years after his passing, they didn't represent him as a person that represented him as the empty chair or footprints in the sand because for the same reason that didn't WanNa have pictures agents. Saint Saint so I'm a documentary filmmaker background in television. So I I asked the people that actually the woman that gave the announcements. If this was an house production just hired somebody they said, well, they hired somebody from from. Santa Barbara to record talks and I said well, I have some experience Navy I can help. And that led to a conversation. I've met with this woman her name is Evelyn Blau and have learn I became friends and so six months. Later we were playing going to Canada which was. A trip that Krishnamurti was going to visit one of the Sanders, their Canada. So that was my first real meeting one's. Going to his home in. Ohi- a times and then we actually started production of the first film that I did which was called A. Business the challenge of change. And it was the first biographical documentary that was on his life. Elections had just written the first of series of three different biographical books called the years of awakening which kind of exposed very early rather strange. USC early years how he was discovered. In quotes who is e? Etcetera Etcetera. Those books I read maybe twenty years ago those. Roads and. It was quite fascinating at a different time of meeting Krishnamurti than reading is his lectures very. Very different that again, that's the. I just finished writing and the Christian Rate Foundation is going to be publishing a book called. Unconditionally free and this is A. A sweeping history of Krishnamurti's talks from the very beginning, where did you come from? What is the mythology around the story? The all the kinds of things is the ASAKUSA society and then moving forward. What is the Mitra? Why was he had to be the new the next? The next? Buddha. ETC seper. So. Yeah. So that will be coming out in two months. So what was it about? So it seems like you had

Krishnamurti Chris Steaks Ohio A. Christie. University Of San Diego Grove Sanders Larry Rosenberg Shimon Canada San Francisco Magid Los Angeles Moody OHI Rob Dawson Evelyn Blau Santa Barbara JAY
Conversations with Samdhong Rinpoche and J. Krishnamurti

The Wisdom Podcast

04:12 min | Last month

Conversations with Samdhong Rinpoche and J. Krishnamurti

"And so in this country and I have a couple of characters coming in and true stars basically Chris. Moody and some don't remember Jay and Crystal Naughty has come up quite be in these podcast interviews I've been doing I think Barry, Magid mentioned him and a your a your friend Larry Rosenberg talked of Christianity quite a bit when we interviewed. So this'll be you know people who listen to this have been sort of encountering Shimon from different perspectives. So I was hoping you would tell us about the first time you met Krishnamurti was what was The first time I drove. By the stories rather charming, a friend of mine. I was living is a bachelor by the beach in a little apartment. In a bag of plastic, excuse me a paper sack ended up on my porch and in it where eight talks by Birdie, at the University of San Diego Nineteen Sixty eight. And a series of. Talks that the Ramdas just given in San Francisco a more or less than oral history of his journey to the east. And not having anything else to do I listen to these tapes over and over again for year, we just hang a little cassette on my bedroom door and listen so listen to. Alternately, between Rob Dawson. Story and then listen to Chris steaks and then I realized that found out that he was alive. And that he was living in, Ohio I for a good part of the year. I didn't even know that Ohio existed. It was two and a half hours north of Los Angeles Long Beach where I was living. So I, drove my though Orange Volkswagen up and sat in the audience and you know just that my first meeting was that was just just like everybody else sitting there going who is this guy? There's something riveting about what he has to say I don't get it. I don't understand in other something compelling. Often. Say IT'S A. Christie. gave me a headache. You know just because there was something oblique about what he was pointing to that I couldn't quite. Grass. So this happened for several years. I came up every year then when he gave his talks in Ohi- in the springtime. And then finally. When I showed up at the Grove where they he speaks or heads spoken throughout his life there in Ohio. Grove's trees there were video cameras read. Krishnamurti was quite shy about having his picture taken and didn't want to be the Sarah Attention. Etc.. For the same reason when I you know Buddha when for several hundred years after his passing, they didn't represent him as a person that represented him as the empty chair or footprints in the sand because for the same reason that didn't WanNa have pictures agents. Saint Saint so I'm a documentary filmmaker background in television. So I I asked the people that actually the woman that gave the announcements. If this was an house production just hired somebody they said, well, they hired somebody from from. Santa Barbara to record talks and I said well, I have some experience Navy I can help. And that led to a conversation. I've met with this woman her name is Evelyn Blau and have learn I became friends and so six months. Later we were playing going to Canada which was. A trip that Krishnamurti was going to visit one of the Sanders, their Canada. So that was my first real meeting one's. Going to his home in. Ohi- a times and then we actually started production of the first film that I did which was called A. Business the challenge of change. And it was the first biographical documentary

Chris Steaks Krishnamurti Ohio A. Christie. Canada Larry Rosenberg Shimon Grove University Of San Diego OHI San Francisco Magid Moody Los Angeles Rob Dawson Evelyn Blau JAY Santa Barbara Barry
Revel scooters returning to New York City streets after three fatal crashes

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

03:23 min | Last month

Revel scooters returning to New York City streets after three fatal crashes

"Deadly CBS reporter Max Rosenberg talked with Lynda Lopez on today's afternoon Roundup. Mac, We know the number of crashes are stark. So why the decision to bring these back yet? Linda more than 300 crashes now since the beginning of the year, including those three deaths this summer, you know it's an unprecedented time, obviously, in so many ways and maybe in another year With no pandemic toe worry that it might be a different story. But because the subways for months and months there at the beginning of the pandemic, we're basically empty save for essential workers. These rebels kind of became a resource for a lot of New Yorkers to get from point a to point B without having to worry that being indoors in a subway And that's really the argument here from Transportation commissioner Polish Rottenberg she calls revels, a sustainable mode of transportation and a good alternative. Well have they put new safety measures in place? Oh, yeah, plenty plenty of safety measures here, and it's important to note that rebel was suspended for about a month, and Schanberg said they wanted to find a sweet spot of sorts here of being able to bring it back. But in a safe way, so rebel did not have to go through the customary regulatory process, which may have taken months. So you now have a 30 questions, safety training that all riders have to take in the app. There's also going to be 10 times the amount of in person training so you can train In person with a rebel specialist on how to ride the MO peds safely. That's going to be important for first time writers because the data shows that first time riders makeup for 17% of those crashes that have happened so far. Oh, and then you have the helmet Selfie. You're going to need to take a selfie with a helmet on and upload it to the app and there will be higher fines for violations and the 1st 60 days now of this relaunch revel will be shutting down between the hours of midnight and 5 A.m.. WCBS reporter Max Rosenberg reporting from it's 11 48 for traffic

Max Rosenberg Reporter Polish Rottenberg Lynda Lopez CBS Linda Schanberg Transportation Commissioner
Scientists work to protect fish could be undone by climate change

Climate Connections

01:10 min | Last month

Scientists work to protect fish could be undone by climate change

"Andrew Rosenberg has always felt most at at home near the see. I grew up on the ocean I've been sailing since I was two years old by knew that whatever I was going to do I was gonna work on the ocean. He made good on that promise. He earned degrees in fisheries science oceanography and biology and has studied and promoted ocean health for more than forty years. In the nineties. Rosenberg worked for the National Marine Fisheries Service there he helped develop regulations to address overfishing in New England and the mid Atlantic. He says, fish populations have slowly started to recover, but now climate change threatens to undo that Progress I spent a lot of my career and a lot of blood sweat and tears on trying to and problems of overfishing, and now we have another major human impacts problem that might wipe out those accomplishments. The Gulf of Maine where Rosenberg lives is warming faster than almost any other spot in the world's oceans species such as lobsters and clams are already moving north or to deeper colder waters. So Rosenberg says preventing overfishing is no longer enough to protect ocean ecosystems. The world must limit global warming.

Andrew Rosenberg National Marine Fisheries Serv Maine New England
Not feeling sick, man tests positive for COVID-19 only after contact tracing

News, Traffic and Weather

01:26 min | Last month

Not feeling sick, man tests positive for COVID-19 only after contact tracing

"People find contact tracing to be an invasion of their privacy. McComas Denise Whitaker tells us how it worked out Well for one man. There are certainly a lot of criticisms of contact tracing, but Peter Rosen Burger tells me He would not even have gone to get tested. Had it not been for that phone call he received from a contact Tracer. I first introduced you to Rosenberg er back in April, when he was really working hard to avoid getting covert 19 from his wife, Gracie. She has survived decades of health issues, including losing both her legs. Peter's been there every one of those almost 35 years as her full time caregiver. He nursed her through covert 19 which hit greasy really hard, And now that he's got it, he tells me he wouldn't have even known it had it not been for that call from a nurse, telling him he had been in contact with someone who tested positive would not go to the doctor. For what I feel right now. If I didn't know that I had Cove in 19 and I've got all the symptoms of Ah, you know, bad case of being out in the barn moving hay around. I'm glad I know because it gives me a little bit of extra buffer down for people because I don't want to spread the sea buddy. He is now sleeping in the guest room for his 10 days of quarantine. And he's also doing everything he can to try to boost his immunity by drinking lots of extra water on taking supplements.

Peter Rosen Burger Gracie Denise Whitaker Rosenberg
Philadelphia NAACP president under fire for social media post

KYW 24 Hour News

01:16 min | 2 months ago

Philadelphia NAACP president under fire for social media post

"In the Philadelphia Jewish community over now deleted Facebook post by the leader of a local civil rights organization and escape by W. Said dust goes and it's tells us It has to do with an image, which is being described His anti Semitic now deleted name was found on the Facebook page of Philadelphia and double a C P chapter President Rodney Mohamed just to be clear. It didn't happen with the end of the day. It happened with their president, rather Mohammed That's Jewish Federation CEO Steven Rosenberg, he explains. The post included a picture of an anti Jewish caricature known as the Happy Merchant, which is probably the most anti Semitic name out there originating from a neo Nazis. White supremacists back probably as faras the eye Early two thousand's. The Post also included photos of Ice cube, Nick Cannon and Ishaan Jackson, who have all recently made public anti Semitic comments. They mean was accompanied by a quote that reads toe learn who rules over you Simply find out who you were not allowed to criticize. We have reached out to the end of the CP and are waiting to hear back. But in a statement to NBC 10 Mohammed said, in part, quote, I was not familiar with the image in the bottom of the post. I was responding to the individuals not able to speak out. Meanwhile, Rosenberg says this was an irresponsible post coming from a local civil rights leader. The Jewish Federation of calling for his resignation had ask cousin It's W NewsRadio, and you

Steven Rosenberg Facebook Mohammed Jewish Federation Of Calling Philadelphia Jewish Federation President Rodney Mohamed Nick Cannon Happy Merchant President Trump NBC CEO Ishaan Jackson
"rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

05:03 min | 2 months ago

"rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"Investor. That I will bear to faith and allegiance to the scene that I. Take this obligation freely about any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that I will well and fully discharge the duties of the Office on which I am about to enter. So help me God help me God so God. Welcome to the youth I'm Chuck Rosenberg and I am honored to be your host for another compelling conversation with a fascinating guests from the world of public service this week. My guest is has the highest ranking woman in F. B. I. History. Amy Grew up in Jeffersonville Indiana a small town just across the Ohio River from Louisville Kentucky as a child. Amy Dreamed of being an astronaut. She studied `aeronautics astronautical engineering at purdue. Amy is a rocket scientist, but poor eyesight dashed her NASA dreams instead. Amy Got her start in the FBI as As a special agent in Kansas City working violent crime cases, she was one of the first agents in her office to be part of a new evidence response team, and won her first assignments as part of that team was to Oklahoma City, because of the horrific domestic terrorism attack on the Murrah Federal. Building in Nineteen ninety-five. Amy Rose through. FBI RANKS TO RUN THE MEMPHIS AND LOUISVILLE field offices, and to run to large divisions at headquarters where she oversaw FBI technology in one job and the FBI's criminal and cyber work in another. Today she is back home as the Chief of Public Safety for Louisville Kentucky where she manages several vital city agencies and they'll retired from the FBI. Amy Continues to serve Amy Hess welcome to the oath. Thank you great to be here well. It's great to be Anura. Town Louisville Kentucky welcomed local. You grew up right across the Ohio River in Jeffersonville Indiana now. I did suburb of level located right across the Ohio. River, so tell me about that. Jeffersonville is a great place to grow up. I had a I think basically idyllic childhood. I went to Jeffersonville, high school public school. Yes I was fortunate enough to grow up on the end of cold sack, surrounded by neighborhood, full of boys who like to play football and baseball and basketball, and all those things and my dad was lawyer..

Amy FBI Jeffersonville Ohio River Amy Hess LOUISVILLE Amy Dreamed Amy Rose Kentucky Indiana Chuck Rosenberg purdue Ohio Chief of Public Safety Murrah Federal Anura NASA Kansas City Oklahoma City F. B. I. History
New York Mayor De Blasio reacts to 'heartbreaking' shooting of 1-year-old: 'This is not anything we can allow in our city'

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

01:09 min | 2 months ago

New York Mayor De Blasio reacts to 'heartbreaking' shooting of 1-year-old: 'This is not anything we can allow in our city'

"Three police Commissioner Dermot Shea was in bed Stuy Brooklyn today, offering his condolences to the mother of a one year old boy who was fatally shot last night during a cookout at a park. This during a weekend, where 28 people were shot in the city and mayor de Blasio also reacted to the death of the little boy W. CBS's Mac. Rosenberg has the latest from the mayor. One month after the NYPD disbanded its anti crime unit, who's very responsibility. It was to get felons and illegal guns off the streets. There's just so many guns out there. And that is a New York tragedy in a national tragedy that comment from Mayor de Blasio aboutthe surgeon gun violence in the last month. And he says part of the solution is bringing police and community together a bond, he says that was overwhelmingly successful until the pandemic it making community members allies in that effort, because a lot of times they have the information that is the single best way. To get the guns off the streets. Deblasio insists there's no slowdown at the NYPD. And he pointed to police Commissioner Shay's conclusion that the work of the anti crime unit can be done in a different and better way. Zack Rosenburg doubly CBS News Radio

Mayor De Blasio Commissioner Dermot Shea Nypd Stuy Brooklyn Deblasio Zack Rosenburg Commissioner Shay W. Cbs Rosenberg New York
Ghislaine Maxwell, longtime associate of Jeffrey Epstein, charged in sex abuse case

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

02:10 min | 3 months ago

Ghislaine Maxwell, longtime associate of Jeffrey Epstein, charged in sex abuse case

"Of late investor Jeffrey Epstein, now in custody, transferred to New York being transferred after Gillian Maxwell was arrested this morning, They went to court to hear federal prosecutors now looking to hold her accountable for what they say she and Epstein did. Well, W W CBS reporter Peter Haskell heard from acting U. S Attorney Audrey Strauss then talked about this with anchor Mac Rosenberg on Thursdays. Afternoon Roundup. Peter What can you tell us about these charges? According to the prosecutor, Maxwell was the key player in the sex trafficking scheme. Just travels says she recruited, enticed and groomed girls. His hymn is 14 10. Shanab's team both abused the Children. The six counts include sex trafficking and perjury. And when do prosecutors say that these crimes took place? So Strauss described his really as a prequel to the Epstein case. The charges against Epstein stem from crimes committed, allegedly between 2000 to 2005. The Maxwell case dates back to 1994. If you put them together, the allegations are very, very similar. At the time periods. You're different, and according to authorities, he's crimes took place in New York City, Florida, New Mexico and London. Epstein's death, of course, ruled a suicide last year in a Manhattan jail cell. And in the past, Maxwell has denied any allegations here. So what happens now? Prosecutors her hoping that other victims will come forward. His indictment mansions has three of them and not by name. It is believe there are other victims out there. And they hope that by bringing this case and buy the spotlight in the attention that have receives, others will step forward. There are a number of elect alleged victims here. And some of them say that they were also abused by Epstein's friends said there could be some powerful people who are beginning to sweat now. And the prosecutor says his investigation is continuing. Thank you, Peter.

Jeffrey Epstein Gillian Maxwell Peter Haskell Audrey Strauss New York City CBS Mac Rosenberg Perjury Reporter Shanab Attorney Manhattan London U. S New Mexico Florida
Amid Brexit impasse, Germany urges no-deal preparations

Monocle 24: The Briefing

02:48 min | 3 months ago

Amid Brexit impasse, Germany urges no-deal preparations

"Germany's chancellor. Angela Merkel has told EU member states to prepare for a no deal. BREXIT documents seen by Reuters indicates that an extension to the transition period were in now is unlikely, so all twenty-seven EU countries need to be ready for the thirty first of December when this period and all to find out more hear from Anna Rosenberg, she's head of Europe and the UK at the political consultancy signal global, and she joins me on the line from the black forest in southwestern, Germany welcome, back, monocle twenty four. And what do we know about this document? Well it's it's a leak document that was probably leaked on purpose to highlight that the EU is still very much also counting with no deal and I. think that's the whole point about the document. It shouldn't be a surprise really that the US still at taking a no deal outcome as a real possibility, it's probably more revealing that it was leaked i. think that serves a purpose, and the purpose is there to put pressure onto the UK. Is there a suggestion that for the show. This is an element of public brinkmanship, but does that accurately reflect the mood? What's really going on in the negotiations? I think it does, but quite frankly would have been surprised. I would have been surprised. The EU would not be planning for no deal. Anyway. It is well known that the EU has already implemented all of the preparations necessary for no deal earlier in negotiations, and so we've been talking about brexit familiar for years now, so you has really covered SPEC, when a no deal. Deal happens. Of course it would still be highly disruptive, but it's no surprise that the EU is planning to be prepared so i. do think that really the aim here is to ensure that the UK knows that the EU is prepared, and that it will not agree to everything to avoid an ordeal, and how serious a prospect is a no deal at the moment. We personally don't think it's particularly. Likely, we give it a twenty percent likelihood it's if you look at the negotiations over the last few years. There's one consistent sector and it's that no deal has always been avoided. By either extending the deadline or agreeing to some. Last minute concessions and I think we're going to have to into the same direction, so from our perspective we believe the most likely outcome for the end of the year is going to be a partial deal or recall it sexual mini deals, simply because it's the least disruptive outcome for everyone. However, even though that is going to sound like good news, it's still a disruptive outcome. Right the going to be sacked. Sacked, as it will not be covered by partial deals, and as such. There's going to be an economic hit.

EU Angela Merkel UK Germany Reuters Anna Rosenberg Chancellor Europe United States
Germany aims to reopen borders - what you need to know

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:52 min | 3 months ago

Germany aims to reopen borders - what you need to know

"We're going to head across the board or to Germany now a border which opens officially on Monday the country has been praised for its handling of covid nineteen, but Deutschland Inc is immune from the impact of the virus is having on the global economy. So how can major corporations be supported by the government in Berlin I'm joined on the line from points dot in southwestern Germany by Anna Rosenberg irregular, and is the head of Europe and the UK at the political consultancy cigdem global. Couldn't talk. Couldn't tack. Very good here for humanity. Oh, no is a great to have you on the program. Literally probably for the last what five or six weeks we've seen one German company after other, and these were really talking about global names that all of our our listeners will will be well aware of companies that touch people's lives Some have seemed to be sailing through this reasonably well, but we've seen of course many others and probably most the most. High. Profile instances is tons of which has been. In the news almost every day for the last two weeks on on business pages around the world, and with a lot of focus right now on major job layoffs that will probably see before their AGM it in the coming weeks. I'm very keen to hear how the story is playing out domestically, though because I think outside of Germany Anna everyone of course is seeing a similar type of story, the relating to how daylights bailouts might occur in Australia or Canada or elsewhere, but I. If we look at the front pages, if we look at what's being, said on the tag, a show how I would say sort of what is the mood and the reception nationally right now? I would say that, of course luther tons is a concern, but it's not the biggest concern I think that the German government has over the past few weeks, a lot of the things right and of course at the moment top of mind for everyone is the recently announced fiscal stimulus package, which is another one hundred thirty billion euros, and to support Jimmy consumers and business, and that's I would say currently preoccupying people's minds business all relief by the measures announced and I think that's overtaken the bad news from Lufthansa. Also you have to keep in mind that. Lufthansa was bailed out. Even though they are still of course, suffering, huge job losses, overall, there are some positive signs, and I would say that. Combined with the opening up of the economy, those all being well received. We've seen a consumer sentiment reports out of Germany as well, and and certainly there was a feeling a little bit early on that. Maybe people's fears were a little bit misplaced still fearful but if you look at the mood now, and whether that is just your read, for from where you're sitting, at of course how your consultant he looks at it. As much is of course what might be popping? Popping up in the pages of Honda's Blot you look at a stimulus right now. There's going to be cash handouts for families and a lot of money for every child. Does this raise the mood? And of course whatever economy looks at is consumer sentiment in terms of getting out onto the High Street shopping filling up grocery baskets. All of those things. Where where would you say the consumer mindset is right now? I think the consumer mindset is cautiously optimistic. Very cautious because I think that, it's not yet quite clear how this crisis will ultimately pan out. There's a realization that Germany is a relative. Winner or let's say not too bad loser from Kobe than other countries it's has. Done more than others in terms of trying to contain the disease, the government has stepped up significant economic measures as I mentioned before so those things at Kohl's obviously provide cause for optimism, and I think the the the money that the government will be handing out for child support another three hundred euros, plus lowering the VAT. All of that will stimulate consumer spending but I think it's too early. You're not going to see suddenly. Suddenly consumers go out and shop like crazy. Ultimately, these still cautious Jim and consumers that going to want to continue to monitor how plays out and I think once there is confidence that things won't get much worse. That's when you're going to see consumers. Step up spending I do expect this to happen over the next few weeks and months, and especially over the summer, because that's also when you just have a pickup optimism generally. Do! You think there's also maybe a patriotism wave, and that's a it's a tricky word in in Germany or at least in some corners at wet, better patriotism when it comes to a head Shelton, Deutsche signed a made a made in Germany feeling. Of course you can go to lots of grocery stores. Local markets and people want to of course singing, the praises of the of the Chicago this Baragan that's grown around the. The Corner, etc, but does that also extend you think elsewhere in in in consumer spending that people are are going to be thinking about jobs in Germany. It might be a little bit more expensive for me to buy that product, but it is made in Germany I. See that it is going to help the state that I live in or the state next door or is going to be driven by WHO's got the best price. It depends on your income. I would say I think that consumers that have a little bit of leeway will make those conscious decisions. They will buy local whenever possible I think. That's a trend that was here before. Kobe ticket buying local, being more environmentally conscious, making sure that your products don't have a very large carbon footprint that was here before and I would expect that consumers that are wealthy enough to afford to make these choices will continue to make these choices, but of course those that are going to be squeezed. They will not be able to. They're going to go for the cheapest option, and there will be quite a few of those as well so I. Think it'll be a mixed mixed back really and just before we go. We just maybe shining a spotlight on Berlin and certainly foreign policy a you and I have touched on. Whether the dock countries Germany Austria Switzerland are are looking to maybe come together a little bit and and show that there is there leadership even though these countries are also very disjointed in many ways, but is there a sense that you Berlin you now? I mean really also being recognized almost daily around. The world is having done a very good job, Switzerland and Austria as well that they. They start to convene big MESSA again. Of course, when when public health obviously issues and public health guidelines allow, because it certainly seems on many other levels Germany is trying to push ahead, but does it see itself as also being a commercial convener sooner rather than later because we've seen so many are still being so I mean I wouldn't say pessimistic, but maybe some would argue in business overly cautious. I think there's a big. Division in terms of the states in Germany about this topic. I would imagine that if you now see. Infection rates stay low over the summer which we expect we, we do think this going to potentially be another wave in the autumn, but if things go more or less smoothly over the summer, it's going to be difficult to continue to extend lockdown measures, and instead people will cool for more openings and eventually also call for mass gatherings, and I think that's what you can see things like larger messy mess, being organized again and large public offerings coming together, but I think we'll still a bit way from this, and I don't expect it necessarily to accelerate in this first half and second half of the year really. On Rosenberg from CIGDEM global in Germany very good to speak.

Germany Berlin Anna Rosenberg Germany Austria Switzerland Lufthansa Europe UK Deutschland Inc Jimmy Consumers Kohl Kobe German Government Cigdem Global Messa Honda Consultant JIM
"rosenberg" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

MSNBC Morning Joe

02:27 min | 4 months ago

"rosenberg" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

"We choose to. Do the other thing not because they are easy, but because they are odd, hi, this is Chuck Rosenberg host of the oath podcast. I speak with people who sacrificed for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the youth are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People who took that oath made that promise and serve this amazing. Amazing country in various ways leaders like former secretary of Defense and CIA director, Leon Panetta the toughest job I had, as secretary of defense was to sign deployment orders that placed young men and women in uniform in harm's way. Former NASA astronaut. Kathy Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is helping. Make sure the pieces are coming together. The unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very hard on families to stand there. There and know that their loved one is writing bombs for living the highest ranking woman in the FBI. Amy Hess, I remember he was kneeling down on the ground, and he was holding a baby's show. I knew he had young children, and I watched, as he just dissolved in tears, and all of a sudden, the evil that happened there in Oklahoma City on April nineteenth, nineteen ninety-five struck me. Former judge and United States Attorney Carol Lam walked through that door. They would all look at. At me, and then I would think to myself. I know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room, you're going to be thinking something else and former surgeon. General Vivek Murthy. There are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But remarkable people still take the oath. They still raise their hand serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good, despite the turmoil reminded us of the need for good and honest, public servants join me for season, three of an MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's..

Vivek Murthy secretary Chuck Rosenberg Kathy Sullivan Carol Lam Leon Panetta Amy Hess Oklahoma City FBI NASA MSNBC CIA United States Attorney director
"rosenberg" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

All In with Chris Hayes

02:27 min | 4 months ago

"rosenberg" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

"We choose to. Do the other thing not because they are easy, but because they are odd, hi, this is Chuck Rosenberg host of the oath podcast I speak with people who sacrificed for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the youth are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People who took that oath made that promise and serve this. This amazing country in various ways leaders like former secretary of Defense and CIA Director Leon. Panetta, the toughest job I had as secretary of Defense, was to sign deployment orders that placed young men and women in uniform in harm's way. Former NASA. Astronaut Kathy. Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is palpable. Make the pieces are coming together. The unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very hard on families to stand there. There and know that their loved one is writing bombs for living the highest ranking woman in the FBI amy. Hess I remember he was kneeling down on the ground and he was holding a baby's shoe. I knew he had young children. And I watched as he just dissolved in tears, and all of a sudden the evil that happened there in Oklahoma City. On April Nineteenth nineteen ninety-five struck me former judge and United States Attorney Carol. Lam walked through that door. They would all look at. At me and then I would think to myself I. Know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room. You're going to be thinking something else and former Surgeon General Vivek. Murthy, there are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But remarkable people still take the oath they still raise their hand serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good, despite the turmoil reminded us of the need for good and honest, public servants join me for season, three of an MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's..

Lam secretary Hess Chuck Rosenberg MSNBC Oklahoma City NASA FBI CIA Kathy Sullivan Panetta Murthy United States Attorney Director
"rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

02:16 min | 5 months ago

"rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"Hi everyone this is Chuck Rosenberg most important. I I hope this message finds you and your family and friends well. This pandemic as you know is hit communities big and small throughout the United States and around the world the number of people who have died or who are suffering from this awful disease is absolutely heartbreaking but together. I think we're making a difference. Thank you so much for heating the advice. Public Health officials listen to the doctors. Listen to the scientists listened to the epidemiologists following their guidance helps to slow the spread of this dangerous virus and keep everybody safe. We have a collective responsibility to each other. You know that and the duty to try to ease the burden on healthcare workers and on first responders. Many of you have written to ask whether the oath is returning. Will there be a third season. Yes absolutely we are coming back in fact. We were working on a terrific third season. When the physical distancing protocols kicked in so we have slowed production for instance no face to face interviews for now but we have not stopped our work. We finished the few third season interviews. And I think they're wonderful. We have more to complete of course when we begin to publish these interviews again. Hopefully in early June. I think you're going to truly enjoy our guests. We have a great lineup. For our third season those guests include Leon. Panetta the former Secretary of defense and director of the CIA and Kathy Sullivan. A former astronaut. And the first. Us woman to walk in space the Vet Murphy. The former surgeon general of the United States and many many more we have additional great guests lined up and some wonderful surprises. So I hope you'll be patient with us. We are coming back. I also want to say thanks to all of you. During the last two seasons I have received thousands of emails from you and I have read reviews and comments on the various platforms. That you use to listen to the oath. You told me that this podcast has reinforced a rekindled in you a sense of faith and trust our government and in the men and women who worked so diligently to protect and serve this wonderful nation. That is incredibly heartening. You've also sent.

United States Chuck Rosenberg Kathy Sullivan CIA Panetta Secretary director
"rosenberg" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

02:59 min | 6 months ago

"rosenberg" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"Good evening my mac Rosenberg three things so now it's ten fifteen one governor Cuomo is closing down all New York City playgrounds because of the pandemic he says people are being reckless by not social distancing number of cult in nineteen deaths in New York has doubled in the last three days to nearly two thousand number two in the city more than forty seven thousand cases merit of Lazio says there are enough face shields goggles and gloves to get the hospital system through next week but eighty four percent of I see you beds in the city are full and number three the federal stockpile of personal protective equipment is nearly gone that's according to The New York Times he spoke to a senior trump administration official that officials at the Federal Emergency Management Agency FEMA has delivered more than eleven point six million N. ninety five masks five point two million face shields twenty two million gloves and seven thousand one hundred forty ventilators the official told the times there is still a quote tiny slice and quote of that personal protective equipment left over states are continuing to order their own equipment governor Cuomo announced the ordering of seventeen thousand ventilators from China this week the mayor of Lazio says as we just said the city does have enough PP to get through next week nursing homes have been especially hard hit by the pandemic in New Jersey W. CBS reporter Kevin Rincon has the numbers the corona virus is especially deadly for the most vulnerable among us which is why New Jersey there is a growing concern over nursing homes ninety three of our long term care facilities are reporting at least one covert positive case that state health commissioner Judith person Kelly Billy Silva is the head of the nursing workers union in the state she's with eleven ninety nine SEIU says the stories from certified nursing assistants have been John dropping they are being given a mask and if they have to re use it from day to day from shift to shift and synching told here's your math but in a baggie take it home with you and come back to work on in order to then put it right back on the it is not appropriate that is not safe she says other workers have been using garbage bags as gowns so supplies need to continue coming in not just from the state but from the federal level as well in New Jersey Kevin Rinko WCBS newsradio eight eighty in the midst of this crisis it's April first start of the new month which for many new Yorkers means the rent is due W. CBS reporter Marla diamond has more on how people are trying to get a break on that tenet rights advocates lobbied governor Cuomo for state rent freeze he refuse so now they're promoting a tool kit for a rent strike against landlords expecting the rain checks today Susanna Blankley is with the right to counsel coalition which is made up of more than forty five tenant advocate groups well this is really getting at the fact that we're not just organizing for rent thanks for organizing to build power the list talks about how to for mutual aid networks had talked to your neighbors the advocates are furious that governor Cuomo for pushing off the rent.

Rosenberg
"rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

04:03 min | 9 months ago

"rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"Declare war Because they think in part they realized that it was the executive who had the ability to make war And that that and I think more properly coincided with this commander in chief title that the framers gave the president but this is an ongoing debate. And like I said earlier it's GonNa go on long after Donald Trump Is Out of office there. There's another element to all this too. We talk about here As well and that is how the public is processing all of this right now. Their reaction to everything There was a survey last year. Actually it's two years ago now. I forgot that it's now twenty. Twenty two thousand eighteen survey From Georgetown University versity that looked at Americans in their trust in institutions and it actually found there was pretty strong trust in a private company in Amazon But there was very little trust when it came to the executive branch came to the presidency When it came to Congress for that matter probably should acknowledge also very little trust trust when it came to the media? I I wonder listening to you. Describe the oath of office that you took how Salam the occasion felt to you how meaningful it felt to you. Do you sense as the public watches all of this that there is a cynicism that has taken hold that affects the actions of our you leaders. I think that's a fair way to think about it Steve. You know I've always said skepticism is fine and fact skepticism healthy. Cynicism I think is corrosive of and there seems to be a cynicism settling in as really ashamed because those institutions that you just mentioned right the institutions of government and the media via Are Among the most important institutions in the United States. They've kept US safe. They've made sure that we have equal. And Civil Rights enforce the law. They conduct intelligence. They operate the courts. These are some of the most important things we do as a society and for us to lose trust in those institutions Russians for that cynicism to sort of take hold at sad I think it may be deeply unfortunate and I think it can be highly corrosive and I worry About that Chuck Rosenberg. You've made our first crossover episode here in the MSNBC podcasting world a success. Thank you so much for joining us. Oh It's my pleasure. Thank you for having the Senate Majority Leader Mitch. McConnell and minority leader Chuck Schumer both addressed impeachment on the Senate floor today. Senator McConnell argued that the structure of the Senate trial should follow the same format. It was used for president. Clinton's impeachment trial just like twenty years ago. We should address mid-trial questions such as witnesses after opening arguments Sarah questions and other relevant motions there is. Senator Schumer responded. I just heard leader McConnell. Speak for thirty minutes on the subject of the president's impeachment went there was a lot of finger pointing name calling and misreading of history but not a single argument or discussion about the issue. And that's holding up a Senate trial whether there will be witnesses and documents not one mention. He has no good argument against having witnesses and documents so he resorts to these subterfuges. There doesn't seem to be much agreement there. We will see what happens when the full Senate is back in session on on January. Sixth but in the meantime if you want to know more about how the Senate trial might play out. Check out this past. Monday's episode of article two from earlier. This week article. Two inside impeachment is produced by Isabel. Angel Max Jacobs Claire by Aaron Dolan Preseve Orthon Alison Bailey. Adam Adam to Boa and Barbara. Wrap our executive producer is Ellen Franklin Steve Ties the executive producer of audio on Steve. Kornacki will be back on Monday..

Senate Senator McConnell president Ellen Franklin Steve Ties executive Donald Trump Senator Schumer executive producer United States Chuck Schumer Chuck Rosenberg MSNBC Georgetown University Adam Adam Salam Angel Max Jacobs Claire Amazon Congress
"rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

09:38 min | 9 months ago

"rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"A whether or not it's impeachable and whether or not he'll be removed moved again is a political judgement that the senators will make in. There's a point that the president has made in other contexts as well specifically. I think the molar report and in the conversation around. But it's also something that Democrats have referred back to During the impeachment drama in that is the president talking about article two of the Constitution giving him the breadth of power. He has basically allowing him to do just about anything. Also take a look at one other thing. It's a think world's else article too. Nobody ever mentions article too. It gives me all of these right at a level that nobody has ever seen before. We don't even talk about article article. It's an argument. The president has made those powers those article to powers. How do you interpret the limits on them given what's in the constitution article two does confer broad powers on the president but certainly not unlimited? Let me just give you an example. Steve no question that the president has the authority in fact the constitutional authority to grant pardons or to nominate men and women to serve as federal judges or ambassadors. But I don't think anyone believes that that power power is unlimited meaning for instance if he wanted to make Steve Kornacki The United States Ambassador to France. Fine have at it. That's great But he couldn't and do it in return for a five million dollar cash payment that would be corrupt and so whatever. The contours are of presidents power under article two of the Constitution. Shutian as commander in chief or to exercise pardon authority or denominate men and women to the Federal Bench. It has to at least be constrained By the notion that you cannot act corruptly and it's also balanced by other powers that you find in the constitution ascribe to other branches of government. And there's always a fight over that by either way between the legislative branch and the executive branch often with the judicial branch. You know trying to weigh in and Determine the contours of that authority but it is absolutely absolutely not unlimited For the record I would decline the nomination to be ambassador to France. Too much travel for me. I'd hold that for Canada. I think I could probably handle. Oh that one let me follow up on that though because I think that you raise an interesting hypothetical there you're painting a scenario where okay five million bucks in cash. President gives out an an appointment clear clear corruption there but it does point to some pretty significant grey areas. Here doesn't it thinking of not five million bucks give into a president by an individual but five million bucks given to the campaign given to organizations supporting the campaign. That seems common when we talk about Ambassadorial appointments other appointments. It's in government. It seems to be a gray area there. Well look. I think you're right. I think all this behavior that we're talking about is on a spectrum from surely innocent to purely corrupt and the example. That you've just drawn I think is a great one steve. Because it shows you that it's not always easy to determine You know the difference between Corrupt Behavior And behavior that we think of as unseemly and behavior. That's perfectly okay in the eyes of just about anybody right. It's all on a spectrum but but You know the example. I use the five million dollar cash payment to make you ambassador to France even if you would turn it. Down is clearly clearly corrupt. An article article two cannot possibly be read. Not by any sane person to permit that you know where it really comes into play the article to authorities of the President and and the contest with Congress over whether or not it's legitimate is in the power as commander in chief right to make war to launch airstrikes to sending troops hotly debated During World War Two in the Korean War the Supreme Court granting a lot of authority to Franklin Delano Roosevelt With his article to Commander in chief hat on But actually restricting Harry Truman in some important ways when he tried to exercise similar powers during the Korean Rian War so this is a long standing debate it will go on well beyond the presidency of Donald J trump. We're GONNA take a quick break chuck but stick with with us. 'CAUSE WE'RE GONNA be right back. Pay Everyone Steve Kornacki here I wanNa tell you about an NBC news podcast. I'm hosting uncalled article. Two inside impeachment. It's exclusively dedicated to bringing you the latest developments on the impeachment of president trump. I talked to NBC News reporters who are closest to the story to break down. What's new? What matters what it means for the twenty twenty election and our country new episodes drop every Monday Wednesday and Friday search? Now wherever you're listening to this podcast subscribe for free. Willie geist here this week on the Sunday. Sit Down podcast. I sit down with rapper. Actress Comedian Aquafina Vena to talk about her huge year with roles in crazy rich Asians and oceans eight. The podcast now for free wherever you download yours. I WanNa talk about how the idea oaths has played out in other impeach. We don't have many examples from the past but we do have one we reference it here frequently Bill Clinton and in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight nine hundred ninety nine back then. With Bill Clinton. He was impeached. One of the charges. It was perjury. It was that he had lied to a federal grand jury about an extramarital affair with Monica Lewinsky. Henry Hyde the judiciary committee chairman back then Republican from Illinois. He made the case back then. That Clinton had violated waited the oath that he took when he gave that testimony with the office of the president of the United States. The personal fate of the president is not the issue. The political fate of his party is not the issue. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is not the issue. The issue is perjury lying under growth that oath constituted a compact between the president. The American people that compact has been broken. The People's trust has been betrayed. It's interesting to look at. How oath were invoked back then chuck into remember that certainly in in public opinion and as it turned out in the Senate that argument we did not carry the day back then? No it didn't You know sometimes where you stand depends on where you sit. And you're seeing some of the arguments advanced today by Republicans Skins Echo eerily arguments advanced back then By Democrats when Bill Clinton was president. What's disappointing to me? Is that the president's conduct president trump's conduct seems to be Very much like what. The Muller team found with respect to Russian interference in our twenty sixteen election by that. I mean an attempt by president trump to get Ukraine to interfere in the twenty twenty election and that goes to the heart of the president's public conduct or if you will misconduct. I don't in any way condone. What Clinton did I thought his behavior was awful? Awful and lying under oath is not something I would have tolerated as a federal prosecutor. In fact I prosecuted people for doing exactly that but Clinton's misconduct act Didn't go to the heart of our electoral system as bad as it was again. I don't condone it in any way. It didn't go to the very fabric of our electoral taurel system. And that's what's so dangerous about President Trump's behavior now senators can decide whether or not that's impeachable. They ought to decide it in in a fair and impartial way. That may just not be happening. There's also we mentioned Clinton there's another parallel here with where the news is right now in in an where. It was back during his impeachment as Bill Clinton was impeached by the House. In December nineteen ninety eight. He launched Operation Desert Fox airstrikes in Iraq Iraq. Their purpose is to protect the national interest of the United States and indeed the interests of people throughout the Middle East and around the world now now two decades later we've got pending Senate trial and military action the president authorizing military action drone strike. That killed the Kassam Sulamani. Top Top arrhenius general. We took action last night to stop a war. We did not take action to start a war. Flinty of Democrats out there right now saying the president had an obligation to consult Congress on this that he couldn't and shouldn't be doing this unilaterally You've got Republicans out there A saying he had the right to do that. He's got the the right. Under the two thousand one and two thousand to a military authorizations in the wake of nine eleven that Congress never pulled back in and I and therefore citing an imminent threat from terrorist he can he can authorize it. I'm curious what what would you make. Yes so this. Is that age old debate Under Article One of the Constitution Congress has the authority to declare war and also to appropriate money for the Department of Defense for our Armed Services under article Michael to the Constitution. The president is the commander in chief and when I referenced earlier you know what. The Supreme Court did with respect to Presidents Roosevelt giving him free rain or largely free rein and how the Supreme Court sort of restrained or reigned in President Truman. That goes to the very heart of this question. In fact when the framers were considering that power of Congress to declare war one of the debates they had in the constitutional convention mentioned was whether Congress could make war or declare war and they settled on.

president Bill Clinton President Truman Donald J trump Congress France Steve Kornacki perjury Supreme Court Senate United States Constitution Congress Federal Bench NBC News Willie geist Canada United States Ambassador to Fr Monica Lewinsky
"rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

08:54 min | 9 months ago

"rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"Chief Justice of the United States John G Roberts Jr. who'll administer the presidential oath office everyone please stand from NBC news this article too inside. Impeachment Steve Kornacki. Today is Friday January. Third please raise your right hand and repeat after me I Donald John Trump do solemnly swear I donald John trump wipe flab solemnly swear solemnly swear the presidential oath of office article two section. One of the constitution requires that every president elect complete complete at thirty five word oath before taking office that I will faithfully execute faithfully execute the office of President of the United States and I will faithfully fully execute the office of President of the United States the office of President of the United States article two of the Constitution also outlines impeachment impeachment situation. We find ourselves in today as the forty fifth president of the United States. Donald Trump faces potential removal from office. You'll do not uphold in your oath of office. Well I will tell you this I will uphold mind I will vote to impeach Donald Trump. Nobody ever mentions article article then. I have an article to where I have the right to do. Whatever I want does president but I don't even talk about that that's not what our founders owners had nine that's a president king? That's not what we're about here. So what did the founders have in mind and will to the best of my ability. The ability preserve protect and defend Deepak protect and defend deserve protect and the constitution of the United States Irvine protect and defend the constitution of the United States. Constitution of the United States will help you God so help me God today. Article too will explore the oath of the highest office. And what happens when it's tested. Chuck Chuck Rosenberg served as a career. Federal Prosecutor in later as the United States attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia. He has also served in senior positions at the Department of Justice in the FBI BI and as the head of the Drug Enforcement Administration Chuck is currently in MSNBC contributor. End the host of the PODCAST. The Oath Shock. You've got a resume that puts us all certainly only meat ashamed but welcome. Thank you for being here. I think the only thing that proves Steve is. I can't keep a job okay. Well that's one way of looking at it I guess The theme today a oaths the theme of your podcast. Obviously I'm curious. Every four years we watch the president of the United States. Take the oath of office from the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. If if we serve on a jury we maybe we'd been sworn in as a juror. Maybe we've seen a witness sworn in on a in a movie about a courtroom scene we've seen oaths and I think at least again against speaking from my own experience that they often seem very sort of ceremonial formulaic. I I wonder about your experience. You've taken I think ten oaths In in positions of high public trust. What is your experience like being administered one of those oaths and is it something that lingers with you once? It's an office But what are the mean to you. Yeah I I have taken it I think ten times. I've also administered Steve. Perhaps hundreds of times. I'm most recently when I ran the. Da To new special agents to new diversion. Investigators to new intelligence analysts and two chemists And I gotTa tell you it is is a very solemn moment it may seem formulaic But it's not and something that stays with you and stayed with me all of my professional life. I remember number where I took it. I remember who administered it And I remember thinking this is a big deal can you think of one of those Maybe the first time what what that experience was like. Take us back to it very first time. I was a new graduate from the University of Virginia Law School. I had joined the Department of Justice through the attorney. General's Honors Program And with a group of ten or twelve brand new colleagues in a small conference room on the fourth floor at the Department of Justice The Assistant Attorney General At the time Shirley early Peterson swore Sahlin. I'll never forget it but I also remember Taking the oath when I became. US Attorney both in Virginia and Texas. I remember Bob Muller administering the oath to me when I returned to the FBI in two thousand and thirteen is he was just finishing his twelfth year as director. It's like I said a solemn moment and it stays with you. Do the words come to you at at critical moments when you have a decision to make when you face a dilemma. Emma at all are you. Are you thinking back to the words. Well I don't know that I ever sat down and said you know this is tough decision that I have to make. Let me pull out the oath oath and read it again. I mean it's what you really making is a promise to be diligent to be faithful to the constitution and to the rule of law. But I'm hoping for people who are drawn to this type of work that they don't need an oath to remind them of the importance the sanctity of the positions that they hold that this is who and in what they are and the oath is really a way of reaffirming that publicly. So let's talk about the oath in the context of this impeachment drama. The oath the president of the United States. I mentioned every four years January twentieth. We all watch on television. A new president or reelected president puts his hand so far some they'll ib. I be a her hand on. The Bible takes the oath of office from the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. Talk about the contents of that oath. I think we all know no the words but what do they mean while. Interestingly Steve The oath that the president takes upon assuming office is the only oath in which the Constitution specifies the precise words that have to be used That's not true for the oath. I took it's not true for the oath that members of the House or Senate take only for the president and it's really rather simple. It's three dozen or so words. It's not extensive. It's not detailed. It's not specific. It's very sort of high minded. Its promise to faithfully execute the job and to preserve protect and defend the constitution of the United States. I think by design It's is not specific. We expect a lot from our president's Some of them have lived up to the promise. Some of them have not yet so in this current moment. You've got. The United States has been impeached. Democrats say he has violated his oath of office. It's a broad oath. Does that make it difficult for Democrats to make an argument or for anyone to make an argument about any president that they violated their oath. Sure because it's really not a legal promise as much as a moral I promise That presidents are making when they take that oath and so what may appear to be You know a violation of that oath to one person may not be a violation elation to another these are political judgments that members of Congress will make about this president or other presidents whether he has Committed high crimes crimes or misdemeanors whether he should be removed from office upon trial in the Senate. These are in the end political judgments. What the president promises to do when he takes the growth and what senators are assessing? Now are really much more in the realm of political judgments. We're all very familiar. Obviously with the basic the case that Democrats have made against trump. The idea that he for a period held up aid to Ukraine that the purpose of holding up that aid was was to try to get Ukraine to launch an investigation or at least to announce launching an investigation into Joe Biden. The argument that that is a violation of the oath where is is the violation of the words in the oath there right well it would be arguably that he didn't faithfully execute the laws of the United States that he didn't preserve protect protect and defend the constitution again. It is not necessarily a crime that the house has to prove that the Senate has to judge its conduct conduct now the conduct could be criminal but the founders were reasonably clear at least if when we think about what they were drawing on when they formulated our the constitution and came up with the phrase high crimes or misdemeanors to describe one way in which a president could be removed from office. High crimes and misdemeanors didn't didn't mean criminal conduct per se. It meant public misconduct. And what you just described Steve. What the president did with respect to Ukraine to try to to get it to at least announced an investigation of a political opponent? I think clearly constitutes misconduct..

president United States Donald John Trump Steve Department of Justice United States attorney Supreme Court Senate Steve Kornacki Virginia FBI Chuck Chuck Rosenberg John G Roberts Jr. trump NBC University of Virginia Law Sch MSNBC Ukraine
"rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

08:24 min | 1 year ago

"rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"Welcome and for so many of you welcome back to the oath. I'm your host Chuck Rosenberg. We begin season two of the oath with an important reflection and in a compelling story eighteen years ago this week al Qaeda terrorists hijacked four planes crashed them into the north and south towers of the World Trade Center Manhattan into the Pentagon and into a field in Shanksville Pennsylvania and killed almost three thousand innocent people men women and children on those planes in those buildings and on the ground it was a horrific and devastating attack. It was a tragedy we lost so many good and decent and caring people including leading hundreds of first responders many first responders to this day continue to suffer from and die from illnesses incurred during their heroic rescue and recovery efforts nine eleven was an inflection point in American history and change the way we think about terrorism and our own vulnerabilities as a nation our guest this week on the oath is Rob Spencer Rob led the team that prosecuted the only al Qaeda terrorists ever face justice in a US courtroom for his role in that nine nine eleven conspiracy the story of that investigation and the prosecution of that terrorist Zachariah Sally is both important and Fascinating Rob Spencer the former criminal chief in the US Attorney's Office for the Eastern District of Virginia who long handled national security cases in that district knows this story as well as anyone he lived it Robs Spencer welcome to the oath. Thanks Chuck. Thanks for having me happy to be here. Where are you from was born and and raised in Hanover New Hampshire. My father was a professor at Dartmouth College. He was a chemistry professor. My mother worked at the hospital there as a cardiac technician. There were four kids three siblings. You're the second oldest correct I have two younger and one older sibling Karen. I know your older sister because we were classmates in college but your two younger siblings took a very different career path than you did. I ended up as a lawyer. Both my younger siblings. My brother's still isn't musician. Shen and my younger sister was a musician but my brother John has gained some following a sort of post punk kind of hard rock musician the Jon Spencer Blues Explosion was a fairly well known banned yeah. When did you figure out rob that you wanted to go to law school. And when did you figure out you wanted to be a prosecutor. Her will always kind of thought I'd go to law school like history and politics. I liked arguing with people I always kind of figured I would end up going to law school actually worked as a paralegal between college and Law Oskoui that didn't dissuade me from going to law school and I also always had in the back of my mind that I'd like to work as a prosecutor and work for the government why particularly being federal prosecutors gators Roy the best job you can have while still being lawyer. You're on the for me on the right side of things. It's full of human drama. There's a lot of interest in doing it. It moves more quickly than civil litigation so there's a beginning and an end to a lawsuit. You actually get to be a real lawyer. It's like the lawyers you see on TV. You're standing up trying to convince Vince a jury of of your case. It's fun you get to hang out with the F. B. I. Agents and people like that for most of the time you're trying to protect society to playing hockey and Lacrosse at Amherst Morris College you eventually went to the University of Chicago Law School. That's correct. Yep and what happened after that I went and came to Washington. DC and took good job a private law firm and worked there for three years to pay off few loans. I had from law school and try to get a background in litigation but always had in the back of my mind that I would go and work for the the Justice Department. How'd you eventually get in in nineteen. ninety-one the fiery the law was passed financial institution something something something act it was a an act passed in the wake of the savings and loan scandal in among another things that provided for the hiring of a number of federal prosecutors to pursue bank fraud claims and that's what I was hired outside in the criminal fraud section of main justice and at this was after spending a couple years trying to get into a US attorney's office somewhere but I was hired at the Criminal Fraud Section Main Justice and started working on bank fraud fraud cases and they had at that point to task forces out of DC one in Texas and one in New England was assigned to the New England Bank Fraud Task Force. Did you like like that work. I liked it at bottom when you get to look at the documents and talk to witnesses and realized there were people who were lying and cheating to steal money from mortgage holders in the federal the government but it was slow moving there was not a lot of work for a lot of new prosecutors and so in nineteen ninety two. I got myself assigned as a special assistant the US attorney to the Eastern District of Virginia Alexandria which is where we first met which is where we first met and it was just an eye opener is fast moving. It was fun you got to stand up in court at least three or four times a week if not every single day and then I spent the next several years trying to get back there permanently and finally got hired magazine Assistant. US Attorney in the summer of Nineteen ninety-five remember your first trial efforts trial is a special was a guy name Moma's Aku he was a west African immigrant granted. He was involved in a scheme to sell false Liberian birth documents because at that point if you're of Liberian origin you're eligible for what was called temporary protected acted status and so along with a gentleman who ended up pleading guilty who worked in the Liberian embassy. It was a scheme where every immigrant of west African African origin who wanted to get into the United States suddenly showed up as Liberian and was granted temporary protected status so massacre was part of that scheme and he went to trial Elon Musk convicted what happened to him. I did some time in jail and then I assume he got deported but I had no idea I know in your career because we worked together for so long that you had some of the most interesting important cases in the Eastern District of Virginia on particularly when you started a little bit later in your career working on national security matters including espionage wanted ask about a couple of those if you don't mind as you know well the Eastern District of Virginia includes the CIA the Pentagon John and a number of other national security installations and so we naturally got a bunch of espionage cases including the the largest naval base in the world in Norfolk which is also part of the Eastern District of Virginia right. You had a couple of espionage cases that I think are fascinating but not well known. I was wondering if you might tell us a a little bit about the squillacote matter so Terry Squillacote and her husband Kurt stand and a friend of theirs named James Clark were ideologically motivated evaded spies who were originally recruited while they were in college in Wisconsin by the East German security service Stasi when there was an east Germany and then after after the the wall fell and there wasn't an East Germany the US obtained the Stasi's file agents in the United States and on that list was Terry Squillacote coat and so the FBI started watching Terry Squillacote and there was no east Germany but then at one point she took out a post office box in a false name in wrote to the communist leader of South Africa pledging that she that she wanted to get back in the in the espionage game and the FBI set up a false false flag and met her at the time she was working in the Pentagon and had recently obtained a secret clearance and showed up to a meeting with someone she thought was a South African intelligence agent and actually was an undercover FBI agent by false flag. You mean a lawful undercover sting operation correct and what about her husband and Mr Clark so Jim Clark had worked for the State Department for many years our state our State Department and he actually would send information nation to his German handler and he ended up pleading guilty and testify against the other two trial. He never had much of access to national social security information. He didn't have a security clearance at least at a at a at a high level but he's still trained and sent information to his East German handler. Kurt stand that was Terry squillacote husband. His role was a recruiter and he was the one.

Virginia United States Chuck Rosenberg Terry Squillacote US attorney Pentagon Rob Spencer Rob Rob Spencer professor east Germany fraud FBI prosecutor US Attorney State Department Liberian embassy
"rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

11:26 min | 1 year ago

"rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"Welcome to the oath. I'm Chuck Rosenberg. And I am honored to be your host for a series of fascinating conversations with interesting people from the world of public service today. Jim Komi the former director of the FBI is back. If you haven't heard my first interview with Jim, please go back and listen to learn more about his formative experiences as a young prosecutor in the storage, southern district of New York office in Manhattan, where he prosecuted, the mafia today we pick up with Jim in nineteen Ninety-three. He has just returned to public service this time in the US attorney's office in Richmond, Virginia, where he confronted one of the highest per capita murder rates in the nation. I was on my way to breakfast with the deputy chief of the police department one morning and he got a call over the radio and asked me where I would mind stopping at a crime scene with him. So I said, sure, and we stop an intersection Richmond, and there's a new pickup truck sitting at a stop sign, and as a woman in the driver's seat looks like she's napping leaning back against the headrest as we closer. We see that she has a small hole in her left temple and a much bigger hole. On the other side of her head where the bullet exited, she had stopped on her way to work to buy drugs gotten into some sort of argument with the dealer who shot her in broad daylight at his spot. Makes no sense for all kinds of reasons. But these were the kind of killings were seeing all over Richmond, and it was murder at as an afterthought. And so I was part of an effort with federal state, and local law enforcement to see if we couldn't change the behavior of criminals in Richmond to drive down the murder rate, and it focused on trying to make them think more about their possession of firearms because they're no carefully plan murders in Richmond. It was all what you say, would you do, and in a shootout, we were trying to use federal sentencing to scare them into being away from their guns. Keeping a distance from their guns. And we thought that might drive down homicide, call this project exile. Yep. Where do you get the name from the notion that this was about taking criminals who terrorize in the community and removing them from the community exiling them from the community and a big part of the? Campaign was to scare them. And one of the elements of that scaring was the prospect of going far away from where you would normally go, which is the Richmond city jail. We're gonna send you to South Dakota. We're gonna send you to big bend, Texas. So as the notion, even though you're working with a state and local partners of federalizing gun violence. Great using federal punishment for gun possession crimes to impose stiff penalties which they weren't getting in the state system, and to remove them from the community physically in a way that was a source of deterrence. It scared people, do you think it worked? I think it surely contributed to significant drop in Richmond's homicide from the kind of cases that the Richmond PD was reporting where they were seeing a drop in homicides. It was all of those happenstance homicides, but the drug related crime, dropped significantly not all of our federal judges were enamored with project exile. No, some of them, embraced it and understood. Good though. These weren't the typical cases that would be brought in federal court, these were still federal crimes, and the goal was one that there wasn't any more important than saving human lives, that was at one end of the spectrum. The other end of the spectrum was open hostility to it in a sense that this was a failure of the local courts and prosecutors to handle this. Well, and so it ought not to be the problem of federal judges in federal prosecutors, but they have sort of less to do with how you charge. And so, in the end federal prosecutors if they perceive, a particular problem in a particular jurisdiction have enormous power to address it. Yes. And the decisions in the federal system about what to investigate what charges to bring are all in the hands of the prosecutor and although I was probably a little bit arrogant in agglomerated, the importance of the personal relationship, especially in a small jurisdiction with. With the judges, because they can bring you pain, if they think you're not treating them with your procreate, respect is I if I had to do over again, I'd be a little more attentive to that. Because my attitude was look, we're trying to save lives here. Screw them and not every federal judge reacts well to that. Kind of approach. Right. A second problem that you confronted in Richmond was a public corruption. And you tell very interesting story about the former mayor of Richmond gentleman named young ki- talk a little bit about that, and why that troubled you so Leonidas young was the mayor of Richmond. And the senior pastor at one of Richmond's, most important and largest historically, black congregations, and he was also simultaneously carrying on multiple sexual affairs with people not his wife and the costs of that dinners and hotel rooms and gifts was overwhelming him. And so he decided to use his role as mayor to try and get some money. Illicitly and one method involve the privatization of city cemeteries. And so they entertain bids from companies and the companies were told on the side, if you want to get this contract, you need to hire consultants the following people. And these were people who are simply fronts for mayor young, the company would write a check to the consultant who would cash it and turn the money over to mayor young. One of those consultants was a junior minister who worked at Young's church and young him to be a consultant on the cemetery deal. And we brought him in to talk to him about that. And we had the, the goods on, and we could see where he cashed the money. Then we could see deposits at Young's Bank close proximity. We could almost draw dots on a map to connect it. And the guy knew nothing about cemeteries, and he started to lie to us, and I begged him not to lie. What did you beg him not to lie? Because he seemed like such a good person. Look, sometimes good people. Do bad. Things, especially when they're under the controller in the sway of powerful figure. They look up to and here was the senior pastor the mayor told him to do this, and so he did. It felt like he had to protect this mayor. This minister this boss. He was getting very little of the cut he was getting nothing. He was doing it because this was something that leonide as young wanted him to do. And, and I just thought the guy's going to ruin his life for this, this corrupt mayor. We're gonna make against case against the crap mayor anyway. And I told him and you know what's going to happen? He's going to sit in the same cheer year in and tell me the you lied today. And then you know what I'm going to have to do. I'm going to have to prosecute you because lying in a federal criminal investigation must be taken seriously. So I said, please, please, please just tell me the truth. We're not going to prosecute you just tell me the truth, and he wouldn't. And unfortunately that future I've. Predicted came true. We indicted, Leonida Xiang for racketeering, all kinds of corruption offenses. He played guilty. And he cooperated against the junior minister flipped on the junior minister as we predicted and said, of course he lied. Of course he didn't. He wasn't a consultant, of course, he gave me the money. Yes, all these deposits, you see your for the money, he gave me and then we prosecuted that union minister, and he went to jail for fifteen months. And I don't use his name use it his name now because I hope he's made a good life for himself. But to me, illustrated, a lot of things, but the most important thing is our criminal Justice system. Our investigations are based on an honor system that witnesses will tell us the truth, the witnesses when they're giving subpoenas. We'll give documents even those documents may hurt them. And because it's an honor system when this violation that we can prove beyond a reasonable doubt, as prosecutors. We have to bring those cases too. To send a message of deterrence and reinforcement to that honor system, or the system doesn't work, right. But the odd thing here is that you're cooperating witness was senior to the person who was cooperating against usually we work in the other direction. Ideally. Yep. Did that trouble you? Yeah. Which is why I was trying so hard to get this guy just to tell me the truth, because I knew there would come a day when to try reduce his sentence mayor young. We try and offer us all kinds of information. But I knew one of the things he would tell us is this guy committed a crime in your office, and we couldn't let that go. You later moved back to New York City you in fact, became the US attorney for the southern district of New York, storied office, a legendary federal prosecutors office, and you had the biggest job in it. I know it's a great honor because I had the privilege of doing something like that. And the point in my career. How did it feel to go back to New York as the boss? I felt like an impostor which I think is a healthy reaction that I kept thinking, what am I doing here and I would actually refer to the US journeys private bathroom as Rudy's bathroom and I would tell people you want us Rudy's bathroom, and it's just hard to realize you're not only grownup, you're now, the boss of this place where you came up. And so it's a it's a bit disorienting and leaves you with a sense that they're all gonna figure out that I'm not what they think I am. You've spoken eloquently about the impostor syndrome, in many different contexts. In fact, you speak about it later in your book, and I'll ask you. But when you do you say it's something that leaders should have at least good leaders in your experience. Do they? All good leaders, I think all people except for very small slice of unbelievable jerks. Feel a sense of the imposter complex that is the notion that if you really knew me the way I know me you would think, less of me that's healthy. It can be disabling because there's some people who, who are who are Phil themselves such impostors that it hurts them. But that sense that I am not all that. I'm not as cool as everybody thinks. I am. That's humility, and that's really, really important in a leader. And how do you overcome it? Then when you are, perhaps Charing meeting, and people are sitting around the table waiting for something brilliant to come out of your mouth. How do you how do you surmount that imposter syndrome by not trying to be something other than what you are? That is by showing them yourself by giving them transparency into your strengths and weaknesses. Sure. They, they may think less of you in some senses than they did. They may realize you don't speak seventeen. Languages or something. But they'll come to realize you're comfortable enough in your own skin to talk about yourself in an honest way. And that creates an environment of extrordinary.

Richmond New York City prosecutor consultant murder Young Jim Komi US attorney FBI Chuck Rosenberg deputy chief Virginia South Dakota Texas director US Leonidas
"rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"Hi, I'm Chuck Rosenberg. I spent most of my professional life in public service. I was a federal prosecutor I worked at the FBI, and I ran the DA since leaving the Justice department I've been distressed by the level of discourse in this country. These days there seems to be more heat than light. And so my new podcast the oath with Chuck Rosenberg is based on a simple premise. We're going to have thoughtful conversations about difficult topics with interesting people, I'm sure you've heard of some of them like pre Pereira, the former United States attorney from the southern district of New York you'd like to think not only is known above the law. But also like to think that every victim no matter what their social standing there ocupation to they can be vindicated in court too. And Lisa Monaco, homeland security advisor to President Barack Obama you were part of a mission to work with the president's national security team to help keep the country safe. That's the job Jim Komi. The former director of the FBI specifically in institutions like the FBI runs down into bedrock. Those values are at the heart of that place. And no president serves long enough to screw that up and ending McCabe. The former deputy director of the FBI your job is to think of others I to think of the safety and the wellbeing and the security of your community of your country of the people around you before yourself. Each of them took an oath as I did to support and defend the constitution of the United States. You've seen them on TV. You may have read their books. Now hear them in long-form right here on the oath. We start on may first you can find my show on apple podcasts and everywhere else said you get your podcast. Thank you. So very much for listening.

FBI Chuck Rosenberg president United States Barack Obama Jim Komi deputy director United States attorney Justice department Lisa Monaco Pereira director New York McCabe advisor
"rosenberg" Discussed on Mike Tyson: Bite the Mic with Peter Rosenberg

Mike Tyson: Bite the Mic with Peter Rosenberg

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"rosenberg" Discussed on Mike Tyson: Bite the Mic with Peter Rosenberg

"Our live and die you know what i'm saying alemi dive at all we died together but they like my real partners you know they not like home is where you know big is doing radio now you know i got cast there they wouldn't even tier the last sandwich and have this a big money you know what i'm saying so i got a real team like it we're gonna wind together we gonna win it together we gonna lose together we gonna lose together and are tom about radio family i'm talking about like like my real road all you know me they probably shouldn't give me so many have sandwiches in the early days well and now look it and that's why i got to 500 power at all blood on his name from the eu david do you have any good uh yes more laughs more stories more craziness from big boys hanging out with us it's mike tyson it's me peter rosenberg this is by the mic you have any really good farside days fight stories though when alexandra went down that's the same thing with the far side the farside were tell me before they were very cool nobody wanted to mess with the fires i thought fat lipka kinda get lives crazy if my guy but he he was a welfare was a deep friendship was more of the wind where he will come up missing you know what i'm saying he didn't want to do shows you know fat leap is an artist fat lip is light miles davis to me do you know what i'm saying so you never knew which lip but he's so dope at what he was doing the only time we got it we got into a problem was we are in dayton ohio and we're in as little little outskirt probably would date but he was a small town i mean like small where the whole tale that we were standing and when you called room service it was the dini.

david mike tyson peter rosenberg alexandra ohio eu davis dayton
"rosenberg" Discussed on Mike Tyson: Bite the Mic with Peter Rosenberg

Mike Tyson: Bite the Mic with Peter Rosenberg

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"rosenberg" Discussed on Mike Tyson: Bite the Mic with Peter Rosenberg

"Hey it's bureaux were guys you know what it is uh your back your back thank you for coming back to bite the mike mike tyson's podcast with me peter rosenberg and um we are are very excited to have you with us were very excitable we have going on over the next few weeks including us getting together to do some awesome boxing episodes in las vegas ahead of the canal triple g fight which is going to be awesome but i promise you more new material that's what we have more new material i sat down with mike tyson over the weekend in new york city to talk about everything little bit of a prince colin kaepernick um his own personal growth all kinds of random stuff it was just me and my tyson sock in this weekend here's more bite the mic yes yes yes it's going down ladies and gentlemen the biggest fight in boxing i don't care at anyone says this is the fight of the year 2017 been waiting for this for a long time the showdown the fans demanded kanalelo alvarez and good nautical off can aka triple g their squaring off an incredible battle for middleweight and pound for pound supremacy and guess what it's all happening when a big day for canal kanalelo mexican independence day weekend september 16th live from tmobile arenas vegas two of the best most explosive incredible heavy hand of fighters in the sport today colliding for the middleweight championship of the world okay you have cannella forty nine one in one thirty four ko's he fears no one but i'll tell you what he's up against someone who actually scares me and i don't have to fight him triple g thirty seven or no thirty three ko's it's all going down september 16th at eight pm eastern time live on payperview cut nelo triple g.

mike mike tyson peter rosenberg las vegas new york city kanalelo alvarez boxing tmobile
"rosenberg" Discussed on Mike Tyson: Bite the Mic with Peter Rosenberg

Mike Tyson: Bite the Mic with Peter Rosenberg

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"rosenberg" Discussed on Mike Tyson: Bite the Mic with Peter Rosenberg

"Hey it's peter rosenberg back with another addition of bite the mic in first a progress report on iron mike he's doing great in fact we are planning here's the deal to reunite in early september in new york and then a week later in las vegas for the best bite the mike's yet so we'll be getting together very soon and thank you for all the comments suggestions by the way i'm at rosenberg radio on twitter if you want to send me your thoughts on the podcast your ideas for gas topics you want to hear covered on the podcast rosenberg radio of course mike is at mike tyson you can reach out to him so let's get into it right now what do i have i have the time mike tyson join me on my hip hop podcast wanna have seen it's currently on hiatus but it's podcast i did the first hip hop podcast ever done um was one epstein me in sipho sounds and we had mike as a guest back in 2013 and we covered so much this is myself sipho sounds it's mike tyson on one epstein and you're listening right now to bite the mic yes yes yes it's going down ladies and gentlemen the biggest fight in boxing out of here and anyone says this is the fight of the year 2017 been waiting for this for a long time the showdown the fans demanded kanalelo alvarez and good nautical afghan aka triple g their squaring off an incredible battle for middleweight and pound for pound supremacy and guess what it's all happening on a big day for kanalelo mexican independence day weekend september 16th live from tmobile arena las vegas two of the best.

peter rosenberg the deal new york las vegas rosenberg radio twitter mike mike tyson epstein kanalelo alvarez
"rosenberg" Discussed on Mike Tyson: Bite the Mic with Peter Rosenberg

Mike Tyson: Bite the Mic with Peter Rosenberg

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"rosenberg" Discussed on Mike Tyson: Bite the Mic with Peter Rosenberg

"It's all going down september 16th at eight pm eastern time live on payperview cut nelo triple g hey good morning mike tyson hey david rosenberg un peter rosenberg healy david never change some things will never change i am peter rosenberg and on with the awesome named i don't know why are so focused on david david is strong as dave eanet um i i've been a fan of mike tyson like all of you my whole life we met for the first time many years ago i'll tell you must during a second but mike first of all how are you and i'm just wonderful in so awesome 'cause you're in my hometown i came i neck of the foods i came to i came to las vegas to see you this is a dream come true for me this is dreams do come true drew's do come true so let's start at like this why do you wanted to a podcast because i think my podcast will be the greatest pact had since the history of patasse why that right view i mean s y you just this is you have always had interesting things to say there's no question about it i dunno of his interesting or true or just um it it has an affinity with other people in the masses and people seem to be struck by the things that you say hey i am of i'm often sometimes struck by the thing that i saw that you usair's lawyer as an another so what happened was straight long story short because people are thinking what's going on here and was a lot going on here there's a lot of what will if mainly please other so david pita david so here's the deal so i i do radio i do mornings in new york at who afternoons on espn radio than radio guy for a long time and envied me on many occasions many occasions many many but the thing is i was i my first became a fan of meiteis when i was like no eight years old like the rest of the world 1987 in a '86 87 became hughes meiteis of him my parents took me to cat skill new york.

mike tyson peter rosenberg david david las vegas david pita david the deal new york david rosenberg peter rosenberg healy david usair espn eight years
"rosenberg" Discussed on Mike Tyson: Bite the Mic with Peter Rosenberg

Mike Tyson: Bite the Mic with Peter Rosenberg

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"rosenberg" Discussed on Mike Tyson: Bite the Mic with Peter Rosenberg

"Hey i'll rosenberg welcome to another edition abide the mic with mike tyson you know with the podcast is it's everything mike tyson on this episode part two with flavor flavor yes we're talking 80s were talking about groupies we're talking about everything that was a wild time and it's mike tyson is flavor flavor it's bite the mic yes yes yes it's going down ladies and gentlemen the biggest fight in boxing i don't care and anyone says this is the fight of the year 2017 been waiting for this for a long time the showdown the fans demanded kanalelo alvarez and gennady gluskin ak triple g their squaring off in an incredible battle for middleweight and pound for pound surpremacy and guess what it's all happening on a big day for kanalelo mexican independence day weekend september 16th live from tmobile arena las vegas two of the best most explosive incredible heavy hand of fighters in the sport today colliding for the middleweight championship of the world okay you have cannella forty nine one in one thirty four ko's he fears no one but i'll tell you what he's up against someone who actually scares me and i don't have to fight him triple g thirty seven or no thirty three ko's it's all going down september 16th at eight pm eastern time live on payperview cut nelo triple g more stories were back in the day with special guest flavor flavor oputa rosenberg this is bite the mic with mike tyson who l who in in the in the good old days onshore else said like who who else killed it with the ladies by them.

mike tyson kanalelo alvarez rosenberg boxing
"rosenberg" Discussed on Mike Tyson: Bite the Mic with Peter Rosenberg

Mike Tyson: Bite the Mic with Peter Rosenberg

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"rosenberg" Discussed on Mike Tyson: Bite the Mic with Peter Rosenberg

"Now maimai i you know i'm pianoplaying man's always found piano the play around with men every was that your game was a game to an extent not was no games were actually that mahathir once he played the pair did you hear flavor flavor play i hear flavio cotti lay it was plotting a game because they're like oh he plays piano really snore he'd yes he's he's classically trained it's something that's more than a year boy it was part of the game mills party more honest in real life stories from mike tyson in a special guest flavor flavor oputa rosenberg this is by the mic don't miss out on another bite the mic every tuesday and thursday we appreciate the great response and thank you so much for taking a minutes a rate us from backstage stories groupie stories i'm talking about everything the good times the crazy times how they handle being celebrities the 80s and what it means to be an icon in today's culture all the stuff you won't want to miss okay all coming up on the next bite the mic on peter rosenberg hey before you go we wanted to let you know that we just launched the ability for anyone to advertise on podcast you're just a few cliques away from reaching millions of people in a way that you never have before advertise were a business event or kickoff and awareness campaign for your brand start today at pure winning dot com slash cnn integrating podcast into your marketing mix has never been easier will even tell you how to save fifteen percent on your campaigns for the rest of 2017 go to pure winning dot com slash cnn to get started.

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