4 Burst results for "Rosanna Shaw"

"rosanna shaw" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

06:44 min | Last week

"rosanna shaw" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Sitting as always in the earthquake chair is Ron Lin and Ron. When you're not out covering, shaking on the ground, you've been pulled into drought coverage for God. How many years now? 15 years. So, you know, for a couple of droughts now. Oh, Jesus. That's like, when mega mega drought though, so. On the wildfire wing, as always, Alex wigglesworth, Alex, if a tree burns in the forest, does it make a sound? Definitely, it's pretty loud, actually. Oh, that was supposed to be more of a mystery, but thank you. And our Cassandra of the coast, Rosanna Shaw is off to get crowned as an honorary turn. So joining us this month is breaking news reporter Haley Smith. Haley, what's your most precious drought memory? Well, I grew up in Miami, which is basically a place with too much water. So when I first got to Los Angeles during the last drought, I was so scared to waste even a drop that I was standing in cold showers instead of waiting for the water to heat up. And I feel like these days that might be a practice I need to revive. So your job now is to create a canal from Miami right to Los Angeles. Can you do that? I'll get to work on that. Awesome. Thank you so much. And thank you all you masters for joining us. And Hailey has the first timer here. You get the first question. So much of Southern California is going to go through unprecedented water restrictions and that's saying something. So what are the proposals? Yeah, this is huge news. The metropolitan water district of Southern California, which is the largest drinking water supplier not just in California, but in the whole United States, has basically announced that they don't have enough water from the state to get us through to the end of this year. So in order to make what we have last, they're ordering about 6 million southern Californians to immediately cut water used by 35%. It's the most severe cut they've ever asked for. Areas that rely on water from our other major source, the Colorado River are being spared for now, but that river is also dangerously low and we're getting warnings that similar reductions are on the table. Water water nowhere not a drop to spare. But how much water is the average person using in Southern California? So the number does vary by area, but metropolitan says, on average, each person uses about a 125 gallons of water a day. And we need to get that number to about 80 gallons per person per day. So for some context, an old toilet uses about 6 gallons of flush, newer models use about 1.3. If it's Brown, let it mellow. Something like that. Ron, you're not just our earthquake master, but you're like, the old man of drought. So back in 2007, back in the days, you wrote an article where you're talking to people throughout Southern California about that drought and that year was a driest on record. That was 15 years ago. Did people take it as seriously then too? Yeah, I feel like people took it more seriously back then because in that drought from like 2007, we only got like three inches of rain that year in LA and we usually get 15 and it was so bad that like the butterflies were staying asleep and the oak trees weren't even sprouting acorns, even the rattlesnakes were slithering into houses, including the home of Sally fields. She actually had to call a rattlesnake hustler to get the snack. They love her. They really love her. But the reason why I think that people don't take it seriously is because there was a lot of rain in December in LA, like 9 inches of rain. But compare that to the last 5 year drought between 2011 and 2016. We never even got 9 inches of rain like every rain year. So that felt a little bit more super apocalyptic than it does now. So because of that, people just say, there is no drought because it rained a lot. Exactly. And I feel like as California, we have like super short attention spans. So if there's a time in the last few months where it felt like it rained a lot, it doesn't feel super real. And I feel like that's been kind of the problem with this drought. Like, I kind of knew reading wise that we were in a drought for the last several years. In fact, we did an episode on this last year, but it was only really after we started talking about this for this episode that I realized, oh crap, it really is historic in a nature that didn't really sit with me until basically in the last couple days. That's how bad this drought is, folks. We did a drought week last year. We thought, okay, that's it. We're done with it. And here we are again. So scary, scary times. Alex, all this dryness. It's great for wildfires, obviously, but what's scarier is that drought makes things hotter. And I know that kind of seems like duh, but it's not. Yeah, so drought can make temperatures hotter because there's less moisture in the soil to evaporate and carry away heat. The earth becomes kind of like a person who can't sweat. There's just no way for it to cool off. And then hotter temperatures can also worsen drought by causing more precipitation to fall as rain rather than snow. And by causing what's not does fall to melt more quickly and earlier in the year. So instead of providing this gradual source of moisture that trickles slowly down into the streams and reservoirs and keeps the vegetation wetter into the spring and early summer when we need it most, you have a situation where the water comes all at once and things green up and then dry out. Then when you add in hot dry background conditions, more of the water will also absorb right back into the soil and into the atmosphere instead of making its way down into those streams and onto that vegetation. Conditions are only getting hotter over time due to greenhouse gas emissions, driving up global temperatures and all that increases the risk of large fires in the spring and summer. So are you saying we should just put a bunch of 5 gallon Home Depot buckets on the Los Angeles river to just get all of that water? Sure. Ron, save me here. Yeah. I mean, it's totally nuts. I was looking at Lake Shasta, which is California's largest reservoir. And I was looking at how much water is in Lake Shasta at this time of year. And in my lifetime, based off of the data that I have on my screen, it's never been this low, and it should be almost full because the winter is over and it should be full of rainwater, but it's really at like a severely low level. And if you look at Lake mead, it's at 30% of full capacity. This is the Lake that's held up by Hoover Dam and that Southern California relies on for a lot of its water. It's at its lowest level since it was filled in the 30s during The Great Depression. So stuff that I thought was apocalyptic and I.

Southern California Ron Lin Alex wigglesworth Rosanna Shaw Haley Smith Ron Miami Los Angeles Sally fields Cassandra Alex Hailey Haley earthquake California
"rosanna shaw" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

08:01 min | Last month

"rosanna shaw" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"For the lack of any big quake so far this year? Not you because the last time you mentioned a lack of big earthquakes we just had one like a month later. Uh oh, I changed the damn it. I always do that. On the wildfire wing is Alex wigglesworth, Alex since water is the opposite of fire. Can you make it rain? I wish we'll get there one day. And joining us in you is our Cassandra of the coast, Rosanna Shaw. So how was that conference of crustaceans you cleverly canvassed in Cabo? I think it would be shellfish of me to talk about that when we're supposed to be talking about earth day. Touche. Thank you all as always for joining us. And Rosanna, let's actually start with you. Reading silent spring, take us back to the 1960s. What kind of state of mind were we in leading up to the creation of earth day? Three things come to mind when I think of the sparks that ignited the modern environmental movement. One obviously was Rachel Carson's silent spring, which really helped the public think about how everything on this planet is connected. Before this book, it was the post World War II era, chemicals were the miracle of science. Frankly, our town has gained a lot by the coming of the nylon plant. In every way, air town is a bigger and better community. Industrialization was our economy booster and we were just starting to learn seemingly simple concepts like food chains and ecosystems. And these concepts I might add were being debated and questioned publicly by major corporations and industries, not unlike the way climate change science continues to be debated today. There was a motto at the time, dilution is the solution to pollution and silent spring really made us reconsider that frame of mind. The dilution just means the problem re accumulates elsewhere. There was also the Santa Barbara oil spill in 1969 in this stunning fire in Cleveland, where a river quite literally went up in flames because there was so much trash and chemicals in the water that the river caught fire. These events shocked us into seeing just how rampant our disregard for the environment was at the time. We take a lot of our environmental protection laws for granted today, but back then, we were just dumping chemical waste into rivers in the ocean. Pesticides like DDT got fogged all over beaches and farms in the smog, as anyone growing up in LA would remember was just awful. So all of this ended up leading to the creation of birthday then? Yeah. Later in 1969, senator Nelson, a Democrat from Wisconsin, was in Santa Barbara to follow up on the oil spill, and he came up with the idea of doing a national teaching on how human activities were damaging the natural world. This was in the era of the counterculture and the Vietnam protests. So teach ends were very much in Vogue at the time. And this idea led to earth day, which led to some pretty significant legislation that continues to guide the way we manage and protect our natural resources today. The clean air act, the clean water act, it also led to the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency, which has a complicated track record today depending on who you're talking to. But can you imagine the EPA not even existing before 1970? I should also note that these landmark regulations were passed under president Nixon, it may not feel like it today, but protecting the environment was a no brainer bipartisan issue back then. All this history, all these people pushing, but now when I think about earth day, I think about my mailbox, just filled with all these emails from companies saying, oh look, we're green, RICO friendly, we're carbon offsetting carbon neutral. You get sick of earth day, quick that way. Is that the same for you, Rosanna? Yeah, I mean, I would say earth day today has evolved into a number of things the cynic in me thinks of all the greenwashing email pitches that flood my inbox too. There are so many. But there is still a lot of meaningful education work that happens each year come April, community cleanups, special education events. I noticed that a lot of environmental campaigns and big policy decisions also often get pegged to earth day. So even though we should be thinking about these issues every day, not just once a year, it is important to acknowledge that earth day has become an important way to check in on these issues at least once a year for folks who aren't engaged all the time and it's not just about buying more stuff that is quote unquote sustainable. We'll be right back. The world is built on relationships from building wealth to building a business, it takes a dedicated team working together, and the only difference between success and failure is who you have in your corner when the going gets tough. At city national bank, we aim to be the people you rely on when it really counts. That's why your relationship manager will take the time to get to know you. After all, it's only by knowing your goals that we can help you achieve them. See what personal can do for you at CNB dot com. City national bank member FDIC. Michael Lewis here host of against the rules. Each season I've been asking what's happened to figures in American life, who need us to trust them. Referees, coaches this season I'm taking a long look at experts. Why is a country that's like the best in the world at creating experts? So horrifically bad at figuring out who they are and taking their advice. We're going to find out together. Listen to against the rules wherever you get your podcasts. So Ron, we're talking about earth day and the campaign every April sort of reminds me of shakeout that they were supposed to pay attention here in California. To earthquake prevention and safety, but no one does what they is it supposed to be again, I forget. It's every third Thursday in October, which is usually around my birthday. So it's easy for me to remember it. I always actually thought that it happens to be around the anniversary of the Loma prieta earthquake, the World Series earthquake from 1989, but the real reason is actually quite boring. The first one happened only in 2008. And it was in mid November and the schools were like, mid October is actually a better time for them. So that's the reason why. But the anniversary is actually for me are helpful because I can almost peg any time of the year to an earthquake. It's a helpful reminder that any month could be a time for an earthquake. I mean, there is this kind of myth that there's an earthquake weather of it happening during hot weather, but that's not true we've had earthquakes in the winter time too. If you give me a month, I can give you the name of an earthquake that has happened before. Welcome to give a month and round Lin gives you an earthquake. First up, we have the times host and columnist Gustavo arellano. June. June June June, there was the landers earthquake of 1992, a magnitude 7.3 that shook up the Mojave desert. Next is Rosanna Shaw, coastal overlord, and pun master. September. September, the two, the two quakes in Mexico, the 1985 and the one from 2017. And that's it. For a given month and Ron land gives you an earthquake. Tune in next month, for ask Rosanna how she's doing and she'll ruin your day with a terrible joke. Wow, we're gonna take this show on the road one day, Ron. But Alex, so there's a shakeout day. There's an earth day. Is there a day where we just think about just wildfires? And doesn't the idea itself kind of sound silly? Sure, there are wildfire awareness days, although I'm not sure that any of them are widely observed, California actually has a wildfire preparedness week in early May. We said in the past and I'm going to bring it back today, we.

Rosanna Shaw Alex wigglesworth Rosanna senator Nelson Santa Barbara Rachel Carson Touche Environmental Protection Agenc Cassandra Cabo earthquake Alex president Nixon Cleveland city national bank Wisconsin Vietnam City national bank RICO LA
"rosanna shaw" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

05:48 min | 6 months ago

"rosanna shaw" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"In the wildfire chair is always as LA times reporter Alex wigglesworth. Hey, Alex, if it's raining, that means no infernos, which means you get to have a break until summer, right? Don't jinx me. Occupying the coastal chair is Rosanna Shaw. If it rains Rosanna, that means water level rises, so does that mean the coast is anti rain? Hey, Gustavo. I would say the coast is more anti Gustavo jokes. Ah, that's mean. Well, whatever coast I only like you and Laguna Beach anyway. Finally, our earthquake chairperson is Ron Lynn. Ron, can we just get rain to drown the monsters that live in fault lines? And then therefore, and earthquakes forever? Yes, yes, that's a big plan. You've got it. Awesome. I should win the Nobel Prize for that. Well, welcome all is always in. We'll start with Alex. And it sounds counterintuitive, but this year's fire season was poised to be pretty disastrous, given the drought levels, but then it rained, so yay? Right, those rainstorm said started last month where kind of a mixed bag for Northern California. On one hand, people were relieved because rain like that can really help with fires that are burning. And once you start to get these rains, that pretty much means the end of the fire season or at least the season of these really large intense fires. At the same time, these storms dropped so much rain up there, and they happened right after, even while some of these fires were still burning, there was no time in between for the landscape to recover. So authorities were also worried about flooding and debris flows. Also, in Southern California, fire season is not over yet. We didn't get that much rain from these storms. It's too soon to say whether this specific string of storms is linked to climate change, but scientists say these rapid shows from intense fire seasons to record breaking storms will continue to become more common as a planet warmth. You're damned if you do and you're damned if you don't when it comes to disasters in California like, okay, fires gone because The Rain, but because the fire just destroyed so much of the land, now it's all of a sudden, vulnerable to flooding and mudslides. Yeah, this risk is especially high if it rains soon after a fire, but it can last for up to 5 years until plants that were burned grow back. That's because a loss of vegetation exposes the soil to erosion and ash and other burn material can kind of clog the soil and prevent it from absorbing water. That can make The Rain run off the soil like its pavement. All that can turn into a debris flow, which is when the water carries the loose mud soil and rock down a slope. When that flow is sandier and more water saturated, it's called a mud flow, not a mud side because Rosetta will yell at me. Yeah, can I jump in? I'm sorry. I need to set the record straight for the gazillions time. I know people in California like to say mudslide and the quote unquote news media Gustavo is also very guilty of this. But there is no such thing as a mudslide. It's a mud flow or debris flow, or it's a landslide, which is a totally different phenomenon. Ron and Alex have heard me go off on this so many times. I'm mudslide is a melted chocolate dessert Gustavo, ask any signs. But mud slides doesn't it? You have mud when it rains, it turns into mud when it falls down like the hills, it slides, so mudslide, right? No, it's a B grade melted chocolate dessert okay, I'm just pulled up the U.S. geological surveys glossary. And here is their definition for mudslides. This is from the United States geological survey, and this is going to put you all to shame. Mudslide, it imprecise, but popular term coined in California, frequently used by Lehman and the news media to describe a wide scope of events ranging from debris laden floods to landslides, not technically correct, period. Please see mud flow previous glossy. Mud flow mud slides sounds like Texas Ron help me. You're your team mudslide, right? Well, I'm not going to get into it, but I can tell you if any California should know about two things. One is a debris flow, which is basically when a lot of water falls down a debris flow can happen within minutes and send torrents of mud and water, screaming down slopes. And you know, can be potentially deadly. The other thing that people wanna know about are something called deep seated. How you see? Look at this. Ron, Ron is from California, and he almost said mudslide. He gives me crap about this all the time. He is low key on team mudslides because he's like every single other California in this state. Good man. We were actually in the same meeting with some USGS person when we heard that like, oh, mudslides actually don't exist. And we both gasped and were like, we didn't both. And I said, that makes a 100% sense. And I will forever never use the word mud slide again. So deep seated glass. Again. Do you see the landslides are a thing people in Orange County? You'll remember this, the Bluebird canyon, a landslide that happened. I don't think it was even very rainy when it actually happened. But over the many months of water accumulation, a landslide can happen. And it can also be very deadly as well. So two things to keep in mind debris flow and deep seated landslides. Fine, Rosanna beets mudslides, landslides for.

Gustavo Alex wigglesworth Rosanna Shaw Ron Lynn Alex Ron California Rosanna LA times Laguna Beach Nobel Prize Northern California Southern California United States Lehman Texas Bluebird canyon Orange County Rosanna beets
"rosanna shaw" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

04:30 min | 9 months ago

"rosanna shaw" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Frank carson was a criminal defense attorney who spent years accusing police and prosecutors of corruption. Then they charged him with murder. I'm christopher gothard writer and host of the l. a. times podcasts. Dirty john and detective trap. I'm inviting you to follow and listen to my new podcast. That trials of frank carson. This eight episodes series is a story of power politics and the law. In california's central valley new episodes of the trials of frank carson are available to find them search for the trials of frank carson. Wherever you get your podcasts. Thank you as is our tradition after all the doom and gloom. And there's a lot of it and it seems every month we have more and more of it but we can still find joy in all of our masters of disasters. always have the most brilliant of joys. So we'll have to start with the joy of ron ron. What's your joy. So i followed it a little bit of alex advice from a previous podcast that we taped and what brings me. Joy is our national and state parks system. I did that road trip up to seattle up and back and man. I mean i am very grateful for the fact that we have a lot of redwood forests that have still been preserved i mean just seeing the old growth and the enormous trees just brings me a sense of calm even also saw. There's something called. The lava beds national monument. And you can actually go into these tubes underground that were formed by lava you know so long ago and just check out you know nature i mean it is destructive nature but right then and there so so that brought me a lot of joy in the last couple of weeks joy in lava only wrong could find joy and joy in past lava. no less rosanna. Please bring us more joy. Well since you loved my joke last month here is another silly choke to bring you more joy gustavo. What did the ocean say to the beach. What did the ocean say to the beach. Surf's up nothing. it just waved. That was a sweet one. It was good. I am not gonna tell anymore joke because i'm terrible at my jokes. Maybe i'll do a knock knock one next time but alex finally what brings you joy so. I actually had the pleasure of being caught in a rainstorm twice this summer. I never used to be one of those people who liked drain until i moved to california. Like dog steve is four and he's only seen rain a handful of times in his entire life. The first time was when i visited philly. That was a nice surprise. The second time was actually out in the desert not far from the arizona border during a camping trip that i clearly did not plan well at all. It was so freaking perilous. I started getting these emergency notifications. The i said life threatening thunderstorms than it was flash flooding turn around don't drown than it said dust storm pull aside stay alive like they all rhymed but when the storm actually rolled in it was beautiful there. Was this insane. Snake lightning the skies opened up. Everything smelled sweet like saffron. My ended up sleeping in a motel six instead of outside but it was worth it to see my first desert. Rain did the motel. Six malek safran unfortunately definitely did not did they do allow dogs though Well always dogs holiday and express his smell like pancakes. And that's a good smell to have and that's it for our masters of disasters are monthly series with ellie times environmental. Reporters thank you. Ron land covers earthquakes. Alex wigglesworth on the wildfires. Be and rosanna shaw. Always about the slowly eroding coast. Thank you masters for thank you thank you. And that's it for this episode of the times daily news from the la times tomorrow. A conversation with los angeles county. Sheriff alex via nueva like what. You're listening to the make sure to follow the times. Whatever platform you use please please. Please don't make us the puccio podcasts. Our show is produced by shannon lynn. Denise gada marina being an melissa kaplan our engineers. Mario deals auditors or shawny hilton lauren. Rabb our internet ashley brown and our theme music is by andrew eden. I'm gustavo deanna. We'll be back tomorrow with all the news and this mother gaseous..

frank carson christopher gothard Dirty john lava beds national monument ron ron alex california rosanna gustavo seattle malek safran Ron land Alex wigglesworth rosanna shaw steve arizona Sheriff alex ellie earthquakes shannon lynn