35 Burst results for "Rosa Parks"

Ruth Bader Ginsburg lies in state at U.S. Capitol

1A

03:21 min | 2 months ago

Ruth Bader Ginsburg lies in state at U.S. Capitol

"At the Supreme Court on Friday, late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg became the first woman And first Jewish person ever to lie in state at the U. S. Capitol. Anita, why hasn't a woman ever help this honor before? That's a great question? You know, they've been doing this tradition since 18 52. And it hasn't been as many people as you might think. It's been about 35. So a lot of presidents, you know other other people, but mostly are obviously this is always for someone who serves in the government. Four civilians have also been honored, but it's not called lying in state. So Congress decides who does this, and, you know, obviously many elected officials in this country until more recently were men. Well, Devlin before the capital Justice Ginsburg lay in repose of the Supreme Court. Can you describe this remembrance was like and who came to pay their respects? Well, pretty much the entire city came to respect it. And it was. It was an interesting Mix because it began as sort of a spontaneous, Ah, demonstration of support remembrance that the very night of her death outside the Supreme Court. And then obviously it morphed into the official pageantry of remembrance. And, you know, I think I think the video that is probably going to be most lasting from that is People chanting against the president when he showed up, you know, I think it says something about the state of our politics right now, that even in you know, a memorial setting That the political anger is so great that people are going to essentially boo the president public. On DH That just tells you what the stakes are of that. You know, her death is obviously sad, and obviously a moment in history. But it's also another. You know another front in this political battle that were that were following Fernando what he tells about Justice Ginsburg's funeral plans and and where shall ultimately be laid to rest? Um, she will be laid to rest on Arlington National Cemetery next to her husband, Marty Ginsburg than in section that is reserved for Former members of the Supreme Court. And today, the Friday will be the on Ly Day that she will be lying in state in the U. S Capitol and the need a set of historic moment is the first woman first person was Jewish Delight in state. Let's remember that Rosa Parks laid in honor at the Capitol Rotunda, but that was 2005. And that is the distinction between laying and honor. And Ling and stay on. Only four people have leant in honor of the Capitol Rotunda. That's Reverend Billy Graham. And to our police, Capitol police officers were shot dead in AA. A shooting in the Capitol in 1998 on then Rosa Parks in 2005. But yes, this will be a very ah, you know? Speaker Pelosi has given the honor to Ah birthday there. Ginsberg to be a two capital dalliances state. Apparently there are some interesting absences, Asari. That way. We know maybe Mitch McConnell and and other members of the Republican leadership not showing up to this event. Well, there's a

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Supreme Court Capitol Rotunda U. S Capitol U. S. Capitol Rosa Parks President Trump Capitol Police Marty Ginsburg Mitch Mcconnell Anita Congress Ginsberg Asari Billy Graham Devlin Fernando Ling Official Pelosi
Ruth Bader Ginsburg lies in repose at Supreme Court

KYW 24 Hour News

01:27 min | 2 months ago

Ruth Bader Ginsburg lies in repose at Supreme Court

"And more on our top story now Ruth Bader Ginsburg lying in repose today in the you at the U. S. Supreme Court and joining us live on our live to the White House. CBS NEWS White House correspondent Stephen Portnoy's Steven Good Morning. So what's the What's the scene in Washington this morning? What's it look like? Well, it'll be a somber scene at the high court, Mourners will be able to stream into the Great hall keeping their social distance. Of course, there's black bunting on the frame of the door that leads into the Supreme Court chamber. And as per tradition dating back to the late 18 hundreds, there is black bunting on the chair next to the chief justice, where Justice Ginsburg sat that bunting will stay there for some time, even though the court well, the court will actually holds its first session less than two weeks, first Monday in October. The Justice League justice will, of course, as you probably have heard lie in state at the Capitol on Friday, and what's interesting is and it's hard to believe this, but Ruth Bader Ginsburg will be the first woman to lie in state at the Capitol. Not the first woman to lie in honor at the capital. You may be wondering what's the distinction. Rosa Parks lay in honor at the capital. After she passed the differences, government officials lie in state When their bodies are placed in a place of honor in the capital, and that's the difference. Rosa Parks was not a government official Rithmetic Ensberg Waas, So Ginsberg will lie in state. She will then be buried next to her husband at Arlington

Ruth Bader Ginsburg U. S. Supreme Court Supreme Court Chamber Rosa Parks Justice League White House Correspondent White House Stephen Portnoy Rithmetic Ensberg Waas CBS Ginsberg Washington Great Hall Arlington Official
Thousands expected to honor Ginsburg at Supreme Court

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 2 months ago

Thousands expected to honor Ginsburg at Supreme Court

"Thousands of people are expected to pay their respects to the late justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at the Supreme Court where she will lie in repose for two days her casket arrives today for a private ceremony inside the great hall with their Supreme Court colleagues family and others close to her then it will be moved outside for public mourners in line with coronavirus guidelines on Friday Ginsburg will lie in state at the capitol the first woman to do so and only the second Supreme Court justice after William Howard Taft who'd also been president Rosa Parks a private citizen was lain in honor at the capitol next weekend's Berg will be buried beside her husband Martin in a private ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery the feminist icon and leader of the court's liberal bloc died last week from cancer I'm Julie Walker

Supreme Court William Howard Taft Rosa Parks Berg Martin Arlington National Cemetery Cancer Julie Walker Ruth Bader Ginsburg President Trump
"rosa parks" Discussed on Swimming Upstream Radio Show

Swimming Upstream Radio Show

04:36 min | 3 months ago

"rosa parks" Discussed on Swimming Upstream Radio Show

"But the people we know the people, how has the how is the courts entered into it and either helped or not helped in your opinion? Can you say? You know I've talked to you before about the courts. And certainly I am audience doesn't know that we talk all the time. So you've got to pretend you've got ten that you're this distinguished person that I just happened to stumble. On the twelfth floor. Yes. Pretend we hadn't talked this. What would you say when we have on the Supreme Court on your program. We've talked about it before. Okay. Let me go back then. It's not what you're listens to us. They. Don't remember. Now you're going to impart something fresh in wonderful that may have sucked their attention last time. I. Ju. I trusted judiciary and Ambrus I don't always trust the president even Obama who I like very much. CAJA STAKES CAN'T DRAW A lie red lines and not follow them but The Supreme Court of Meli is the voice of the people. It does respond to the times and ultimately they get it right? They didn't get a Ryan I. In part because the spring court was composed of people who are very racist additionally. The. Whole Science. And some of the decisions are really concert me to our Constitution and contrary to what Abraham, Lincoln. Proposed a thirteenth fourteenth. amendment. On. But I think the ultimately understand. And I trust them and I noticed even people that we thought would just fall in line with everything trump's and. Did Not. His appointees. And so I I do trust the court and. There's is something that happens to you when he judge because I wanted a couple of times. You could on the bench. and. You look at your shoulder and you say I represent something more. Now I am one. And then You look at cases and you may decide him contrary to what you like what you believe or you learned, but it's the law and law. And the facts prevail indecision said is. That's really very, very exciting at encouraging because sometimes, we feel that maybe you know that that is getting lost. So you really do feel that there's change that happens to the that the people that that wear the robes actually are aware of the burden that goes on the shoulder along with. No question. Look at Justice Chief Justice Roberts. He was a very Very conservative man in many ways. But he's frightened he's frightened the reputation and the prestige of the Supreme Court is not being uphill. And he's very hard. Sued. And what? Have you feel like he's doing a good job of can one even say that with Supreme Court as do they do what they can and that's the best you can hope for No. I watch these hearings. And I said, this man deserves be affirmed by the Senate because he is a judge he he said look I would I'm an umpire I call balls and strikes. And I must say, I agree with that entirely. What are the characteristics that a good justice or judge should have? Will you know? In Washington state displaying you about Supreme Court judge or not. Spring, Corporation judges that reported in our state is. That the their primary requisite is a new governor..

Supreme Court Justice Chief Justice Roberts CAJA STAKES Obama I. Ju president Senate Ryan Meli Washington Abraham Lincoln
Trump will not visit Capitol to pay respects to civil rights icon John Lewis

Mark Mason

03:28 min | 4 months ago

Trump will not visit Capitol to pay respects to civil rights icon John Lewis

"The world said goodbye to a civil rights icon in our nation's Capitol today and elsewhere, representative John Lewis honored in ceremonies at the Capitol. Talk about how that's impacting people where you are and what you saw, but it's hard to underestimate His impact on the civil rights leader. He was literally one of think a gang of six lieutenants under Martin Luther King back in the sixties, and at the time I think he may have been 25 26 years old Martin Luther King was only in his early thirties. When he gave his I have a dream speech, and we forget, you know, there's such towering figures were way think that they were much older than they were. And John Lewis died at 80 has had this incredibly long career. Hey, was beaten to within an inch of his life defending their right to vote and equal rights. For African Americans. This man is a hero. His bravery is is just breathtaking. One comment. I read from a colleague of his today and I was really taken with, she said. It was during the time of the hippies when John Lewis forever wore a three piece suit and carried a briefcase because he wanted to be taken seriously and thought to be ah, involved with important stuff. And you don't see that much anymore. And not only that, but hey also recalled that when he was arrested for civil disobedience, certainly not violence, but simply Protesting and using his first Amendment right to speak up. He always smile for the mug shot because he goes, I didn't do anything wrong. Why should I be doing anything about smiling here truly one of a kind of the benefit of all Americans then and now you go ahead and what's astonishing is that President Trump once again? Is not doing anything to pay his respects to this American icon. Hey, was asked, the president was asked if he was going to go up to the capital to pay respects to John Lewis, who was lying in state. They're one of I think only three African Americans to ever do that Rosa Parks. And Ah, uh, Thurgood Marshall. I think you were the other two. And he the president goes. No, I'm not going to no explanation. No comments about John Lewis. And, of course, he and John Lewis. We're not B f F S. John Lewis famously did not show up to the President's in all your old saying that he thought he was an illegitimate president. That he thought that he or at least the Russians did everything they could to get him elected and that it wasn't a legitimate presidency. He was going to attend the inaugural A good opportunity if nothing else, and this is a crass way to look at it to score some points. And we're all taught from a very early age. We show respect for those who have passed on it. It seems like an easy opportunity for the president take advantage of well. The president has not done that. For many leaders who died over the last couple years. John McCain, notably He did not was not invited to the funeral but didn't even bother to crash He was playing golf at his name escapes me now the congressman from Maryland who died another African American civil rights leader. Also had clashes with the president. He did not show up for that, then think I think the only major funeral that President Trump has shown up for was George H. W. Bush.

John Lewis President Trump Martin Luther King John Mccain Thurgood Marshall Representative George H. W. Bush Rosa Parks Maryland Congressman
Body of John Lewis crosses bridge in Alabama, site of 'Bloody Sunday' attack that helped lead to Voting Rights Act

IRG Health Talk

00:44 sec | 4 months ago

Body of John Lewis crosses bridge in Alabama, site of 'Bloody Sunday' attack that helped lead to Voting Rights Act

"John Lewis continue. His body in a flag draped casket is headed in a hearse to Montgomery, Alabama, to pass the Rosa Parks, Museum and other landmarks. The publican walk past Lewis's casket later today at the state Capitol building. This. After Lewis is final crossing of the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, were in the sixties. He and other civil rights marchers were beaten by police. ABC is Mary Bruce and Selma. Edmund Pettus was a leader of the cake. And they say that the bridge does not represent now the symbol of civil rights. So the calls are growing for this bridge to be renamed John Lewis, the name that they believe reflects Legacy and the life and the future in the direction of the country is headed and Oscar winner Olivia have.

John Lewis Edmund Pettus Bridge Edmund Pettus Alabama Selma Rosa Parks, Museum Montgomery Mary Bruce ABC Olivia Oscar
Remembering civil rights icon John Lewis

NBC Nightly News

05:00 min | 4 months ago

Remembering civil rights icon John Lewis

"We begin tonight by remembering a civil rights icon congressman John Lewis flags have been lowered to half staff at the White House and on Capitol Hill to honor his passing the longtime Georgia, Congressman, died Friday at age eighty after a valley battle with pancreatic cancer, his tireless and fearless efforts for justice help change the trajectory of the civil rights movement, impacting countless lives less your whole now on more of this tremendous life. When you see something that is not right. Not Jazz not fair. Obligation to set something to do something. John Lewis devoted his life to the fight for Justice and equality. Deep. Down within me moving me. That I could no longer be satisfied or go along with an evil system. The son of Rural Alabama, Sheriff Cropper's Lewis was inspired as a teenager by the activism of Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King Junior. He joined the civil rights movement in. It's early days the sit ins and freedom rides, often facing arrest and violent opposition segregation was the order of the day that was a tremendous amount of fear, and I wanted to do something about it we wanted to. Redeem, the soul of America. And move toward a more perfect union. He became the leader of the student nonviolent Coordinating Committee and help organize the historic march on Washington I. Lewis spoke that day, too. He was twenty three. We do not allowed freedom. We wanted to be reading. Abbey was among the leaders who met that day with President John. F Kennedy I was not concerned about making history. just wanted to change things on March seventeenth nineteen, sixty five in Selma Alabama he did both. Much today to Germany ties to the nation leading a peaceful march for voting rights. And others were attacked by state troopers, wielding clubs and tear gas. It became known as bloody Sunday. Lewis suffered a fractured skull. Laws consciousness fifty years later. Don't recall. made it back across that bridge televised images of violence that day galvanize the nation, spurring passage of the Voting Rights Act signed into law just five months later. John Lewis was there to. John Lewis Education Project. He worked tirelessly to turn hard. One voting rights into political power to minute people. A two-minute black people died in the state for the right to register and the right to vote. He helped run volunteer programs for President Carter and in nineteen. eighty-six was elected to Congress from Georgia vegging. He served more than thirty years at enduring symbol and a tireless advocate for social justice. Let us. We came into do job. We came into work, a leading voice and a moral beacon John Lewis was known as the conscience of Congress admired respected and loved generations from now parents teach their children. What is meant by courage? The story of John Lewis will come to mind. An American. Who Do the change could not wait for some other person for some other times we must never ever give out. We must have an advocate. We must keep the fake key. Own the. Lesser Reporting! House Speaker Nancy Pelosi today, calling Congressman Lewis One of the greatest heroes of American History Jeff Bennett has more on the outpouring of touching tributes. Tonight tributes and remembrances for the civil rights icon and longtime congressman. John Lewis Former President Barack Obama saying that Lewis loved this country so much that he risked his life and his blood, so that it might live up to its promise. Lewis and Obama shared a deep admiration for one another last month, the to offering inspiration to young activists, leading the latest demonstrations for equality and justice. That's why when I see these young people. Here right now. I am inspired to go into him. Redeem this Sullivan Mercker. In say that country former President George W Bush saying tonight that America can best honor John's memory by continuing his journey toward liberty and justice for all Bill Clinton calling Lewis the conscience of the nation and from Jimmy Carter all Americans. Oh John Lewis a debt of gratitude,

Congressman Lewis One John Lewis John Lewis Education Project President John Congressman President Carter Selma Alabama Pancreatic Cancer America President George W Bush Georgia Barack Obama Martin Luther King Junior Germany Alabama White House
John Lewis, Civil Rights Icon, Has Died At Age 80 In Atlanta Home

Forum

01:07 min | 4 months ago

John Lewis, Civil Rights Icon, Has Died At Age 80 In Atlanta Home

"From NPR News. I'm nor RAHM. Representative John Lewis, a leader of the civil rights movement in 17 term congressman from Atlanta, has died at the age of 80. He had pancreatic cancer from member station W A. B M A hurt has this remembrance growing up in the segregated South? John Lewis refused to accept the status quo of segregation. He decided to follow in the footsteps of civil rights icons Martin Luther King Jr and Rosa Parks that was deeply inspired to get in the way. I got in trouble. It was good travel necessary trip, people must find a way to get in the way and find a way to get in trouble. Good trouble became a motto of

John Lewis Martin Luther King Jr Rahm Npr News Rosa Parks Congressman Atlanta Representative
Hundreds gather at large protest in downtown Detroit on Friday night

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:43 sec | 6 months ago

Hundreds gather at large protest in downtown Detroit on Friday night

"J. at one point some members of the crowd vandalized a Detroit police car by breaking out windows and also spray painting the side of it meantime police called in their strike force to handle the crowd of hundreds of people in downtown Detroit as one man was arrested near Michigan and Rosa Parks some angry protesters nearly pulled a police officer all of his police horse community activist minister militia bass says this is a rebellion what's not covered and we are proud of it and we don't do it and the law enforcement has got to

Detroit Michigan Officer
"rosa parks" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

07:50 min | 7 months ago

"rosa parks" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"I not really seen Rosa Parks as a threat more so innocent right I mean I think if she was wearing like a Black Panther uniform at the rate that would be a completely different story enforcer skin complexion I think has somebody with it he doesn't look like the trip possibly the traditional you know but yeah I mean I I don't think she was seen as much of a threat to super incident in that case yeah I mean there's definitely evidence again park says this herself right I mean when she's arrested eating Nixon is like yeah right he's like this is one she's the one right in the all gather at our house to convince her of that and who's against it her husband because he's not an idiot he knows how dangerous places yeah using that on violence in the Nixon kind of fortune article made her kind of the figure of the civil rights movement that's been propagated since then that's a great question I don't think Robinson did I think parts of it and I think Nixon did Robinson was angry she was really angry when they backed off of cold front right and Coleman was a student was a was a young girl that parks had worked with because parts was in charge of the NWP use active right so they had a relationship in that sense so when they backed off a cold and she was really upset because the gear article tells you you're waiting you know Robinson has been you know fighting this fight for a decade right and when the the one this is in the brown decision comes out and she writes four days later she writes to the mayor like you know just reminding you African Americans make up seventy five percent of the writers and if we were to actually boycott that would be really bad for the bus company right I mean that's a threat right to that degree to which you can do it so I don't think that you I don't think we can take that on Robinson so much I think we can take it on gender politics of the time and certainly then also politics of color because it's not incidental that she's a light skinned woman she's chosen all these things lead allow for this idea of middle class respectability they all lead for a lot FOR idea middle class with Billy despite the fact that Rosa Parks is absolutely of the working class you know and arguably of the working poor she doesn't have that veneer right so that's part of it and she doesn't she has it she does not have a demeanor that radical she has a radical activists passed but she doesn't have a demeanor that is radical so there's definitely image politics going on here and we can decide whether or not we fault them for that or that they're looking at the reality of their situation we've talked in here about the trap of getting into an image politics game right and so one of the things we can scan centres what are the effects of Rosa Parks have been having been the symbol right because I think that goes back to Morgan's point of light who is worthy of justice right we talked about that with maybe two Bradley as well another thing that I want to do just keep in mind is that you know the question often comes up why women why was it primarily women and was primarily women who are doing this and all you need to know is Emmett till right that's I mean that I mean there's a bigger history to that to do the same type of resistance you're seeing these women get beaten right to do the same time type of resistance as an African American man would have been even riskier right even riskier also African American men were riding the buses as much if there was a car in the family in after the man would be taking it to his job it was with women who were on the bus also because they were domestics right so they were on the bus integrator a greater capacity and often with white people those lines are kind of blurred because they might go to the grocery shopping with the children of their white employer and in that capacity they set up front right they sat up front because that white baby wasn't going in the back right so there's a little bit more blurring of the lines there and their stories of American men often if the stuff would start on a bus with an African American woman they just get up and go out the back door and it suffered psychically for that right and we're criticized for if they just get up go out the back door because that's they understood how loaded that situation was so I also want to go to the next idea of this movement being unprecedented and spontaneous and I want to try and trouble that or just what if you did bring the Greer on American history once you spend radio from Wellesley College right there's examples with in Alabama that refute that idea there's a boycott in nineteen hundred R. nineteen hundred of the trolleys and buses at this point talk of the trolleys that lasts about two years it's not as total as the Montgomery bus boycott is the Montgomery bus boycott is ninety five percent successful among African Americans and and you know what is right is the seventy five percent of your clientele is African American and the ninety five percent of them stay off the buses I mean this crippled the bus company they keep raising fares they were very much on the on on the brink of financial ruin and yet time after time after time again they refused to segregate buses that's important to you know to think about to understand so Montgomery blacks have a boycott of the buses in nineteen forty one around Easter holiday event that happened and they said that they often like bust out but then dropped far away and had to walk in the rain and everything so they boycotted the buses that was just a very short event and then in baton Rouge in nineteen fifty three there was a bus boycott the people in Montgomery very much took information from right and so that's when I say if you own a bus boycott narrative that's as simple as the one that we have you can't do what people in Montgomery did in terms of the baton Rouge boycott where they took information and they learn from that organizer awake at and then this idea of it being spontaneous right I think Carol successfully hi deconstructs that idea and you look at when the girl article was written in nineteen eighty five so when you ask you how many of you have a more complex idea about Rosa Parks or the Montgomery bus boycott and you're telling me in the year two thousand twenty but it's still coming down this way that's problems we've had this information now for a long time you know people educators we've had this information for a long time right in the women's political council just blows that out of the water that idea that is entertaining is that they decided at the last moment we know from Guero that there was a plan in place right at least a loose plan that Robinson was just waiting and that there'd been many many meetings between that the W. P. C. and city authorities to address the segregated seating with all these half measures you know like let us come in the front door you know at least you know have more black bus drivers doesn't even necessarily have to be that you know it's an integrated bus at this point but it's no no no to all of those things right so the question that I have then is why didn't we know anything about the women's political council Intel nineteen eighty five and then why don't you know anything about her right why do you think we don't know anything about her or anything about the women's political council this far what is that can do the math for thirty five years later we think accounts for that.

Rosa Parks
Trump Adviser: Social Distancing Protestors Are the Second Coming of Rosa Parks

The Vegas Take

01:32 min | 7 months ago

Trump Adviser: Social Distancing Protestors Are the Second Coming of Rosa Parks

"My life listen to this this is trump adviser I don't trump only hires the best Stephen Moore ladies government areas that's the no we're going to see a lot more of those in Ohio we saw more protests today I'm working with a group of Wisconsin that wants to do a drive in Hey are you remember the old sentence with this degree of drive and they're gonna shut down the capital sh don't tell anybody but they think they can get fifteen hundred people to come and and this is great yeah you guys all so that we have a one big going on Wisconsin I'm not gonna mention his name and I told about this you said Steve I promise I will pay the bail and legal fees for anyone who gets arrested so this is a great time gentlemen and ladies for civil disobedience we need to be the Rosa Parks here and protest against these government injustice ladies and gentlemen Donald Trump adviser Stephen Moore just compared Rosa Parks to some of these protesters it is one of the dumbest and by the way can you quite a few one of the dumbest comments that anybody in Donald trump's cabinet has made JD you can't possibly defend that statement he said we need to be the Rosa Parks here like we need to be like Rosa Parks yeah and he made a reference to some of these protesters running out there and protest the war the protesting you're so you're comparing it to think all about best what the protests and I'm asking you are you okay with that they want they want America to open back up they want their jobs back they want their lives back if anything that's an outdated they think this is a no brainer

Stephen Moore Ohio Wisconsin Rosa Parks Donald Trump America Steve
"rosa parks" Discussed on Fake the Nation

Fake the Nation

12:39 min | 7 months ago

"rosa parks" Discussed on Fake the Nation

"Topic. Number two is using this global pandemic excuse to give all Americans access to universal healthcare. I mean kidding. He's using this pandemic to implement some of his shitty immigration policies. He's been after legal immigration since the beginning of his presidency. And he this week. He halted the issuance of green cards for at least sixty days. Citing Corona virus. Does this make sense to you? Guys Leah. It makes sense to me and as far as that. He wants to keep his people on board. And he's like Oh some of my people have lost jobs and are getting sick and I want to remind them why they love me. And that's because we hate immigration so I feel like it makes sense as far as Sticking to what he does best. Jody I think there's a. There's a number of things going on here. But one of them is definitely immigration. Is the core issue. That riles up his base. And it's been awhile since that has been activated And you know you saw the trump campaign Fundraise off this immediately. The next morning sending out emails Based on a tweet and we should make clear that so far what we have right is just tweets and a an indication that we're going to do something we'll see how it plays out a lot of trump's sort of especially around immigration a lot of his sort of bold statements have been ended up in you know mired in court proceedings But yeah I mean. I think that's where you have to start. You have to think of this as something that that that is about now. Red Meat for his base. I will also say though that it's been a long term strategy of immigration critics people who want to curb immigration to do quote unquote temporary measures and You know the the. There's there's memos from far right groups going back decades saying basically you know the way to do this debate and make this palatable to start a temporary measuring it's much harder to roll back a temporary measure than it is to try and get a permanent measure through and so you just go step by step and so we potentially seeing a little bit of that strategy playing but I think it's more that like I dunno know. Stephen Miller got an trump's ear and got hyped up and then he went and he sent a tweet you know and I should also point out about that tweet so the tweet was like. I'm halting immigration. I think it was a little bit vague and then it turns a what he's really doing. He's he's halting the issuance of green cards for sixty days and then but he's not halting temporary visas. Temporary workers are still going to be allowed to work at the reason for that is because the business community was like dude like we actually need. The temporary visas for our business is to function of. He's gotten in trouble in the past for for the temporary guest worker program being halted or whatever like being threatened and the the president of the National Farmers Union You know said to hold the the temporary workers visa program quote adds to an already would just add to an already stressed food system so so yes so there's like actual great reasons not to do that but I think the other weird I mean I think you know Leah Your. Ira totally with you in that like. He's halting imagine you know these green cards first of all. There wasn't terribly much activity going on in terms of immigration. Because it's the time isn't the best time a and then I think the other thing is He we know it was a sign to his base that I'm still anti immigration. Even the middle of Kroger's. A strong man was against who's against immigration. I am always working on it. So don't worry I haven't lost my edge. It's it's again it's a it's a campaign rally moment as opposed to having anything to do with pandemic even though the stated reason his stated reason as Americans should get those jobs. Immigrants should not get those jobs and that would be. I think a very strong argument for people who think that immigrants are taking their jobs again. No one there are no jobs right now so like this is kind of not in issue but but I think but I think you're right. It's just a gross. Stephen Miller got his ear or like the campaign. Was You know what we need? We need a little bit more of the red meat To throw to the base about emigrants. Here's a good one because it doesn't affect very much right now. You know a whistle without a whistle. I mean without a thing happening. It's not a dog whistle. It's a it's a bullhorn or an air or whatever but you know it is also. I think there is a little bit of consistency and maybe substances in exactly the right word but you know. I think closing borders has been a consistent. Refrain of this administration in response to almost any single problem. And it's and it's clearly red meat. Fire up the base thing but it is also I think there's some philosophical consistency there If that's the way to put it And I but I just think you know by all accounts that the China Ban Travel Ban didn't seem to do much this virus every time we figure out more about how it got here it was here earlier and earlier and earlier than we thought And this as well. I don't think you know I don't think this is the way to attack the quote unquote invisible enemy as he puts it Is through closing borders. But that is just you know. It's like the the consistent answered almost every problem for the and it's it's It's it's like what you know. A country like Sweden will do with their pandemic versus a country like Turkey Brazil where they doubled down on on be strong men and having authoritarian rule. So it's kind of like this is the donny's equivalent to the like Balsam narrow for Gerbil response which brings me to our next topic topic number three. Today's topic day. What I know. It's so exciting. You guys topic number. Three Sweden's approach Sweden like Norway is one of those non. Shithole countries that Donnie wishes. We had more immigrants from but they're handling this. Global pandemic vary differently. Schools are open. Cafes or open they're letting people roam around They are aiming for her immunity. And and they're still doing social distancing but it's based mostly on self regulation. What do you guys think of? Sweden's approach Leah. I think this calls back to what you said previously about. Why you think people is at the heart of what people are protesting. Sweden's approach I feel is based so much on how Sweden is already set up that they could have that approach. Everybody has a healthcare base. There is a social safety net. It's you know not as big as race. So it's their approaches so tailored to what they already have in place that I couldn't. It's not a thing where I could think of it as what if we tried that. You know we can't try that because of a myriad of reasons a lot of them involving our healthcare system and economic backup. But you know so. I think it's so specific to Sweden that. Maybe it can work there but also I noticed articles. They'd be like you know as they have less numbers than Italy and Spain but they also still have more numbers than the Scandinavian countries which is the country's they should be being compared to right right. Right right yeah. We'll see what happens. I think there is some evidence of the last few days or week that it might not be working as well as they hoped them. But I do but I do think these questions about Both safety net in Sweden and sort of economic and health care structures. But also there's just a through line of trust in government and when you read about the way that the policies and Sweden have an implemented. I think there are based on kind of understanding among the people that our government is acting in good faith that there's a sort of moral framework around some of the decision making and you know we. We lack that in this country For for number of reasons not just about the last four years but for the last several decades and so you know to some extent I will say in this country. I've been surprised at how much we've rallied. Given how much distrust there is in government. How much scepticism. There is about expertise and so forth But I think in Sweden you see that people. It appears to be that okay. There's a plan now. We'll see if it's the right plan is wrong but we are going to trust our government. We're going to listen and so forth. I mean the other thing to point out that yes there's a more quote unquote lacks Policies about closing businesses of people are still social distancing by all accounts you know. Most movie theaters are completely empty. People are keeping their distance and so I think that goes that again ties into just this understanding this collective understanding that we have to do this together and there are some sort of agreed upon facts and procedures whether they are directives or not You know we are. We're going to take on what it. What what we need to do in to tackle this thing whereas in this country that didn't happen until the government said you have to do x Y and Z. People were not doing it. Sorta voluntarily or out of some spirit of of a communal understanding or something right. And so I WANNA point out a couple of You know facts that they've laid out about why. This works in Sweden. We a you mentioned like they have a much better healthcare system. They manage they at no point worried about like not having enough medical equipment or hospital capacity. That was like just never an issue. They were able to set up. Set up emergency care facilities around the country that have mostly remained empty because they've just like had an existing system that didn't need as much. I just want to say and I know this Sweden smaller. I know that they And I know that they are just completely different. It's hard to compare sweet into the United States but we're the richest bucking country in the world. Right and it's embarrassing that we don't also have that I'm just GonNa say that for the record embarrassed okay. I'm unblushing with embarrassment but also more than half of Swedish households are single person. Which was that surprising to you. I didn't think I for some reason. I thought Sweden would have more families because they have they also have more like childcare and shit like that. So I think I would just think people will be fucking popping out kids and there'd be a lot more family household but no more than half. The households are single person so make social dissing so much easier also. This is another thing. More people work from home already more than anywhere else in Europe which I thought was interesting and they already have. All of them have access to fast internet which we don't have right so internet is so different community to community It makes it harder for us to have you know To work from home to have remote learning all of that shit so much more so much more difficult So those are some of the reasons why Sweden is Is is is better at it in a yeah. I mean I think the the trust in government pieces huge because I was looking at Iran Iran part of the reason things got out of hand in Iran is because the government would like guys. This is a big deal you know. Take all these precautions and the people were like but you lied to us like all the time. So are you lying to us right now? And that's what happens. I think an indicator United States. It's you know Donnie. Were saying one thing. Health experts were saying another thing. We just had no consistency in message for very long time and we still lack it in many respects so e it's hard to develop a trust in government when there is no consistent voice from the government and when your whole life has been like..

Sweden Leah Your Stephen Miller Donnie Kroger Jody Europe United States Ira president Iran National Farmers Union Spain Italy Norway
Interview With Jeffrey Howard On The Coronavirus Situation In the United STates

Monocle 24: The Globalist

08:59 min | 7 months ago

Interview With Jeffrey Howard On The Coronavirus Situation In the United STates

"Joining me to discuss the latest twist and turn stateside is the political philosopher and US politics expert at UC L. A Good Friend of Monaco Twenty Four Geoffrey Howard Jeffrey. Good morning to you. You're listening to that. I was quite striking. Some of Ed had to say it's been tracking obviously trump's presses in this kind of thing this idea that he's oscillating between attack mode and a more conciliatory tone on the latter. It's not something that he does particularly. Well it people. We're talking just a couple of weeks ago that we're seeing a new tone from the president on this topic and people wondered whether this was a a moment of pivoting to a more conciliatory manner may be one. That would be bipartisan. That would engage people on both sides of the Aisle. A but every time people think that that's happening We're disappointed within hours. And the president reverts to really what his is natural tendency which is to be compatible. Cabada to be extremely defensive into interpret any attempts to have a thoughtful inquiry about the best next steps regarding this price process as a criticism of his administration. Well to that point and then Jeffrey do you go along with this reading. Because perhaps of essentially a lack of national strategy on this trump is happy to play this. Blame game you know. He's got governors Left and right. Oh it must be said in his in his crosshairs. Is that what? He's decided his way to deflect that. Scrutiny that you mentioned that is to simply turntables on a on governors and of course the regions and say you know. These are the people who are letting the nation down. There's no doubt that his intention is to declare victory and then point whatever bad fallout transpires. And of course they're always been already been thousands dead point two governors and say it was their fault. I think that's clearly. His strategy take responsibility for the good stuff for the progress. That's been made and place responsibility for all the bad stuff on the governor's and we're already seeing him. Turning this debate into a kind of culture war. Such that one's position on the lockdown Will be a matter of partisan affiliation so It was so striking Lake Friday that he tweeted out. Liberate Minnesota Liberate Michigan Liberate Virginia What's he talking about? So He's essentially encouraging the public to disobey State Public Health Advisories and stay at home orders. Many of which his own administration Encouraged the creation of and. I think it's important to remember here in the context of the battle against Corona virus. That it it's not about you when the government tells you to stay home of it's not about restricting your freedom in order to make your life go worse. It's about the moral obligation. All of us have not to endanger one another by spreading the transmission of the virus and thereby risking infecting others and therefore risking the overwhelming of hospitals and the fact that he couches it in terms of liberation That he couches this requirement that people look out for one another in the community is tantamount to oppression is is so striking. I think one of the worst things I saw in the last few days is a quote by Stephen Moore. Who's of one of the White House advisers to trump on corona virus new called the protesters quote? Modern Day Rosa Parks. They're protesting against injustice at a loss of liberties and quote. Rosa parks being famous civil rights activists of the African American woman. Who In nineteen fifty five famously sat at the front of the the busted. The whites only section. Right it's just absurd to be calling people who are literally endangered one another Tantamount to Rosa parks. But that's where we're at. That's where I'm struggling through the process. That comparison in my mind Jeffrey. Let's move on just in terms of I mentioned rounded up this show. It's hard to see that trump has anything other than the general election later this year In his personal crosshairs. And you can see how this fits his old narrative his this this rabble-rousing citing the second amendment in tweets. And this stuff you said about oppression and liberation again designed to play too and I use the quote marks his base. Do we know how both his really hard coal committed supporters Following him suggestions are that his poll ratings are are off amongst that demographic but with anyone who may be I don't know if flip-flopping little or or or or open to possibly voting Democrat in the Autumn House this actually playing this narrative especially this crazy new authoritarianism. I guess you'd call it. I mean what's striking about these? These protests does that. They're certainly attempting to appear. Grass roots. There certainly the kinds of scrappy movements of people that suggests that it was a a bunch of people on who just decided to get up and go out in protest. But if we've learned that's not quite true. We know that. For example the Michigan protests were explicitly funded by organizations like the Michigan Conservative coalition. The Michigan Freedom Fund of quite striking that the Michigan Conservative coalition also goes by the name the Michigan Trump Republicans according to the Washington Post. So it looks like this is not really grassroots. It's what we would instead. Call ask her turf. Fake grass roots at a concerted attempt by powerful interests to make. It seem like the people are rising up. And I think it's a difficult question because generally speaking we're having widespread compliance would stay at home. Orders were not having tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands of people out in the streets protesting relatively speaking. The protests are somewhat small but online. They have a very large presence on facebook. They have a very large presence. And I think already we're seeing the president. You Use Corona virus as a way to whip up agitation against mostly Democratic governor so in Michigan for example. The governor is Gretchen Whitmer. Who's a democrat? Who's been named as a potential potential vice presidential pick for Joe Biden? A very popular Democratic Governor Michigan and she has absolutely in trump's crosshairs in terms of his rhetoric and he's very much Trying to lower her public opinion in the state and lower the public opinion of other democratic governors around the country. And I think it's not that trump oscillates between a mood where he's thinking about how we genuinely solve this public health crisis and then shifts to the political register to think about how the politics plays out. He's I think always in the political register he's always thinking about how this impacts his popularity how it impacts his electoral prospects in November November twenty twenty and it seems all decisions are being made in light of that well given that then Jeffrey. What are the prospects to the US? It's interesting if you track the data points this weekend. It just seems they've kind of another grim allstone North of forty thousand deaths. Which is I think over. A quarter of the global total Three quarters of a million infections which I think is more than a third of the global total feels out of control with his focus so unrelenting unrelentingly on domestic political maneuverings is there a risk that the US doesn't develop a coherent strategy in the weeks. Ahead I mean. There isn't a coherent strategy even now so the president has outlined a three step phased reopening of the economy that he's encouraging governors to to pursue a book. Governors are very insistent that you have to link the reopening of the economy with testing. And we know that there have been considerable. Shortages of testing kits considerable shortages of supplies of the governors have been complaining about this. We know that that particular issue has been a disaster where states have been trying to bid against one another. They've been trying to bid against various government agencies rather than having a unified federal response. And because of that. I think it's going to push the reopening later and later now I think what seems likely is that trump is going to say. We need to do this. We need to move forward and states with trump loyalists as governors will move. We already saw beaches reopening in Florida. Just this past weekend now. It looked like people were practising reasonably good social distancing on those beaches but the point remains that if trump says let's reopen. Let's do it now. A lot of Republican states are GonNa follow suit and then you might have a really terrible situation where you have states that favor the president in greater peril than states that don't favor the president and I think it's just a very sad state of affairs that you have people who like the president who were essentially being lied to by the President about what's in their own Public Health interest in. What's actually going to protect people in their communities. Jeffrey is Great. Salt with you as always. That was our friend. Geoffrey

President Trump Geoffrey Howard Jeffrey Donald Trump Michigan United States Corona Michigan Conservative Coalitio ED Monaco Twenty Day Rosa Parks Stephen Moore Facebook Gretchen Whitmer Lake Friday Joe Biden Michigan Freedom Fund Minnesota White House
"rosa parks" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

07:16 min | 10 months ago

"rosa parks" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Announcing the year of Twenty Twenty Twenty Twenty Vision that is twenty twenty vision at the center to be exact. That's why we are giving you twenty percent off your twenty twenty with thick with design plus a free consultation and no interest financing. Call the is center today at eight. Eight eight eight four four twenty twenty to get your twenty percents off isla thick or visit the eye center dot com to schedule your consoles online financing on approved credit see website for details restrictions apply. Today's episode is brought to you by Lexus. You at Lexus. Their greatest curiosity is you because the most amazing machines aren't inspired by machines. They're inspired by people. That's why Lexus asks different questions. Better questions more human questions like can you see with your ears and answers are as inspiring as you are which may leave you with one question. What amazing ideas will you inspire next? Discover the answers. Lexus DOT com slash curiosity? Welcome to brain stuff. Production of iheartradio. Hey rain stuff lauren. Vogel bomb here. Most of us know Rosa Parks as the African American woman who quietly but firmly refused to give up her seat to a white person on December. I nine hundred fifty five in Montgomery Alabama. That small active resistance sparked the year long Montgomery bus boycott which in turn kick-started national efforts to end racial segregation in the United States. In honor of that we wanted to fill in some of the often misunderstood circumstances surrounding parks resistance to start with. This wasn't some totally random act. Parks was a lifelong activist and she came from a family of activists. Parks was born in nineteen thirteen to James and Leona MacAulay. The couple separated two years later and parks. Mother moved the family to her parents. Farm in Pine Level Alabama parks grandparents rose and Silvester Edwards where former slaves who strongly believed in racial equality. One of parks early memories of her grandfather standing guard with his shotgun. As the Ku Klux Klan marched down their street end of him telling her stories about black history and courageous figures like Christmas addicts. Harriet Tubman and Marcus Garvey in nineteen thirty two when she was nineteen Rosa MacAulay married. Raymond parks an active member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People or N. Double ACP parks began her civil rights activism shortly after graduating from high school and continued until shortly before her death in two thousand and five at age ninety two. She served for years as secretary to the president of nwpp's Montgomery Chapter Parks also worked on issues such as voter registration desegregation of schools and public spaces and justice for black victims of white tally. In addition she participated in numerous major civil rights events such as the nineteen sixty three march on Washington entity nineteen sixty five. Selma to Montgomery March parks was also an activist for women's rights and ending the Vietnam War at one time. She served on the Board of Planned Parenthood when she made her famous stand. It wasn't her first interaction with the bus driver. The driver James e Blake often made derogatory marks to African Americans especially women he also made black people get off his bus after paying then reboarded in. The rear sometimes hid driveway before they got back on twelve years before. The boycott in Nineteen forty-three Blake tried to make parks board after paying. She refused and he tried to push her off. The bus after that parks avoided lakes. Best no matter. What but on that fateful day. She didn't notice. Blake was the driver when she stepped on board her family reports. The parks was distracted. Thinking about Emmett till as news had just come out that his lynch's we're going to go free but about that famous stand in telling. The story sometimes mistakenly said that. She sat in the whites only section. What really happened. Was this in fifty-five Montgomery's buses had thirty six seats the first ten were reserved for white people. The Middle Sixteen were first. Come first serve with priority given to why people and the last ten were for black people park sat down in the first row of the Middle Section next to a black man. A two black women sat across the aisle. The other black people got up when Blake told them to parks as we know did not and she didn't refuse to give up her best seat because her feet hurt. She wrote in her autobiography. I was not tired physically or no more tired than I usually was at the end of a working day. I was not old. Although some people have an image of me as being old then I was forty two. No the only tired I was tired of giving in several months before parks refused to give up her seat. Fifteen year old. Claudette Coleman did the same thing. But unlike parks colden made a scene and was physically removed by police officers. Some say parks. Refusal ignited the boycott and Colin's because parks was calm polite and slightly older which made her more sympathetic figure and parks was well known and liked in the community through her work with the ACP however it was cold and not parks who is part of the lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of bus segregation in Montgomery. You may have seen photos of parks. Mugshot or being fingerprinted. But those are not from that first famous arrest there from two months later with the Montgomery bus boycott going strong when parks was helping. Arrange Carpool rides to people who refused to ride the buses on February twenty first nineteen fifty-six a grand jury indicted parks and others for violating an Alabama law prohibiting organized boycotts once again parks was arrested and jailed. The Montgomery bus boycott lasted three hundred. Eighty one days ended when the Supreme Court Segregation on. Public transportation was unconstitutional. Although the boy was a success it through Rosa and Raymond parks life into turmoil. Montgomery Fair Department Store where parks worked as a seamstress fired. Her Raymond was also fired from his job after his boss said he couldn't talk about Rosa or the boycott at work. The couple who had received threatening phone calls death threats and hate mail during the boycott continued to receive them for years after in nineteen fifty seven after neither could find steady employment in Montgomery. They joined rose's brother and cousins in Detroit taking along her mother. Leona but even in Detroit parks had trouble finding work finally in nineteen sixty five. She was hired as an administrative assistant for congressman. John Conyers junior a position. She held until her. Nineteen eighty-five Retirement. Parks died in two thousand five and her body lay in honor the US Capitol Rotunda the first woman to receive that distinction but she remained an activist all her life in one thousand nine hundred four. At the age of eighty-one she was mugged a young black man. A crime that many pundits is a sign of decaying values and young people but park sought differently. She said at the time I hope to someday see an end to the conditions in our country that would make people want to hurt others. Today's episode was written by Melanie. Mcmanus and produced by Tyler claim. Brenston is production. Iheartradio's how stuff works for more on this amount of other topics visit our home. Planet has stuff works dot com and for more podcast for my radio. Isn't the iheartradio APP APPLE PODCASTS? Or wherever you listen to your favorite.

Rosa Parks Twenty Twenty Twenty Twenty Vi Montgomery Chapter Parks Montgomery Lexus James e Blake Montgomery Alabama Leona MacAulay isla thick Ku Klux Klan Montgomery Fair Department Sto Rosa MacAulay Harriet Tubman United States Pine Level Alabama Vogel
Frances E.W. Harper: American Author and Social Reformer

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:26 min | 10 months ago

Frances E.W. Harper: American Author and Social Reformer

"Are warrior today for Abolition Women's Rights Racial Justice Status Voting Rights and more. She was poet Teacher Public Speaker and writer. WHO's considered the mother of African American journalism. Let's Talk About Francis Harper Francis Ellen. Watkins was born in Eighteen. Twenty five in in Baltimore Maryland. She was the only child of free parents. Though at that time the state of Maryland still allowed slavery when Francis which is three years old and both of her parents died. She was then raised by her maternal aunt and Uncle Henriette and Reverend William Watkins and took their last name Francis. Uncle was minister. Teacher activists and abolitionist who had a major impact on Francis's life and work. She attended his school until she was thirteen years old. The following year Francis started working as a seamstress wasn't working. She was writing a much wasn't writing. She was reading. Francis was bright and curious and was always looking for ideas to share and stories to read in her early. Twenties Francis published articles and poems and her local local newspaper. She also wrote pieces for anti-slavery journals and completed her first book of poetry called. Forest leaves or autumn leaves then in eighteen fifty. Congress passed the fugitive slave act. The Watkins Family Left Baltimore for Ohio. There Francis was the first woman to teach at Union seminary before moving to Pennsylvania to work with the Pennsylvania Abolition Society and the American Anti Slavery Society in Eighteen fifty. Four Francis gave her first public speech part of the Abolition Movement. She did such a good job that it launched a two year lecture tour Francis beaches focused on abolition equality and women's rights in eighteen fifty four. She also published poems miscellaneous subjects. The book was was quite popular. Four years later in eighteen fifty eight hundred years before Rosa Parks would become famous for a similar action. Francis refused to give up per seat or move to the designated colored section of a trolley car in Philadelphia. The following year Francis became the first African American woman to publish the short story in the US. Her story called. The two offers appeared in Anglo African magazine. Throughout her life Francis's this is writings both fiction and nonfiction told the story of the African American experience in that era and urged social change in eighteen. Sixty Francis Married Fenton Harper and the couple had one child together. Fenton died just four years. After their naturals Francis continued her activism and writing writing after the civil war she traveled through the South during reconstruction teaching former slaves and speaking and writing about their living conditions. Her journey lead to her book. Book entitled Sketches of Southern Life. She wrote and spoke about the need for greater access to education. Women's suffrage and temperance Francis spoke at the eighteen sixty six national women's rights convention and urged the women there to fight for black women's rights. She said we are all bound up together. In one great bundle of humanity and society cannot trample on the weakest and feeblest of its members without receiving the curse and its own soul From eighteen hundred eighteen ninety. She organized for the National Woman's Christian Temperance Union and she helped create the National Association of Colored Women in eighteen ninety four alongside IDA wells Barnett and Harriet tubman among others the organization sought to advance the rights of African American women. Their campaign pain centered. On Women's suffrage Anti Lynching and Fighting Jim Crow laws. The organization still exists. Today in Nineteen Eleven Francis died of heart failure at the age of eighty six. She was buried next to her daughter. Mary who had died two years. Prior Francis Harper remains literary legend and one of the most important writers for time she was a poet and passionate activist who used her lived experiences to promote social change

Francis Harper Francis Ellen Francis Married Fenton Harper Francis Reverend William Watkins Pennsylvania Abolition Society Baltimore National Association Of Colore Anglo African Magazine Abolition Movement Maryland Teacher Public Speaker Ida Wells Barnett Watkins Family Rosa Parks Uncle Henriette Congress Jim Crow United States Christian Temperance Union
Rush Limbaugh's Medal of Freedom from Trump draws backlash

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

03:33 min | 10 months ago

Rush Limbaugh's Medal of Freedom from Trump draws backlash

"Backlash to President Trump's decision to award rush limbaugh the Presidential Medal of freedom. You've got to C. N. N.'s. Brian Todd Brian Wolf to say this is controversial is putting it mildly rush. Limbaugh has a huge following one of the reasons for that is that he's so controversial but some members of Congress civil rights leaders and others are simply outraged tonight because of limbaugh long history of divisiveness in dramatic fashion Russia for the first time ever at a state of the Union address a president awards the Presidential Medal of freedom rush limbaugh. Thank you for your decades devotion to our for some members of Congress like Cedric Richmond who've worked for years to bridge racial divides the award of the nation's highest. I civilian honor to radio. Host Rush. Limbaugh in their chamber was a Gut Punch. This would just be one bad time in America's history where we placated in pander to racists and Dan dividers for decades limbaugh's been accused of overt race baiting of appealing to the worst of Americans prejudices often directing his most incendiary remarks toward African Americans. The NFL all too often looks like a game between the blood weapons. President Obama was a frequent target target. Limbaugh playing a provocative song on his show magic and Limbaugh was one of the early proponents of one of the most infamous false attacks on Obama which was heavily promoted by Donald Trump. Rush Limbaugh was at the centre or at least was a contributor to the conspiracy theories about President Obama the specious and harmful argument. That President Obama had not been born in the United States and therefore was an illegitimate president. And what riles Congressman Richmond. Is the company rush. Limbaugh now keeps when you think about the people who have received this awarded as people who bring the people who fight for cause of unity and justice and then we just give it to somebody who has stoked and is a blatant racist limbaugh now shares a medal of freedom with civil rights icons Martin Luther King Junior Muhammad Ali Jackie Robinson and Rosa Parks who President Clinton recognized after bestowing stowing. The award on her at a state of the Union address in the middle of his impeachment limbaugh also drew criticism for comments about women including his remark Mark About Female Georgetown University Student Who Campaign for access to birth control. Does that make her an extra slut right right prostitute. She wants to be paid to have sex rush. Limbaugh later apologized. President trump does have the prerogative to give the medal of freedom freedom to whoever he chooses and plenty of other recipients have been controversial. It should also be noted that rush limbaugh has an enormous following and just revealed he has late stage stage lung cancer but historian Tim Noth- tally believes at this moment in this political climate. I think the president has tarnished the award by giving it to a very divisive figure in of reality show moment in the state of the union at a time when this country three desperately needs healing. I asked Congressman Richmond if he'll lodge a protest against the award to limbaugh. We're watching effort to have that award revoked. He said there are too many other other important issues. He has to concentrate on and he doesn't want to give this any more attention. We did ask the White House to respond to the criticism over the limbaugh award. We never heard back from them.

Rush Limbaugh President Trump President Obama Congressman Richmond Brian Todd Brian Wolf President Clinton Congress NFL N. N. America White House United States Russia Tim Noth Female Georgetown University
New Jersey 14-Year-Old Charged in Shooting That Killed Man, Injured Another

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

New Jersey 14-Year-Old Charged in Shooting That Killed Man, Injured Another

"Only fourteen but a New Jersey teenager is under arrest for murder after a fatal shooting last Friday afternoon in Paterson prosecutors say twenty two year old said dot free died after being shot by the teenager during the fight the two were involved in outside a restaurant on Rosa Parks Boulevard a second gunshot victim is expected to recover from his wounds the gunman's name is not being disclosed because of his age and he's only

Murder New Jersey Paterson
Rosa Parks honored with a statue in Montgomery, Alabama

Financial Issues with Dan Celia

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Rosa Parks honored with a statue in Montgomery, Alabama

"A statue of civil rights pioneer Rosa Parks is the debut today in downtown Montgomery Alabama it'll be unveiled at an event in Montgomery plaza this afternoon at the court street fountain the date coinciding with the nineteen fifty five anniversary of parks refusing to give up her seat on a public bus to a white man that protests sparked the Montgomery bus boycott and that's one of the key moments in the struggle for civil

Rosa Parks Montgomery Alabama Montgomery Plaza
Montgomery, Alabama elects first African American mayor

The Glenn Beck Show

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

Montgomery, Alabama elects first African American mayor

"In Montgomery Alabama voters elect the first black mayor Stephen Reid winning Tuesday's run off and says it's not about being first it's about a vision for change we can everyone turns two hundred years old this year notably sixty four years ago so the police arrested Rosa Parks refusing to give up her seat on the bus for a white

Stephen Reid Montgomery Alabama Rosa Parks Two Hundred Years Sixty Four Years
The Murder of Emmett Till

Retropod

03:32 min | 1 year ago

The Murder of Emmett Till

"Emmett till his tragic murder in one thousand nine hundred fifty five is a monumental moment in civil rights history. The African American teenager was tortured tortured shot wrapped in barbed wire and tossed in a river by white men seeking revenge for what till had allegedly whistled at a white woman in a grocery store when till's mother Mamie Elizabeth till mobely viewed his lifeless body swollen beyond recognition his teeth missing and I hanging out the only thing she could use to positively identify him was a the ring he was wearing Lord. Take my soul she cried according to a two thousand three interview with The Washington Post in her grief and outrage. Till's mother wanted the world to see the barbaric act committed against her son. She called the Chicago defender under one of the country's leading black newspapers she called Ebony and jet magazines too and she invited them to his funeral on the south outside of Chicago then. Maybe did something that would change history. She asked for an open casket skit at his funeral. I think everybody needed to know what happened to Emmett till his mother said according to PBS fifty thousand people attended the funeral in saw till's body the evidence of a vicious and hateful attack though open open caskets were an African American tradition. Till's body presented challenges not just in how he appeared but also and this is hard to say how badly it smelled. Simeon Wright till's cousin told Smithsonian magazine that the funeral home scrambled for a solution finally settling on the extraordinary step of putting glass over the casket to contain the odor otherwise right said no no one would have believed what till endured the result was profound the emotional photos from the funeral showed Mamie as she approached her son's casket. Her body seemed to buckle. Photographers captured her leaning over the casket to which photos of the smiling boy had been taped inside inside the litter. The funeral gave the nation in image. It hadn't yet seen what a lynching really looked like the brutality the anguish the sheer sense of wrong in this Massoni interview right said the photos led to renewed vigor in the fight against racist and a few months later a woman named Rosa Parks refused to give her seat on the white section of a bus prompting a year long bus boycott in Alabama led by an up and coming leader in the civil rights movement and the Reverend Martin Luther King Junior King may till's murder a centerpiece of his sermons and speeches the crying voice of Little Emmett till he'd say screaming from the rushing waters the evil of racial injustice the justice.

Little Emmett Mamie Elizabeth Murder Emmett Chicago Mobely PBS Rosa Parks Simeon Wright Alabama Smithsonian Magazine Massoni Martin Luther The Washington Post
Emmett till's Open Casket Funeral Lead to Vigorous Fight Against Racism

Retropod

03:32 min | 1 year ago

Emmett till's Open Casket Funeral Lead to Vigorous Fight Against Racism

"Emmett till his tragic murder in one thousand nine hundred fifty five is a monumental moment in civil rights history. The African American teenager was tortured tortured shot wrapped in barbed wire and tossed in a river by white men revenge for what till had allegedly whistled at a white woman in a grocery store when till's mother Mamie Elizabeth till mobely viewed his lifeless body swollen beyond recognition his teeth missing and I hanging out the only thing she could use to positively identify him was a ring he was wearing Lord. Take my soul. She cried according to a two thousand three interview with The Washington Post in her grief and outrage. Till's mother wanted the world to see the barbaric act committed against her son. She called the Chicago defender under one of the country's leading black newspapers she called Ebony and jet magazines too and she invited them to his funeral on the south outside of Chicago then. Maybe did something that would change history. She asked for an open casket skit at his funeral. I think everybody needed to know what happened to Emmett till his mother said according to PBS fifty thousand people attended the funeral in saw till's body the evidence of a vicious and hateful attack though open open caskets were an African American tradition. Till's body presented challenges not just in how he appeared but also and this is hard to say how badly it smelled. Simeon Wright till's cousin told Smithsonian magazine that the funeral home scrambled for a solution finally settling on the extraordinary step of putting glass over the casket to contain the odor otherwise right said no no one would have believed what till endured the result was profound the emotional photos from the funeral showed Mamie as she approached her son's casket. Her body seemed to buckle. Photographers captured her leaning over the casket to which photos of the smiling boy had been taped inside inside the litter. The funeral gave the nation in image. It hadn't yet seen what a lynching really looked like the brutality the anguish the sheer sense of wrong in this Massoni interview right said the photos led to renewed vigor in the fight against racist and a few months later a woman named Rosa Parks refused to give her seat on the white section of a bus prompting a year long bus boycott in Alabama led by an up and coming leader in the civil rights movement and the Reverend Martin Luther King Junior King may till's murder a centerpiece of his sermons and speeches the crying voice of Little Emmett till he'd say screaming from the rushing waters the evil of racial injustice the justice.

Little Emmett Mamie Elizabeth Murder Emmett Chicago Mobely PBS Rosa Parks Simeon Wright Alabama Smithsonian Magazine Massoni Martin Luther The Washington Post
"rosa parks" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"rosa parks" Discussed on Historical Figures

"London two thousand twelve the thirtieth summer Olympic Games. The Sixty six thousand capacity stadium was full to the Brim for the men's four hundred meter semifinal eight of the thirty two fastest men in the world stood in front of the starting blocks. There was a smattering of applause for the Venezuelan in lane to the Brit and lane three received a predictably warm roar of appreciation from his home country. The Belgian lane four fed off the energy of the excited crowd hollered for him as well but it was the South African in lane in five who ignited the stadium into a frenzied uproar indeed millions of is around the world were fixated on the man in the fifth lane the starting gun fired and the runners took off South African maintained pace coming out of the first turn but was soon overtaken shaken by the Belgian when this was of little consequence all the South African needed to do to qualify for the finals was finished in the top three but within the runners came to the home stretch and the South African found himself in sixth place looking ahead at the determined runners including the man who would go on to win gold in the last fifty meters the South African fell back into seventh in the final twenty meters he was overtaken by the Venezuelan Venezuelan and crossed the finish line in dead last several strides behind the man in front of him but then the winner of the heat the future gold medallist turn to embrace the South African. He signaled that he wanted to trade the BIBS that had their names printed on them. A sign of the greatest respect between athletes the South African man then raised his hand and bowed to the crowd as though he had one the stadium cheered wildly for him at homes around the world family sat in their living rooms and shook their heads in disbelief amazing some mm said absolutely incredible they reacted as such because the South African was a man named Oscar pistorius the first double amputee to run in the Olympic Games to get here he not only had to qualify competing against the world's greatest but also navigate the trials of hellacious litigation to prove that his carbon fiber prosthetics did not give him an unfair advantage edge historians had become an international hero a poster boy for overcoming obstacles but what he would be remembered for was not his phenomenal unrivalled resume of athletic achievement. It was the result of a single night six months after the London Olympics when when Oscar pistorius fired four shots into his closed bathroom door killing his twenty nine year old girlfriend Riva Steam Steam Camp.

Oscar pistorius London Olympics four hundred meter twenty nine year twenty meters fifty meters six months
"rosa parks" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

10:35 min | 1 year ago

"rosa parks" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Laws when they decided the best way to fight fight-back would be to boycott the Montgomery City buses on December fifth the day of Roses Trial N. double. ACP volunteers mimeographed yeah graft over thirty five thousand fliers to get the word out about the boycott they read stay off the buses Monday in protest protests of the arrest and trial. You can afford to stay out of school for one day. If you work. Take a cab or walk but please children children and grown ups. Don't ride the boss at all on Monday. These flyers were sent home with black schoolchildren and they were posted in black neighborhoods and on December fourth Nixon was even able to get an ad in the local paper on December number fifty nine thousand nine hundred fifty five around twenty people gathered at Mount Zion African Methodist Episcopal Zion church in Montgomery to discuss the best strategies auditees for the bus boycott. They decided that if Rosa lost the case the boycott would extend beyond her trial date indefinitely to organize organiz a longer bus boycott the group elected one of their most trusted team members to spearhead the movement a twenty six year old Baptist Reverend by the name of Dr Martin Luther King Junior together with the help of the N. double. ACP He formed the Montgomery Improvement Association. Their goal was to keep the boycott going until the status. Quo Changed that day forty two year old Rosa parks stepped into the stuffy halls of the Montgomery County courthouse. She was greeted by a bustling crowd of around around five hundred local supporters cheering her on her attorney was a man named Fred Gray and accomplished lawyer preacher and and activist who graduated from Case Western Reserve University School of law he was a go getter with a strong passion for civil rights in fact upon moving to Alabama. He said he was ready to destroy everything segregated but given the racist laws in place. Rosa never stood a chance the entire trial lasted all of thirty minutes during which Rosa was convicted of disorderly conduct and and violating the local bus ordinance she was fine ten dollars plus four dollars in courtroom fees approximately one hundred and fifty dollars in today's currency all the crime of refusing to vacate a bus seat the N. double. ACP and the black community at large deemed at this verdict unacceptable Rosette should not be charged with breaking the law if that law was unethical in the first place and so the Montgomery bus boycott began it rained on the evening of December Fifth Nineteen fifty five but but even so the city buses were mostly empty forty thousand people walk through the rain to get home from work some as far as twenty twenty miles as Montgomery's black population made up about seventy percent of all bus customers. The boycott struck in early in devastating blow. The buses soon became something of a laughing stock public buses sat at the side of the road completely empty except for the drivers ars but the boycott also had an adverse effect on Rosa and her husband a week into the protest. Rosa was fired from her seamstress job he'd held for years. No reason was given about Rosa suspected. It was because of her involvement in the boycott the next week Raymond also lost his job after talking about the boycott at work but the setbacks only made the parks family all the more more resolute as weeks passed the city of Montgomery began to feel the financial impact of the boycott bus fares bears were a reliable source of income for any city and now with the boycott in full swing that revenue stream was drying up on January anuary thirtieth nineteen fifty six the fifty seventh day of the boycott. The home of Dr Martin Luther King was bombed to buy white radicals two days later Edgar. Nixon's house was also bombed but once more the black community refused is to be intimidated in the face of property damage and violence the boycott continued meanwhile roses legal troubles proliferators liberated the city of Montgomery had criminalized boycotts and on February twenty first nineteen fifty six. She was arrested once again again for her role in the movement. Her supporters once again bailed her out but she knew that the fight wasn't over yet six months after the boycott began roses attorney. Fred Gray finally managed to gain an audience with the US District Court for the Middle District Straight Valla Bama in June nineteen fifty six fred argued that state bus segregation laws were unconstitutional and violated the rights of his community on June fifth nineteen fifty-six the three judges announced their ruling two to one in favor of Fred Gray. The fight still wasn't over the city of Montgomery filed an appeal that took the case to the United States Supreme Court on November Thirteenth Nineteen nineteen fifty-six over the next month. Fred continued to fight for his community and on December seventeenth nineteen fifty six he emerged victorious the Supreme Court rejected the appeal and ruled that bus segregation was illegal at the time roses case and the accompanying boycott was the largest successful black civil rights action in US history on December nineteenth nineteen fifty six the supreme court's written order arrived at the Montgomery Court House. Segregation of buses was officially officially illegal in the city. The boycott ended the next day and Montgomery's black citizens resumed using the buses after three hundred and eighty one days of walking and taking cabs for her bravery and her vision Rosa came to be known as the mother of the civil rights movement unfortunately even after the boycott ended she continued to face further harassment and threats Rosa and her husband Raymond grew to feel so oh unsafe they eventually relocated to Detroit Michigan in nineteen fifty seven and settled near Rosa's brother Sylvester MacAulay while in Detroit Rosa became an administrative aide in the Detroit Office of Congressman John Conyers Junior. She stayed there from nineteen sixty four to to her retirement in nineteen eighty eight regarding her work at this time she said I would have to take long of a minute to and give my whole synopsis of my life but I want to let you know that are all of us. Uh should be free and equal and have equal opportunity and that is what I'm trying to instill and and curry and inspire young people to reach the high for ten zero throughout the nineteen seventies Rosa Parks donated most of her money to civil rights organizations like the N. double. ACP and witnessed the establishment of a number of equitable laws including the Fair Housing Act and the Civil Rights Act of nineteen sixty eight the nineteen seventies also proved to be some of the most personally heartbreaking years of her life on August nineteenth nineteen seventy seven her husband died of throat cancer a few months later in November nineteen seventy seven her brother also died of cancer mindful of her husband's in the ability to receive a formal education during his lifetime Rosa co-founded the Rosa Rosa l Parks Scholarship Foundation for college bound high school seniors and the Roseanne Raymond Parks Institute for self development to serve Detroit's youth on October twenty fourth two thousand five at the age of ninety two Rosa Parks passed away in her apartment in Detroit Michigan she was laid to rest in the US capital and honor typically reserved for statesmen and military leaders in fact she was the first woman to ever receive such a distinction at her funeral over thirty thousand people passed by her coffin to pay respects and on December first two thousand five most major cities in the United States left seats empty on public public buses to commemorate roses incredible act of civil disobedience roses dedication to community and equality extended far beyond a refusal to give up her seat on a bus she was an advocate for black people and women everywhere and helped catapult the civil rights movement to the mainstream thanks to her courage. Rosa parks became a role model and icon and for women of Color as she explained I have learned over the years that when one's mind is made up knowing what must be done does away with fear.

Rosa Montgomery Rosa Rosa l Parks Scholarship Rosa Parks ACP Montgomery City Fred Gray Detroit Rosa Dr Martin Luther King US Montgomery County courthouse Detroit Montgomery Improvement Associa Nixon attorney Raymond United States Supreme Court Montgomery Court House
"rosa parks" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

10:44 min | 1 year ago

"rosa parks" Discussed on Historical Figures

"In September nineteen forty four thirty one year old N. w. c. p. activist Rosa Parks met met with rape survivor rec- Taylor in Abbeville Alabama local police tried to stem roses advocacy attempting to intimidate and even threaten in her into letting receives case disappear the moment she was back in Montgomery Rosa returned to the end of Lacey Pe- office and explained the encounter counter to their President Edgar Nixon in response to the police's tactics. Rosa and Nixon founded the committee for equal justice for the rights of Mrs Mrs Resea- Taylor as subgroup of the N. double. ACP This committee was comprised of a dozen leading black activists that were dedicated to making taking Taylor story public knowledge. They sent dozens of letters to the office of Alabama Governor Chauncey sparks urging him take the case to trial in one letter Rosa wrote. I know that you will not fail to let the people of Alabama know that there is aqel justice for all citizens roses efforts paid off and the incident was picked up by local newspapers then by press around the nation by February of nineteen forty five Alabama. Governor sparks was forced to take action. He reluctantly agreed to launch a second can special grand jury investigation into the crime but the special jury ultimately brought no charges against the accused rapists. Rosa was furious all her efforts had stirred up public support an outrage but Taylor still couldn't secure justice one by one. The frustrations of dealing with inequality on a daily basis started to build up a year earlier. Rosa Rosa had had a memorable encounter of her own. The Montgomery bus system was becoming a lightning rod for political controversy in part because of the extreme lengths they went to in the name of segregation for example bus tickets could only be purchased at the front of the vehicle meaning meaning all riders had to use the front doors to buy their ticket but Montgomery buses also had segregated entrances one for white people at the front and and another for black passengers at the back when a black person wanted to take the bus she'd have to board at the front purchaser ticket then and leave and re board through the back doors. The ridiculous policy served no practical purpose. It was only there to embarrass an inconvenience black black riders on a rainy day in nineteen forty-three. Rosa boarded a public bus in downtown. Montgomery reluctant to go back out into the rain mm-hmm. She instead walked directly back to a seat without exiting and re entering through the back door. The driver James F Blake was is infuriated. He ordered Rosa to exit and re enter through her designated entrance twice. Rosa refused so oh blake grab. Rosa dragged her outside and threw out into the rain before she had a chance to process what had happened. The bus pulled away a stranding her. The whole ordeal was incredibly traumatizing for Rosa in her autobiography she wrote. I never wanted wanted to be on that man's bus again after that. I made a point of looking at who was driving the bus before I got on. I didn't want any more run. INS is with that mean. One Rosa wasn't the only person who is sick and tired of discrimination on the buses in nineteen fifty five fifteen year old girl named Claudette Colvin was riding the bus home from Booker T. Washington high school in Montgomery. The bus was was crowded that day and cove and was asked to stand so a white woman could take her seat. Kovin refused the bus driver ordered cove and and to get up but Kovin held her ground this escalated to the point that the police were called and Coleman was arrested at at that time Montgomery had several contradictory laws regarding segregation a symptom of the push and pull between civil rights activists and the racist cyst establishment so one law not only permitted but required the bus driver to have cloven arrested while another protected cove ines right it to any seat. She wanted the N. double. ACP had long been looking for an opportunity to challenge the pro segregation laws and have them formally formerly overturned in Co.. WTN's arrests seemed like a perfect opportunity to bring Jim Crow all the way before the Supreme Court however the Organization soon learned that the teenage Kovin was pregnant out of wedlock. This should have had nothing to do with her case but at the end of the Lacey Pe- feared that juries would be less sympathetic to an unmarried mother with stakes so high they didn't WanNa take any chances chances the organization raised funds for coal WTN's defense but chose not to try to make her the new face of racial inequality. They'd have to wait for the next arrest nine months later on December first nineteen fifty five forty two year old Rosa parks boarded Ed bus number two eight five seven. It was about six. PM and she was on her way home from work at the Montgomery Fair Department Store. She paid her affair and sat down in an empty seat in the back section. She wasn't paying much attention as she boarded and didn't notice that the driver was was James F Blake the same driver who'd kicked her off the bus the previous year for not using the back door for the next three stops the bus traveled along its normal route more passengers got on and the bus slowly filled up by the time the the bus reached its third stop outside the Empire Theater. The whites only section at the front of the bus was over capacity. There was no seat for one. The white passengers in the front so blake stopped the bus and told the first row of black passengers to stand up so he could make a new row for the white writers. He said Y'all better make it light on yourself and let me have those seats. Rosa hadn't planned to make a stand that day but for whatever reason something snapped she later explained. I was not tired physically no more tired than I usually was. At the end of a working day how old I was forty two. No the only tired I was tired of giving in the rear of the black passengers stood up up Rosa didn't she later wrote when that white driver stepped back toward us when he waved his hand and ordered us up and out of our seats. I I felt a determination cover. My Body like a quilt on a winter night. Rosa remained in her seat staring at the driver. Offer Blake squinted back at her. He asked her again. Why don't you stand up. She replied. I don't think I should have to stand up then. She moved to the window seat. Further away from the Isle Lake asked her again if she was going to stand up Rosa again refused blake threatened to call the police. Rosa responded you do that so blake aac place the call while they waited. Roseau remained firmly planted in her seat. She tried to ignore the judgmental glares from the other. The riders assured that she was in the right eventually. Two policemen arrived at the scene. Blake explained the situation and Rosa was was charged with violating chapter six section eleven the Montgomery City code which enforce the segregation of public buses. They took her off the bus and drove her downtown to police headquarters along the way. She asked one of the policemen. Why do you push us around around. The officers. Response was simply. I don't know but the law's the law and your under arrest. Rosa was allowed one call at the station which he made to her husband Raymond. She told him that she had been given even a court date on December. Fifth Raymond was worried but he was also proud of his wife from making stand he promised her he would find the bail money to get her out of jail soon N. double. ACP Chapter President Edgar Nixon arrived the same night Rosa was sent to jail AOL Edgar paid her bail and had her released by then word of Rosa Parks arrest had spread to most of Alabama's black population. Rosa was an upstanding member of the community in many were astounded that she of all people would be arrested for such a minor offence offense. Edgar saw this anger in his community as an opportunity to get people mobilized later that night he visited the parks home and explained a plan to Rosa she could be the face of a new activist movement and as Rosa listened to Edgar's pitch. She felt hope spring in her chest. She was about to spark the historic. Montgomery bus boycott up next. We'll hear how roses work transformed the civil rights movement now back to the story. The black community in Montgomery Alabama was outraged following Rosa parks arrest on December first nineteen fifty five the N. double A. C. P. wanted to capitalize on roses case raising awareness as they tried to overturn Montgomery's segregation.

Rosa Rosa Rosa Parks Montgomery Rosa James F Blake Montgomery Rosa Mrs Mrs Resea- Taylor President Edgar Nixon Alabama Montgomery Alabama ACP Montgomery Fair Department Sto Governor sparks Chauncey sparks Abbeville Alabama Lacey Pe President Kovin
"rosa parks" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"rosa parks" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Alabama to find the sheriff armed and waiting for her already. Roseau walked right right past him to enter Recipes House for the duration of their meeting. Rosen noticed the patrol car that drove back and forth in front of the house she he was resolved to just ignore the police until receives front door burst open and the sheriff stepped inside. He warned Rosa that he didn't approve. You've of troublemakers and urged her to leave. Rosa packed up her belongings and departed. She was content to let the sheriff think he'd. He'd won this battle. She bring him the war up next. I we'll discuss how Rosa parks and the N. double. ACP advocated for rec- Taylor fame money obsession. These things can make athletes seem superhuman but what happens when those in professional sports reveal the darker side of their humanity every week minute show sports criminals investigate some of the most significant sports crimes throughout the world and we explore explore the dramatic collision course are most revered athletes and the underbelly of society you'll learn about these athletes rise through competitive sports and and how the discipline and motivation that brought them to the top served a push them into their downfall. Whether you're a rabid fan or a passive observer these stories carry significance significance for us all listen and subscribed to sports criminals for free on spotify and anywhere you listen to podcasts and if you hang around after the end of the show you can hear a clip of the first episode of sports criminals.

Rosa Recipes House Roseau Alabama Rosen ACP spotify Taylor N.
"rosa parks" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

10:45 min | 1 year ago

"rosa parks" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Hi I'm Vanessa Richardson. Send and I'm Carter Roy Welcome to historical figures apar- cast original every other Wednesday. We discuss different persons lasting historical compact unique personality and impression on the world around them. You can find episodes of historical figures and all other par- cast originals four free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts to stream historical figures for free on spotify just open the APP tap browse and type historical figures in the search bar that podcast. We are grateful for you our listeners when you allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach shout on facebook and Instagram at podcast and twitter at podcast network and if you enjoyed today's episode the best way to help us is to leave a five star review. See you wherever you're listening. It really does help we also now have merchandise head to park cast dot com slash merch for more information our our audio biographies cover big lives but we like to focus on little known facts. Today we're discussing. Rosa parks dubbed the mother of the Civil Civil Rights movement. She's most famous today for refusing to give up a seat on a bus in Montgomery Alabama. Her Act of Resistance Against Racist Segregation Segregation launched a boycott that proved pivotal to the fight for racial equality but Rosas activism extended beyond bus protests. It's an active member of the N. double. ACP Rosa championed black victims of sexual assault organized acts of civil disobedience and founded educational initiatives for disadvantaged students of Color Rosa Parks was born Rosa Louise as MacAulay on February fourth nineteen thirteen INTAS Gigi Alabama her early life was unstable as her parents separated when Rosa it was only two roses birthplace in Gigi insured. She grew up in the center of the nascent civil rights movement prominent Black Intellectual Booker. T. Washington was active there as soon as Rosa was old enough to understand issues of race. She was hyper aware of the inequality as well every Sunday she worshiped at the African Methodist Episcopal Church. Historically Black denomination initially founded to promote an abolitionist geology and then later devoted to racial equality. When Rosa was eleven years old she moved with her mother and brother to Montgomery Alabama Alabama where her grandparents lived there. She continued her harsh education about racial politics by the early nineteen twenties the white supremacist hate group that Ku Klux Klan was increasingly active for a decade after the civil war the K. K. K. had terrorized people of color color in the southern United States the hate group had declined to the point of nearly disbanding in the late eighteen hundreds but white supremacy experienced a resurgence surgeons in response to the growing number of immigrants in the US by the time Rosa was a young child the KKK boasted more than four million Leeann active members fearful of racially motivated attacks each evening roses grandfather laid a loaded shotgun across his lap APP and slept in a rocking chair near the front door eager to help defend her home and family. Rosa took to sleeping on the floor beside him. You're so when Rosa Parks was eleven. Her mother enrolled her in the private segregated Montgomery Industrial School for girls. It was the best education available to a black girl in the city despite her young age Rosa had to work to pay for her tuition. She took a janitorial job at the school pool cleaning up rooms after classes and every day she saw little reminders of the inequality she faced the white students had a bus Rosa and other black students didn't she walked to school every day. Even in the winter in her autobiography biography Rosa Parks My story Rosa wrote. I'd see the bus pass every day but to me. That was a way of life we we had no choice but to accept. What was the custom. The bus was among the first ways I realized there was a black world and a white world hold on during her walks. Rosa often passed by white children and adults who would shout racial slurs at her unprovoked. Some children even tossed pasta rocks at her as she walked by to cope with the stress. Rosa found comfort in her religious beliefs. She reminded herself that her bullies were simply lost sinners and prayed for them while they harassed her. She knew she couldn't do anything more concrete to defend herself because the police wouldn't look kindly on a black girl fighting white people even if they'd started it. Rosa attended high school at the laboratory school at the historically Black Alabama state teachers college but unfortunately she had to drop out a year later to help care for her ailing grandmother shortly after Rose's Rose's grandmother died her mother to grew. Ill now the family's primary caretaker. Rosa needed to work to support them and provide medical medical care education was out of the question at least until someone new entered Rosa's life and encouraged her to go back to school in Nineteen thirty one when Rosa was eighteen a mutual friend introduced her to a twenty eight year old barber named Raymond Parks. It was clear during their very first meeting that Raymond was romantically interested in her but Rosa didn't return his affection one of her biggest reservations nations lay in the fact that Raymond was a light skinned black man Rosa didn't find him physically attractive and she also doubted that a man and who could pass for white could really understand her day to day struggles as a dark skinned black woman however as their friendship blossomed Rosa learned that Raymond was passionate civil rights advocate and a member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People War N. double. ACP She was surprised to find that although Raymond dressed well and was an intelligent and thoughtful speaker he barely attended school at all aw thanks to segregation in time a romance blossomed between Raymond and Rosa and they were married on December eighteenth nineteen thirty thirty two when she was nineteen and he was twenty nine Raymond Encourage Rosa to pursue the education he'd never ever had and with his support. She returned to high school and finally completed her degree. Soon after Rosa got a job as a seamstress at a department store you're while Raymond continued on his work with the N. double. ACP although Rosa and Raymond shared beliefs about equal rights initially she kept her her distance from the organization N. Double ACP members feared reprisal from white supremacists and they regularly came to meetings heavily armed should did they need to defend themselves on one occasion. Raymond volunteered to host a meeting at his in Rosa's house shaken by the number of men who arrived lived armed Rosa walked out of the House and sat on the porch hunched over with her head between her knees while the men inside discussed politics Sushi's sat alone in the dark waiting and fear for the first bullets to fly in the moment Rosa was paralyzed by fear violence silence but long-term she grew increasingly frustrated with these sexist assumption that her husband could take risks and join the N. double. ACP while she she needed to be shielded from it so in nineteen forty three thirty year old Rosa finally joined for herself once again sexism reared its head at the N. double ACP as the only woman to attend on her first night. Rosa was tasked with taking taking meeting notes. She was elected secretary at that same meeting but she soon had the opportunity to advocate for women and Black people alike has the chapter began to examine the racial inequality in how police investigated sexual assaults. It was all too common at the time for black men to be falsely accused of raping white women if those men were lucky they'd go to court but still have to plead their case before racist judges judges and juries if they were unlucky. The accused were often lynched by white mobs before their trials began black. Women men also suffered from unjust investigations when they filed reports. The police rarely took their cases seriously rape survivors of have color had few opportunities to pursue justice especially if their attacker was white a particularly egregious case involved a woman named re resc- Taylor on the evening of September third nineteen forty four was walking home from church with two friends when a group of white men abducted abducted her and gang raped her after the assault REC- reported to the police what had happened her friend corroborated the account a few hours later a police officer found the rapists and asked if they had an alibi imen- confess that they'd raped reecey and the police halted the investigation there without pressing charges news of this crime and the polices inaction made it back to the N. Double Lacey Pe- later that month Rosa volunteered to investigate receives case firsthand not only to uncover the truth of the matter but also so to draw national attention to the injustice but before Rosa could capture the attention of the press. She drew scrutiny from the police piece. She stepped off the bus near receives home in Abbeville.

ACP Rosa Rosa Parks Color Rosa Parks Rosa Louise Raymond Parks ACP spotify Montgomery Alabama Vanessa Richardson facebook assault Carter Roy Montgomery Alabama Alabama African Methodist Episcopal Ch Ku Klux Klan Rosas N. Montgomery Industrial School Instagram
Lonzo Ball shows off his new incredibly detailed tattoo sleeve

Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

03:40 min | 1 year ago

Lonzo Ball shows off his new incredibly detailed tattoo sleeve

"Lonzo ball and no longer laker he's down in new orleans part of the big trade but <hes> making some news this week not so much for anything. He's doing but for what he has had done to him. If you haven't seen it it's all over the the internet internet. Lonzo got a sleeve arm sleeve left arm of great kind of <hes> likenesses of historic figures in the african american light. You know these transcendent figures. It's martin luther king junior. It's malcolm x. It's barack bama harriet tubman rosa parks and jackie robinson. You can go look this tweeted out of camp brothers. This is the most stunning tattoo i've ever seen not just not just for the the the the striking but like the quality of it. It is incredibly some of the best best tattoo artwork when you really think about tattooing as art. This is some of the best art work done in this form. I've ever seen scene. It's like i don't under- by st no exaggeration at st butcher tattoos guy named steve butcher. You guys are going to have on yes right coming up tomorrow. He is based on a corona. He's he'll come on tomorrow. Four forty men today's his birthday happy birthday. He's gonna come on today what he's doing other things. He's gonna get a a lot of publicity on his birthday bissau's magic johnson now we did a list of the best tattoos on lonzo ball's body trying to figure out who would be i it would be nickel but it's the will depend. Is it alphabetical well first name or last night. If magic did it for his name yeah magic name yes which is the unconventional way of doing it on top of the unconventional album barack obama yes number one rock will be i <hes> and then you know i'm not doing this. Lebron won every here number two too but i mean this is. This is amazing but like i just the one question when i saw this was i i feel like we are a nation of generally ignorant. People like everyone and like i the pressure to feel like okay. I know my stuff when you're putting these these people on your arm. When you're putting jackie robinson rosa parks malcolm x martin luther king junior barack obama harriet tubman like i love the sentiment behind it but you gotta know your history. You gotta know who these people. I don't know if i agree with that. I feel like oh no see. I disagree with that. You should know but i feel like once you put that on your arm and you go that far out of your way to put that on your arm. Everybody actually assumes that you know if anything anything you just the average person is gonna feel incredibly investment cover up your ignorant. The average person now is going to feel incredibly intimidated intimidated around lonzo to make sure they know their stuff like your going to be the one that feels the pressure to be able to talk about black. So what are you saying. Brian k af via lonzo has martin luther king on his arm you saying he has to go all the m._l._k. Parades from now on you go to whatever the you want the job. I'm just saying like i would feel this enormous pressure to really like unless you gotta understand who these people are and what they did know your history. You told calling me a story about a personal reality. Show wondered how they got the trains underground for harry thomas.

Steve Butcher Lonzo Barack Obama Martin Luther King Martin Luther Barack Bama New Orleans Jackie Robinson Malcolm Lebron Harry Thomas Johnson
"rosa parks" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"rosa parks" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Antiboycott act right which basically said it it it's it's illegal for you to not ride the bus or in this case in that case sure or at least organiz people thing get them to not ride the bus now uh it was something like it was a misdemeanor to organize against somebody carrying out lawful business or whatever so there again onto things that boycott and then infringing on the bus lines franchise in that city right right so what do you do if you are suing or i'm sorry if you're uh if you have an antiboycott act i mean you can't arrest everyone so they go after m i think eighty nine a martin luther king junior an eighty nine other uh other members of the mia and obviously because they're the most like how many of them 24 more ministers they're the most prominent members and he was fined five hundred bucks and a spin a couple of weeks in jail data is very proud of his crime should be yes sure so um now martin luther king as um appealing so you've got a few things going on here you've got rosa parks who has been convicted in now is appealing her for ten dollars plus four dollars in court costs fine for breaking this city ordinance even the she didn't you've got martin luther king now who is appealing his five hundred dollar fine for the boycott in the infringing on the bus lines franchise and then you have something else you have a class action suit called um browder versus gale it was um named after uh oh what's her name the the woman who's the the lead plaintiff in the case her name is a really a s browder uh and the gale in the case was the montgomerie um the montgomerie mayor i think william gayle and we'll talk about that all those take a break we'll talk about this case in most will come back to the the drumbeat of the court system surnamed of kick in.

martin luther king browder william gayle five hundred dollar four dollars ten dollars
"rosa parks" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"rosa parks" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Double acp and an activist herself for years by then she must have been fully aware of the potential outcome yeah which proved to be the actual outcome from her arrest for not giving up her seat but the idea of saying that this was all staged it does a couple of things it's almost like dumb kid a casually racist waived this kind of diminishing it because it it does to things one it takes away her bravery because if if it were if it was staged to make your decision port the whole time there would it would have taken away a measure of of fear um and then secondly it also makes the in double acp look kinda sneaky like they're socially engineering stuff in the pretending like that's not the case so i think by saying like this was staged it really undermines the reality of the situation which is that is brave woman said she had enough yeah and you're right she probably it probably occurred to her the ramifications of this but surely a bitch anything in the moment she was just like nope nope not getting up uh that's what i understand that's what she's always said via so um here's what happened from there she was arrested like i said she gets out on bail um over that weekend a bunch of churches got together and they started talking boycott um on the winner trial comes round as group called the women's political council and they handed out 35000 handbills uh the basically said uh please a children grownups don't ride the bus at all on monday please stay off the buses on monday let's really try and make a difference here because it was i think at the time uh black people made up seventy five percent of the passengers yeah um so it it could have a real impact on like the finances of the bus company kennedy started out as a boycott for one day for the monday following rosa parks arrest which was the the happen on a thursday and they were just going to do.

kennedy seventy five percent one day
"rosa parks" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"rosa parks" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"But rosa parks when she was arrested from what i can tell she was treated like the the uh with the respect that would be afforded to a middleclass black woman at the time in montgomery alabama which is to say with maybe the slightest measure of respect which is to say she was beaten all right waited to jail uh there's a book by the way called claudette colbert on cohen twice toward justice from phil whose or hoofs and uh i think a lot of people these days are trying to china little light on some of the lesserknown figures of the civil rights movement and books would be unwritten stuff like that which is pretty awesome and she she was asked claudette colbert was asked like why why does she think it was rosa parks and not her and she had a whole list of reasons and all of them are pretty legitimate that you know rosa parks is a very again but palatable person to a large swath of people uh and more the point she's also fifteen and the end up alesi p didn't think that a fifteen year old was going to be the most reliable icon to kind of projected into the national forefront yeah not to say um that a lot of people have said over the years that it was staged so because they set rosa parks up the era cetera but they they picked her to do this because she was fouled 'able but they stages whole thing to make which you know would have been fine uh if that sleigh want to kickstart the bus boycott but from all accounts it was a uh in the moment decision cisse said i didn't know that i was right gonna get arrested no one's going to sit down yeah it's just something to happen and so so on the one hand the people who say that now this was staged um the nwpc p and even before then double acp was around buses had been like a target of a black activists in montgomery in particular for decades i think the first bus boycott was in nineteen 100 and it wasn't even a bus who was a trolley line here is what was boycotted so sheep in in having already been the secretary of the end.

montgomery alabama claudette colbert cohen cisse secretary china fifteen year one hand
"rosa parks" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"rosa parks" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Oh man i mean just so brave and so the police did come she was arrested she was booked charged with a disorderly conduct and uh bailed out by clifford durr in edgar nixon who were the local president of the uh the chapter than doubly cp at the time right so um that she's out at least temporarily yeah the next evening so she spent the night in jail i don't i didn't run across any any statements her i any kind of evidence that she was like physically mistreated or verbally abused by the police um but that that seems to be unusual for people who were arrested for not giving up their seats on the bus what that she was not mistreated right yeah i mean i'm sure they didn't throughout the welcome mat no nina no but um the there said of though this is actually this is no worthy here do you wanna talk about how she was not the first person that year not the first woman to have been arrested for not giving up proceed on the bus yeah sure this is something i didn't realize and i think a lot of people didn't realize this but there were at least two other women in montgomery who were arrested that same year uh one was a claudette colbert ensues fifteen at the time it when she pregnant to she got pregnant afterward belka um but she was fifteen and uh she in march was arrested for not giving up her seat on the bus um she said at the time she was scared to death but she fell on one side suggestion or truth is holding her down in on the other side harriet tubman was holding her down and she was not about to get up so they they took her off the bus and arrested her and um apparently she was ridiculed entreated rather roughly um there was another woman her name was mary louise smith i believe she was eighteen at the time she'd been arrested leica in october um for the same thing i didn't get the impression that she was necessarily treated roughly yet but um.

clifford durr edgar nixon president montgomery claudette colbert harriet tubman leica mary louise smith
"rosa parks" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"rosa parks" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"I would probably not forget that bus driver were shot so on on this day she got on and dumb she took her seat in the colored section and when she sat down again she was behind the sign and i guess after a couple of stops and think about this man amid riding the bus and say you have like seven stops think about that pit that would be in your stomach on a daily basis like mug to to get up all right we're gonna have to be humiliated i'm against to give up my c2 white person because even if somebody who was told that they had to get up because the white person needed to sit there even if they just kind of quietly complied the doesn't that doesn't get the point across how they were feeling right then anybody would be humiliated by that and uh i read that one of the reasons why buses not just a montgomery but throughout the segregated south they were kind of flashpoints because they were people were in such close quarters it was the racism was bright up in your face the area in front of a bunch of other people so the humiliation was even more pronounced right so so rosa parks kiss on the bus she takes her seat in the colored section and after a few stops some white people god on and the the driver james blake um said that it was time for them to move that these white people need is seat and he was moving the sign back a at least one row yes so at this point um there's one white dude left that a seat uh so as his custom he made four black folks get out of their two seats on that roe everyone had moved back because there had to be a whole new white road just for this one guy right three of the passengers got a moved uh rosa parks to slid over to the window seat and sat there and he said are you going to get up and she said no i'm not he said well if you don't stand up i'm going to have to call the police have you arrested and she said you may do that his off anna.

montgomery james blake
"rosa parks" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"rosa parks" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Um i guess footsoldiers for lack of a better term are some of the most important people to like in the by kanther episode when you know the the women didn't get nearly the recognition they they should have gotten era purchase keeping that organization running on time soctt but she was more than volunteer though she had some really jobs as some real gravity like she was a an investigator of um because sexual assault of black women by white man um which is a very dangerous thing to do because you're going to liking a interview witnesses to crimes that aren't being prosecuted because they are perpetrated by white people um she was a justice for prisoner advocate she did a lot of like really important stuff and as she was doing this stuff as the secretary for the local end up and double acp she was also making contacts that would later become really important in this nascent civil rights movement that largely grew out of the montgomerie bus boycott we're gonna talk about i had no idea how big of a an event it was the new policy but i didn't realize like how farreaching the effects of it were area uh in this another kind of important thing happened to her as far as integration goes is she got a job type job at maxwell air force base not for a little while which uh because it was a federal institution was integrated and this was the first time that she hid um first time she had worked in it are basically ben and a professional integrated atmosphere uh in that along with the uh highlander folk school which has shown that to uh nineteen 55 she went to a meeting a workshop at the highlander folk school in this is in the hills of tennessee uh and it is still opened the day is the highlander research and education center not an that original building but um it was just this great folk school where they prepared kids for us.

investigator assault secretary highlander folk school tennessee maxwell air force
"rosa parks" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"rosa parks" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"He was also a big influence on her because she said that he was the first activists like real activist that she ever met and i believe this is even before the end up alesi p was in town this guy was like a grassroots activist i and he and his group were basically armed do you remember in the black panthers episode where area like the whole idea of arming yourself came out of the south um though this guy was like raymond parks was one of the the real deal people who originated that um and he and the group of activists that he um he met with uh would they would all come to the house and everyone to have a gun uh and apparently rosa parks had sometimes there were so many guns on the table that she didn't have any place to set the refreshments during these meetings near but these meetings weren't like you know how are we going to get white people back it was how are we going to protect like the scouts boro boys from false rake rape accusations i'm he was a he was an a url lee pre under boise p activists in montgomery yeah and later on was a member of the nwpp uh we should do a showing scouts were boys at some point you uh too much to get into here but the shor version as on a a group of black man on a train were accused of rape uh by two white women who um just made up the story basically uh went to trial a few times n m while he not will will save the outcome okay because they're all kinds of outcomes because what the drought so many times um so she did finish high school and she became involved along with her husband in the montgomerie chapter then aa cp and worked as their uh secretary for fourteen years so not only wishing activists but she was involved in in service of these organizations like she worked for the like whatever you need done i will do and anyone who's ever volunteered like knows that.

raymond parks rape secretary panthers boise montgomery fourteen years
"rosa parks" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"rosa parks" Discussed on What It Takes

"In the bed i got off the bus on the release of course the civil rights movement didn't spring out of thin air that day even if that's the simple version sometimes tolkien textbooks for some time african american community leaders montgomerie had been discussing the need to take action against the city's abusive bus system when rosa parks was arrested word spread quickly she was both secretary end youth director for the local branch of the end aa cp so she was wellknown and well regarded the evening of her arrest her friend fred gray soon to be her lawyer went over to the home of a professor name joanne robinson so they could talk about the situation professor robinson had suffered her own share of humiliations on the bus and she is the one who suggested a busboy here's how fred gray described their conversation to the academy of achievement in early two thousand seventy souza's were renewed to do rose asked the community to stir off of the buses on monday for one day and the air we'll have a meeting and decide where we go from there about this term is getting pretty late on thursday evening all more center friday morning and i said world number one how you gonna get the notice out she said well i'm prepared to prepare notice i'm gonna do a notice that in effect says another black woman has been arrested a trial is going to be monday this as all african americans to stay all for the buses for that day.

rosa parks joanne robinson souza african americans civil rights montgomerie secretary fred gray professor rose one day