20 Burst results for "Roosevelt Institute"

Climate change in the era of coronavirus

Morning Edition

04:17 min | 1 year ago

Climate change in the era of coronavirus

"Kevin as we sheltered home scientists are finding the behavioral changes like telecommuting can significantly reduce emissions but how much good can these changes ultimately make if we're not making them together Naomi arrest kiss is a professor of the history of science at Harvard her books like why trust science explore climate change denial she says climate change in covered nineteen are examples of problems that can't be solved at the local level air pollution doesn't respect state boundaries you put the motion throughout this year it moves because of virus is comparable to this thing didn't stay in China and then we got to America didn't stay in Washington state the rest this is the principle of limited government or leaving it to the states breaks down in the face of these issues and now is the time to remind people the government's role is to solve problems that individuals or states can't solve alone it took federal action she says to abolish slavery and leadership on the federal level to bring us out of the Great Depression it's true government is not the solution to all our problems but it clearly is the solution to many of our biggest problems like public health environmental health which will be most effectively solves all the states can work together rescue since the pandemic proves that Americans are willing to make sacrifices for the greater good and that bodes well for fighting climate change and now my colleague Molly Peterson takes a look at another way that climate change and covert nineteen are connected thanks Peter Riana gun right directs climate policy at the Roosevelt institute is a think tank she says the pandemic has made existing and equities worse if you are low income black and Latino you are far more likely to live near toxic fumes to be exposed to higher levels of toxic pollution which in turn creates a ton of background conditions you're talking about cancers heart disease respiratory issues all of which are linked to higher likelihood having serious complications from corona virus for Andres Soto an organizer with communities for a better environment that vulnerability is always apparent bay area skies are bluer with more people off the road but in Richmond we also see the refinery is still operating apparently a full capacity and there's been absolutely no indication that chevron is going to be cutting back on its pollution while everybody else has to shelter in place he also points out the corona virus has made it harder to pay the rent because of the lack of an efficient social safety net we now find ourselves having to address people's personal needs as our lives have become destabilised by the goal with nineteen and then set us as the pandemic offers a glimpse of what it would look like if the whole planet works together for big solutions here's my friend Danielle vet and she talked to someone with a view about doing that for climate change thanks Molly okay let's get something out of the way while carbon emissions and pollution have plummeted during this pandemic shut down this is not a gift for the earth or any sort of meaningful Denton are carbon output because we got there the wrong way and this can't last we can't have everybody staying in their homes we can't have people thrown out of work we can't have people unable to feed their families Katharine Hayhoe a climate scientist at Texas Tech University says we can however use this as an opportunity to learn this shows is that we do have the power to act and we can't affect incredible change when we do act in the corona virus we recognized a common problem that threatens ourselves our loved ones our communities we want people to be able to live in safety and that's exactly what climate change threatens to we don't know yet Hey ho says if this crisis will spur stronger clean energy and climate policies or make us retreat will this be an opportunity for a Marshall Plan after World War two or the new D. hello or will people use it as an opportunity to return to the past even more strongly rolling back environmental protections as we're seeing today to shore up feeling industries like the coal industry the question is what will we

Kevin
What the Coronavirus Means for Climate Change

Morning Edition

04:22 min | 1 year ago

What the Coronavirus Means for Climate Change

"As we sheltered home scientists are finding that behavioral changes like telecommuting can significantly reduce emissions but how much good can these changes ultimately make if we're not making them together Naomi arrest kiss is a professor of the history of science at Harvard her books like why trust science explore climate change denial she says climate change in covered nineteen are examples of problems that can't be solved at the local level air pollution doesn't respect state boundaries put pollution throughout this year it moves because of virus is comparable to this thing didn't stay in China and then we got to America didn't stand Washington state the rest this is the principle of limited government or leading into the state's breaks down in the face of these issues and now is the time to remind people the government's role is to solve problems that individuals for states can't solve alone it took federal action she says to abolish slavery and leadership on the federal level to bring us out of the Great Depression it's true government is not the solution to all our problems but it clearly is the solution to many of our biggest problems like public health environmental health which will be most effectively solves if all the states can work together rescue since the pandemic proves that Americans are willing to make sacrifices for the greater good and that bodes well for fighting climate change and now my colleague Molly Peterson takes a look at another way that climate change in covert nineteen are connected thanks Peter Riana gun right directs climate policy at the Roosevelt institute is a think tank she says the pandemic has made existing and equities worse if you are low income black and Latino you are far more likely to live near toxic fumes to be exposed to higher levels of toxic pollution which in turn creates a ton of background conditions you're talking about cancers heart disease respiratory issues all of which are linked to higher likelihood of having serious complications from corona virus for Andres Soto an organizer with communities for a better environment that vulnerability is always apparent bay area skies are bluer with more people off the road but in Richmond we also see the refinery is still operating apparently a full capacity and there's been absolutely no indication that chevron is going to be cutting back on its pollution while everybody else has to shelter in place he also points out the corona virus has made it harder to pay the rent because of the lack of an efficient social safety net we now find ourselves having dressed people's personal needs as our lives have become destabilized by recorded nineteen MM set us as the pandemic offers a glimpse of what it would look like if the whole planet works together for big solutions here's my friend Danielle van she talked to someone with a view about doing that for climate change thanks Molly okay let's get something out of the way while carbon emissions and pollution have plummeted during this pandemic shut down this is not a gift for the earth or any sort of meaningful Denton are carbon output because we got there the wrong way and this can't last we can't have everybody staying in their homes we can't have people thrown out of work we can't have people unable to feed their families Katharine Hayhoe a climate scientist at Texas Tech University says we can however use this as an opportunity to learn this shows is that we do have have the power to act and we can't affect incredible change when we do act in the corona virus we recognized a common problem that threatens ourselves our loved ones our communities we want people to be able to live in safety and that's exactly what climate change threatens to we don't know yet Hey ho says if this crisis will spur stronger clean energy and climate policies or make us retreat will this be an opportunity for a Marshall Plan after World War two or the new deal or will people use it as an opportunity to return to the past even more strongly rolling back environmental protections as we're seeing today to shore up feeling industries like the coal industry the question is what will we do that part of history is yet to be written we all will be writing it

Trump Promotes Low Unemployment and Rising Wages in State of the Union

Morning Edition

04:37 min | 1 year ago

Trump Promotes Low Unemployment and Rising Wages in State of the Union

"I'm David Brancaccio New York president trump address both houses of Congress last night into a quick can be seen as a victory lap on America's place in the world and the state of the economy tonight I said for you to share the incredible results jobs are blooming incomes asorio poverty is plummeting crime is falling confidence is surging and our country is thriving and highly respected again he said he was thrilled to report the US economy is quote the best it is ever been it does need to be said that average growth in the economy as measured by gross domestic product during this administration is much lower than it was under presidents Bill Clinton and Ronald Reagan however the president headline the low unemployment rate market places Nancy Marshall ganzer joins us here from Washington with some context on that even the president said the unemployment rate is at the lowest level in half a century that's true the president also talked about what he called the blue collar Boone wages are rising fast and wonderfully they are rising fastest for low income workers who have seen a sixteen percent pay increase since my election but which is aren't rising as much as they normally would with an unemployment rate this low in the present also talked about factories he said his administration was restoring manufacturing is that right well the president said the US has gained twelve thousand new factories under his administration that number is a little off but the bigger issue is most of these factories employed five people or fewer the government has a very broad definition of a factory including things like bakeries candy stores and custom tailors also the institute for supply management's manufacturing index of more traditional factories fell for five straight months last year although there was an increase last month Nancy thank you the president's headline case that these are now with the good times has weight however this could be a risky strategy to pitch to people who have their own gauges of the economy we have our own stakes states of the union and may judge this in part on how their own household economy is doing Felicia Wong is president CEO of the liberal leaning nonpartisan think tank the Roosevelt institute thanks for joining us thank you David so it is the lowest unemployment in fifty years people on the left and right thought the trading system with China was broken and there's a phase one deal now with China wasn't the president right to show off his achievements I think the real argument it's hard to understand what's going on under the hood of the economy first of all trump inherited a recovery that's important to remember he didn't mess it up which is good they're also doesn't mean that he deserves any credit for some of that things that are happening out there that are intact better for American workers the question is whether the groceries yet there is either shared or last name and we look under the hood growth really isn't shared wages are barely rising even though they are better at the bottom adjusted for inflation we just for workers are up in less than one percent which is worse than under president Obama and more importantly wages are rising in part because we see minimum wage increases at the state level the president did refer to the fact that the lower half of incomes are improving but you're saying yeah in part because of increases in minimum wage which the ministration unlike that's right you have not seen a federal minimum wage increase because the Republicans opposed it but what you have seen in dozens and dozens of states and municipalities across the country is increases in the minimum wage pushed for by labor unions and other kinds of movement actors and this is a lot of what's actually driving wages are at the bottom where you really see growth in health care and other industries but a lot of those jobs are very precarious and a lot of that a lot of health care jobs are actually very low wage all right Felicia Wong head of the Roosevelt institute a liberal leaning nonpartisan think tank and we also spoke to conservative economist Glen Hubbard who used to be the chair of the council of economic advisers under George W. bush the marketplace morning report podcast feed has that if you missed it on the

New York Congress David Brancaccio President Trump
"roosevelt institute" Discussed on The Friend Zone

The Friend Zone

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"roosevelt institute" Discussed on The Friend Zone

"Less people would be on it in that would redistribute how that money is spent basically. And then the second one is the VAT this value added tax. He was talking about and this will be based on the production of goods or services of business for deuces. So it's a tax. He says it's a fair tax. It makes it much harder for large corporations who are experts at hiding profits and income to avoid paying their fair share of taxes similar to. Elizabeth Warren was saying the real her version of real corporate tax. He's calling the VAT the value added tax. So we would essentially take the money from Amazon and the like he wants to take it from the welfare recipients. And the like I mean that part I was like. Dog. I told you you've been talking to Yang from down the street item. Her what he's talking about. No, he also creams that by doing this by having this an implementing this universal basic income putting money directly into the hands of Americans consumers would grow the economy. He thinks it would just be the natural result. He says Roosevelt instituted the Roosevelt institute projected that the economy would grow by approximately two point five trillion dollars and create four point six million new jobs. This would generate approximately five hundred six hundred billion in new revenue from economic growth inactivity. I would like to see how they arrived at those conclusions like the break our likes to see. He's saying that we currently spend over one trillion dollars on healthcare incarceration, homelessness services. And the like he feels that we would save one hundred two hundred billion as people would take better care of themselves. Face anna. Void the emergency room jail. And the street would generally be more functional. He feels that these will be the results of everyone having this basic income because everybody having an extra thousand dollars a month. That's his Pat form. Please. Who's next? This this. I mean, come on. This sounds like a great, I think in theory. It's fantastic. But I would love for charter too. Just for meeting know that at minimum have a thousand dollars. 'cause we know as creatives, especially there's Evan flow to pay. We have months that we are living like hangs. And then months, they you don't know what's going to happen McDonald. You know, what I mean, you trying to go home to eat your friends, food or whoever. So because of that it would be so nice to know that you have that at least. But when I really read down the breakdown of weather. This is coming you see how with Elizabeth Warren felt like there was like remind fans like concrete. It was like that's why I was saying earlier that with hers if more reliable, and I could understand them like, okay, I see where it's coming from see how this can be done with this one. I don't know like a little bit more fluff. Especially the part about like. People would you know, not be homeless take care of them better care of themselves. Well, I've seen you Yang. So what are your thoughts on universal basic income? Even just as an idea. It's a great idea. But honestly, I also get scared 'cause like you say it would be amazing for thousand dollar check to everyone. Just because you're you, but I hate to be like this. But you know, niggers, right? You know, Nick is like, and I would have to see I guess what other things would be like alleviated or how that would change. And like 'cause I feel like getting extra care month. Some people are going, oh anchorman and get my nails done this third..

Elizabeth Warren Roosevelt Yang Roosevelt institute Amazon Nick Evan McDonald thousand dollars five trillion dollars one trillion dollars thousand dollar
"roosevelt institute" Discussed on Left, Right & Center

Left, Right & Center

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"roosevelt institute" Discussed on Left, Right & Center

"There are things that don't get done and people lose confidence in certain aspects of the performance of government ended. If ended affects the economy and all sorts of ways people people aren't getting paid if we're if we're going to do this over and over again for a couple of years that that could be significantly costly for the real. And for a lot of ordinary people's lives. Absolutely. I have a huge worry about that. I do think that this shutdown has helped to educate many Americans who don't usually think about the role of government in the economy or in their daily lives about those things. But that doesn't really help the fact that this relationship continues to really sour the only small hope I have for any of this is the president is gaining a measure of respect for leader Pelosi this little revealing quote, which Twitter's made a big deal about. But I think there's something to it. The president said the other day, you know, as I call her Nancy so Twitter, saying, oh, the president's nicknamed for Nancy Pelosi is Nancy which is so unlike this president, of course, but that says to me that you know, he is going to see her as somebody that he's going to have to deal with do what do you what do you make of this, Richard? It looks to me like the president doesn't know what to do with Nancy Pelosi. The times did note he he tried to nickname for her during the campaign tried calling her high tax high crime Nancy Pelosi. Did not send this better nickname Kimmy. I think in the state of the union thing, which was a subplot here as he finally said in a tweed, it's her private of whether or not me or not. And the fact is it is her perogatives. She has the power just can't just walk in and give the speech without a joint resolution. So at at that level might be a occurring to him that you know, this. This is a a real thing in his is a real check on him at a certain level. I I find it funny. The president seems convinced that he can play Chuck Schumer Nancy Pelosi against each other. And he's been tweeting all this stuff sort of insulting Chuck Schumer's manhood. Calling him a puppet of Nancy Pelosi sort of insinuating that Schumer wants to make deals with him. But Nancy won't let him I I guess because that would drive Trump crazy if Trump were in that position. But I I see no indication at all that Schumer is the least bit bothered by any of that. I'm going to take a quick break. I will be back with rich Lowry of national review and Felicia wall or the Roosevelt institute to talk about how the shutdown is affecting aviation and others. Specific services of government. You're listening to left right writing center. What do you think? Share your thoughts on today's show on our Facebook page or tweet us at L RC KCRW and download.

Nancy Pelosi president Chuck Schumer Twitter Kimmy Richard Facebook Roosevelt institute Felicia wall Trump
"roosevelt institute" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"roosevelt institute" Discussed on KCRW

"Not Trump. What should the pitch be from Democrats is it basically a restoration of the Obama era policy agenda? I don't think so I think it has to be more than that. I was a member of the administration and a card carrying supporter and architect of of parts, certainly the economic parts of that agenda. So I'm not distancing myself from it. But I think there needs to be something much more bold to respond to where the country is where Trump is and decades of I would say lack of progress against the structural inequality and power dynamics, racial dynamics that plagued the the country today and some Felicia. I mean, obviously, that's something that you and folks at the Roosevelt institute work on day to day what what is an agenda like that mean because I I think back to the two thousand sixteen election, and you had this weird messaging situation for Democrats were they're basically trying to say things are good. But still. A lot of things need to be fixed, and we need change. But not too much change. What are those transformative changes in a country to do more than just not be Trump? Right. Well, I'm going to get back to that not tweaking around the edges agenda that Jared alluded to. But it's it's worth going back to Lamaism for just a second. Because I think that the funny thing is by the end of his term, even Obama left Obama's on. Right. You started in the beginning of two thousand eight to two thousand twelve with a kind of tendency toward a grand bargain. He saw the composition of the stimulus which were mostly tax cuts didn't really show up in people's paychecks is kind of assuming a very short recession all of that turned out to be wrong. And I also think that you know, disposition really the idea that Obama lead with which is bring everyone to the table gift Silicon Valley, the benefit of the doubt, give pharmaceutical companies in the benefit of the doubt, you know, that there are pieces of that that just didn't work out. But by the second term Obama was actually starting to set the table for the kind of. Bold policy agenda that Jared was talking about you know, he recognized the seriousness of the problem by twenty thirteen fourteen. He started to focus on inequality. He really talked about free community college. You talked about a a expansion. So if you get to today, right where you see the energy and the Democratic Party around a green new deal and Medicare expansion and free college, you can kind of see the roots in that in the learnings of the Obama administration was does that sound right to you? I I note the words Medicare expansion from Felicia there, which is probably not how you would describe your preferred healthcare policy. No. I mean, I think it's a good takeaway that the Medicaid expansions those were the actual pieces of the Affordable Care Act that worked really well and proved to be pretty politically resilient, and those actually changed.

Obama Jared Trump Obama administration Felicia Roosevelt institute Democratic Party Lamaism Medicare Medicaid
"roosevelt institute" Discussed on Slate Money

Slate Money

04:31 min | 3 years ago

"roosevelt institute" Discussed on Slate Money

"Competitors. So I the reports from the Roosevelt institute and the national employment law project, both progressive groups we can agree. And one of the headline findings was sixty percent of profits that public companies make our go to share buybacks, which is astounding. The fact is while that was happening, I think over the past decade and a half CEO pay is up nine hundred thirty, seven percent and wages haven't gone anywhere. The simple fact is these companies should pay their workers more on the do pay their work as well and in the in, if those work is a senior management, yeah, and this is the thing which I really which I don't think report was nearly clear enough about is the these stock buybacks spending on wages right to the executives and go. So basically every single the way that every one of these companies works is it doles out enormous stock grants to senior executives, and those dot grunts naturally dilute the show Chaib as the number of outstanding. And so in order to offset dilution they buy back the Hsieh's in the market. And so basically effectively, what that. Doing if you give out stock to your senior employees name, buy back the stock in the market. That's the same. Just giving that money to you'll senior stock buybacks are basically back door raises to executives at the expense of regular employees who are toiling away for in the case of McDonald's or some of these other companies minimum wage which hasn't been raised in, I think over a decade which you cannot even live on. Meanwhile, they just got this huge plein blowing tax break from the government. Of course what you're saying possibly makes rational sons. Perhaps if your job is to maximize profits. But it's interesting to me that also stock buybacks where legal in before Ronald ridiculous illegal though, but I don't think it was because what we're seeing now is all this value going to basically really, really rich people, excess profits going to the is the executives. And you know the. People who own stock, which say, one thing because I think we are confusing a lot of things here a little bit. So I agree with you that if you can show that the employees were being paid in stock based compensation or who are being paid, very high salaries are not adding that much value to the company. Then I think it's fine to argue that you know what they are. They're being overpaid. Now when you're talking about CEO's and this is why I do sometimes criticize the way CEO pay is compared to worker pay is because if a CEO is doing a good job, they can add so much value to the company that they can pay themselves pay for themselves multiple times over that doesn't always happen. Sometimes you overpay your CEO, you end up with lower value and then clearly that's fired. So that's just one thing. They're also if you're talking about the amount of share buybacks. This was one thing they actually mentioned in the article and didn't seem to quite get what that meant is that was actually more than a lot of the money they were making. And the reason for that is they borrowed money, but I want to explain why. That that's actually kind of important because what really is happening there is this is a decision by the CFO too often alter the capital structure of the company wanted increase leverage in the company because rates are super low, and I want to jump in here and say, you can call altering the half to structure. I can call it. Thanks, Vatian. Oh, tax optimization, something. What you have here is to different things which are basically both trying to avoid taxes won is raising debt rather than equity, because debt is fully tax deductible and equity isn't. So what you do borrow money raised and then you buy dog. So you have less equity. And then the second thing is you would turn money to shareholders in the form of buybacks dividends because by a generally reflected in capital gains, whereas dividends income and capital gains rates lower than income tax rates. So in both cases, what you're doing is basically reducing the. Tax, you pay to the government and ultimately to society as a whole. So you know, it is tanks voice in the same way that you could argue when I buy a home and I'm getting the mortgage interest deduction renting tax evasion if you want to call it that that's fine..

CEO Roosevelt institute Hsieh McDonald CFO seven percent sixty percent
"roosevelt institute" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:43 min | 3 years ago

"roosevelt institute" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Is an agreement that benefits the people of this country and now months later the trump administration in house republicans are violating the spirit of that agreement it is not a serious way to govern this is money for our children not for the president to claw back to placate fervent conservatives who maintain their drumbeat on twitter and tv and what do republicans get for breaking their word going back on their promises and taking from children while according to the congressional budget office mr speaker the actual impact of this recision package they appear to be beholden to the lobbyists and the insiders who have profited so exorbitantly from that gift and according to the center for budget and policy priorities eighty three percent of the tax scam benefits will go to the top one percent and those big boosts to pay jacks they have not materialized you look at walmart they spent twenty billion dollars on stock buybacks for their shareholders yet according to the roosevelt institute at walmart instead dedicated that money to workers they could have raised wages to more than sixteen dollars an hour they did not mr speaker budgets spending appropriations and recissions reflect our values and it is clearer than ever that president trump speaker ryan and the republicans in the congress value corporations and the wealthy not people who work for a living or those who are the most vulnerable they rigged the roles for the rich and rob from the poor to pay for it congress must reject president trump's proposal and put forth policies that work for the middle class and families and for those who are most vulnerable not balanced the budget on their backs the american people would be five bedrooms served if congressional republicans joined with democrats to fund critical investments in education healthcare infrastructure and protecting our retirement programs and when teachers are protesting across the country for fair pay republicans wanted to go backwards when americans are stuck in jobs at do not pay enough to live on republicans want to go backwards when forty percent of households cannot afford the basics of a modern middle class lifestyle republicans want to go backwards mr speaker it is unconscionable and.

president twitter walmart roosevelt institute ryan trump congress twenty billion dollars eighty three percent sixteen dollars forty percent one percent
"roosevelt institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"roosevelt institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Brian lehrer on wnyc and don't let the headline on my next guests article fool you nation magazine article called like twenty eighteen might not be the year of the woman that sounds like pessimism about the chances of a female blue wave riding into congress and other offices but what is really is practical advice about how to maximize the chances of victory for progressive women candidates especially ones who are new to running for office so let's hear some of that advice and related to some current issues like healthcare and the roseanne tweet perhaps with me now julie kohler the senior vice president for the democracy alliance of progressive donor network and felicia wong president and ceo of the roosevelt institute hi julie hi felicia welcome to wnyc today thank you so much for coming on hi brian it's great to be with you hi there and let's talk first about the interest level you cite a stat of thirty six thousand women forty times the number in the last election cycle who want to run themselves or work on a campaign how in your words would you describe the core set of issues driving so many women into the arena the bottom line is that we've seen incredible energy and activism from women not just in this election cycle but really sense the twenty sixteen election you know driving a hallway of congressional advocacy and marching and really you know really engaging in all levels of civic life and that's incredibly exciting and what we're seeing now is the election is coming closer is that that energy is being electrolytes and record number of women are raising their hands and saying i want to run for office and i wanna make change in that way so we're in a real moment where i think we have an opportunity to change not only the partisan representation but the gender composition of our elected officials and that's that's you know much to cheer on that but what i really wanted to highlight in this article is that the progressive community lacks sufficient infrastructure and investment not just to support this current wave of talent but to support the next generation of promising women progressive leaders and to.

Brian lehrer congress roseanne senior vice president roosevelt institute nation magazine julie kohler president and ceo
"roosevelt institute" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:45 min | 3 years ago

"roosevelt institute" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"And strengthening the middle class his book fair shot that the tacna tax rates roughly that level are what we had for the decades following the second world war when we had immense economic growth and that economic growth was broadly shared we had broad based prosperity so this for me is not about pitchforks coming for the rich it's about the it's not what we owe one another i think we all should invest in an america to provide economic opportunity to all americans and what's happened right now in our economy because of the way that we've structured it it's just become egregiously unfair and the gains are consistently going to the top one percent into the top point one percent rather to everyone else in this is bringing it back into line you mentioned the you know the upside down taxco that we have you know the the cost of what i'm talking about over the next decade is just a little bit more than the cost of the trunk tax reform bill that was passed at the end of last year so anybody who's out there who thinks this is like you know such farfetched idea this is far too expensive i think the question really is is what are our priorities as a country is i if it's so easy to you know think about one half trillion two trillion dollar tax cut on corporations why can't we think about that when it comes to working people in fact i very much think that we should and it is doable it is expensive to be clear and i think it would be a very meaningful change in how the tax code is structured but i think is the movement to repeal and replace last year's bill grows and we move into twenty twenty twenty twenty one hopefully we can see opportunities to do something i've been very impressed with the idea that the people living in poverty that people on the edge who would be beneficiaries the of this five hundred dollars a month are likely to spend almost all very high marginal propensity to spend to consume whereas people at the top the top one percent aren't so you think that from a dynamic perspective the economy they grow more quickly we're robustly with this without well there's some research that suggests exactly that that the roosevelt institute did a study last year.

america roosevelt institute one percent trillion two trillion dollar five hundred dollars
"roosevelt institute" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"roosevelt institute" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"The freedom dividend if you include the money were currently spending on income support then the rest of the money comes because as the economy grows by as much as a couple trillion according to the roosevelt institute and it's common sense most americans have give them a thousand dollars a month they're going to spend the vast majority of it in their towns on their children on tutors classes restaurants games like the money is going to get spent it's going to grow the consumer economy our current revenue gdp ratio was about twenty five percent so we're gonna get twenty five percent of that wrote back in tax revenue which would be hundreds of billions of dollars and then we're currently spending almost one trillion dollars on healthcare incarceration homelessness services and all of those costs go down with a freedom dividend because people who are getting a thousand dollars a month are less likely to wind up in the emergency room as their primary care less likely to wind up in prison costing us all tens of thousands of dollars per year it's actually much more efficient and inexpensive to keep americans functioning than it is to allow anyone to get point where they become dysfunctional and ended up hitting our institutions in various ways that's not freedom dividend is much more affordable than the skeptic stink in large part because the money goes directly to us i think too i think we spent somewhere between four and seven trillion dollars in the afghan and iraq wars alone now have to stop the epic mismanagement we are still the richest country in the world we just have to stop shooting ourselves in the foot.

roosevelt institute iraq twenty five percent thousand dollars seven trillion dollars one trillion dollars
"roosevelt institute" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"roosevelt institute" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"In the world doesn't have much at all i can actually say hey we didn't make money this quarter no income tax and that's our system and this is really really unintelligent so what we need to do is we need to implement a value added tax which is being used by every other industrialized country in the world except for us because a value added tax and all of a sudden amazon pays tax on every transaction robot trucking company pays tax on every mile our economy is so vast that a value added tax at half the european level would generate about seven hundred billion dollars in revenue which pays for the majority of the freedom dividend if you include the money were currently spending on income support he then the rest of the money comes because as the economy grows by as much as a couple trillion according to the roosevelt institute and it's common sense most americans have give them a thousand dollars a month they're going to spend the vast majority of it in their town on their children on tutors classes restaurants games like the money is going to get spent is going to grow the consumer economy our current revenue to gdp ratio was about twenty five percent so we're gonna get twenty five percent of that growth back in tax revenue which would be hundreds of billions of dollars and then we're currently spending almost one trillion dollars on healthcare incarceration homelessness services and all of those costs go down with a freedom dividend because people who are getting a thousand dollars a month are less likely to wind up in the emergency room as their primary care are less likely to wind up in prison costing us all tens of thousands of dollars per year it's actually much more efficient and inexpensive to keep americans functioning than it is to allow anyone to get to a point where they become dysfunctional and end up hitting our institutions in various ways the freedom dividend is much more affordable than the skeptics think and lawrence part because the money goes directly to us and i think too i think we spent somewhere between four and seven trillion dollars in the afghan and iraq wars alone now have to stop the epic mismanagement we are still the richest country in the world we just have to stop shooting ourselves in the foot.

amazon roosevelt institute lawrence iraq twenty five percent thousand dollars seven hundred billion dollars seven trillion dollars one trillion dollars
"roosevelt institute" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:53 min | 3 years ago

"roosevelt institute" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"To twenty sixteen productivity went up seventy three point seven percent wages only went up twelve point three percent and he talks about how you know monopoly is when the seller's all get together and concentrate their power and prevent people from paying you know force people to pay high prices for things i mean you know we're seeing this with with the pharmaceutical industry has cetera monop sunny as opposed to a monopoly is when the buyers are concentrated in this case the buyers being the employers they note a recent paper from the roosevelt institute found that the average level of concentration and labor markets is forty five percent higher than the threshold for highly concentrated markets that are used by antitrust regulators only one in five workers is subject to a non wanted to excuse me fully one in five workers is subject to a non compete clause a tool for employers to push wages down by forbidding workers from getting jobs with their competitors i mean this this is this is how bizarre it is this is how how bad it is major franchises also forbid their franchisees from hiring workers away from one another so we've got an economy with no jobs not a good thing anyhow we'll be back i think i think we've got our phones working stick around we'll be right back tom harmon here here's what you might have missed on our program today cliff what's up i really admire the way you handle yourself tom dealing with you know the right wingers i learned from you know arguing politics with my dad starting around the time i was sixteen when i decided i was no longer a republican but i was it was a socialist but we argue politics until the day he died he died a republican what we learned both by dad and i was how to debate how to argue on a fight without without hurting each other and so that our relationship was still intact after we were done and i'm trying to model at for people i really think that we need to learn how to do that and and so you know when you see conservatives on this show and you see me debating them and you think maybe i'm being too nice to them or whatever keep that in mind we these this is a skill set that you need when thanks giving comes in crazy uncle ralph's shows up for more information about our podcast go to tom harmon dot com slash podcast.

roosevelt institute tom harmon ralph forty five percent seven percent three percent
"roosevelt institute" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"roosevelt institute" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Higher so i do think that there's a there's increasingly a sense of responsibility now that's probably more on the left then on the right but my hope is to appeal not only to sense of moral responsibility but also a sense of pragmatism and by that i mean what we know about what creates longterm economic growth is you know is that consumer spending is the biggest driver of that and if you put one hundred dollars in the pockets really of anybody in your description there anybody in the middle or at the bottom they're going to spend most of that money on whatever is most urgent for them housing healthcare education you put one hundred dollars in the pockets of the one percent and we know it goes into it goes into a bank account because to work and complex financial moves but it's not part of the productive economy so there was a study that the roosevelt institute did last year that modeled out if you gave five hundred dollars for guaranteed income to every american what would happen to the economy and the model shows that over the next eight years gdp would grow by seven percent seven which is just adamant based just on that amount and so my my argument is that i think indy long run a guaranteed income is good for everyone certainly for the middle class and the poor who need the funds the most but it should also be good for.

roosevelt institute indy one hundred dollars five hundred dollars seven percent eight years one percent
"roosevelt institute" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"roosevelt institute" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"Institution right beg that's what they say so now they have this bill right they have all the leverage on this bell bank lobbyists are like man we really want this bill we love this bill their bases like fuck you guys don't vote for this bill they could do it they could say you know what we'll give you this bill but in exchange donald trump you gotta get mulvaney out there you've got a point director with some bipartisan support maybe even direct someone who who the community banking lobby is comfortable with but who's going to come down on the big banks like like you could do this that is how you legislate and they're not doing that they are just taking a dive and like barney frank and people who i've spoken to you know who were influential national party i think they're being polite about it like it's it's true that this bill is like not the end of the world and you don't need to burn down your house over john tester voting for it but this no there is no case for like they're not the moderates the cavill this leverage and they are not using it to achieve anything that is in any way defense of all other then make bank lobbyists so this actually leads and our questions curious as there's even during reporting on this if you've thoughts on is how this became like v bipartisan thing like you can start at us off with this in charlie about like you know course this is not what people are demanding i found a piece by mike consul at the roosevelt institute interesting where he wrote about the situation that community banks are currently in and it doesn't seem that bad so this is reading from his article where he says loan balances for community banks rose by seven point seven percent over the past twelve months this is more than twice the loan growth in large banks which is which was three point three percent over seventy five percent of community banks increased their lone balances from a year ago the fact is community banks aren't struggling in the way many policy and industry advocates to.

donald trump mulvaney director barney frank roosevelt institute seventy five percent seven percent three percent twelve months
"roosevelt institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"roosevelt institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In the hands of lowincome families in general is probably the best idea i can think of to improve the lives of as many people with one action jan emailed love this idea but how do you suggest implementing it i don't see the one percent or the point one percent willingly going along chris well i think where we know from economics is that when you put more money in the hands of working people the economy grows and does better there's a recent study from the roosevelt institute that showed if we provided guaranteed income of about five hundred dollars tall all americans it would increase gdp by about seven points over the next eight years i say seven points of the next eight years roughly appointed year which is a remarkable and and the the reason that that's true is that if you take a hundred dollars or five hundred dollars and you put it in the hands of someone who's working hard to make ends meet they're probably going to spend much of that on care housing health care whatever is most stressful for them if you give another tax breaks to corporations to the wealthy me we don't we don't have to to to postulate about what they do we know from the past forty years at it goes into things like stock buybacks in corporate jets and the bank account pocket feeling it it it doesn't go into the productive economy to create that kind of growth so in my view the way that we have to make the case for this is not only the the the moral and ethical case that everybody should be able to be able to make their own decisions about their own lives in their own time but also the practical way that this is a critical way to grow the grow the economy but chance question was about getting the one percent of the point one percent to willingly go along i mean we've spoken of some people on this program nakane our who's a billionaire investor who's talked a lot about the pitchforks being at the gate who say that the one percent better smarten up and do something about this before we go the way of.

roosevelt institute one percent five hundred dollars eight years hundred dollars forty years
"roosevelt institute" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

03:07 min | 3 years ago

"roosevelt institute" Discussed on WCPT 820

"No and we are back on the euro hour this is richard rj at and one of the persistent questions troubling policy makers or those policymakers they continue to care about working people in this country any way is why is it with what appears to be a full employment recovery wages are still so sluggish and so many people are are are struggling to see uh income growth our next guest is an economist who has coauthored when i think is a very significant paper on that topic marshall stein bomb is the research director and the fellow at the roosevelt institute in new york city and he has recently written a paper on as i say coauthored paper on labour market concentration and we talk about that he joins us now first of all marshall thanks for coming on the program very glad to be back on the program and we're glad to have you back now uh this uh this mi overstating well it probably modesty forbids you from answering but uh i really think this is such an important issue uh just stagnation of wages and basically what i've fell you and your co author is uh were uh were pointing to was the nature of the labour market in so many areas of this country makes it very hard the even with what seems like full employment for demand to go up in a way that allows people's wages to get stronger um first of all did i state that correctly from your point of view and secondly how we can talk about why that is you did stated correctly the issue that we uncovered by is essentially that there are too few employers or at least two few employers posting jobs i'm in a large variety of occupations and more or less all over the country and that has a significant impact on reducing wages uh so it may be the case that there are employers who have current employees who work in the occupation in which are looking for a job but does died employers aren't posting vacancies in hiring new workers as frequently as frequently if at all um and consequently a employers have market power we interpret they in him they have market power on in the labour market and this enables them to to reduce wages and suggest to be clear we're not talking about a lack of jobs there could be a.

richard rj research director roosevelt institute marshall stein new york
"roosevelt institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"roosevelt institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That's generally making small loans around town marketplace's ryan kylo thank you as we approach the trump administration's one year anniversary were looking more broadly at the economic agenda ahead tomorrow prominent conservative voice will help us with what's next today what do the democrats have felicia wong as president and ceo of the progressive leaning non partisan think tank the roosevelt institute thanks for coming in thanks for having me the republicans think they nailed it they got their tax overhauls not very popular and we have and parsing its pluses and minuses for weeks here but you talk to a lot of prominent democrats what are they got for the new year gifted democrats are really encroaching on the idea that let's really hurting our economy is corporations that are really healthy anymore there hoarding rather than investing and that's a huge problem for americans that's a huge problem for people who want jobs and economic security the big question david is when are they going to get there they're and whether there's gonna be a coherent worldview behind those piece of an agenda that will be lasting beyond any single election cycle you know when companies try to sell you something they brand it and they come up with a sink message for it the democrats have there yet i mean what a chuck schumer the new york senator use in the last year oh he said a better deal that good enough i think what's more important to talk about within the context of the better deal are the components of what senator schumer and his fellow democrats are really getting at he talked about antitrust in the problems of corporations that had just gotten to bag you you know whether or not that has yet to be branded that is a longer conversation to have but also we really have to come in act something as abstract as antitrust corporations getting too big in that view with people's lives you have to make the next connection which is therefore you're not getting paid as much as you should or something on thank you definitely have to do that i don't think that's the world the easiest case they make that's why i go back to this question a world fail but people do understand that overwhelming corporate power something that they don't really feel comfortable with they don't really wanna live with but in order for.

ryan kylo david senator schumer felicia wong president and ceo roosevelt institute coherent new york senator one year
"roosevelt institute" Discussed on Left, Right & Center

Left, Right & Center

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"roosevelt institute" Discussed on Left, Right & Center

"Supporters for this podcast include sayek the southern california institute of architecture located in the arts district where arts science and industry converge and new futures unfold insomniacs master of arts and fiction and entertainment one year program students work with world renowned professionals in filmed fiction animation marketing games and documentary making to build new forms of architectural practice learn more at sayaka dot edu forward slash fiction back in with left right and center i'm your host josh barrow on leftist katrina vanden heuvel of the nation magazine on the raiders rich lowry editor of national review and we're joined by mike cox old roosevelt institute which is a think tank on the left uh there's been some pretty significant action in congress this week the senate voted fifty to fifty with vert vice president mike pence breaking the thai to overturn a wolf from the consumer financial protection bureau this rule would have prevented banks from enforcing arbitration clauses were consumers agree in some fine print when they opened an account or whatever uh not to have lawsuits against those banks not to pursue participation class actions instead to go to arbitration instead of court mike what's the practical effect for consumers of this vote malta continuation of the status quo a reverts back to out though cfpb proposed rule last year had several years of studying per doddfrank uh and then announced this rule and because of the fact that it came around the time of a presidential transfer congress has a special ability to repeal it and to prevent the cfpb for making a similarlysituated rule so the status quo will continue and i think there's been a lot of discontent with that i think there's been a lot of reporting showing the strong prevalence of these kinds of fine print clauses a big scandals at wells fargo and equi facts have shown that they really do impact people were on there is a brief period words cmic people could not sue wells fargo for opening fake accounts in their names because those drink accounts had these clauses in it.

mike pence wells fargo malta mike cox rich lowry forward slash master of arts southern california institute cfpb josh barrow vice president senate congress roosevelt institute national review editor raiders katrina vanden heuvel one year
"roosevelt institute" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"roosevelt institute" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Now from the one and yet yes let's not stolen from it is welcome back to the majority report michael brooks joining us now is marshall stein dumb he's a research director and fellow at the roosevelt institute marshall thanks for joining us thank you for having me so morsel let's start at the basics you've a really good piece in the jacket than the tax to be we need what is the purpose of modern republican tax policy and i guess which is take it back to the reagan era my interpretation of what the republicans and the broad conservative movement have been up to in tax policy over the last forty or so years has basically been to re concentrate power in the hands of the wealthy uh that is to say the owners and executives of major corporations and their errors on and anyone who exerts power over the economy and the other stakeholders in the corporations but they owned and run um i think basically what happened was that in the new deal ending in the progressive era um their power was tamed by many policies by especially by progressive taxation because as i explained in that peace i view crank up progressive tax taxes high enough you basically make it defacto illegal to be rich i'm and once it's defacto illegal to be rich that weakens the bargaining power of the richest stakeholders in society um and so what happened was the united states adopted a strong progressive tax regime in that had a profound impact on the distribution of power in the economy i'm there was one that i certainly franklin roosevelt political enemies felt acutely end hated him for i and i think that after the new deal after two uh the roosevelt presidency was over um day said about sh.

research director tax policy the new deal united states michael brooks marshall stein roosevelt institute reagan roosevelt