5 Burst results for "Roosevelt Elementary School"

"roosevelt elementary school" Discussed on 60 Minutes

60 Minutes

05:31 min | 3 weeks ago

"roosevelt elementary school" Discussed on 60 Minutes

"And then if you want a child psychiatrist, you're looking at months to a year. How important is it to get them help when they need it immediately? As days go on, the symptoms get worse. If you have a depressed child, you know, maybe they started out where they were feeling depressed. And then as the days goes on, their suicidal. So it really you really do need to get that help and that support right away. 11 year old Austin bringer desperately needed that support during the pandemic. He's a 5th grader at Roosevelt elementary school in Milwaukee. How old were you in the pandemic hit? Yeah, I was. I was still going to school, but then I kept hearing on the news in the car, just like pandemic stay put quarantine 14 days. When they first said, hey, you don't have to go to school. What was your reaction at that moment? Heaven, but then I realized it's the complete opposite. Opposite because like millions of school aged kids, Austin was forced into remote learning for more than a year and disconnected from friends. It was like this shut it and the only way you could see people is through phones or your family that you live with. That isolation took a toll on Austin, who was already struggling with news that his parents were getting a divorce. And that's when I think everything just started to magnify. He was always asking to see his friends. We couldn't, and I remember there was one moment that he was just on the floor kicking and punching the air, just but couldn't describe what he was upset. Unable to vent with friends and without access to in person therapy, Austin's mother Melissa says his world began closing in on him. Felt like he was interacting less and just kind of withdrawing into himself and spending a lot of time by himself. And I went to go tuck him in and he said, mom, I'm having suicidal thoughts. And he was held. He was 9. And I was kind of like, I didn't know what to say. I didn't know what to do. I just imagined myself going through all these things, like jumping from a building and like taking a knife from my kitchen. And I think my life, it was over 50 of them that just flooded my mind. I don't really know if it was from old just antisocial, I love being able. It also felt like with the divorce came a lot of yelling and I felt like my parents didn't need me anymore. Just really hard to think about that moment. Desperate, Melissa called Austin's pediatrician who referred her to outpatient therapists and in patient psychiatric programs, only to be told there were long waiting lists and no beds. All this stuff is racing through my head. And then for them to say, well, there's no beds right now. And I'm like, how am I going to keep him safe? In an effort to try and keep kids safe, Wisconsin is trying another approach that's being adopted in other parts of the country. How are you guys? 17 pediatric clinics across southeastern Wisconsin have incorporated full-time therapists inside their offices. Offering mental health screenings

Austin bringer Roosevelt elementary school Austin Milwaukee Melissa Wisconsin
"roosevelt elementary school" Discussed on 60 Minutes

60 Minutes

07:26 min | 5 months ago

"roosevelt elementary school" Discussed on 60 Minutes

"We unfortunately see a lot of kids who have attempted suicide. That is something that we see, I'd say at least once a shift. Once a shift, yes, unfortunately. Doctor Pickett has worked in the ER for 9 years. Is there any group that's not being impacted? No, we're seeing it all kids, you know, who come from very well off families, kids who don't kids who are suburban kids who are urban kids who are rural, we're seeing it all. The surge of families needing help for their kids has revealed a deficit of people and places to treat them. Across the country, the average wait time to get an appointment with a therapist is 48 days, and for children, it's often longer. What does it say to you that the place they have to come as the emergency room, that there's something wrong with our system, the emergency room should not be at the place to go and get acute mental healthcare when you're in a crisis. We are not nice calm environments. But they're desperate. Yeah, but we were there and we see everybody, but I wish there were more places that kids could go to get the help that they need. We just have a couple questions for you to answer on the iPad. To manage the mental health crisis and heavy caseload, doctor Pickett introduced an iPad with a series of questions that screened the mental health of every child ten and older who comes to the ER for any reason. Among the questions, have you been having thoughts about killing yourself? And have you felt your family would be better off if you were dead? Harsh questions that can be lifesavers to the kids who answer them. We've had four kids that I know of personally that came in for a completely unrelated problem. So a broken arm or an earache or whatever it was. And actually we're acutely suicidal to the point where we needed to transfer them to inpatient facility to then in there. So we're catching kids who are in very much crisis like that. But we're also catching the kids that just need help and don't know what to do and haven't really talked about this. According to the CDC, hospital admissions data shows the number of teenage girls who have been suicidal has increased 50% nationwide since 2019. I thought it was normal. Sophia Jimenez was one of them. I remember crying every night and not knowing what was going on and I felt so alone. Sofia and her friend Nina used were an 8th grade looking forward to high school when COVID turned their worlds upside down. I've always been a super smart kid and I've always had really good grades. And then as soon as the pandemic hit, I failed a class when I was virtual, I had no motivation to do anything. I would just sit in my room, never leave, and it was obvious signs of depression. My mental health got really bad, especially my eating disorder. I was basically home alone all day, my parents, while they noticed that I wasn't eating, I would refuse to eat. So then they ended up taking me to the hospital. Sofia had to stay in the hospital for two weeks before a bed opened up at a psychiatric facility. Your generation got hit with this. And what's supposed to be kind of a fun carefree time. What was lost? What did you guys lose during the pandemic? Myself, yourself. Yeah. I would definitely say there were big pieces of myself that I were definitely lost. I lost friends. Because we wouldn't see each other. We couldn't go to our first home come in. I couldn't have an 8th grade graduation, I know that doesn't sound like that big of a deal. It's a big deal when you're an 8th grade, yeah. I feel like if the pandemic hadn't happened at all, a lot of my. Sadness and mental problems would not be as bad as they are. It just made everything worse. Are we in crisis mode right now? We are. We are in crisis mode. And it's scary. Tammy mackley has worked as a child therapist throughout Wisconsin for the last 25 years. I think there was a hope that, you know, we're back in school, the kids are able to see their friends again and play sports, that this would all go away. Has it? No. No, I've noticed that the wait lists are longer. Kids are struggling with more anxiety, more depression, so we were in a mental health crisis prior to the pandemic. Did the pandemic accelerated? I believe so, but we're coming out of the pandemic, but kids have still lost two years. Two years of socialization, two years of education, two years of their world kind of being shaken up. So as we get quote unquote back to normal, I think kids are struggling, even when the pandemic's over, this crisis isn't going to be over. CDC numbers show that even before the pandemic, the number of adolescents saying they felt persistently sad or hopeless was up 40% since 2009. There are lots of theories on why social media increased screen time and isolation, but the research isn't definitive. This past march, Tammy mcclue was tapped by children's hospital to run an urgent care walk in clinic specifically open to treat kids mental health. We are here to give some help. Open 7 days a week from three to 9 30, it's one of the first clinics of its kind in the country. Now, what's gonna work for you and what's gonna work for you. So when they come to our clinic, we assess them, and we provide them with a therapy session. So we give them some interventions. We give them a plan, an action plan. The plans are catered to each child's situation. Actionable things families and kids can do while they look for a doctor or facility to make room for them. How long have the wait list been to get help? Normally you're put on your scheduled and appointment within a few months. And then months? And then if you want a child psychiatrist, you're looking at months to a year. How important is it to get them help? When they need it immediately. As days go on, the symptoms get worse. If you have a depressed child, you know, maybe they started out where they were feeling depressed. And then as the days goes on, they're suicidal. So it really you really do need to get that help and that support right away. 11 year old Austin bringer desperately needed that support during the pandemic. He's a 5th grader at Roosevelt elementary school in Milwaukee. How old were you in the pandemic hit? Yeah, I was. I was still going to school, but then I kept hearing on the news in the car, just like pandemic stay put quarantine 14 days. When they first said, hey, you don't have to go to school. What was your reaction.

Doctor Pickett Sophia Jimenez COVID Sofia Pickett CDC Tammy mackley depression Nina Tammy mcclue Wisconsin Austin bringer Roosevelt elementary school Milwaukee
"roosevelt elementary school" Discussed on Teachers in America

Teachers in America

07:32 min | 11 months ago

"roosevelt elementary school" Discussed on Teachers in America

"On this episode, we meet kitty donahoe, elementary teacher at Roosevelt elementary school, part of the Santa Monica Malibu, unified school district in Santa Monica, California. Raised in Yosemite valley, kitty moved to Los Angeles to attend UCLA where she received her BA and masters in education. She has looped with her classes for about 20 of the 34 years that she has taught. This means that she is able to teach the same group of students for more than one year. While kitty believes that developing student relationships is the key to successful teaching, she also finds support by surrounding herself with educator friends and experts both online and at her school. Every year, Kenny attends summer institute at Columbia University's teacher college reading and writing project. She is also an alumni fellow of the kotzen foundation for the art of teaching. A passionate writer, kitty's debut children's novel, is how to write a dragonfly. Now, here are kitty and Noel. Good morning, kitty, how are you? I'm so excited that we're getting this chance to meet. Good morning, Noel and I'm very excited to be here to my first podcast that I've ever done. I'm can not say enough how excited I am. First of all, you teach in Santa Monica, which is one of my favorite places in the country. I love LA and when I'm out in LA, I love Santa Monica. Did you start your student teaching and you're still in the same district? That is correct in my school is only a few blocks away from the beach. It is so beautiful there and you're right. It's an incredibly amazing place to teach and a beautiful area to live. In the 30 plus years that you've taught, has anything changed within the district have you gotten to just see the community change? I mean, you have that natural beauty of the beach. Definitely. But I can imagine over the decades, just the iconic nature of where you live, but tell us a little bit about teaching in that environment, the community and what you've seen change over the 30 years. Well, one thing I've noticed about my school district is that it's always embraced creativity and innovation and I'm really grateful for that. And what I really like about our district is a lot of us do the teachers college reading and writing project, which is led by Lucy Hawkins. We use that curriculum. And so the really ready to try and embrace very progressive curriculum like that, which I love, something else I love about my school and it's become even more so, although it always was, is that it's very international and I have students who either their parents or even themselves were born in another country. I do have a lot of children who were born in California, but I would say at least half of my class or more than half have parents that were born in another country. And this is not unusual. What I have this school year and it adds a really amazing and deep cultural appreciation in our classroom. And we have been doing a lot of work to bring books to the classroom that reflect all students, so they see themselves in their books we read and they can see other cultures and appreciate that. So I really feel like our district is I know for sure my school really train hard to raise awareness of not just anyone group so that they see themselves in the books and see other people. And I'm really thrilled to see that going on in our. Is there an author? Is there a book that you've discovered that your students are just raving about? I have to say, last year, I did zoom teaching for a year. Unlike maybe some teachers I did not feel alone. I was really lucky. And I had always loved grace Lin, and so I read to my students on Zoom where the mountain meets the moon and I was so transported and so were my students by this beautiful book. And we felt that we were no longer in a zoom classroom, but we were on a journey with a little girl in China and her dragon friend. And the children left her so much, usually I tried to read different authors, which I did in the picture books, but they were begging me to read more graceland. So during the pandemic, I ended up reading all three of her books that are companion pieces to each other. And one of the lines I'm going to prayer phrase it in the book when the sea turned to silver. The grandmother is in the grandmother in the book is a storyteller and she's thrown in prison and her granddaughter goes on a quest to rescue her. And there's somebody else in prison with the grandmother and he finds out that she's a storyteller. And he says, when you are in prison with the storyteller, you are not in prison at all. And it really made me think about the metaphor of how even though so many teachers and children all over the world might have felt really stymied by the fact that we were on Zoom school and we couldn't go and do things that we normally did. The fact that we had stories to transport us made us feel that just like in that beautiful metaphor in her book, we weren't in prison. Our stories let us travel everywhere. So I feel like graceland got myself and my class through Zoom teaching last year. And I'm forever grateful for that. Aw, I'm gonna take that memory to heart and I'm definitely going to unpack that quote for myself and the work that I do. So thank you so much for sharing that. Kitty, do you come from a family of teachers? That is a really good question. I have a very interesting family background. My great grandparents immigrated from Ireland in the late 1800s and they homesteaded in Yosemite National Park before it was a national park. And there were 7 children, and even though they were in the wilderness, they made sure that every single one of them both the men and the women in the family got a college education. There was a real love of education in my family and both of my sisters have done teaching and I'm just not surprised I became a teacher because education and language was always really valued in my family, Noel. I'm now trying to picture family photographs of homesteading in Yosemite park. Do you on the side of education too? Do you have a love of nature and exploring and outdoors just because of where.

kitty Santa Monica kitty donahoe Roosevelt elementary school Santa Monica Malibu kotzen foundation for the art Noel Lucy Hawkins Yosemite valley LA California UCLA Columbia University grace Lin Kenny Los Angeles China Yosemite National Park Kitty Ireland
"roosevelt elementary school" Discussed on ROADIUM RADIO

ROADIUM RADIO

06:25 min | 2 years ago

"roosevelt elementary school" Discussed on ROADIUM RADIO

"No, we're originally are you from ritual I cur. Everywhere but not everywhere, I grew up in San Bernardino. or how people like to say San Brandon? Ghetto. I was born in Glendora and then after that when we live in a month until I was like I don't know like two or something, and then we left to Mexico. So I lived in when what though for like. Since I was like two till I was six around there. and. Then we came back over here we lived in La. For like maybe like half a year and then that's when we moved to San Bernardino. San Berno Gada. Hey I. Love Iran Edina. Memories. Going to yes man it was dope. We saw go like when I was younger, we would go every two years but like living there, I remember my birthday was always my birthday November first so there was always like some type of Halloween or the other those shit going on I really liked that. And you know they celebrate the little. The owners they hook them up with all kinds of share I don't really remember too much but I remember like my birthday Halloween. would be standing right there like big I need. To make everybody. Who who are you? and. I remember. Just Everywhere like is very freely. It was not fleets kind of safe. We're just be everywhere I would love to go there when you celebrate nearly. To Watch that cartoon movie called. Cocoa. Cocoa pebbles such dope man left cocoa. When then became with them I was was just like. I love this I love the whole sugar skulls and the wear those my little girl was born on the other. Either get. More Halloween, my birthday, and she's wearing the other lawmakers you bring up Halloween. Holiday. Halloween. Halloween brought Martin. Halloween, I everything else curses all of Halloween. Plenty of growing up what was your favorite? Costume more dressed up like me give you mine and it became my because only that was same credit I'm GonNa put me on. What mom what am I going to be? I was a devil wants the two and we have a picture of was like a girl there whatever. But Yeah I just as a little devil. I had a lot of different costumes. I can't sit there and be like this was my favorite because. I just I love you could use up and all that I can't like. You're going to be this and you're going to be that. Love it also. So the following year, mom, what am I going to be? Three years in a row damn devil then when I grew up. was. I was a teenager I was always getting into trouble de told the Oslo I was like hey. This. Is. Exactly. Yeah. So now growing up. With your mother and father what type of music would you say you were raised with your mother and father play different music Yeah. My Dad was more like the com- stuff. But Like what like in the your but op Spanish? Obviously, there will listen to all the Spanish, the but I grew up listening to lake nona kind of hard like the same taste. To as we listened to gotTa that actually reminds me of living, in Mexico, let's that they wanNA. 'cause we were. All the time my mom cheetos. His Rossio Luca. Cello Does Not that's. What else? We only indio bring these. There's a lot. It was the Spanish. Shit. Later on when I started kind like catching my own type of thing that I started going up it was just like. US and The Spanish the yeah. Go to school medical. I went to kinder- in Mexico. Yeah. So when I came over here, I was very like King Louis. Shit I was kind of like the Awkward Child. Didn't. Talk to nobody 'cause. I didn't speak English I mean people spoke Spanish but like in school like English and. kind of like a loner a, but the beginning all. And obviously, you went to your high school in high school. Yeah? Okay what school did you go to for people that may be outdoor? Shannon Hills Middle School I went to Roosevelt Elementary School. And then from there I went to Shannon hills middle school. And High School I went to a Royal Valley High School one year. But then obviously, fucking when my parents like you're going to a continuation school. So I graduated from Powell Center. Charter school I guess if you WANNA call it and yeah class of. ood. Growing up that you play any instruments at all. My Dad was always like China make us do something so I remember. I school we got like because we have good grades or something know some bullshit, but we qualified to golden to play the Gordian. Freaking we took a few classes and right there learning. The three blind man is you know the basic shit and what's cool. But after I was just kind of like, this is too difficult for me like. So on, but that's about early on play accordion okay. I try I try and. At what point in your life? What would you say that you want it to start sinking? I know you said you, we're seeing your brand new accordion but was there ever a turning point where you said you know what I really WanNa do this. I've always saying. But your when when I was a after. Maybe like six seven years ago my friend. She. Hit me up and like, Hey, 'cause she's she. She was like, Hey, let's make a three long. She's like we don't even have to play the instrument they they play her and the other grow a play instruments. She played the violin and other completely w well, and I would just seeing. What the? Or sometimes, it would just be tracks and we'll see we started doing the whole House party thing and then that's when I was kind of like I like this like especially because. I..

Mexico Shannon Hills Middle School High School San Bernardino. San Berno Gada Royal Valley High School San Brandon Roosevelt Elementary School Glendora Edina La lake nona Rossio Luca US Oslo Gordian whole House King Louis
"roosevelt elementary school" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

08:28 min | 3 years ago

"roosevelt elementary school" Discussed on 790 KABC

"That's the wraparound Lee that's the rapper let me let me change the question the other side of the question is can you treat a mentally ill person when he is on the street when he's homeless can you realistically expect him to show up for treatment no you have to be you have to have some teeth does he always was a pretty good movie yeah also the soul of yards very good exploitation I thought able four walls and he left ring the man you're able to help people to bring them to care until they get stabilized sufficiently that they are willing to stay with it because it becomes its own rewarding process and then they start looking back and then they're furious and people who left them on the street to languish and die they're furious of course they would be but you have to build a poor you have to give you have to have some ability to get them to the care because they will resist that the nature of the condition Anna signos Jr is the condition that prevents them from seeing and continuing in the care another issue that has come up locally is where do you do this where do you house and treat almost people especially well Leland we've been saying and I know that I know that that Dr head of hud a doctor van parked cars in cars is looking at federal buildings in old hospital buildings and large institutions where we can start to build these kinds of boarding care and outpatient facilities you know the do it New York City this animal Randall's island every night and while they're there they motivate them to get care some them to get care some of them were given a voucher to go back to the city to do as they please but every night they're brought to the board and care every night and guess what it works guess what you don't see this was set in Venice there mayor Garcetti has a proposed and I believe the city council is funded one hundred and forty bed homeless shelter to replace the MTA bus terminal on main street in Venice and also the parking lot will be replaced by eight of formerly homeless housing this is a proposal and of course people in Dennis are livid about this are up in arms they don't want to homeless people housed in their neighborhoods and it is been pointed out that the cost of each unit of housing if you include the value of the land is about half a million dollars of that I think it's over a million now getting up towards a million yeah but but that that so you know you have sixty thousand people how are you going to house people with those sorts of that kind of an accounting and then and it's wrong don't real irony David retentive can answer he can either he's a publisher the Santa Monica observer the real irony is the way they've designed those units with the small I know with why they put the tiny windows in no because it it makes it a green building do you know about people with mental illness that drives them to the street makes agreeing to see my first I will be so they can jump out the window they will not be able to tolerate that kind of a closed environment they will not tolerate it trust me watch what happens so you've built a film of a silly that specifically will not serve the people that are actually on your street so good luck with that so you know this is this is a mess and it's created by the politicians and the anyone getting in the way of treating these people is a murderer they're murdering people three year Diana street every day in Los Angeles county and it's time we actually did something about it the federal government's gonna come in they're going to eventually local government those ways the millions and millions and millions of our taxpayer dollars and getting worse is it going to be an epidemic of infectious disease epidemic the finally gets is going or the rate of death accelerates to ten or fifteen a day and what's the what's the body count need to be three is not enough to reach humans is not enough on real it's unreal go ahead David I want to commission at Santa Monica does have a large number of volunteer opportunities some through the city and some through private organizations such as meals on wheels and you can find these at the city's website and your listeners can individually get involved in this process contribute their time yeah looking at some Instagram pages and people are saying you know Santa Monica the pier is not safe there so d'oeuvres videos of homeless fighting fist fighting each other a homeless man threw a bottle at a girl in cash your head open over the weekend I mean people are like it's not even safe to go to Santa Monica anymore don't even go down there if you're if you're a visitor and I'm like that that's so sad because Santa Monica excuse me is to be one of the first places people would come to California and they'd want to go right to the pier see you know see the Ferris wheel go to the ocean look at everything and now people are like totally afraid to go there and we have two accounts one like Mister bond and had an opportunity to help on a homeless man what was that the divider where is that that like on similar now some yeah and who lit a fire under you know on the fire was put out and then obviously out of his mind and bonded same claim that they went back got him well no services I am brandished live footage of him than eight and was Rambo without a shoddy the next day in the same spot brandishing that attacking people that's the next day then he finally got arrested by police and guess what he's already on the street now but but this the criminalization of the mentally ill is the other crisis here we're creating we wait until either they are dying and end up in a hospital in that we have no place to put them or their threatening people's lives or they do something out of a illegal nature we now turn them over to the the the legal system neither of which is where they belong and we have a a city council it seems blind to this it's unbelievable but go ahead and do it almost people are both frequent perpetrators and victims of violent mass of yours yeah sure I say it all the time down on Skid Row too and this is cause people to lose patience there is a fellow in a wheelchair in my neighborhood who tells me that he was a certified nurse's assistant seven years ago he had a stroke and put him in a wheelchair and he gets disability checks but he was on the street in his wheelchair and if you talk to the crossing guard Roosevelt elementary school on Montana Avenue she says that he will I was sitting in his wheelchair in her role obscenities and insults at imaginary people Wall school children are crossing right he has a brain injury that brain injury should be treated and cared for it's a it's a tragedy it's it's no other country on earth doesn't provide for the peep the brain injured the brain ill it's just I think it's it do in a case like I'm describing that's a someone who needs a Friday commando deal airplay he needs a conservatorship and he needs to step in and those are people we have to be honest we have to say it out loud he may need care and be in custodial care for the rest having life is I worked at a facility myself where there was a lot of custodial care needs and patients that stay there decades there are three but there then go out on passes they could do all cards they are they are they are reconstitute area they're not decompensated the you gotta understand brain disorders the D. compensate until you create structure and treatment of various types and pharmaceutical interventions so they can be reconstituted and then sustained we know how to do this every other country on earth as it David we we have to say goodbye we appreciate your fighting the fight there is a in terms of how to change the laws are dot center John Morlock is coming up with a symposium this Saturday at nine AM at vanguard universe in Costa mesa they're going to look at these issue of lanterna patcher short act and the conservatorship PSE and try to figure out ways to change that they've gone up to Sacramento with families well these people have family members who are dying to get their family member home they were the law is going to take a hike yeah begging for help begging to get their loved ones homes lots of resources lots of relationships a bed waiting for them scram get out of there that's what our state thinks about this it's it's incredible you should talk to more like David okay well thank thank you for having me on Dr the back is a publisher of the St Martin server our numbers eight hundred two two two five two two to return your calls midday lives of ninety KABC ABC dependable traffic.