21 Burst results for "Ronnie Mola"

"ronnie mola" Discussed on Reset

Reset

06:38 min | 5 months ago

"ronnie mola" Discussed on Reset

"Our very own. Ronnie mola is here to tell us about what's going on with the workforce in america right. Now hey running. Hey how you doing. Well it's fun. Having to rico daily hosts hosting at the same time. We'll see who wins. Nice to see on this side of the mic. Sorry okay so ronnie. What's going on with pandemic job recovery. So the unemployment rate is down to five point two percent. It's a lot lower than it was in the height of the pandemic but still not as low as it used to be and more importantly there are six million fewer americans working now than there. Were you know at the same time. Employers are really desperate for workers All sorts of industries are saying. We can't find enough people to fill these jobs. The other end of that is that you know. They're not necessarily willing to pay them a lot more. You also have a lot more people wanting to work from home or wanting sort of a flexible schedule and sort of to fill that void. You've got gig. Were coming in. And there's been a huge jump in the number of americans who are doing gig work and by gig work. I mean any job. That isn't like traditional employer employee relationship. That could be temporary work. It could be driving an uber. It can be contract work doing something like freelance online. For a specific project so the number of people doing gig work jumped an unprecedented thirty four percent to fifty one million this year And that's basically equivalent to a third of the number of people working in the us according to be less data. So why are people turning to gig more now than ever. This is one of those the teen gazillion times that an existing trend has been accelerated by the pandemic basically anytime there is economic uncertainty People turn to whatever work they can and increasingly. That's been gig work. It's also part of a decades long change. That's been happening. A lot of companies trying to save costs have moved people from regular employment to contract jobs or sometime in some cases just missed classifying them as contractors basically it saves employers a lot of money to do so somewhere from twenty to thirty percent see have a lot. Fewer employers offering traditional employment now You also have the rise of a lot of platforms like up work and fiber that. Make it easier to find this temporary work. Also stuff like uber and jordache where he'd get these gig jobs so it's sort of a confluence of things. The dissolution of traditional american work the rise of online gig platforms. So you mentioned a lot of different types of gig workers gig work. Were there any that saw a bigger jump than others were. Was there a specific. Kind of gig. Works at american seem to lock to. Yeah the data on using is from m. b. o. Partners which has been surveying independent workers for years and they said the biggest growth was among the people who did dig work occasionally regularly but no set hours per week and that a lot of the time is what we traditionally think of as gig work you know working for ubereats or finding a job on a freelance job site in that could include people that had fulltime jobs as well. Yeah a lot of the people who are taking on gig. Work are using it as a supplement to their traditional income. Their regular income just isn't enough to make ends meet for a variety of reasons. You know so. They're having to take on extra work. something like three quarters of the people in the survey said that they took on gig work to supplement their income. Right so for instance. If i still have my full time job my wife loses her and we need to have our household and come look something like it was before i might start driving lifted night. Exactly You know if you find something to fill the void. Well it seems ironic at best for workers to demand better working conditions and then ultimately have to turn to gig work which is known for having few if any worker protections to supplement their income are there any protections in place for gig workers. Yeah that that's the huge problem with all of this know there are a variety of reasons why people are choosing gig work mostly because there's just more of it It is just the option now but the largest problem with it is. It doesn't come with a lot of these. Traditional benefits like health care or overtime doesn't even necessarily come with a minimum wage. So you have a lot of americans taking on these jobs that if they lost they could be in serious trouble you know they. They don't have the safety nets that traditional employment affords them and as we've seen time and time again with companies like we'll just use uber lifted as an example they can sort of change. their policies and people's incomes can change quite dramatically. Even if they're doing the same amount of work the work is especially volatile. And then you know this is just part of a larger move from putting responsibility on employers to putting responsibility on employees. You if you're a gig worker than you have to kind of pay for your own healthcare and make sure that you're putting away money for your taxes and we saw happening slowly. Before the pandemic but again dependent make accelerated earlier trends. There was a movement to give gigahertz more protections for the government to step in and start taking better care or at least having more oversight over a companies that offered gig work as there've been much movement on that front now Yeah i mean the freelancers union has been working for very long time to create something called portable benefits. Basically that means that your benefits package your healthcare. You know your 401k. Whatever with stick with you no matter who your employer is so is not contingent on your employment status that you get these very basic necessities. They've had middling. Success added a few states offer. Things like paid parental leave. But now there's been some movement with the american families plan That's currently working. Its way through congress The idea would be to create a comprehensive paid family. leave plan that would hopefully include freelancers but You know th that's still far from affording them all of the same protections that traditional employees have so we mentioned the great resignation before which might have led to more gig work. But i've also heard of something called the great reassessment where people are looking for better jobs. They're not willing to work for terrible benefits or no benefits at all. Has that.

Ronnie mola rico daily jordache ronnie us congress
"ronnie mola" Discussed on Reset

Reset

05:34 min | 5 months ago

"ronnie mola" Discussed on Reset

"Do we go back to normal. We may ease. Things are cyclical but the cost of turnover for companies is a year and a half of that individual salary. I think about that and institutional memory that walks out the door and we're actually seeing early retirement people who are saying actually like to be home. We've been through this crazy crisis. I don't want that stress anymore. Lee losses of drastic journal. It's not just you're losing talent. you're also messing with the culture of your organization. Think about a place where. There's an exodus that you're witnessing that's not a motivating environment. That's not a bustling environment. Now not only. Are there pragmatic losses when someone leaves but there's also cultural socio emotional. Psychological blows that companies will take and i would fight tooth or nail to retain my top talent in a company right now i would like to keep my best people because my best people will ensure that i well i've been reading about. How working mothers really wanna work from home. But they've also been having a really hard time doing so the reporting higher rates of stress and burnout. How does remote work help them. I have been a lar- because of the us. Labor statistics data. That showed that over three million women have left. The white were made my head explode and then another survey that looked at the same data was able to identify that almost two hundred thousand our mothers and caretakers what a shame if organizations are not leaning into the gift that virtuality and remote work is so that they can take advantage of flex time as lex jobs to retain their women or to also incorporate some kinds of child care apparatus in order to support mothers some of the smart companies that. I've talked to have done things like from this time to this time every day. We're actually going to have online programs. So that mothers with children between the ages of five and ten can get some kind of respite and like programs or something like that or what would he. Yes we can't send your babysitters in the middle of the global pandemic but these companies have done programs and have found ways to support women and mothers but these are in the minority. We talk about diversity and gender and women and then we see amazing women leaving the have to work hard to bring them back and to reintegrate them into our organization even pre pandemic ways of handling the young families and professional demands. We're not great as i can work from home. My pickup would be much easier than me breaking my neck to get to my child to pick them up between i and whatever time all of that goes away we know working from home can benefit certain groups people with disabilities people were never good at schmoozing and the office in the first place. Some black people say they prefer working from home because they feel like a sense of belonging. And you know experience fewer microaggressions. What does this mean for diversity and inclusion. Oh always been out of the mainstream in their organization suddenly feel like they're not only at the table that no one is calling them the wrong name. They don't have to take that psychological commute every day in order to code switching instead in those with physical disabilities or even newer diversity. Challenges and concerns are finding so much more peace but what we should not do though is to say wait a minute. Black professionals prefer remote. And we're gonna make all of them remote would be the mistake of the century so i've made some really bad predictions before. So i want you instead to make a prediction. What is this going to look like in a year or two or five from now. My prediction is not the guidelines in the policies of settled competencies around flexible workplaces will rise individual managers will level up to figure out how to lead a distributed workforce. People will be more agile with using digital tools so things like tech exhaustion will go away. After people experienced a hybrid format. They will settle into a rhythm that really works. Ah them and. I think that we'll see more remote than in person days. I also predict that physical spaces office spaces will look very different remote. We're has totally influence. What people want smart boards global furniture outdoor space for work. So we're going to see physical spaces of offices look very different than they are today as well. I'm ronnie mola and this is rico. Daily this episode was produced by sophie lalonde and engineered by melissa pawns from hemlock creek productions. Don't forget to check out our show notes for more from recode and as always send your questions to.

Lee us ronnie mola sophie lalonde melissa pawns hemlock creek productions rico
"ronnie mola" Discussed on Reset

Reset

03:49 min | 7 months ago

"ronnie mola" Discussed on Reset

"A lot of companies are offering Remote work as a sort of must have perc The sheriff remote jobs on sites like lincoln ziprecruiter went to ten percent up from like two percent last year. And even still. There's just so much competition over. Those increased number of remote jobs. Remote jobs are getting four times. The applications of non remote ones do you see the number of remote jobs rising to fit that demand i promote working on to bow was pre. Pandemic my my point is simply that remote were isn't always going to be super are super remote. It's gonna be the near mall. And i think i think ramon workington rain critical to to not only what workers want or saving but What firms offer. I think you'll see that as ubiquitous sort of starting point offer. Now i do a job. That can be done remotely. Someone's time in general jobs where you work on a computer. Lend themselves to being done remotely. But we've also noticed that a lot of jobs you wouldn't expect to be remote are becoming remote at least part of the time One example. I gave him. The story is home health. Aides people who physically have to go into other people's homes their employers are now saying okay the one day a week where you might have done paperwork in the office. That could be a work from home day. do you see more remote. We're coming to these sort of industries where you don't normally expect it very much so to be clear what the only thing i don't massive is these long term. Long distance moves. I think remoteness remote or for part of the time of every week is becoming a will become more ubiquitous. You know. I think it's become a seller's market for Labor for a while and therefore remote worth going to become an offer from all kinds of employers so what are the economic impacts of a more distributed workforce where more people working from home or outside of cities remote or is it really or emerging factor is just not important in the way we've been talking about as a driver of moving into the heartland exodus that will save all communities over communities in in the heartland are still going to have to do things the hard way. But this is going to be a major factor in metros in your metros and we don't know how that's going to play them maybe could benefit participation labor force maybe has improved editions of work for people on the negative i think it's the sprawl driver and the impacts near and within metros are gonna be substantial what happens to all the lunches and services provided in in the downtown. We're go see hubs of earners in the suburbs you know. And i think we're gonna see then sprawl and movement into the excerpts. So so there's i think there is substantial Disruptions and changes within metro. I'm ronnie mola and this is retail daily. This episode was produced by. Alan rodriguez espinosa and engineered by paul mounsey. Let us know what you want to learn more about. Email us at recode daily at recode dot net..

ramon workington lincoln Aides ronnie mola Alan rodriguez espinosa paul mounsey
"ronnie mola" Discussed on Reset

Reset

02:24 min | 7 months ago

"ronnie mola" Discussed on Reset

"Every one of our episodes the season will take up. The question of cost who absorbs the true cost convenient. What do we gain and lose from these services and the price that consumers paying right now. Is it realistic that it'll stay that low in the future on the next episode cost from the perspective of the apps themselves you'll hear from their leaders and investors who are trying to figure out a fundamental question what will it take for their businesses to be consistently profitable in the long run. It was a big risk but we believe in the company. We believed what they were building. We saw long term value and profitability of that company. If we could get there and so we took the risk land of the delivery. Wars is a production of rico heater and the fox media podcast network nor was was is. The show's producer was edited by up and meghan caen. Adrian lily engineered this episode with help from brandon mcfarland. Alex letterman is our fact checker. Our theme song was composed by gotham streakish. Thanks to recode. Senior correspondent jason delray and recode senior data reporter. Ronnie mola for their health. This episode sam oltman is recode editor and chief. Amanda is eaters editor and chief. Julie myers is our show runner and shot korac producer. I'm amadiya for land of the giants is conveniently located on all of your favorite apps commission. Free subscribe wherever you get your podcasts and leave us a review. We'd love to know what you think support for. This episode comes from forward. Here's the thing that should never happen waiting months for a ten minute doctor's appointment healthcare is backwards but forward is clearing things up by offering primary care that's both surprisingly personal and refreshingly straightforward using the latest tack like in-depth genetic analysis in real time bloodwork. Their doctors create highly personalized easy to understand. Plans aimed at improving long term health. Move your health forward today at go. Forward dot com. That's go forward dot com..

Julie myers jason delray sam oltman Amanda Ronnie mola meghan caen Adrian lily today Alex letterman fox media brandon mcfarland ten minute amadiya rico heater both land of the giants one Wars korac
"ronnie mola" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

01:49 min | 7 months ago

"ronnie mola" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Every one of our episodes the season will take up. The question of cost who absorbs the true cost convenience. What do we gain and lose from the services and the price that consumers paying right now. Is it realistic that it'll stay that low in the future on the next episode cost from the perspective of the apps themselves you'll hear from their leaders and investors who are all trying to figure out a fundamental question. What will it take for their businesses to be consistently profitable in the long run. It was a big risk but we believe in the company. We believed what they were building. We saw long term value and profitability of that company. If we could get there and so we took the risk land of the giants delivery. Wars is a production of rico eater and the fox media podcast network nor was was is the show's producer. This episode was edited by lisa. So up and meghan connie adrian. Lily engineered this episode with help from brandon mcfarland. Alex letterman is fact checker. Our theme song was composed by gotham streakish. Thanks to recode. Senior correspondent jason. Del delray and recode senior data reporter. Ronnie mola for their help with the separate. Sam oltman is recode editor and chief. Amanda clue is eaters editor in chief. Julie myers is our show runner and shot kirwa because our executive producer. I am amulya. Land of the giants is conveniently located on all of your favorite apps commission. Free subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. Believe us a review. We'd love to know..

Sam oltman Julie myers Ronnie mola Amanda clue jason Lily lisa Del delray Alex letterman Land of the giants brandon mcfarland meghan connie adrian fox media amulya Wars one rico eater
"ronnie mola" Discussed on Reset

Reset

08:16 min | 7 months ago

"ronnie mola" Discussed on Reset

"Got more real june. Eleventh congress introduced five antitrust bills the target amazon apple facebook and google and could potentially break up their businesses a few days later. The white house appointed lena con a big enemy for big tech as a commissioner of the federal trade commission the agency that enforces anti-trust laws. Then it made her their leader kendra. Explain is trained ghaffari history. Hey ryan so we've talked about her before but for those who don't know. Who is lena con. So lena con is a legal scholar. And she's actually the youngest person to ever join and furthermore lead the ftc. She's thirty two and she's really made a name for herself. As a kind of expert on antitrust law and someone who's been a major major critic of big tech and it's alleged monopoly power. I think one of the challenges is deep information a cemeteries that exists between some of these firms and enforcers regulators You know. I think it's clear that in some instances agencies have been a little slow to catch up to the underlying business realities and the empirical realities of how these markets work. And so i think at the very least you know ensuring that the agencies are doing everything they can to keep pace is going to be important. So she's publicly advocated for breaking big tech companies like amazon. She wrote a famous paper a few years ago. That totally changed the way people were thinking about how you could potentially go after big tech companies for being monopolies and she has a lot of support politically from a wide range of people. So everyone from progressive senator elizabeth warren to republican senator. Josh hawley have supported lena kahn. Which is pretty notable right. Yeah it's crazy to have. bipartisan support. These days so how big tech industry leaders reacting to her appointment so big tech industry leaders clearly are not pleased about her appointment. Let alone her being chair of whole ftc which is quite powerful agency right because the ftc can block major tech companies from buying other smaller companies so for example. The ftc code in the future stop facebook from acquiring the next instagram. It could even go back and retroactively tried to separate out companies like facebook from instagram. That would be harder to do but overall the fact that someone who so openly has said that she thinks that these tech companies have too much power is now in power and has the ability to really harm their business that that is not looking good for the tech industry so they see someone who could fundamentally harm their business. Do we know much about khan's plans for the ftc yet. We don't know exactly what she's going to do. But we know that she is going to pursue the whole strain of legal thought that she has essentially pioneered around trying to make the case that went. Big tech companies are too big. They're hurting consumers. They're hurting every day. Americans even if let's say facebook is offering a free social media network for people that it's still could be harming us because we don't have as much of a choice about other alternatives that you could use to facebook for example. So she kind of changed. The definition of how a monopoly can harm consumers because traditionally people thought that if something's a monopoly that means that you're going to be paying higher prices like if a railroad company was a monopoly. You would see that reflected in the fact that you're paying really high ticket prices. That's not the case. Here with these tech companies google facebook amazon services or pretty much free to us but lena con has really made a case that there are other ways. These companies are hurting the economy and individuals so our big tech companies trying to counter that argument. Well they're trying to say that basically. It has no basis that you know that. Actually when when companies like google or facebook acquire startups like instagram or fitbit that they're helping the economy that these companies may have not succeeded if a big tech company hadn't come in and bought their business and made them more profitable. A lot of them are really making the case. That over-regulating tech industry could do more harm than good. And so one thing that they're worried about for example is if you start telling a company like apple that you can't free install apps on phones. Well that could mean that you don't have maps and sells on your phone. You don't have even or something like that installed on your phone and you know there's a case that when apple puts its own kind of software like i message or find my iphone on there that you're sucked into kind of their environment but on the other hand people so find the stuff incredibly useful and it may be hard for them to sort of navigate around that and like hack thrown iphone apps so You know the congressman who is leading legislation came out and said he would make sure that iphones can still have absence stalled on them and he would just make it so that it's more fair but we're going to see a lot of this back and forth where industry people in big tax are going to say. Wait a second regulations going too far. This could actually hurt people and make it more inconvenient for them to use these tech products that we all know love. 'cause they're so easy to use the iphone. They're also arguing that if you were to start separating out the different very lucrative lines of businesses and these big tech companies like. Let's say you took away. Google ads business from g mail on everything else that it would be hard for the companies to continue to give away things like g mail for free so they may hang this sort of threat of. Hey do you really want to be charged for your email or for doing google search. Because that's what it may come down to you if someone like lena con enough to see where to break up our businesses right. Okay so just. Before khan's appointment. Congress introduced five antitrust bills. How do those play into all of us. The are very related. Because lena con actually was helping a lead an investigation into all these tech companies alleged monopolistic practices for like a year and a half and that investigation. That she was running was with. Congressman named congressman. Cellini and says alenia is the one who's now really leading all these new bills to try to regulate big tech. Many of the practices used by these countries have harmful economic effects. They discourage entrepreneurship destroy jobs. High-cost and degrade quality simply put. They have too much power. This power staves off new forms of competition creativity innovation so essentially cisa lenient con are working hand in hand to have this two pronged a antitrust action against big tech companies. One is through these actual bills. That could turn into laws right. That could change the game. For how big tech companies are regulated and the other is through the actual enforcement agency. Which lena con is now in charge of the ftc which would go and pursue those potential new laws and actually start finding or demanding. The company's changed your business based on the law. So all of this is well and good but can can really make these sweeping changes. That would fundamentally change the tech industry. It's gonna be tough first of all. She has a narrow margin of support on the. Ftc forest strong antitrust action. You know she has to get a majority of the five commissioners to support whatever agenda she wants to pursue right now seems like things are in her favor but that could change if if one member of the ftc changes the other thing is under existing antitrust law. It's pretty outdated. And it's difficult in some ways to go after these tech companies which are fundamentally very different businesses and the railroad monopolies or even the telecom companies of years past. So that's why congressman says lenient are trying to change a to update it to make it more applicable to tech companies. But if those laws don't get updated it will be harder for khan to make the case that even under these old outdated laws. These new tech companies are still applicable. Thanks so much for talking with us. Thanks for having me. I'm ronnie mola and this is rico. Daily this episode was produced by sophie. Lalonde ellen rodriguez espinosa and engineered by melissa. Pawns hemlock creek productions. Let us.

Josh hawley Congress google ronnie mola iphone amazon ryan Cellini fitbit elizabeth warren lena kahn sophie five commissioners congress facebook iphones Lalonde ellen rodriguez espino thirty two republican a year and a half
"ronnie mola" Discussed on Reset

Reset

06:23 min | 8 months ago

"ronnie mola" Discussed on Reset

"And down. This is recode's ronnie. Mola she been reading lot of tweets from elon. Musk and has been paying attention to how it's been moving markets running and truly blessed. Hi adam so go back to that for twenty tweet from twenty eighteen. Tell me a little bit more about the trouble. Daddy lennon too. So the brought must to court Basically because they're saying this is true you didn't have funding secured you misled. Investors sent the stock price up. You know it was nowhere near four twenty at the time. So they ended up settling out of court. He'd have to admit any wrongdoing. But he lost his chairmanship tesla. And musk find a total of twenty million dollars each and he was supposed to run any like market-moving tweets by the company's lawyers kind of the settlement was to sort of get a hold of of this wild twitter. And we've been seeing the tweets alana's sort of famous for being wild on twitter but recently we learned that you didn't really follow the judge's orders. In the case of running his tweets by lawyer right right even after paying forty million dollars was against chairmanship turns out based on this correspondence that the wall street journal through a request that he not running tweets by his lawyers. And the sec's upset that he's not actually following the agreement in the settlement so one of the tweets was about solar reproduction and the other one was him saying that the the stock was too high which actually sent the stock down about ten percent to be clear you on. Musk is still the. Ceo of tesla. Right he is still the. Ceo tesla in a ceo saying that your company's stock prices too high. Seems like a bad idea. Yeah i mean. He just has such an effect on the stock price. And it's like so obvious. Every time he sends a tweet you can chart out. You know how much he sends the tesla's stock upper down. Has anything happened to. Egon tweets by the sec added. The short answer is no There's a lot of back and forth between the sec. And his lawyers lawyers are saying he doesn't really need to run those tweets by them because their opinion Sec tried to hold him in contempt of court for an earlier tweet but the judge was like you guys deal with this and they did by saying okay. Employers have to go re tweets but only when they have to do with production refinances. But that doesn't seem to have stopped him here. I mean sec's only recourse. Would be to try to go back to a federal judge. See if the hold him in contempt or relitigate this whole thing you know get rid of the settlement and try to try to get him in trouble for that original for twenty tweet. So that's sort of one issue with tweets where the government can't get involved but lately we've been seeing. ilan moved. The price of bitcoin crypto currencies. What's happening there. Yeah he he's like not he's not an upper of to move the prices tesla. He's also now tweeting. A lot about cryptocurrencies in particular point and bitcoin. And every time he does so he sends the stock up or down in case of bitcoin. He's been tweeting a lot about the environmental impacts of it. He saying that they're no longer accepting bitcoin as payments every time he doesn't mean like that The price of bitcoin goes down. There's also been tweeting. Positively about those point. Sending the price does point up saying that he's going to work with doj coin developers to make it about air cryptocurrency key clear when alon said that tesla was going to start accepting bitcoin that sent the price of bitcoin way up and then he said they were gonna stop in that senate right back down. Doesn't outface at it made sense because it was weird that he said we're gonna accept bitcoin which is like notoriously bad for the environment. Tesla is eight electric car company. And then you know. He reneged on. That was like okay. No we're not going to accept it because it's bad for the environment some ways he's just like playing around. It seems it seems like he's playing around and there's not a teacher on the playground to stop him. Is that right because his parents bought the playground so they owe him okay right or i guess case a cryptocurrency like who is going to stop him. The crypto police right the the thing with currencies. It's not clear who is any. Us government body regulates at. It's it's unregulated. So he has a lot less to worry about with his crypto tweets than he does with ones for tesla so it sounds like we can expect this to keep happening is the last nike tweeted a medium and some text emoji about breaking up with bitcoin. Stock down something like five percents this morning so it doesn't seem like he's gonna stop he's having fun with it tweet. A lot tweets to express myself some people use their. He's not even just tweeting. About tesla and crypto. He's also like testing the waters with baby. Shark we did that. How much he loves baby. Sharpen how much it crushes that or something and that sent stock price of sohn's publisher up something like ten percent of my head. Why does this matter there. Are there consequences. It's easy for us to talk and joke about and certainly easy for yuan to but why should we pay attention to his tweets of crypto. This matter is because it's become much more mainstream So many more institutional investors and then just regular retail investors. You know people like you and me are investing in stuff like bitcoin and the price is all over the place. He's making people lose or gain lots of money with a single tweet. One of my coworkers said something. Like i lose two hundred bucks every time elon. Musk tweets about bitcoin so here we have someone who is often the richest person in the world tweeting and making others either richer reporter right it might be insubstantial to him but he is definitely messing with other people's wealth. There's also the issue of tesla having a lot of bitcoin so you can say that sort of unfair they were able to turn a profit last quarter. I leave because of selling bitcoin so he's able to make money on.

Tesla adam nike forty million dollars ten percent two hundred bucks Egon five percents alana twitter Musk Mola last quarter elon twenty about ten percent eight twenty tweet twenty million dollars each one issue
"ronnie mola" Discussed on The Daily Dive

The Daily Dive

07:35 min | 8 months ago

"ronnie mola" Discussed on The Daily Dive

"Think feels a little safer to people those all inclusive packages and one of the travel experts. That you were talking to about this. Put it a pretty accurate way. I think we went from these social bubbles and pods very carefully curated groups of friends and family that she would be doing stuff with two now bubble travel which is kind of this all inclusive thing. We're getting out. We're going to other locations. But it still has that feeling of safety. Ns because you're staying on that resort. You're limiting yourself in that sense. Yeah it's it's like people are trying to limit their exposure and other they're not trying to sort of wing it and say oh well. We'll catch a bus from here or maybe it will stop in at the city. They're trying to be like okay. You know didn't go anywhere at all last year. We need a break. We need a vacation. We might have saved up a little extra money. What the way we could do this. In the way that seems the safest and a lot of these resorts are also requiring either kobe test beforehand or on site so it gives people at least the feeling of safety. Yeah and you mentioned it right there. A lot of people are splurging this time around because they were able to save some money last year in large part due to not going on these vacations that people would normally do know. Stimulus checks all that stuff. Whatever it is people have saved up more money. So they're looking for these more luxury experiences. Also yeah i think it's a two part thing right. Yeah you didn't spend any money last year and vacations or anything and then also it was just a hell of a year. You know people want to feel like okay. I'm getting a break finally. I'm gonna get this. And what i'm going to make it really look serious if possible. Another interesting thing about all of this. We came out of memorial day weekend. Lot of people travelling. you know. we're doing these stories looking towards summer and what to expect and all that but the travel industry does have a long way to recover one of the big things when you look at it. Cruises and cruise lines really took a huge hit during the pandemic in part because of those closures and there was outbreaks on those things before that you know we always heard stories about outbreaks of norovirus. Even so that was always kind of thing but cruise lines really do have a very loyal customer base but still it's gonna take a while for that travel industry to come back what you're seeing. The cruise industry is a lot. What you're like what you're seeing in the travel industry and that's that it's recovering more quickly in north america. It's a couple of more quickly in the united states where you have higher vaccination rates all of travels sort of related. You know people are going to travel once. They're vaccinated for the most part so you're seeing a lot of common. Us destinations recovering more quickly. So the caribbean is doing much better cruises than something more internationally. And that's also people traveling again for the first time in more than a year. It just makes sense that they wanna go somewhere like a little closer to home. That feels a little more safe than you know. Going on a big international attract the other part of it too is You know places. Like vr b. o. Airbnb are also gonna be impact with a lot of people wanting to get out there remote work. Airbnb i know is aiming at a shift at longer stays things like twenty eight a month long basically but even you know again going back to that. You know i'm planning on vacation. What are my options. A lot of these airbnb and houses places. These isolated places that have easy access to water mountain ranges parks. They had really good years. This past year and that trend is going to continue to the resorts for. You're talking about that sort of the new trend at the one. That's like continuing over from last year. Is this idea of road trips. And then vacation rentals so There's an estimate that there's going to be more row tricks this year than there were twenty nineteen which is what you'd expect normal years for to get more and more and then the vacation rental industry you know things like airbnb are also expected to do really well again because people like having their own house and where they could kind of stay separate from other people and as you mentioned this whole work from home trend where people are allowed to work from pretty much anywhere. They're saying. Hey why don't. I go rent a place for a few weeks or a month because i could be anywhere. Why do i have to be my apartment in brooklyn. I could be next to a national park and similar to the resort thing with these outta hitchin rentals. The ones that are doing best are the ones where they're located next to something nice and outdoors either national park or the lake or you know something where people could get outside and and do the relatively safe thing ronnie. Mola senior data reporter. Fox's recode thank you very much for joining us supposed to plug in your coop. Intendo to your four k. Hdr screen. The tv doesn't know what to do with it. I mean it sends out an analog signal in what's called two forty p which is a low rez video signal. The tv thinks it's four eighty or four eighty p doesn't know what to do with it tries to scale it up and i look really messy and joining us now is aiden. Mo- her game journalist and contributor to wired. thanks for joining us aidan. Thanks so much for having me to talk about some gaming right now. More specifically retro gaming and One of the hottest pieces that retro gamers are looking for right now are actually old. Crt tvs so these old. Cathode ray tube tvs to complete that retro gaming. Look but also a lot of times. These retro games were made for these types of tv so it looks better than it would on. You know what we're using now big. Lcd flat screens so eight. And tell us a little bit about Kind of this renaissance of retro gaming. And how a lot of people are looking for these. Tv's right now sure yeah. I'm in my late thirties. And so i grew up game two. Tv's right. i had a super nintendo. I hadn't intended for people in a playstation. That's what i had to tv. I actually used the commodore sixty four monitor as my main gaming mission as a as a kid growing up and These systems in the games more designed with graphics and and video signals that were meant to be sped into teas that you know had lower resolution lower fidelity but also really interesting technology behind them but cathode ray to batum really produced a super unique interesting video signal and look and while i would say that you know you go back and you watch Old vhs tape. They don't hold up very well because the technology behind them but you know not not there yet like video. Technology for film and television has come so far until his game. But you can't go back as effectively or as easily like remastered or a super nintendo game for martin without a lot of effort and of course it happened but if you plug in your whole super nintendo to your four k. Hdr screen. Tv doesn't know what to do with it. I mean it sends out an analog signal in what's called two forty p which is like a low rez video signal. The tv thinks it's four eighty i or four. Adp doesn't know what to do with it. Tries to scale it up and look really math money so there are ways you can do that. You can bake it into the software to that. End up residence All graphics in software spits it out as a ten eighty p video signal or you get an expensive scaler that you would plug into your tv. That'll do that job. But that's still out putting you know an analog video signal onto a digital screen through digital pipeline in.

north america brooklyn Airbnb aidan Fox last year united states two two part this year aiden one more than a year first time One This past year ronnie super nintendo martin Mola
"ronnie mola" Discussed on The Daily Dive

The Daily Dive

08:11 min | 8 months ago

"ronnie mola" Discussed on The Daily Dive

"There's sort of a theoretical risk that it could cause organ rejection. I mean i think that you know. Theoretical means relatively remote. But they wanna do these studies just to make sure that it's safe for people you know effective. Is it worth it for them to actually get this extra shot or not running this now is joe barrett senior midwest correspondent at the wall street journal. Thanks for joining us. Joe going to be here to talk about the covid nineteen vaccine and people that have an compromised system so this would be people that are transplant patients. Some people with certain cancers things like that they take these drugs to suppress their immune system. A new study found out that these people are not getting the normal amount of antibodies in their system after receiving their two doses. You know if they were getting maduna or pfizer vaccines so in some cases. Now they're exploring a booster shot for them. Some are trying to get monoclonal. Antibodies treatments to boost their systems in protection against cove. Nineteen so joe. What are we seeing in these studies. Showing about these people people with compromised. Immune systems always have a little bit less of an uptake of vaccines. From what. I understand but it was really start with the kobe. Vaccines the study. That came out in april. Showed that only about forty. Six percent of people who hadn't gotten to shots had actually gotten any antibodies and the people who actually did get anybody got less than With a normal immune system so there were people out there who got in two shots and basically thought they were covered. You know like everybody else but it turns out many of them art and you needed to do additional testing to figure out how much immunity you have and you know whether you got any at all. There's about ten million people in the us that take immunosuppressants for various conditions. So that's a lot of people that might know somebody in their lives that have an immune compromised system. The cdc has basically said that they should operate as if they weren't even vaccinated. That's how much they don't really know about this. And that's the big question is is what to do. They're trying to explore options right now for how to how to get them. Those antibodies some people consulting with their doctors are going out and getting another booster shot. But the cdc says that really needs more study. I mean they don't want to send people off when they're not one hundred percent sure what the reaction is going to be. Apparently they're sort of a theoretical risk that it could cause organ rejection. I mean i think that you know. Theoretical means relatively remote. But they wanna do these studies just to make sure that it's safe for people you know and that it's effective. Is it worth it for them to actually get this extra shot or not right and obviously the way everything works out. That oregon is more important than the vaccine would be. You know you need to take care of that to help. Complete the body system. A more than he would need these vaccine. So that's kind of the tough spot to be. You did speak to you. People who are in this situation and one of them specifically he was a man who went out and got another shot and his antibody levels did shoot up. Yeah apparently anecdotally this is. This is working for some people but you know they really haven't tested enough to be sure that it's going to kind of work for everybody but you know they have even talked about well. If the second and the third one doesn't work you could even possibly get a fourth one if it's proving this is safe. There's also possible benefit from going so you had pfizer and dirna going what they call cross platform and having your next shot. Be johnson and johnson like that might spur a reaction. It's different than what the other one did. And so you know. There's a lot of options out there but sort of the cdc in its guidance is being very cautious and the thought obviously is that it is that cocktail of drugs. That is doing something to the vaccine. That's that's causing the anybody's not to form yeah. People have had transplants. That's about five hundred thousand of the ten million who take immunosuppressants. They take like more than one. And i guess some of them are some of the Meena suppressants are stronger or make the vaccine even less effective and other ones like so. There are some people with lupus who might be taking one of the drugs. The transplant patients take and their chance of getting anybody's is just as low or even lower than people with the transplants any anyways. It's kind of a complicated picture. But the transplant people take off and more than one and so they're sort of the biggest group that's sort of at risk for this all in one lump sum and so has there been a recommendation for people who take immunosuppressants to go and get tested for antibodies to see what their levels are like right. Now i don't think the testing is very widely available at the moment but they recommend that people talk to their doctors and their doctors are certainly going to tell them to you. Know where extra p. Don't don't act like you can take that mask off yet because you might not be protected so it's not widely recommended that everybody gets tested but it kind of seemed like that's the path were heading joe barrett senior midwest correspondent at the wall street journal. Thank you very much for joining. Ask no problems. Take when the brightest minds at the university of florida come together. Something extraordinary happens. Engineering empowers medicine. Data science drives agriculture geology fuel. Space exploration and artificial intelligence transforms learning and research. The idea that go on to change the world. They're launching right from here. At the collision of big ideas and massive potential something momentous becomes possible at the university of florida. Ufl dot edu. This is a metaphor for your business. Johnny sometimes it feels like the world is throwing everything at has a year and a succeed. You need someone to guide you through. That's what technologies advisors do. They have the tech advice to help you. Navigate whatever challenges. You're up against a gate you safely to where you want to be for advice on solutions like xps thirteen laptops powered by intel yvo platform colin advisor. Today at eight seven seven. Del supposed to spend any money last year -cations or anything and then also just a hell of a year. You know people want to feel like okay. I'm getting a break. Finally i'm gonna have this. And so when i go on vacation. Let's make it really look serious if possible joining us now is ronnie mola senior. Data reporter at boxes recode. Thanks for joining us running. thanks for having. I love to talk about these types of stories for a couple of different reasons. One were getting back to normal. People are starting to venture out into the world again but then also purely for planning purposes you know we're gonna be talking about top travel destinations and basically if you're planning a vacation you wanna do it early. You wanna do it right. You might want to go to these places we're gonna talk about. You might want to think of some alternative places know twenty twenty because we were so confined at home and the only way we can get out is in our own little pods and everything. The big summer travel things were all about road trips or twenty twenty one. It's going to be a summer of resorts leader luxury trips beach resorts things like that. Ronnie tell us what we're expecting for this summer the summer. You're gonna see a lot of north american beach. Resorts part of that has to do with a lot of the travel restrictions. You don't know what you're getting into if you go to another country traditionally in the summer people go to big international cities new york san francisco tokyo sydney. You're not seeing any of that this year. You're gonna see a lot of florida also hawaii beaches in mexico so basically close by each places and that's because they offer this sort of resort package. Where you know you get a flight you get in. You might get picked up by the resort and you spend your whole vacation for the most part on the resort which is a more conservative way to travel. Especially if you know in the wake of pandemic when you're worried about being exposed to many people or too many different situations i.

joe barrett Ronnie Joe florida new york ronnie mola johnson two doses north american mexico april Today Six percent hawaii last year two shots cdc nineteen vaccine Johnny intel
How Do Taxes Work for Remote Employees? It's Complicated.

Reset

02:30 min | 10 months ago

How Do Taxes Work for Remote Employees? It's Complicated.

"Is april fifteenth tax day. Except it's not the. Irs has extended as yours deadline to file and people like myself now have until may seventeenth to get those forms in but if you're one of the millions of employees who work remotely in the last year you may find some surprise taxes you haven't heard about yet. Luckily my colleague. ronnie. Mola is here to explain ronnie. Hey peter you know used to sit next to each other day after day after day and then the pandemic came and you went away to an undisclosed location somewhere north of new york city as it going up there colder than where you are but pretty good. It's colder and are your taxes any different because you because you live upstate. So for me. It's not that different Because i used to live in brooklyn. Now i've moved upstate within the same state so it's just a matter of you know just paying taxes where i live but to another state. Say like texas or tennessee. You might be a different situation. Why is up. Your taxes are generally based on where you're physically doing the work like where you're sitting in sweatpants and typing on your computer except in the case of these convenience role states which were these states that say hey we're gonna tax you based on where your job is located which kind of just like a whole wrench into how this normally works. So the convenience will states are states like new york arkansas connecticut. There's a they're seven of them and convenience rule states say that they're going to tax you based on where your office is where your job has an office not based on where you're physically working So that's obviously a big deal in the pandemic when a lot of people are no longer working Where their offices and they might be in a completely different state okay. I'm half following. So let's say you had moved to texas along with everyone else in technology. What would happen to your taxes for your current job at vox which is based in new york city since if i had moved to texas a state that has no income tax and it sounds like that's gonna be awesome because i'm going to get to keep more of my money because new york where my job has. An office is a convenience rule state. I actually still have to pay new york income tax. If my job had an office in another state say like tennessee or florida or any of the other non convenience role states i would pay taxes based on where i'm living in that case it would be texas.

Ronnie Mola IRS New York City Texas Peter Brooklyn Tennessee New York Arkansas Connecticut Florida
Congress gets involved with GameStop and Robinhood

Reset

05:58 min | 1 year ago

Congress gets involved with GameStop and Robinhood

"Story has been crazy but is it all legal whether it's the flurry of retail traders drug stock prices or the hedge funds and partner companies trying to maintain their dominance wall street is entering some new territory and the rules. Aren't really clear here to explain. Why congress is actually starting to involve is recruits. Ronnie mola sherani. Hey daddy so catch me up on game stop so we talked here on the show about retail traders mobilizing on read. It obviously A key part of the internet to buy hundred game. Stop stock right. And then there's this. Hedge fund called melvin capital but hedge for the general were shorting the stock and they lost all this money. What happened since we last talked about game. Stop so basically robin hood. This commission free app that everyone's been using to buy all these memes stocks like games up. Amc announced that it was actually going to restrict trading on certain stocks including game. Stop rate as all. These people were making a lot of money in the stock price was super high. And as a result everyone got really upset especially these retail investors. A lot of people joined this class action lawsuit saying that robinhood manipulated the market by restricting trades and caused them to lose a lot of money. Sort of this. This platform has become Now being dogged by allegations as it's an tank for one side or another. So why would robin and do this. Why would they yup. They're supposed to just facilitate trades and not care whether game stock goes up or down. Don't they make money on volume so they want more activity. But why would robinhood care if some hedge funds were taking a hit. So i don't think robin hood did care that hedge funds retaining hit. There's a lot of confusion about this but basically it comes down to this plumbing about how the market works and how trades are actually executed that you would never really need to know but essentially because all of these people were investing in these really volatile stocks stocks whose prices go up and down. Robinhood has to keep a certain amount of money. These deposits with clearing houses that are based on how volatile a stock is toronto. Keep some money. Just in case stuff goes race yes essentially and because so. Many people were trading in these really volatile stocks. They had to keep a lot more money. Something like tenfold. What they're used to. And they just didn't have the money for so they actually had to get an infusion of cash rely on a few of their investors to give them a billion plus dollars in order that they could keep letting people trade came out said that we didn't want to stop anyone from trading. Anything this has nothing to do with pets funds or anything. This was just a. We didn't have enough money to clear. These deposits okay so for all the conspiracy theories that have been going on about robin hood somehow being on the take or something like that. You're saying the explanation is actually more boring. It's just has to do with the way that complex financial from his actions like this happened right. And i mean it doesn't help that the way that robin hood makes money is it actually has this other company called citadel securities actually executed trades. And they pay robin hood and they make money because they sell the stocks for a little bit more than they buy them for. They make a few pennies on each trade. And then the guy who owns citadel it all securities also owns a hedge fund called citadel which helps bail out melvin capital which was short and game. Stop okay so there's some associations between between Robin hood and the people who were shorting stock. Yes but they're saying this had nothing to do with the decision they made. That was simply because the deposit requirements for too big sure. Sure okay so now what happens now. I mean so. We're starting to see some action in washington about this. Obviously this politically appealing to a lot of people because you can run against wall street running in silicon valley run against the rich people like. Tell me what we can expect. Obviously there's a lot going on dc but the seems like something that could have some. Bipartisan outrage to it yeah you saw lawmakers on both sides of the tweeting and calling for hearings. There's definitely going to be multiple hearings in congress about what happened. Precisely lawmakers are pretty happy to find any reason to call into question. What's going on wall street. And why a lot of this seems very unfair conservative. Republicans like ted cruz want some answers. Progressive democrats warn zero cossio. Cortez are making a big deal about this. Warren obviously has a background in financial regulation. Tell me tell me what she's thinking. About what congress should do about this just so we get a flavor of the types of things being talked about washington. Yeah she's saying there needs to be an sec investigation. The sec needs to do their job. Make sure there's more transparency in financial markets. Make sure it's not rigged. Make sure there's no manipulation so she's sort of just calling for them to figure out what's going on. Are they doing anything about this yet. So the sec side. It's monitoring the situation. It's also going to look into whether any investors were disadvantaged because they weren't allowed to buy these certain securities It's also important to know the sec's in transition right now. They have an acting chair but they're waiting for their nominee Gary gansler to actually be confirmed. But in the meantime yeah. You're you're just gonna see the sec monitoring the situation. They makes me wonder. How does robin feel about sort of these allegations or conspiracy. Theories robert is now being a little bit more open about what happened and they were in the initial kind of crisis mode. Yeah i mean. They've lifted some of the limits that they had on securities. You could now by game stop again if you buy a shares of amc. They're also going on the sort of like pr offensive. Where they're saying exactly what happened. The they wanna tell you all about clearing houses they want to tell you about the deposits the volatility. You know how how they had to spend so much money this time. So like even the vlad ten of went on clubhouse yesterday with your skin kind of tried to explain exactly what happened. you know. And they're just trying to say this wasn't some sort of giant wall street cabal. This was a really boring thing that had to do with deposit requirements.

Robin Hood Melvin Capital Ronnie Mola Sherani Robinhood Congress Citadel Securities Hedge Fund AMC SEC Robin Ted Cruz Cossio Confusion Toronto Citadel Washington Silicon Valley Gary Gansler Cortez
Why everyone suddenly switched to Signal

Reset

04:44 min | 1 year ago

Why everyone suddenly switched to Signal

"Recode. Ronnie mola's explain. Hey ronnie why is signal so popular right now. Okay there's there's three reasons. what's app. It's facebook competitor. another encrypted messaging app has changed. Its privacy policy upsetting people the capital riots usually after any sort of social unrest people. Download this app and then finally elon. Musk the up. The richest man in the world now tweeted about it. He said you signal toured. Yeah that really made a lot of people download it. In fact on friday signal went down because so many people signed up. So let's let's each of those. So you mentioned a privacy. Update at whatsapp right. Which is the massively popular. Messaging service owned by facebook very popular overseas. What did what's app change about. Its privacy policy so it just changed some language that made people think that you were going to have to share your contacts and some other information with facebook. They came back and said that. That's not actually what the language meant but people widely interpreted to be that okay so actually the privacy policy. Update doesn't look to be that bad but everyone thinks that it's bad people aren't going dig into the details. Yeah yeah and i. It's just it's owned by facebook. So i feel like that's like enough for some people. Yeah a signal different from what's up when it comes to privacy. They're not that different. In the sense that they're both end to end encrypted that means that it's encrypted on both sides and you know it's supposed to if they interceptor message. It's supposed to look like garbled text. The difference is the ownership. I think one's owned by facebook and one's own by a nonprofit that's committed not selling it to a big tech company. Actually what's up spit in sharing your data with facebook since two thousand sixteen. But it's just a pretty small amount. It's just your phone number. Everyone's sort of mad about this privacy update but it actually doesn't mean you're gonna share anything more with facebook but since so many people misinterpreted the privacy update the company said. They were going to push it back till may and what's up is owned by facebook writes. A lot of this is about perception. Even if whatsapp is encrypted also it could just be seen as less secure. Yeah and it's not hard to imagine that facebook would like to eventually make some money off of it and you know incorporate some of its information into its ad network and is signal going to be a nonprofit for forever. I mean what's up was an independent company to at one point and bright and then it got bought by facebook and suddenly all these people using facebook product could the same fate come for signal That's what the the the people who founded signals say. They say because it's a nonprofit. They can't sell to one of the big tech companies. You know it just makes it a little harder less likely And and they just don't want to that's like built into the ethos of signal one of the founders actually is also the founder of what's up it was sort of a messy breakup with facebook He left after facebook. Bought whatsapp and around the same time started working with signal And how big a deal. You think the capital riots. Where you mentioned those earlier. Can you just walk me through the logic here on why the riots might explain why more and more contacts of mine or yours or listeners might be joining signaled first place. So it's hard to know for sure if you know people who are involved in the capital riots are now signal users. But every time there's been sort of the perception of social or political unrest signal sees a lot of downloads when donald trump was elected. A lot of people downloaded the app again. The black lives matter protests this summer. A ton of people downloaded it. The idea is that if you're doing something that could even be perceived as illegal or if you're just worried about the government or things like that you want an app where you feel like you're communications or so you don't know for sure that people who maybe have been d platform from a bunch of social media companies need a different way to communicate but i would speculate that has to be the case in some instances so apps like parlor and telegram have been linked to the capital riots our list in the aftermath account the riots. More more folks are flocking to them has signal had any of the same sort of concerns. I know obviously private platforms can be used for good and for evil and for people who are joining signal for its privacy protections. That can be abused right. I'm i'm curious. If signal has had any similar troubles the concern is certainly there but the nature of a an encrypted app like signal means that we don't really know Have been subpoenaed before for a trial and they were only able to turn over like very little information about the user sorta by one. They started their account in the last time. They were on the account So they say that in the event of law enforcement wanting access they wouldn't really be able to give that much

Facebook Ronnie Mola Elon Ronnie Donald Trump
"ronnie mola" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:55 min | 1 year ago

"ronnie mola" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I want to ask both of you. Is there a text story you think deserves more attention in 2021. Maybe something that got overshadowed by everything else happening in this year. I'll start with you, Tina. I think we're still especially on the Congress and regulatory front fighting the battles we can see which obviously makes sense. You fight the battles you can see. But I think the invisible battle against algorithms that have bias is going to be increasingly more important. So I think the idea that Decisions are being made by a set of characteristics that we don't really understand whether that's getting alone getting a job getting a house all these things, and I think that's going to be a big issue for 2021 in the years to come. Ronnie. One thing that was sort of highlighted. This year was our access to broadband, you know became so important that if we wanted to do anything, social life for work, we had to have fast Internet. And I think because of the pandemic, the issue of inequality in broadband has really been highlighted. Ronnie Mola is senior data reporter for Recode and Gina. Freed is chief technology correspondent for Axios. Thank you both for this discussion and happy New Year. Thank you. Thanks for having us. No, we're thinking about this past year. Another story that rocked America was the killing of George Floyd last May by Minneapolis. Police recovered the Nash nationwide protests in depth throughout the summer. Delved into problems like systemic racism and police brutality. Well this afternoon on all things considered another aspect of this story. Thousands of people have left remembrances at the site in Minneapolis, where Floyd was killed. Now, Some people who live there are working with volunteer artists to preserve an archive them for a potential memorial. That's permanent. You'll hear more about these efforts and all the news today on all things considered. You're listening to here and now. Hmm. Here's what's coming up in one o'clock today on the take away more than two years after the killing of journalist Jamal Kasogi, his murder still sent the troubling signal to members of the press worldwide. The global reaction was tremendous. The flip side of that was there any meaningful action taken? The answer is no. A conversation with the director of a new documentary on Jamal Kashiwagi is life and death. That's next time on the takeaway from W N Y c N p R X.

Ronnie Mola George Floyd America Minneapolis Jamal Kashiwagi Tina Jamal Kasogi Axios Congress technology correspondent Recode director Gina reporter murder
"ronnie mola" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"ronnie mola" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's here And now this year, we turned zoom into a verb Airbnb into a refuge and watched as lawmakers and congressional hearings accused big tech of illegally squashing the competition. What a year It's been for some of the world's biggest tech companies, and now we're going to take a look back with two tech editors and reporters in a freed is a chief technology correspondent for Axios. And Ronnie Mola is senior data reporter for Recode. Hello and welcome to both of you hate having me well in the midst of so much this year, we watched federal scrutiny of some of the tech giant's heat up Facebook, Twitter, Apple and Google. Now, At least two of those companies Google and Facebook are the subjects of lawsuits from federal regulators in state attorneys general in I'll Start with you how big of a shift was there in Washington this year over tech regulations. Well, I think you mentioned that the suits themselves or the action. I think the theater of having the executives hauling them before Congress was Maura an active frustration and good political theater. The real action is that they went to court against two of these companies, and we haven't seen that. Really since the Microsoft trial, you know. Two decades ago. Hmm. Ronnie do Do you think we're going to see significant changes as a result of Washington's renewed interest in antitrust? I mean, I should hope so just by the sheer number of cases that are being filed so far against, you know this three against Google one against Facebook, there's Probably going to be once against Apple and Amazon. Alternatively there, Congress could certainly pass legislation that could govern these tech companies a little bit more than we've been doing. Sure, because there have been a lot of hearings, but it seems like Democrats and Republicans are talking past each other. Yeah, I think you know, the fact that we did see bipartisan lawsuit is a sign that there is some common ground. I think a lot of what we saw on Capitol Hill was actually different Frustrations you had Democrats talking about one thing you had Republicans talking about anti conservative bias s O. There was shared frustration, but not about the same thing..

technology correspondent Facebook Google Ronnie Mola Congress Washington Apple Axios Airbnb Microsoft Maura reporter Twitter Amazon
"ronnie mola" Discussed on Land of the Giants

Land of the Giants

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"ronnie mola" Discussed on Land of the Giants

"I'm Peter Kafka and I'm Ronnie. Mola and this is landed the giants. The net flicks effect a podcast on Netflix's disrupted. Hollywood change the way we watch TV and movies. And how it should have been squashed by giant competitor, but ended up turning the tables and killing the video store. Okay Peter. Let's go back in time long. Before we had netflixing chill, we had blockbuster nights. Remember this tonight. Make a blockbuster. In the nineties and early outs, blockbuster was the world's largest video rental chain. It was a huge part of American culture at its peak, it was bringing in six billion dollars a year in revenue and had more than nine thousand stores around the globe. It was the place to rent movies it was. Social place like teens would meet their. You know people you know because that was one of the few things that you could always do as a high school student. Was You know you could get together with your friends and rent a movie and go to the cool, parents, house, and watch it where there's a copy of the wiz that I would like hide in a corner at blockbuster because I always wanted to be there when I come back for, and we would go in there her car then go into blockbuster and pick out a movie, and then we get a little treat you know I don't know. We pick two to three movies scary WanNa funny one and then in action. Nobody has the movie I want I. Even Video Blockbuster probably hasn't I mean? We have over ten thousand videos? Five six o'clock on a Friday night. Phones are ringing off the hook. It's never what do you have? That's good. It's always what you have. That's new that last voices Jason Bailey nowadays. He writes about movies for places like vulture in the New York Times, but years ago, he used to work at a bunch of video stores, including blockbuster, which he says wasn't as great as we might remember. I have much more nostalgic for the video store. Then I do for blockbuster in particular which really in a lot of ways. Ways killed the video store, flattening it into the sort of McDonald's version of the video store, right? That's what I remember about. Blockbuster killed my local video store replaced with blockbuster, which I did not like blockbusters were everywhere, and everyone rented from there, but that didn't mean it was a great customer experience, one of the big things that you always hear people who who don't remember blockbuster through a Golden Glove nostalgia talk about where the late fees or as they tried to rebrand them additional day fees or additional rental fees. They were outrageous. Boxer made a ton of money on late visas or additional day fees running. At one point late fees made up seventy percent of blockbuster prophet, and along with this highly fees, there are a long list of other problems limited new releases, long lines, shitty customer service all which is lousy for customers, which also made it lousy for employees. I got cursed out a fair amount. Again for you know just doing what I was told to do by corporate, but yes I would, I would be told that you know that. We were monsters that we were bloodsuckers. I had that thing back on time I saw you. You take it out of the box I was like I got called out like that I had people tell me I saw you in here when I dropped it off. You tell me you didn't check it in on time. I'm not paying that if it got heated, but this is all factored into blockbusters business model. The company even had a term for it managed. Dissatisfaction managed to satisfaction is a term that John Antioch. Oh the CEO Blockbuster <hes> explained to me, and that is is long as you give a consumer and. And of what they want. They will ignore the fact that they're not always getting what they want. This is unique heating. She's a journalist who covered enough for Reuters she also wrote a book and made a documentary about Netflix's history blockbuster understood that only twenty percent of customers who came in would get the movie that they wanted, and they would have to get something else the other eighty percent of the time. They weren't happy, but they weren't horribly angry. Managed dissatisfaction is one of the great corporate euphemisms for screw you give. Give us your money. You are ever going to hear and if you can't remember what it was like to go to. Blockbuster occurred analogy. Be Like an airplane. You WanNa. Airplanes are like it sucks every way, and if you want to improve it in any way, you have to pay additional fees for everything that is blockbuster in a nutshell in the nineties, yeah, customers felt trapped, and with all the smaller mom and pop stores being squeezed out. They didn't really have a better alternative, and then all of a sudden they did. Again you've gotta remember. That netflix emerged in the late nineties when the Internet still felt pretty new. Amazon was just becoming release accessible selling books online. They're doing it cheaper than the competition and they didn't have to operate stores, so Reed Hastings and Marc Randolph to tech guys in the bay area are surveying the landscape and they thought hey, we could be the Amazon of something else. There's a better way to rent movies as many as you want. Go to Netflix DOT COM. COM Bake a list of the movies you want to see and about one business day you'll get three. DVD's kept him as long as you want. Without late fees DVD's had just come out. And suddenly there was this new way to watch movies that didn't involve these bulky VHS tapes. DVD's were smaller, more durable, and you could ship them for price of a postage stamp. So? Hastings Randolph thought. Hey, we could be them on of movies. This may seem obvious now, but at the time this was a big deal. Suddenly instead of having to go to the store and deal the crummy customer experience, he could stay home. You can hit a button and someone somewhere sent you the dvd you wanted instead of the one you had to settle. for which Netflix customers loved by the way they tended to order? The kind of movies at blockbuster didn't feature or even carry it all they had all the indie movies and older movies and blockbuster was focused on what was new.

Blockbuster Netflix Hastings Randolph CEO Shane John David Charlie rose Marc Randolph founder Jonah Antioch mccord
Who really killed Blockbuster Video?

Land of the Giants

05:37 min | 1 year ago

Who really killed Blockbuster Video?

"I'm Peter Kafka and I'm Ronnie. Mola and this is landed the giants. The net flicks effect a podcast on Netflix's disrupted. Hollywood change the way we watch TV and movies. And how it should have been squashed by giant competitor, but ended up turning the tables and killing the video store. Okay Peter. Let's go back in time long. Before we had netflixing chill, we had blockbuster nights. Remember this tonight. Make a blockbuster. In the nineties and early outs, blockbuster was the world's largest video rental chain. It was a huge part of American culture at its peak, it was bringing in six billion dollars a year in revenue and had more than nine thousand stores around the globe. It was the place to rent movies it was. Social place like teens would meet their. You know people you know because that was one of the few things that you could always do as a high school student. Was You know you could get together with your friends and rent a movie and go to the cool, parents, house, and watch it where there's a copy of the wiz that I would like hide in a corner at blockbuster because I always wanted to be there when I come back for, and we would go in there her car then go into blockbuster and pick out a movie, and then we get a little treat you know I don't know. We pick two to three movies scary WanNa funny one and then in action. Nobody has the movie I want I. Even Video Blockbuster probably hasn't I mean? We have over ten thousand videos? Five six o'clock on a Friday night. Phones are ringing off the hook. It's never what do you have? That's good. It's always what you have. That's new that last voices Jason Bailey nowadays. He writes about movies for places like vulture in the New York Times, but years ago, he used to work at a bunch of video stores, including blockbuster, which he says wasn't as great as we might remember. I have much more nostalgic for the video store. Then I do for blockbuster in particular which really in a lot of ways. Ways killed the video store, flattening it into the sort of McDonald's version of the video store, right? That's what I remember about. Blockbuster killed my local video store replaced with blockbuster, which I did not like blockbusters were everywhere, and everyone rented from there, but that didn't mean it was a great customer experience, one of the big things that you always hear people who who don't remember blockbuster through a Golden Glove nostalgia talk about where the late fees or as they tried to rebrand them additional day fees or additional rental fees. They were outrageous. Boxer made a ton of money on late visas or additional day fees running. At one point late fees made up seventy percent of blockbuster prophet, and along with this highly fees, there are a long list of other problems limited new releases, long lines, shitty customer service all which is lousy for customers, which also made it lousy for employees. I got cursed out a fair amount. Again for you know just doing what I was told to do by corporate, but yes I would, I would be told that you know that. We were monsters that we were bloodsuckers. I had that thing back on time I saw you. You take it out of the box I was like I got called out like that I had people tell me I saw you in here when I dropped it off. You tell me you didn't check it in on time. I'm not paying that if it got heated, but this is all factored into blockbusters business model. The company even had a term for it managed. Dissatisfaction managed to satisfaction is a term that John Antioch. Oh the CEO Blockbuster explained to me, and that is is long as you give a consumer and. And of what they want. They will ignore the fact that they're not always getting what they want. This is unique heating. She's a journalist who covered enough for Reuters she also wrote a book and made a documentary about Netflix's history blockbuster understood that only twenty percent of customers who came in would get the movie that they wanted, and they would have to get something else the other eighty percent of the time. They weren't happy, but they weren't horribly angry. Managed dissatisfaction is one of the great corporate euphemisms for screw you give. Give us your money. You are ever going to hear and if you can't remember what it was like to go to. Blockbuster occurred analogy. Be Like an airplane. You WanNa. Airplanes are like it sucks every way, and if you want to improve it in any way, you have to pay additional fees for everything that is blockbuster in a nutshell in the nineties, yeah, customers felt trapped, and with all the smaller mom and pop stores being squeezed out. They didn't really have a better alternative, and then all of a sudden they did. Again you've gotta remember. That netflix emerged in the late nineties when the Internet still felt pretty new. Amazon was just becoming release accessible selling books online. They're doing it cheaper than the competition and they didn't have to operate stores, so Reed Hastings and Marc Randolph to tech guys in the bay area are surveying the landscape and they thought hey, we could be the Amazon of something else. There's a better way to rent movies as many as you want. Go to Netflix DOT COM. COM Bake a list of the movies you want to see and about one business day you'll get three. DVD's kept him as long as you want. Without late fees DVD's had just come out. And suddenly there was this new way to watch movies that didn't involve these bulky VHS tapes. DVD's were smaller, more durable, and you could ship them for price of a postage stamp. So? Hastings Randolph thought. Hey, we could be them on of movies. This may seem obvious now, but at the time this was a big deal. Suddenly instead of having to go to the store and deal the crummy customer experience, he could stay home. You can hit a button and someone somewhere sent you the dvd you wanted instead of the one you had to settle. for which Netflix customers loved by the way they tended to order? The kind of movies at blockbuster didn't feature or even carry it all they had all the indie movies and older movies and blockbuster was focused on what was new.

Blockbuster Ceo Blockbuster Netflix Peter Kafka Giants Hollywood New York Times Mola Jason Bailey Hastings Randolph Amazon Reuters Mcdonald Reed Hastings Boxer John Antioch Golden Glove Marc Randolph
"ronnie mola" Discussed on Behind the Steel Curtain

Behind the Steel Curtain

05:29 min | 1 year ago

"ronnie mola" Discussed on Behind the Steel Curtain

"I do think that we do have to bring this up. Without East Kennedy hundred and ten targets and sixty five catches. How many drops did he have? I was getting ready to look that up Dave Shipley another great contributor to our show this sixteen drops so that's something that I was going to go ahead and look up a while. I was speaking, but you know I'm multi tasking problems that I have so thank you. For going to bring that up. You live with sixteen drops. I don't have a problem with that. Mets that's something that you know. Drops are going to happen in this league. You're going to have Especially when you're a tight end, I mean that does happen, but you're still going to have a lot of opportunities in the red zone with him, and you're GonNa have a lot of opportunities with Vance McDonald. Vance McDonald has had drops as well, but however when Vance McDonald is on the field with Ben Rothlisberger. He's very stolid, tight and option, and I would actually think that he is A. Is a higher. Higher Quality of tight end that they've had in a long time. He's probably the best since he miller is as well. But they can hear Michael Bear with me on this. Let's combine stats. Reason I'm going to combine stats because if you look at everything. You, look around this team. Stats are going to go down. You'RE NOT GONNA. Have the sexy stats with a guy with you're not gonNA. Have Antonio Brown type numbers with a guy. You don't need to have one guy getting everything and the others hoping to get some numbers in looking down because you know you take. One of these guys put them on another team. They're going to do so much better with Ben Rothlisberger having four really good receivers another one in Ryan Schwartz that he trusts. There's he's going to have to spread some baller balls around. Not Everybody's GonNa be happy. Not Everybody's giving be. AM over a thousand yards, but if you have five guys between the ranges of. Seven hundred and twelve hundred somewhere there some are going to be lower. Some are going to be higher. You're going to have a great. Receiving stable there so jujubes numbers are not going to be thirteen hundred. Beyond, Johnson's aren't going to be thirteen hundred as well beyond might not be over, but if you get nine hundred and you'd get twelve from Juju maybe I'm just spitballing James Washing. It's six or seven hundred. Shake label gets five or six hundred as a rookie. And the titans are getting. There's you're doing well. So what do you think about stats? As far before we get into the combination here yet, you know if. You take things into consideration we can. I think we can safely say there's no way this team's going above five thousand passing. If that's the benchmark, even a completely healthy Ben, he'd. Re does what he doesn't two thousand Eighteen Y- when you factor in all those names, especially when you consider his love of Ryan, Switzer under the middle will pick up a couple of hundred yards if he does what he did a few years ago. It's hard to imagine that there's GonNa be a ton of thousand yard receivers. There might be one. There might be too, but I think you're gonNA see a Lotta guys floating around that seven hundred yard range because there's so many. Balls to go round there. There's just not going to be those opportunities, but I think when it comes to tight end specifically we saw last year. They should have been used more of course given up that fifth round pick for Mr Nick Bennett at which was a complete waste now that he believed for nothing when you're looking at a year ago when they seriously coulda used those tight ends, they didn't. If that's a game plan thing, or that's just a mistrust thing with the QB's. It was a A. A little frustrating me when watching this team, if two tight ends at they obviously believe in because they're using them a lot of course, Vance was in and out of a lineup but van. It wasn't getting the ball. They weren't throwing the. We're not throwing these guys a ball, so if if they cannot build that trust or rainy features, not gonNA call any place at or kind of designed to tighten. It's easy to imagine a world where stats aren't as great as we can expect them to be. And why would that matter? Michael Back in the reason I'm asking that question. Is You look at teams that have running back by committee? And they're making the super bowl. They're winning the Super Bowl. You don't always have to have a thousand yard rusher to get in there. That's what I'm saying, so if you have a lot of high end numbers, but they're not glamorous pro bowl members who cares if you're winning a writing and this is a team that could win a ring as a team and not. Having just. Divas right, so that's that's what I'm looking at here. They've seen us through a huge revolution. In how we think about content, it's just changed everything about the world of entertainment. I'm Ronnie. Mola and I'm Peter Kafka and we're hosting the new season land of the giants, the Netflix's effect. We're exploring all things. NETFLIX's by talking to the people who started the company. NETFLIX's changed how we watch and.

Vance McDonald Ben Rothlisberger titans Mets Ryan Schwartz East Kennedy Netflix Dave Shipley giants Antonio Brown Michael Bear Michael Back Mr Nick Bennett Switzer Johnson miller James Washing
"ronnie mola" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

05:18 min | 2 years ago

"ronnie mola" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"What's going on Your List Ronnie? I mean I probably echo both of those things. Yeah just ECOMMERCE who delivery anything that you can get online That there was an option to get online. I think there there may be an increase in whether people are going to like actually do that now and then to from the working from Home Front absolutely like I've written about work from home and how it's naturally been trending upwards but this really is exposing a lot of people to it who hadn't done it before it's forcing a lot of people into it and you have to think some percentage of those will be like. Oh yeah this wasn't so bad as David said a lot of bosses may be like wait you know. Maybe I don't have to lease the story expensive building in midtown if I can downsize and a bunch of May workers could work from home and I don't need to provide snacks or or whatever else and also in commercial real estate. Yeah I know it's a new thinking about that for another piece but we have to wait and see and then finally I had talked to some designers awhile ago about how work from home actually changing. What your home was like how people are much more conscious of like having their homes both have a good office space or an area. That is much more that much better for like an economic work situation. And if we're going to be quarantined in our apartments you kind of want them to be a little nicer. So there's the thought that like. Maybe we go a little bar on on our quarantine creature comforts. Yeah I think those are great author mine in the ring here. I think this could lead to a little bit of a renaissance chat bots. We saw them being very popular a couple years ago and then not so popular over the last couple of years is maybe the. We've seen the natural progression of hype cycle But we are seeing that they can conversational interfaces in general whether they chat or voice can be actually quite helpful when you've got surges in demand To triage things to help get people into the cue. Whether that's call centers or whether that's like your doctor Is part of the interaction with you and if you think about it right now if you go to a physician and at least in the US you normally will see nurse. Maybe a physician's assistant before you actually see the doctor. Because the doctor's time is so valued That they WANNA make sure all the little things are taken care of before they get in there because they only have seven point two five minutes with you. and I think that we might see as we move. Some of those things online is David you're saying and my daughter just had an online one. This doctor's offices never done online visits before. They did it this week. So I think we're GonNA absolutely see more of that. We need that type efficiency in healthcare system. But you know maybe it doesn't have to be a nurse or physician. Assistant is the first line. When you start your appointment maybe you interact with some sort of voice. Bader Chap First and then it moves onto the humans in the loop but I do think that these boys interfaces are actually GonNa get boost and what we find. Is that a lot of times platform shifts. There is some sort of external shock. That really kicks into gear. So we've had this sort of linear adoption of voice recently Spar speakers look more than linear but overall we look at voice we see sort of this incremental gains since two thousand twelve when it came out in Syria and then go back to two thousand when we start seeing in cars But I have a feeling we're GONNA see a lots of different types of technologies really. Get a boost. Ai Being the biggest if people will start to think about how they can automate some of these things forecast all these other things. But there's a lot more to discuss their. I don't. I don't think we have any more time today to do that. Everyone who's listening first of all if you missed anything showed up late. This is GonNa be on voiced by that next week so we build. Watch it back Also what I'll do is I'll make sure that We share with you. The the at least the twitter handles of the people who are Today and maybe some of the articles or some links to things that they've done recently on. This building is really rich. Information there plus Questions I mean. That's what happens when you put hundreds of people on a on a Webinar. We got two of your questions. I'm going to do my best to answer as many as possible on twitter. So labral Casella So what I'm GonNa do here is just to wrap this up to say David Watkins at Reeve Watkins from strategy. Analytics thank you so much. Ben Fox Reuben is at benefactor. Even at you can you can find him there at Ronnie Mola. A at Ronnie Mola R. A. N. I M. O. L. LA is she don't know that At recode and epochs side thinks she. You'll see your titles there. Thank you so much for your time today. We'll try to keep this conversation going. Maybe we'll get back together in three months or something to try to do this again and see see how things have changed because I have feeling we could do is next week and things would be different But thank you so much for your time today. Thanks for every when he joined. I hope this was useful as you're sitting at home and have yet one more video conference to to sit through today. Thanks.

David Watkins twitter Ronnie Home Front Ronnie Mola Ronnie Mola R. A. N. I M. O. L US Bader Chap Spar Ben Fox Reuben Casella Syria Reeve Watkins
"ronnie mola" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"ronnie mola" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"Sharing and provocative thought in thinking. About what conversation. Should we be having right now? Beyond the obvious topics around health. I immediately thought about the data. We are seeing around the supply and demand shocks the supply chain and of course Amazon which is playing a central role. Once I had that in mind the guests were really obvious choices and they graciously gave their time on short notice to have this conversation for all of our benefit. So we definitely appreciate that. Ronnie Mola is the data reporter for recode. And Vox where she writes about tack and how data sheds light on what is really going on. There's few times where that's more important than right now. Also with his David Watkins. He's an expert in the global consumer electronics supply chain from China South Asia to the Pacific Rim factories all the way forward to the western markets among the sectors. He covers his. An analyst is also smart speakers who has particular insight there and we have been Fox Ruben. He's the lead reporter on Amazon for C. Net. I've had several great conversations in the past about Amazon and the company's playing a particularly outsize role right now in managing the daily surge online shopping. And that's moved online is people have moved inside to shelter in place. Next up is a forty five minute discussion. We had a March nineteen twenty twenty in the thick of the early weeks of the covy nineteen pandemic. Let's get started. Who wrote all.

Amazon lead reporter David Watkins Ronnie Mola reporter South Asia Pacific Rim China C. Net
"ronnie mola" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

09:42 min | 2 years ago

"ronnie mola" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"A Robo copy. He now has a new initiative called Kodak Ko- Mentioning it right. It's not live yet in basically they're going to offer for security and identity services within voice so that means Yes everything will be locked in the chat or in the voice window if you call it that either virtual or veto visual so you as a user. We'll have a record of it. You know that the other party on the other side is authenticated. So that's the official breath bought. I'm talking to and those kinds of services will be needed so I think security from hacking perspective. I don't really care. Because that's that's always going to be an issue but I think that is like manipulation. Am I really talking to my bank and my really talking to my mother and she really need that money right now. I think think the services that really work that well are going to be very important again. That's a very good opportunity. I really expect on a very simple level. I mean everybody always always talked about deep fake videos. Of course you're going to have deep fake audio depict voice and Apple and everybody else will have a little lamp flight. ICON on your phone. Or maybe even audie awarding saying this is a human voice. This is going to happen within the next five years. We need A target will explain this. Probably better you can. It's easy to detect this as a computer but not as a human so we need help there. Okay so I want to get round. He's point on that ask because maybe she agrees with you. But I think you're unusual near total disregard for security so we've got three different examples. Google example is operates rates as it's supposed to but they've they put it in a different environment than Google expected. And so there's a risk. You've got the social engineering attacks which the technology is being used. The right lightweights as people are manipulating it. In a way that they can do social engineering sway they do with email and then we have these technical attacks like the laser beam from across the room. Home which is preying on vulnerabilities in the in the actual design. What do you make of all this okay? So just what they make like the security aspect of it or how. How does that play in when we talked a lot about that? Seems like it's four Should we be talking more about security. I mean yes we absolutely should be talking more about security It's sort of tough to see. I guess there are these different aspects of security. There's the hacking Social Engineering Parts. I think I think what I can speak to. Better more is is Just are sort of evolving idea of what privacy insecurity means. He's like I don't think what I think of his privacy or what. We thought of his privacy. Ten years ago is going to be the same ten years from now So I realize that doesn't quite answer the question but can you be like no. That's perfect. Todd what are your. What are your thoughts? Well you know a lot of the the different hacks that I've heard what about you need to be pretty close to the device anyways so I thought they were. You know there was something like you could with high pitched audio you could could hack hack it Loudspeaker things like that and to me those if if you have to be within fifty feet. I don't see that as a big risk any time that your your front door is hooked up to the Internet. There's a risk but you can also argue. Hey Hey if you got a camera there and You know you have other security measures to monitor things. Maybe that risk is is diminished But you know there is there. There is a sort sort of a another slightly different angle may be more related to the privacy side of it which There was some discussion in our industry about our fourth amendment rights. You know in the states. We've got these amendments to the Constitution that include the fourth which prevents unlawful search and seizure. And there's some arguments being presented that if we invite a microphone and cameras into our home to to record and spy on US then Giving up our right to our forth men rights you know for a policeman pulls me over in the car. The the can't search my car but if they see something thing than they can inquire about it. So it's sort of an interesting Fourth Amendment Question. That's being brought up by this whole new era Of Smart Devices. I want to bring it back to you Ronnie before we close reading something about regulation and the tech giant's and there's a lot of reasons to potentially for regulators to potentially look at the tech giant's around additional regulation. Just because they're so involved all different parts of our lives in a lot of this has to do with privacy when when it comes to security sort of standard of care angle but I wonder if voice a I wonder what voice contributes to this. Is this something that makes the regulation of tech giant's more likely. Are they basically by launching these assistance since become so pervasive they making more likely. They're going to be heavily regulated and then like what does that mean for them and then was at me for Become up and carve out a space sir. I think largely the regulation part has to do with like sort of business monopolization whether they're using fair and competitive business practices but as you mentioned like the security part of it is definitely a way to be like wait. They screwed up on this now. We're GONNA look into them and that's where they dig up all of this information so I think that's swear voice assistance plan like if this is you know as I think it was It was todd. was saying that like you know if you have a microbe an Internet connection or a microphone on your door lock like there is the possibility of it being hacked or information being gotten from it I do so I think it extends the possibility for there to be packs or you know in situations where the the contractors are listening to us and people feel upset about it so anytime they anytime. You have some sort of privacy. The issue I think that gives the government more leverage into like investigating a company and thereby therefore looking into larger Manta trusted CETERA. Issues that they have been already yeah. I'd say it's both a reason. Because they're gathering more information and it's a pretext right because it be sensationalized positional is and then they can say. Oh we must protect the people and so you know can be used for good or for ill but I do think it's pretty interesting. That voice since could be the technological innovation that puts some of this government oversight on the fast track the might have taken a little bit longer otherwise also a billion different reasons why the exam. There's going to be oversight into these companies. One more thing one more one more thing okay. So it could be oversight and it could be breaking them up right. You know one of the one of the questions being discussed in the elections these days you know Elizabeth. Warren wants to break up some of these big companies at Yeah Mark Zuckerberg and so tight these days. So I'd love to talk about this more I really appreciate you guys taking so much time Ryan. Why don't you start? Just tell the listeners how they can learn more about you. Follow the work that you do every week on Rico sure on when you can go to a rico dot net. I think it's bound recode dot net slash Ronnie Mola. Let's see that's right it's wrong. It wasn't so bad. Well you could definitely find me on twitter at Ronnie Mola. It's a at an Ra an excuse me at R. A. N. I. M. O. L. A. or my authors page on code which is sort of long? But I'll put it in a show now it's recovered covered. Thank you so much. Yeah definitely definitely. I'd shout outs around you. See there's some of the best work in the industry so I was always Martin. How about you? Yeah everything I do is always on twitter. Also in Lincoln do alive. Does Google Lens Dash Fitzgerald and you find me if you WANNA go straight to the source. Lens Dash Fitzgerald Dot Com is basically my site. We can read everything perfect tot my company's website is www ww dot sensory dot com that says CNS O. R. Y. and. Let's see I'm on linked in. I'm Todd Mozer. Td Ammo Z.. E. R. and I accept linked in requests from most people in the industry And not from people outside of our industry sounds like a good practice thank you voiced voiced by listeners. For listening all the way to the end the special episode really focusing on an issue which has characterized a great deal of the discussion of Twenty nineteen privacy the insecurity when we thought we were going to be talking about new devices and more features voice assistance. Week keep talking about these potential threats and how we were going going to absorb them or mostly how. We're going to manage them. So I hope the discussion today gave you. Maybe some new insights in the way people in the industry and outside the industry are looking at this. I'm Brechin seller your host. The voice by podcast. You can find me on the twitter African Sela come back next week for another amazing guest but for now other say thank you Ronnie Martin Antioch Thank You Brat Tears..

Google Todd Mozer twitter Ronnie Martin Kodak official Apple Ronnie Mola US Ronnie audie monopolization E. R. Mark Zuckerberg Manta Rico Lincoln todd.
"ronnie mola" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:11 min | 3 years ago

"ronnie mola" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Mola is data editor for re coachee joins us from New York. Hi, ronnie. Hi, thanks for having me. Well in case people don't remember the online pet supply store. petScom got a lot of attention for its sock puppet. But it collapsed because the company itself was in very strong in the dot com. Bubble burst of two thousand you right and Recode this week that the last time unprofitable companies went public at this rate was then so let's take a closer. Look how is it that lift more than two billion dollars in revenue last year is still losing money. They've outsourced their workforce. They don't have factories. What what are they spending it on? Well, it still costs on a lot to bring in that revenue in the first place. They have to pay for insurance payment processing the lift platform itself. It's also important to note that lift could have turned a profit if they hadn't spent money on marketing or research and development, but if they didn't spend that money on marketing, and research and development, they wouldn't have more customers coming in. And they wouldn't have. Future in which they someday have autonomous cars and don't have to pay drivers anything, and we should say that the big rival Uber is also losing money. They are also preparing for an IPO one that dwarf lifts is this because even though it seems to us like they have an awful lot of money. They need more. They do. Well, they certainly think they need more money. They're going to the public markets. So that they could raise money much more quickly than they can as a private company. The idea is that they use all this money put it back into their company and grow. They they expand to more areas expanded different business models. They get more customers by advertising, and then in the long run the hope is that they'll make a profit because of all the spending now. Yes. And what else might they be spending it on? And we were just thinking how is this possible? And someone suggested well, maybe research and development. Driverless cars would else might investors like to hear that lift is spending money. The on. Well, I know at least for Uber. Uber is spending on things like ubereats, which is the food delivery investors like to see that there. That they're spreading they're hedging their bets a little bit. But I'm lift definitely is investing in autonomous vehicles. They hope to one day just be able to take in the whole class of the fair as opposed to giving quite a bit of that to the drivers themselves. We know Ronnie, I'm hearing all these numbers, and I'm sure lift an Uber drivers are hearing to these numbers in the billions of dollars in an IPO and many people are drivers as full-time gig or to supplement other income. But we know there's not a huge ton of money to be made just kind of curious. Do you think that this investment this, you know, going public will this money filter down to better income for those drivers? I doubt it right now. Uber and lifter sort of an arms race of who could have lower prices and they're competing with each other. And they're trying to beat each other out across the country. So I don't think that's gonna lead to higher prices. They're not going to get more. Customers by charging more. And in the long run what these investments. That Uber and lift are making will do is actually they're trying to have autonomous vehicles. They're trying to have vehicles that drive themselves. So eventually there won't be drivers at all. Okay. Well, one could have hoped there. What in general does this mean all these huge IPO's? Is there something that in general, it might mean about the economy? Yes. And no there's a lot of differences. I the the thing that everyone saying that this is a lot like the dot com bubble when a bunch of tech companies a lot of investors were speculating on companies and then the market crashed. The thing that's different about this. Now is that even though there's so many the rate of IPO's is is the same Eighty-one percent of them are unprofitable last year. There's a lot fewer of them in general. There's also the companies that are going public are older they've been around for a longer time. So they've have more proven business models than the ones during the dot com. Bubble the revenues also a lot higher, and as I mentioned earlier, quite a few of these companies could be profitable. It's they're choosing not to be in order to put the money back into their businesses and grow, right? It's not the sock puppet for petScom. He was so popular is on good Morning, America and everything. But it turns out not really I mean that went from nineteen ninety eight to two thousand. So it was just in a heartbeat as you said, these companies are older, Ronnie Mola data editor for Recode. Thank you so much. Thank you..

Ronnie Mola petScom editor New York America two billion dollars Eighty-one percent one day