18 Burst results for "Ronald Young"

"ronald young" Discussed on Solvable

Solvable

08:03 min | 6 d ago

"ronald young" Discussed on Solvable

"Ecosystem negatively. Brought to you by discover. When you have a simple question about your credit card, getting an answer should be simple, right? But then you call your credit card company, and you can't reach a real person. How can I assist you? Speak with a representative. I'm sorry. We don't have live representatives. What? Connect to a representative. Did you say representative? Yes. I'm sorry. There are no representatives available. How can I help? At discover, they believe managing your credit cards should be uncomplicated. That's why when you call discover with the question about your credit card, discover gives you the option to speak with the real person based in the U.S. day or night 24 7. They also give you the option to find help by messaging them through the website or the mobile app. Because having the option to connect with the real live person beats dealing with the recorded message any day of the week. That's just common sense. And at discover, they think there needs to be a lot more of that. So go ahead and give them a call. Send them a message online, or connect with them on the app. They look forward to speaking with you. Live. Learn more at discover dot com. There's a new place to buy and sell off market properties. Trolley trolley is a brand new marketplace for real estate investors. It's like eBay meet Zillow, but for investment real estate. Trolley lets landlords and real estate investors find analyze by and sell off market properties from verified sellers and it's free. Trolley is the only real estate marketplace for off market investment properties. That's 100% free to use. There's even a trolley mobile app. Be the first to know about hot off market properties and let trolley find your next deal. Sign up for free today at trolley, TR E LL Y dot com that's trolley, LL Y dot com. Trolley, designed for investors, buy investors. Trolley is not affiliated with Zillow or eBay. Adrian, one of the things I really enjoyed in your book was that you talked about when a call out can be useful. You say, call outs can feel most powerful when they are used with their tactical intention for those with less positional political economic or other power to demand accountability to stop harm or abuse. Which I appreciate and I think you laid that out perfectly with the way that you were talking about R. Kelly. How do we make the distinction between call out cancellation and consequences? Because I hear all three of them being used interchangeably, especially in media, and especially by people who are trying to get themselves out of consequences. Oh, I love it. I think we're still in the birthing stages of figuring out what all these things are. And that's why people are like, it's a whole culture of this. It's a whole culture of them. I'm like, yes, this is in the culture. You know, we are in some ways cancellation is in the culture, right? And the culture is steeped in a punitive culture. So it's like cancellation is just the peak of a certain kind of wave that's happening in the culture. But it's not the only thing that's happening in the culture. And I think what we actually need is an accountability culture or a culture of consequences, where it's like, oh, it's true that you actually did this thing. We know that it's true. And here's something. Here's what a consequence can actually look like. When I think of a call out, the call out functions as an isolating tool instead of a tool of community. And I think that's where when some people use the term call in. The idea is like it's actually supposed to be bringing people deeper into community into a space where they can actually be held versus something where it's like we actually don't want this person to have access to community. I think a consequence, though, to me, a consequence is when it's like, oh, I can draw a direct line. I really can see this consequence makes sense based on what happened. You know what this person did. And I think a lot of times what we're missing is, there's no veracity around what actually happened. We don't know, right? And then there's no clarity on what is the consequence? Is it taking one year out of the spotlight? You know, is it taking a year off of Instagram or whatever? Because that's about what I've been noticing as the patterns. People kind of dip out for a year. And then you see them come back like everything's great, you know? Yeah, yeah, yeah. We don't talk about that other thing. Yeah, we don't, you know? And a lot of and they just move on. So I'm like, we need I'm always interested in what actually works. If that strategy worked, you know, if it was like, dang. We called these people out and rape just stopped. Like, isn't that happening anymore? This really worked. You know, Miriam kaba is someone that I always point people towards. She is an incredible teacher around abolition, particularly prison abolition. And she really talks about that long pattern of harm doing continues in spite of this system of punitive justice, you know, in spite of all those efforts. And she's like, we should just be focused on how we end the harm. That's the only measure. Did the harm end or did it not end? And I think that helps in a lot of these conversations because people get into some moral high ground space, and I'm like, it's not working. You know? Fundamentally, it's not working. So it can't be the right way. I can talk about this with you for. Or is I really appreciate you writing this book. Adrian rebrand. Thank you so much for being with us today. Wow, thank you for having me. This was a great conversation. Adrian Marie Brown is the author of we will not cancel us and other dreams of transformative justice. She's the co host of the podcast. How to survive the end of the world, Octavia's parables and emergent strategy. Listeners, if you want to learn more about the solutions we talked about today, I highly recommend Adrienne's book. We will not cancel us. And you could find links to her other books as well as articles on conflict resolution, restorative justice practices, truth, and reconciliation, nonviolent communication, and to more information about the leaders and mentors Brown mentioned in this conversation. They're all in our show notes. Solvable is produced by Jocelyn Frank. Research by David jah. Booking by Lisa Dunn, editing help from Keisha Williams. Very special thanks to tanzina Vega for pointing me to Adrian Marie brown's work. Our managing producer is Sasha Matthias, and our executive producer is Mia Labelle. I'm Ronald young junior. Thanks for listening. At discover, they believe managing your credit card should be uncomplicated. That's why with discover, card holders can get their questions answered by a real person based in the U.S., day or night, 24 7. They can also get help by using the discover app, or messaging them on the website, because having the option to connect with a real live person beats dealing with a recorded message any day of the week. That's just common sense. So go ahead and give them a call. Send them a message online, or connect with them on the app. They look forward to speaking with you live. Discover. Learn more at discover dot com. Deals are heating up right now if you're ready for it, get 0% APR on select models all month long on approved credit. Remember if they can't beat any other Ford dealers advertise price by at least 500 bucks. You get a thousand bucks on the spot. Shop 24 7 a period for dot com to get your deal started now. 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"ronald young" Discussed on Solvable

Solvable

03:40 min | Last week

"ronald young" Discussed on Solvable

"Doctor akin before we wrap, I want to ask you about what listeners can do to get more involved. You've invited them to the conversation, but what would that look like? I think we have to think about global solutions, because cyberspace is a global construct. But I think equally, we have to be respectful of national criteria of cultural differences in different countries who want to approach cyberspace in their own way for their own population. So I think that you have solutions that are local country by country. And then you have agreed solutions in shared spaces in cyberspace. We have maritime law for shared waters. We have aviation law for the shared airspace. So I think they're basic things we can agree on, and then there's some things that will need to be legislated country by country. I would ask listeners to reach out to their local legislators, their local politicians. There are a number of bills that are being debated at the moment in the U.S., for example, send her warners safe tech Bill, which will address some of these issues. So get involved become an activist in cyberspace a good activist. One thing that I can mention is that for any listener that is now fascinated by cyber psychology and the way that I am, we are offering the world's first online masters at capital tech and online PhD in cyberpsychology. So if you feel like you want to complete your education, reach out to us online. Doctor Aiken, this has been a great conversation very eye opening. Thank you so much for being on the show. Thank you, Ronald. Absolutely enjoyed it. Doctor Mary Aiken is a cyber psychologist and chair of the department of cyberpsychology at capital technology university in Laurel Maryland. You can find links to her recent publications about cybercrime and to the degree program she mentioned in our show notes. Solvable is produced by Jocelyn Frank. Research by David jock, booking by Lisa Dunn. Our managing producer is Sasha Matthias and our executive producer is meal Labelle. I'm Ronald young junior. Thanks for listening. How far is too far? Going after the entire nation of Norway may be too far, but when designing our next generation of EVs, General Motors engineers ask themselves, how can we go even further? That's why GM developed LTM, a revolutionary new EV platform built for power, flexibility and range. Capable of taking you from here to there and back again, discover how GM's new electric vehicles can take you further at GM dot com. Everybody in. Hi, I'm lyla wrapped topless. I host a new podcast called FT weekend. As a young journalist working at the Financial Times, I used to sneak upstairs to visit our life and art section, FT weekend. It was a playground up there, a playground of ideas and creativity and big questions. On FT weekend, the podcast, we bring that energy to life. From asking the world's best chef how to be good to entering and erupting volcano. Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts..

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"ronald young" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

07:44 min | 3 weeks ago

"ronald young" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"Of pen fed. Federally ensured by NC UA. What has a wisecracking Ryan Reynolds, a glamorous Gal Gadot, Dwayne The Rock Johnson and a very convoluted story about priceless eggs, it's the new action comedy red notice that's got cars and boats and secret safes to crack. It's got ballroom dancing, and a jailbreak, and you can check it out on your couch because it's come straight to Netflix. I'm Linda Holmes and today we're talking about red notice on pop culture happy hour from and PR. Here with me is one half of the two bossy games newsletter and one third of the appointment. Television podcast, Margaret Willis and welcome back Margaret. Hi, Linda. Oh, so joining us is Ronald young junior. He is the host of the pushkin podcast solvable hello Ronald. Hi Linda. And last but not least, we have our pal and our punching and fighting specialist, right or Chris climate. Great to have you back Chris. Hi Linda, I want to say I'm also at least two thirds of the degree absolute podcast. Remember the other guy's name on that one? I'm really feeling the mana here. Serious mana, serious model. I hear ya. I hear ya. It's a little bit pointless to talk about this movie in terms of plot. But such as it is, here it goes, Dwayne Johnson plays a guy named John Hartley who's an FBI profiler chasing an art thief named Nolan booth, played by Ryan Reynolds. Now you get no points for figuring out that this odd couple will eventually be forced to work together, specifically to chase after an even better art thief known as the bishop and played by Gaga dot. This was written and directed by Ross and Marshall thurber, who's worked with Johnson before in central intelligence and skyscraper, by the way, skyscraper, still very proud of my headline. Building size giant fights giant sized building. As you might expect this movie has got action sequences and every drop of smart, intentional knowing smart that you can extract from Ryan Reynolds. And you should know that the whole thing hinges on three jeweled eggs that were supposedly given to Cleopatra as gifts. Everybody's looking for the eggs, hiding the eggs, chasing the eggs. So not be unfair to point out as I have, and now will again, that this movie has an egg, macguffin. What was your impression of this bit of silliness? My impression was, I mean, having conducted a long-term study of the filmography of Dwayne Johnson. Now, I discussed skyscraper with you and Margaret on this very show. I wrote about skyscraper. I wrote about central intelligence. I just, in terms of cinematic appreciation, what I want to ask Dwayne Johnson, do you even lift bro? Because I really feel like the biggest movie star in the world has never seen a movie that he didn't star in. So, I mean, this is really just right perfectly into his filmography. It is a 27 way tie for second place if you try to rank them like everything is sort of a watery vague version of a better movie. If you like the sort of fizzy escapist quips and intrigue, milieu that this movie read notice is trying to create. Let me point you towards the 2015 man from uncle reboot that Guy Ritchie did. Not a hit, but much sharper, much funnier, more buoyant and elegant. Also real locations. I mean, I can't really slam this the way I want to slam all the marvel movies because I know it was shot during COVID, but you know, there is a section of the press notes for this movie red notice that is headlined, not even making this up Atlanta, gateway to the world. This is a bunch of screen savory green screen BS you do not get the exotic locales, the sense of travel that you get watching a Bond movie, watching tenant, watching any Mission Impossible, which was also shot during COVID, and they still didn't shoot it at a parking lot in Atlanta. So you get the production value that you are supposed to get from a movie like this. Like it's okay, but I watched it like two nights ago and I've already forgotten 95% of it. I think that's fair. Ronald how about you, bud? I think this movie, I think one of the words that came to mind for this was smug. This movie is very, very smug. It wore on me for a while from the very beginning because it felt like The Rock showed up to do a normal rock movie and be his serious self, but they didn't even really let him get the crack jokes in this movie, which I think kind of took away from it for me. It just made it just a smug off between Ryan Reynolds and Gal Gadot. And I think maybe about two thirds of the way through the movie I realized that Ryan Reynolds was just being Deadpool without a mask, and I really had a problem with that because at one point he actually references how they were going to rob one of the eggs. As he's explaining this to The Rock, he mentions feature to extras. And I'm like, okay, so he's breaking the fourth wall in this movie. I'm like, I don't understand why this is happening or why he's acting like this in this film. And maybe I'm going to end up going after Ryan Reynolds a lot for this movie, but it felt like after seeing something like free guy or any of the other Ryan Reynolds work that he does, he has more range than this, but it felt like he typecast himself in this film, particularly, and it kind of it was hard to watch for me for that reason. All of the things that Chris said I agree with, I felt like watching this movie, I'm like, this seems very cheap. And I remember also thinking that universal probably got the better end of this deal by selling this to Netflix as that's how it ended up on Netflix because this is 100% a Saturday movie that I wouldn't even pay attention to. I would just like pick a different task and have this all the background. I wouldn't even face the actual television to watch it. But that being said, I mean, there was one joke that I did laugh at that was towards the end of the movie, which was they pointed out that there's a point where Ryan Reynolds is eating some cheese and Gal Gadot says to Ryan Reynolds, that's not Gouda. That's uncooked pork. And I laughed out loud. And I remember thinking, why could the whole movie just be more of these types of jokes? I mean, I laughed at the part where Reynolds was seen drinking his own brand of gin and then in the next scene, Dwayne Johnson has served a his own tequila. Again, I feel like movies are just brand extension for Johnson in particular. I didn't even notice that. When he gets to the house in Bali, aviation gin has a very specific bottle and he just pours a little bit of that liquor right into a glass and I was like, this is a moment, Ryan Reynolds where I bet you wish you had a celebrity tequila brand like everyone else instead of a gin brand because you know what you don't do with gin, drink it straight. Second generation. I've had them. But they're not a common thing, and I doubt that aviation gin is that. As soon as that happened, I started counting down. It was like, okay, we're gonna get the Terra Mona bottle in three, two, there it is. So other than the sipping jam. Other than the gin spotting. Yeah, what'd you think? What was my experience with this movie? Well, as Chris says, I'm on the record as being a fan of skyscraper or as I like to know it, die hard XXL. But I gotta say that this one, Thomas crown of fair colon Tokyo drift didn't. I found the experience a little bit like drinking flat soda. You can taste all of the places where the fizz is supposed to be. There were definitely lines that I went. I recognize that structure, unless I am tickled by this. And we had someone talk about Dwayne. We had someone talk about Ryan. I'm here to talk a little bit about gal. I found her just staggeringly flat in this role. And they were just scenes where like I wanted her to pop more than she was. And obviously stunning, fight choreography was pretty cool. There was a great fight sequence at the beginning that almost had a little Jackie Chan, a land where Ryan Reynolds was climbing scaffolding and pulling pins out, making people fall. I was like, got in here for this. But by and large, there were a lot of things that didn't work for me. Yeah. You guys..

Ryan Reynolds Dwayne Johnson Gal Gadot Linda Linda Holmes Margaret Willis Ronald young Chris climate John Hartley Nolan booth Gaga dot Marshall thurber Netflix Margaret Ronald Chris Atlanta Guy Ritchie Johnson
"ronald young" Discussed on Solvable

Solvable

01:46 min | Last month

"ronald young" Discussed on Solvable

"Our executive producer is mail Labelle. I'm Ronald young junior. Thanks for listening..

"ronald young" Discussed on Solvable

Solvable

03:53 min | 3 months ago

"ronald young" Discussed on Solvable

"So what can our listeners do to help. I'm listening to this. And i'm like man i really support i care about black representation in writer's room. Maybe i'm somebody who loved insecure like man i'd love to see more things like that on television At the same time. What can listeners do to help support this. Listen there's like over four hundred show on air So when we're putting our show on air we're actually getting a shot. Watch that would that would really watch these shows and even beyond watching the show. Look them up the ways in which you can like help support their careers specifically with the program you know if anyone out there would like to reach out who are interested in investing and may and you know like the idea of this program existing on living on for many years. Please feel free to reach out to contact me. Because without visibility there's no change without visibility of there's no access so it's really about getting in front of as many eyes and ears as possible to get your story out there to be able to build that support. Do you have any Reading resources to help become a sharper rider or anything to become a stronger. Networker anything that helps you persevere. In your journey my god podcasts. The writer's room the screenwriters rent room. I don't know if you know hillier guests like he. Hilliard is fantastic. He has a fantastic podcast. The wg has a great podcast. I one of the first screen writing books. I ever got with the screenwriter viable. I suggest every rider have that. I really listen to podcasts. Podcast where my thing mike. This has been incredible conversation. Thank you so much for taking the time to be with us ronald. Thank you so much for having me this this great. Thank you guys reaching out mike. Goyo is a television writer and founder of black boy writes black girl rights. Mentorship program solvable is produced by jocelyn. Frank research by david jack booking by lisa done are managing producer is sasha matthias and our executive producer is mayola lebel. I'm ronald young junior. Thanks for listening. Solvable is supported by ziprecruiter. Did you ever wish there was a hiring superhero. Who could make finding great candidates easy. That's ziprecruiter is like without the flowing cape instead of fighting crime like other superheroes ziprecruiter fights time by helping you find qualified candidates fast. How fast well. four out of five employers. Who post on ziprecruiter get a quality candidate within the first day. That's because ziprecruiter's matching technology identifies people with the right experience for your job and invites them to apply ready to conquer hiring. Make sure you go to ziprecruiter dot com slash solvable. That's ziprecruiter dot com slash solvable. Pack your bags because we're sending you to the twenty twenty one iheartradio music festival. Iheartradio has teamed up with one of dot com to give you the ultimate trip to las vegas now through fourteenth claim your free limited edition iheartradio music festival digital token every day on one of dot com. The more you collect the more chances to win visit one dot com now to claim your free iheartradio music festival digital tokens. That's one of dot com..

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"ronald young" Discussed on Solvable

Solvable

04:36 min | 4 months ago

"ronald young" Discussed on Solvable

"You hope to see in the fashion world As a result of your influence in the next five to ten years. I guess we could say we're still token is right like it's still like a niece issue to. Oh look at the body issue or look at look at this runway show. We included three plus models. Hell amazing are we. you know. And so it's still kind of a talking point and the headline win. A plus size model does something. And so i think when plus size models and when plus is blocked models are being included consistently in campaigns and in fashion editorials like when our size there are being offered at every store. And it's not the exception but it is the rule. I think that's when it truly gonna feel like you know. There has been a shift in the tide where we are just included. And it's kind of the exception for us to not be included versus to be included working listeners. Who are struggling with self hatred and body image issues due to combat them. And what can listeners do to support people who are struggling with body image issues and self adrian. Yeah so i think a couple things but one thing i always start with is like if you are struggling to accept your body Following influencers or just people who look like you is life changing. And i know it sounds kind of superficial or not that important but i cannot emphasize enough how much representation matters and how much seeing someone who looks like you and who reflects your body and your experience is important so that even if when you're following some influences in the beginning you might even be judging them because a lot of us have internalized shame and internalize fat phobia so you might be like. Oh she should not be wearing that like why is she wearing a string bikini. You might have that initial gut reaction and that's because you have been conditioned to feel that way until like it's even more important for you to follow those people over time what you'll find. Is that like those reactions will dissipate because when you're seeing that on a day-to-day basis in your feed and you are normalizing that to yourself and realizing oh wow. These women like themselves in our allowing themselves to express themselves through fashion or through creativity and like enjoying their lives. And like when you seeing fat person do all the things you've been told they're not supposed to do and you see that consistently over time you give yourself that grace to and that permission to live that way as well. Thank you so much for being with us. Course thank you so much for having me and this is a great conversation. Kebbi rushes body positive digital content creator software listeners. I wanna thank you so much for listening in on these last two episodes that were way more personal for me. It's been meaningful to get to talk with experts about how to solve these difficult problems. And i'd love to hear more from you. What are the challenges that you're struggling with. And what are some problems. You'd like to hear us discuss on the show. What solutions do you need. You can tweet at us with the hashtag solvable tweet at me at. Oh it's big ron. That's at h. It s. bi g. r. o. n. or tweeted pushkin. At pushkin pods at p. u. s. h. k. I n. p. o. d. s. solvable is produced by jocelyn. Frank research by david joh- booking by lisa done or managing producer is sasha matthias and our executive producer. Is meal lebel. I'm ronald young junior. Thanks for listening. How far is too far going. After the entire nation of norway may be too far but when designing our next generation vs general motors. Engineers ask themselves. How can we go even further. That's why gm developed altium. A revolutionary new ev platform built for power flexibility and range capable of taking you from here to there and back again. Discover how gm's new electric vehicles can take you further at gm dot com. Everybody in it's carlos watson watson show mazi is back with the brand new season. The la times called an anderson cooper meat so we have real conversations with the voices matter. Jeff cardi b. or friend. John ledge advertise about this part of my life. You have your pilon. Must gabriel union to undertake exists. Billy crystal ali gives me that hug whispers little and that's what he called me. Forty carlos watson show watched over one hundred million viewers every weekday on youtube. And wherever you get your podcast..

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"ronald young" Discussed on Solvable

Solvable

03:30 min | 5 months ago

"ronald young" Discussed on Solvable

"Do to kind of help to be engaged in your mission. Just go start. Googling permaculture just like inspired a holistic design go find a place locally that is practising these these land management techniques. Because you will see a future that you to live in that is awesome and verden and mike abundant whatever. Faith you are. In the connections you have encouraged the fiduciary support. That is really the missing piece for for the organizations and terrible at fundraising but the whole space needs help. It needs money. All of the faith favors every faith for earth organization desperately their way for listeners to get involved directly with the actual bat making and help propelling the project forward. Gosh if you've got one point three billion catholics collecting data on species. We'd have like the greatest global species inventory in like a month. It'd be so cool you know. I'm really hopeful. Actually about all of this right now. I know our partners at the scene. Kadoorie conservation center have affect where you can log different species. I think there's a lot of apps out there too like like the audubon society and their day. You know bird count and it's it's awesome. I'm hopeful about the future. You know we're all just hacking at it. And i see it happening in. It's it's coming out ambitious. Not just catholics. All face the people. I've met in favor of space. We're all carrying the same thing. Molly thank you so much for being with us today. Thank you molly. Burns is the founder and executive director of good lands to learn more about her. Work mapping the lands of the catholic church and to find links to suggestions about ways you can get involved with ecological design and mapping check out the links in our show notes. Solvable is produced by jocelyn. Frank research by david job booking by lisa done are managing producer is sasha matthias and the executive producer of pushkin. Podcasts is meal. i'm ronald young. June thanks for listening management concepts powers. Federal leaders every career level. They're six leadership programs. Include courses aligned to opium cues and fundamental competencies taught by experts with federal experience management concepts programs combined live instructions with experiential learning personal assessment coaching online collaboration to deliver the real world skills. You need over. Ten thousand government workers a year twos management concepts for their leadership. Development needs learn why at management concepts dot com classes forming now. Mattress warehouse knows that buying a mattress can be tough with so many choices. Where do you start introducing bed match a patented diagnostic system. That determines your pressure points and recommends the mattresses that are best for your individual sleep needs and it's found only at mattress warehouse. Come try bed match at a mattress warehouse near you. Visit sleep happens dot com for locations and get free next day delivery on select purchases peppers dot com..

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"ronald young" Discussed on Solvable

Solvable

01:53 min | 5 months ago

"ronald young" Discussed on Solvable

"Pushkin no one is reading your mind. But hp instinct knows when you're printers running low and sends new cartridges before you run out so you never have to think about inc for details. Visit hp dot com slash instant. Inc conditions apply solvable is sponsored by discover card. Are you spending more on groceries. This past year wanting to order some weeknight takeout. Whether you're spending on the essentials like groceries or splurging on dinner from your favorite local restaurant do so with your discover. Credit card only discover automatically matches all the cash. Back you've earned at the end of your first year and it's so easy to earn cashback since the discover card is accepted at ninety nine percent of the places in the us the take credit cards when it comes to discover get used to hearing yes more often learn more at discover dot com slash match limitations apply 2021 nilson report. This is solvable. I'm ronald young. Junior religious.

Introducing Ronald Young Jr., Solvables Newest Host [TEST]

Solvable

08:26 min | 7 months ago

Introducing Ronald Young Jr., Solvables Newest Host [TEST]

"Listeners. I want to introduce you to ronald young junior. You might be familiar with his name from other work. In podcasting leading shows like time well spent and leaving the theater. He's sometime guess contributed around. Npr's pop culture happy hour. We are really excited to make it. Official that ronald is going to be the newest host of solvable. Thank you thank you for having me. I'm so so excited to be here so publicly on the team. Believe it or not hosting solvable is not my main job. My main job is being. Ceo pushing in and pushkin over the last year in lockdown has like doubled in size. We have almost fifty people now. And it's exciting. There's a lot going on But it's sort of crowded out the time that i like to spend preparing and figuring out gas that also i'm not really a host. I don't know if you noticed that. I think i am trade. I'm an Host i have certain hosts qualities that i'm really interested in talking to the guests on the show And i have a lot of drive to learn. But i don't have that quality of hosting which i hear your voice and i really wanna know how that is done. Well first of all. I don't know if that's that's the message like we got hosted coaster said coming on all star show. I've always found it easy to talk to people. I've always founded easy to connect with folks and ask questions. And i'm curious about and mostly because as a child i was always encouraged to ask whether it was two friends. The families the teachers. And i think that's what helps with being a good host and with conducting good interviews. Which you do a great job of thank you ronald but yeah no. I think that just that basic quality of curiosity. If if you don't wanna know you can't read someone else's questions the producers on the show do suggest a lot great questions for us but ultimately you ask the ones that are your questions that have been you want. no yes. It's funny because like you know working with the solvable team. It's certainly is a team effort. But i think what makes a good host that what makes a good interviewer is the ability to read the conversation and to know when it when it needs to take a turn when it's about the pivot or when you're curiosity might push the interviewee a little deeper into the subject matter and even more comfortable and ready to answer more questions as they go so and i really enjoy doing that so this is a very exciting role for me. You do something i mean. Since were on this this topic. I do think being a really good host goes beyond just the flow of the conversation. Asking the right questions that something about creating this this environment this kind of comfort even this sense of place. And here's what. I don't feel that. I really know how to do but i hear in your voice you know in a lot of the people who are just really good shows terry gross. You know you just feel like you're at her place like you're in her world and you know in the guest is coming into her world and you feel as a listener. You're made to feel welcome and comfortable. How do you do that route. You know wish. I could say there was a trick. I wish i could tell you. Hey do this thing. And this'll this'll work but for me. It's just it's hospitality. It's really being genuinely interested in what they have to say. It's paying attention to them. Not necessarily thinking so far ahead that you can't be president in the conversation creating that warm sensitive environment it really comes from like a genuine place inside people and i think most people talk to you. We'll tell you that this is who. I am all the time. So it makes it easier for me to just bring this be to a hosting role Whereas some people. I think are very good at being a host and then you know in the rest of their lives are not nearly as hospitable or friendly and i can't say anything about ten gross but i i know that good host is being able to create that sense of hospitality in the conversation that they're having that moment. Yeah i think of the great host of my childhood dick caveat who was on. Tv obviously long before your time but back in the days before cable there only a few channels every night cabinet was having these interesting people on his show and he's charming. He's charmed by the gas and a lot of what he's trying to do. Is of course just inject wisecracks. I've got clip here. That's a good example of that it's cabot talking to the comedian don rickles. It's hard for you to be serious but it is. I think people don't admit that deep down inside. If i may be serious for a moment that you do something on stage that all of us would like to do if we had no class the other host i think about all the time as i grew up listening on the radio growing up in chicago. Two studs terkel here just as one example is studs terkel interviewing muhammad ali at one thousand nine hundred seventy five. Why do you think it is always in this particular theater. So many different people are. Why would they rooting for you. The outsider we'll i think the masses root for me because this scuffling they've been persecuted they figure by the tat taxes and whatever they've underdogs people are basically the underdogs hole and the things that i say from my people in the free involve people and the way i speak out in the title of the have and the and now let this. Stop me from recognizing every day man that thing. This is what they whether it'd be black or white. The massive people hardworking people the amazing thing about studs terkel circle. He was so good at talking to anybody today. He would have like a janitor and then he would. Have you know an opera singer. And then he would. Have you know a former vice president or politician and he just part of what was great about him with. He would talk to everybody the same way. Yeah i mean there's a sense of empathy that comes with no matter. Who's in the room. It should be able to be extended to anyone who's sitting opposite from you whether they'd be the janitor or the president of the united states. The other thing is not being afraid to ask even a question that may not sound as smart as you think it does. I think larry king wants said He was he was on. He was talking to jesse thorn. My friend hobie. Khan who wrote you negotiate anything. We grew up together. He says to me larry. The secret of your success is your dumb dumb. Is the great road to success. Because you not afraid to. I don't know tell me help me. That's a lot of interviews help. help me that. You're you're a brain search. You got brain surgery tomorrow morning. Think about it tonight when you go in the check your hands. If they're steady. And then all of a sudden you have this. Very poignant moment because larry king asked a question that is wow. I would have even sit there. I was like ronald do you. Do i do that. Also i wanna make sure that. I i do that but having that empathy allows you to be embassy to cross from you like i said whether it's the janitor or the president of the united states. Yeah so for this show. We do interviews with a particular kind of focused. How is problem solving. And how are people who have ideas about solving problems. Making the world veteran capable of making the world better. And that's the thing that can be big range of stuff. Yeah if you look out there let's say your your houses near the water and you look out there and you're just like the water seems to be creeping closer and closer. You're only thinking about what's going to happen when the water reaches your house and all the horrible things that can happen as the water continues to rise and the flooding when you when you start to think about all that it kind of changes your posture versus if you think how do we stop the water. How do we get the people out. How do we keep my house. Dry and think in terms of This podcast i'd like that it's pivoting from us talking so much about what the issue is because in most cases we know what the issue is what we really need to know is. What's the best way forward. How can we like either neutralize whatever. This problem is or at least adjust our lives so that the problem isn't what it is. Do we need to build a bridge. Maybe we need to build our houses higher whatever that means in order to To get out of the water. I think it gives a bit of optimism to the world

Ronald Young Ronald NPR Terry Gross Don Rickles Jesse Thorn Cabot Larry King Muhammad Ali Cabinet Dick Hobie Chicago United States Khan Larry
"ronald young" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:14 min | 1 year ago

"ronald young" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Films like this, You know, In a lot of ways, this is a very new kind of film. Like people won't admit it, but we're not used to seeing ourselves and our full complexity and having our inside conversation he told to the outside world. Andi. I think that's part of why people are upset about it, but they may not be consciously aware of it. Andi, I think the other thing is I thought his internal as depression like, you know, it was conscious that Vanessa Williams was a light skin woman, right was propagating Eurocentric beauty standards. And I personally I'm so glad I didn't want Any white woman to take screen time from all the people who were there because it was like it wasn't about them. It was about how we've internalized. Those messages not saying that we're to blame for it. But you know there is Internalized repression is example. You know, wrap rampant, so I think it's a combination of both. No, just the context in which the Hollywood context intuition movies being released, but also just the way that black people will suffer from the damage of All this internalized repression. Well, John, is this a movie that would have been otherwise released in theaters if it weren't for the pandemic? No, definitely. I mean, it's you know, and I think it would have found an audience. I mean, I think that's one of the strange things about the times we're living in that, you know, no movies are getting released theatrically. And now so many things are getting released on streaming services that has actually become highly competitive. That Disney is putting a lot of it's movies on Disney. Plus Universal is putting a lot of it's movies on premium video on demand channels. I mean, you know, AMC, the nation's biggest movie theater chain, Michael out of business in the next couple of months, they've run out of cash. So Yeah. I mean, this is a movie, and not only would it be a movie that should be in theaters. Watching this movie with an audience would be a lot of fun because there'd be a lot of talk back to the screen and I think, and there was when I saw it in part City at the Sundance Festival, but you know, that is something that is going to be missed. It's a kind of film. I think that would Ah. Play well with a group and I'm gonna come back to like my takeaway quote Lena wave who was in it, she says. It's a story about the adversity black women phase in the workplace, and I think you could take blackout. I think it's a story about diversity that women could be. You know, a female lawyer trying to fit into a firm headed by, you know, white partners. I think it's really about people who have been marginalized just based on nothing more than the way they look. And it gets this bigger issue that really kind of concerns me and that is like with Noah bomb back or Steven Spielberg make a movie. It's about the human experience. But if Spike Lee or Barry Jenkins or Justin Simeon make a movie It's about the black experience, and that's patently unfair because this is a movie about the human experience. These characters happen to be black, but it's about how people Are marginalized, and I think that's the takeaway that I had for the film, and I wish it wasn't kind of put in that category like Spike Lee and Barry Jenkins. Movies are about a certain group of people. It's about all of us. And how we judge people and how we accept people based on nothing more than how they look. I'm Jen white. You're listening to one, eh? We're reviewing the holo original movie. Bad Hair with KPCC is John Horn, film critic and Podcaster Be Andrea July, and Ronald Young, junior film critic and host of Time. Well spent podcast well to that, and we got this email from John, who says, I counter that a white man can understand Black here it is forgotten that many white men suffer male pattern baldness. And starting in the twenties, get the invisible treatment that we hide behind. Hats here, die to pay and head shaving to not feel invisible in a room of attractive people, you know be Andrea. I I hear that, but I'm thinking two back to the way black women's hair. My own included has been Politicize from the time you know, we are tiny, tiny, tiny little little girls. And even even now, when I went natural in my thirties If, on the rare occasion I would get a blowout in my hair would be straight. The comet would be Oh, You look so professional, which is And if you think that my natural curly here it's considered unprofessional in some ways, I'm curious how you've experienced this and and how you think about it is a black woman. Yeah. I mean, I think part of the reason I can have the view I have about the movie is that I have never really been interested in. We've I tried it once, and I said this is not for me and I have kept my hair natural for the majority of my adult life. I'm just in general, low maintenance person. So short hair works for me because it's left time. But I do think that, um, you know Our hair stories are very personal. You know, I used to think of it. I think of hairdressers as healers, because, like I said, my grandmother was a hairdresser and also I always knew as a child that leg if my mom was in a bad mood, I used to wish he had a hair appointment because she would come back a completely different person. It's part therapy. It's part here. Selling Yeah, Yeah, yes. So it is. It's sort of interesting twist for me on like, what if he just evil, you know, like, you know, Just again. Universal izing the black female experience, but the only way you can get that is, if you know the cues of the black women's experience. We've got have a sort of mixed opinions about this film. But there's this larger confirmation conversation about black filmmakers and criticism and they get into it a bit on the show on another string platform that started similar conversation. Here's a clip from Netflix is black, F and innit creator and star Kenya. Barris talks about a movie he dislikes with other black filmmakers. You guys see that link? I sent you of the movie, would you would you think Who did Yeah, it was. It was cool. I'm gonna stop you right there. That was not cool. There was nothing cool about that movie has no way do come on..

John Horn Andi Andrea July Spike Lee Disney Barry Jenkins Vanessa Williams depression AMC Jen white Hollywood Netflix Kenya Barris Lena Steven Spielberg Michael Noah Ronald Young Justin Simeon
"ronald young" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:16 min | 1 year ago

"ronald young" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Film critic and host of the time Well spent podcast. We're talking about the film, bad hair. Do you think he pulled off? What he was what he was aiming for. Be Andrea there, you know, Trying to present the present thie struggle. Black women have to go through during their hair journey, but without really making commentary on whether we've is is good or bad. You know, I do think the least successful part of the movie was definitely the mosque Earl element to it specifically the end of the movie where it's It's revealed that a character we've seen before who is white is leading the charge for hair kind of ring. It's very convoluted. As you've said, as many of you said And it's a little bit confusing. And I kind of I had wished the movie had ended just with No, that last scene where the main character is talking to her sister, because that to me, you know, leave it up to the viewer to decide. You know what they think that that ending that is there kind of Sort of goes halfway there and then doesn't go all the way. So I do agree that it doesn't really It definitely doesn't tell us what to think about it. But I do think that Maybe Justin underestimated the sense which pushed Black women's button because, you know, it's sort of we're sort of like, okay, our hair people always talking about her hair. There's laws against our hair girls getting suspended because of their hair. And you know, not to mention the unfair Eurocentric standards. So it's like, can we just live, you know, and I do think it's kind of funny that both of the movies that people can name about black woman's hair were both made by black men. Do you think this movie is much more nuanced and good hair, Chris rock community which I didn't like it all. But I I do think that there's good intention here. You know, Justin all the main characters in the movie are named after his mother is named after Anna. And his name. Dr. His mother and his aunt are the energy and Edna and another woman in the movies. So I think he had definitely had black woman in mind. But I don't know what it is with black gay men in wigs, something happened. Yeah, I'm not. Have you seen that? I don't know if you've seen this episode of Queer Eye were Karam. Oh, puts on a wig when they're helping one of their clans this season, and he just goes absolutely insane. Like he turns into a different person. I I have not. I have not seen that. I mean, what I will say about this film is that it was funny. Like there were moments when I was definitely laughing out. Loud Run. What did you think about the balance between? Horror, which was very campy was very over the top but also comedy Do you think, he said he did a good job of balancing the two I think he nailed. I think you've nailed the comedy a lot. I think I'm a scared cat. So I don't want scary movies on watch for movies I've seen Get out. I see us dancing this and I think you could sense the theme and the types of horror movies that I will watch the things that I feel like I do have to show up for as opposed to this, But this was there were definitely some laugh out of moments in this and I thought he struck that balance. Very well. I wasn't ever really scared. And there were. I think the only part that I really got creeped out was during the body or parts, and it means like when when the soul in was actually happening. I cringed a lot in the beginning when she was first getting the cock in her hair. I like cringed a lot. I mean, so and I think those portions really got to me in terms of the horror elements. But the parts that were funny were very funny. J. Farrell's character just being like a perpetual like garbage man with this's very, very, very funny to me. But if I could just take the one thing, the entrance set, which I want free with us, I think the perspective matters because I think this would've been a different movie if we were made by women instead of black women instead of made by black men, because there's only so much Empathy a perspective I can have talking about my mother and sister versus my mother and sisters telling you a story from their perspective. Yeah, I agree with you that I had visceral reactions, too. The both the relaxer seeing when, when the lead character Anna, played by El Lorraine when she gets that chemical burn, and also the sow in because Those air based in rial experiences, and there was something just deeply horrifying about about both of those, both of those scenes and very realistic. I'm curious low, John Iran is as the guys on our panel. Did you learn anything from the movie? Did you take anything away from it? John? Yeah, definitely. I mean, and I'm gonna come back to this idea of like invisibility because I think that's really what this movie is about. And if you think about the first time we meet kind of a lead character Played by Oh, Lorraine Anna. She's walking through a crowded lobby. She's invisible. No one sees her because of the way her hair looks. And then you think back to you know, even in the autobiography of Malcolm X, he writes about conking his hair and so for me, the bigger takeaway is like what part Of yourself. If you're a black woman, do you have to give up to fit in? The way you're expected to look and that for me was the takeaway. Listen on the straight white guy. I can never understand that experience, but I'm gonna learn piece by piece to try to Have empathy and understand it better. And I think that's what this movie succeeds. That this woman is invisible because of the way her hair looks and that is criminal. Ron, I want to get your take after the break. We're discussing the new Who, Lou original movie Bad here with our one A movie club KPCC is John Horn and film critics. D'Andrea July and Ronald Young Junior. We're also talking to you Tweet us at one a comment on her Facebook page or drop US an email at one A. W A m u dot org's male and female Love. The movie beautifully captured the sacrifice black women experience based on our physical appearance, four stars like the pace of the movie buildup to the climax. My mother in law was a hairdresser loved the handling.

Lorraine Anna Justin Andrea Facebook Chris rock US Ronald Young Junior Malcolm X Karam Dr. His Ron John Iran Lou John Horn J. Farrell Edna John El Lorraine
"ronald young" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

05:50 min | 1 year ago

"ronald young" Discussed on KPCC

"Films like this, You know, In a lot of ways, this is a very new kind of film. Like people won't admit it, but we're not used to seeing ourselves in our full complexity and having our inside conversation he told to the outside world. Andi. I think that's part of why people are upset about it, but they may not be consciously aware of it. And then I think the other thing is I thought his internal as depression like, you know, it was conscious that Vanessa Williams with the light skin woman, right, who was propagating Eurocentric beauty standards, and I personally I'm so glad I didn't want Any white women to take screen time from all the people who were there because it was like it wasn't about them. It was about how we've internalized. Those messages not saying that we're to blame for it. But you know there is Internalized repression is damp, You know, wrap rampant. So, um, I think it's a combination of both. You know, just the context into which the Hollywood context intuition movies being released, but also just the way that black people will suffer from the damage of All this internalized repression. Well, John, is this a movie that would have been otherwise released in theaters if it weren't for the pandemic. No, definitely. I mean, it's you know, and I think it would have found an audience. I mean, I think that's one of the strange things about the times we're living in that, you know, no movies are getting released theatrically. And now so many things are getting released on streaming services that has actually become highly competitive that Disney is putting a lot of it's movies on Disney. Plus Universal is putting a lot of it's movies on Premium video on demand channels. I mean, you know, AMC, the nation's biggest movie theater chain, might go out of business on the next couple of months. They've run out of cash, so Yeah. I mean, this is a movie, and not only would it be a movie that should be in theaters. Watching this movie with an audience would be a lot of fun because there'd be a lot of talk back to the screen and I think, and there was when I saw it in part City at the Sundance Festival. But you know, that is something that is going to be missed. It's a kind of film. I think that would play well with the group. And I'm gonna come back to like my takeaway. I'm gonna quote Lena Way through is in it, she says it's a story about the adversity black women face. In the workplace, and I think you could take blackout. I think it's a story about adversity that women could be. You know, a female lawyer trying to fit into a firm headed by, you know, white partners. I think it's really about People who have been marginalized just based on nothing more than the way they look, and it gets his bigger issue. That really kind of concerns me and that is like with Noah bomb back or Steven Spielberg make a movie. It's about the human experience. But if Spike Lee or Barry Jenkins or Justin Simeon make a movie is about the black experience, and that's Patently unfair because this is a movie about the human experience. These characters happen to be black, but it's about how people Are marginalized, and I think that's the takeaway that I had for the film, and I wish it wasn't kind of put in that category, like Spike Lee and Barry Jenkins. Movies are about a certain group of people is about all of us and how we judge people and how we accept people based on nothing more than how they look. I'm Jen white. You're listening to one, eh? We're reviewing the holo original movie. Bad Hair with KPCC is John Horn, film critic and Podcaster Be Andrea July, and Ronald Young, junior film critic and host of Time. Well spent podcast. Well to that end, we got this email from John, who says, I counter that a white man can understand black hair. It is forgotten that many white men suffer male pattern baldness. And starting in the twenties, get the invisible treatment that we hide behind. Hats here, die to pay and head shaving to not feel invisible in a room of attractive people, you know be Andrea. I I hear that, but I'm thinking to go back to the way black women's hair. My own included has been Politicize from the time you know, we are tiny, tiny, tiny little little girls. And even even now, when I went natural in my thirties If, on the rare occasion I would get a blowout in my hair would be straight. The comet would be Oh, You look so professional, which is Inferior thinking that my natural curly here it's considered unprofessional. In some ways. I'm curious how you've experienced this and and how you think about it is a black woman. Yeah. I mean, I think part of the reason I can have the view I have about the movie of that I have never really been interested in. We've tried it once, and I said this is not for me and I have kept my hair natural for the majority of my adult life. I'm just in general, low maintenance person. So short hair works for me because it's less time, but I do think that you know Our hair stories are very personal. You know, I used to think of it. I think of hairdressers as healers because, like I said, my grandmother was a hairdresser. And also I always knew as a child that like if my mom was in a bad mood, I used to wish he had a hair appointment because she would come back a completely different person. It's part therapy. It's part here. Selling Yeah, Yeah, yes. So it is. Motive is an interesting twist for me on like what if here just for evil, you know, like, you know, again, universalized, the black female experience. But the only way you can get that is, if you know the cues of the black women's experience. Well, we've got to have a sort of mixed opinions about this film. But there's this larger confirmation conversation about black filmmakers and criticism and they get into it a bit on the show on another string platform that started a similar conversation..

John Horn Andrea July Spike Lee Disney Barry Jenkins Vanessa Williams depression AMC Jen white Sundance Festival Hollywood Steven Spielberg Noah Ronald Young Justin Simeon
"ronald young" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"ronald young" Discussed on KPCC

"The director Justin Simeon is probably most well known for directing the movie and Netflix series Dear White people, and it follows a group of black students at a predominantly white Ivy League college. You know, John stylistically. Do you see similarities between bad hair and dear white people in both the themes and the artistic style? Yeah. I mean, he is a satirist, and he worked through comedy sometimes dark comedy, but I think he has really sharp insides, and I think one of the things that he is really good about Listen, I have no understanding or experience about what black women suffer to make their hair look unnatural. But I understand what this story is about. I think where Justin is really strong as he takes audiences into a perspective that you might not recognize or appreciate. I think that's why you're white people, especially it's too serious. I think the movie was good, but I thought the Netflix series was better. I think he takes you into a story through some strange devices. I mean, in this movie, it's horror in his Siri's. It's comedy, but I think he really kind of illuminates a perspective that you don't Wouldn't normally access. It was straight drama, and I think that's what his gift is. And I think that's why he thinks horror. Much like Jordan Peele, Khun B. Highly political of You Use it, right, Ron. What about you? I mean, I'm I'm sure you have been. Herr adjacent to some of these conversations with black wimp it well, which your take, so I grew up with the mother and sister and I always think about their her journey's When I think about how passionate I am about natural haired about a black women being allowed to do whatever they want with their hair. I always think about specific stories. My mother, it's just hurt me. From growing up, you know, and I can't say that I feel to pay for his hand. But I watched what they went through with their hand. Watch them cry tears about and even as a kid like as a 7 to 12 year old kid on this thing. I don't understand why they're crying, but I don't want them to be upset, And I think that's what my biggest problem with the movie is. They really they talk about patting the hair of the use of paint lotion, which resonated with being like, Oh, my God, That's what Piccolo ship is like a president. But this is where I feel the move we fall short. They did not make the connection between why black women have to go through these things. They kind of alluded to it. They talked about hair politics and then policing each other saying, Girl You've got to get that right here and all that, but they didn't connect it backto white supremacy and white is the reason why black people have to do this. They made it very mystical about the monster of a woman. And I'm like myself would be a white woman. Right? Like these. Are these witches away right? Like you don't know. I felt like they never made that connection. And instead they made this beautiful movie that tall and the imagery What beautiful man these great images, even about putting in a solo and what a bad So it looks like all that and the bloody hair and all that to all the beautiful things, but they don't connect it back to the roof for me up like, go back to the beginning and say, Why? Why do you have to have good here? Yes, bad here and I'm like that's where I feel like I feel like there was an attempt to do that. But it it It ended up being sort of. Ah, a bit of a tortured attempt to do it. It ended up being to my mind, at least Maura about About capitalism in this weird sort of way than it was about. I guess that there was there was an opportunity there to do something that was really powerful and mystical. But instead it became this sort of convoluted commentary on on capitalism to my mind, but that's That's me. We were hearing from other folks, Heather emailed. I watched the movie this weekend a bit uneven inconsistency of pace. Lots of fun, though. Reminded me of Chris Rocks. Commentary on Good Here. The tumbling tumbleweed. Vanessa Williams was fab. She rise on Twitter says it reminded me of death by temptation from the 19 nineties loved the African tales. Six out of 10 stars John, You spoke to Justin Simeon at Sundance this year, and you asked him about his approach. To the subject of black women and their hair. Let's take a listen. You know, it's funny. Someone asked me one of the first communities like, um I supposed to feel good or bad about the weave. And the truth is, is that the uncomfortable answer is both. You know, there are black women who get weaves because Is helping to protect their natural hair. There are black women who get weeds because that's just the aesthetic that they're going for. And I didn't want so much to moralize the choice of doing this or that to your hair, but just sort of point out that like it's one of the many aspects of our bodies that we are having to Consider or lop off, just in order to be seen as equal, not even better, but just be seen at all. I'm Jen white. You're listening to one, eh? We're talking to film critic and podcaster Be Andrea July, John Horn of KPCC in Los Angeles and Ronald Young, junior film critic and host of the time Well spent podcast..

Justin Simeon John Horn Netflix white Ivy League college Jen white Jordan Peele director Siri Vanessa Williams Herr Twitter president Ronald Young Maura Chris Rocks Sundance Ron Heather Andrea July Khun B.
"ronald young" Discussed on Power 106 FM

Power 106 FM

11:17 min | 2 years ago

"ronald young" Discussed on Power 106 FM

"You get. Yeah. That's cool. Baheen like me. Late. Get it face New York. Do you let it take? Jackson. She. Shooting. The. Back. Bill. When I just want have. Yeah. Got a. Of money. Dow. Talking. Don't you think? Now, the girls. Bag on. I got this data show me the me. Is. Yes hottest they know when everybody knows yet. Back. Good. Bill. On. Guys. Bob. Number one. The middle of ninety minutes on star. Six. Try. Bench. Clear. Hi. See? Smoke. Daddy. Gene. Boise. No money there. Problem. Now, go. Snow? Check. Check. And. Every time. Candy. Back down. Fuse. Kid. No more got over. Lucy. Oars? Valley. On the track. Move. Cowboy. Oh, my. Nobody. Perfect. Second every. Pie. Hi. Nights down right now. National grace. And I know you. Everybody knows basic late everyday poetic Justice poetic Justice told you that. Trust me now, right poem dedicated win. Impotence? Better yet with them. I really wanna know you really wanna show you off. Playmate of champagne this name job girlfriends. Gee, when it go when she went to go with the with. And a good game. They say compensation. Nation. I can tell but I could never write my lesson. I write it down. Not. What? Don't. Zana's Dom freezing. That's how we already know. When my daughter Patti villa Louis. Dashes? Sally. No, he don't. I tried to show. This show. Yes. Yes. Get together Gano you with to pick Ronald young aflame here. Civil what's going on Drake. And right now, you are in a mixed view. Both at the gate out seven news. News jump out boys as you. Play give. After that. The nose. Down. Now back..

"ronald young" Discussed on Killer Cocktails

Killer Cocktails

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"ronald young" Discussed on Killer Cocktails

"He'd been married twice. So the first wife she was need Mary crown than they had two kids together. And then he married his second wife, Pamela Phillips. They were married on October fourth nineteen Eighty-six in San Diego and Pamela have to kiss to two kids from a prior marriage and then gearing Pamela have two kids Trevor in Lois. Gary was very successful financially. So Pamela ended up so they were both in real estate. Stuff. Pamela, ends up quitting real estate job. So she's essentially just a socialite and in nineteen ninety three triana's he has massive debt and starts to pile up. So they've actually kind of separating divorce, then she's kind of doubt about it with the money, and when the money drying up now having all these financial issues, it's kinda like via. So at the time of the divorce Triano filed for chapter eleven bankruptcy. He claims forty million in debt G after several failed business dealings regarding Indian casinos. No. So his ex wife, Pamela, she moves to Aspen, Colorado. She takes her kids, and she continues like she gets back into commercial real estate. And she's over there doing that. It's then discovered that Pamela had taken out a two million dollar life insurance policy against Triano shortly before his death. Their divorce. The couple's two children were set as the beneficiaries of. She's opening it up in their names for their father. Does she do on herself to than? So that's paid out in nineteen ninety seven to Phillips and she's like the executor of their she gets stuff. So she gets the two million suicide Ronald young he's a small time criminal and he meets Pamela in Aspen, according to her he became her business advisor, this kind of small time criminal guys her business. Yeah. There's they have records of Phillips paying him sums of money throughout the nineties. So suddenly when all of this kind of comes to light later police have this theory that may be Phillips paid young to go knock off ex husband has this life insurance policy on them shortly before the bombing van rented by young was found abandoned in Yorba, Linda, California and inside the vehicle were documents pertaining to Phillips and trios divorce a map of Tucson, what an assault off shotgun. No, okay. So all of that kind of looks bad, and is a mess but nine years later so nine years after the murder on November nineteenth two thousand five and episode of America's most wanted profiles Ronald young. And this has nothing to any of that. It's about forgery Annabel's, embezzlement. Yes. But in the upper so the mentioned that he has his potential connection to this other crime. He's found two days later, they find him in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. He serves a ten month prison sentence for weapon possession in probably was on parole and stuff, and then he gets extradited back to Aspen for these charges that have to do with her so following his arrest. Investigators found phone records and Email correspondence between young and Phillips relating to triana's murders. There's like evidence because now they're looking at him and finding all this other stuff in two thousand eight he's charged with the murder of Gary Triano acquire. So although thirties tried to track her down in two thousand eight she flees after her indictment and the end up finding her in two thousand nine in Austria what? Yeah, how they find her. They're they're always that's creating. So then they have to have a extradition. Yeah. So then the she doesn't get protected until two thousand ten while this kinda takes awhile after a brief episode in two thousand eleven where they're saying she's not fit to stand trial. There's kind of arguments about her mental stuff. She's declared able to stand trial in two thousand twelve. So she's arrested for his murder, and she then out here. So she goes to trial and she keeps an innocent medicine. She's like pleaded with the judge she's talking to people in court, and they're not have it. She's like a mob hit. It wasn't with me.

Pamela Phillips Aspen murder business advisor Gary Triano triana Triano Ronald young Mary crown San Diego Fort Lauderdale Colorado Trevor Florida forgery California embezzlement America
"ronald young" Discussed on Power 106 FM

Power 106 FM

06:17 min | 2 years ago

"ronald young" Discussed on Power 106 FM

"Bannon. Now, you only say cousin not now. Mentioned. But again, you think I am. Cousin? That she. Everything's. Pot in that it would end. Everything. Not even speaking. So my friends. Not in. Pitching. By now. Kasowitz sucks. They're on their own. John, john. China. But. You probably think that you up. I think. Now. Down. See you. Do. It was pretty cool. How can novel you? Goes on. Can you do? Catchy. That you. But now you only cousin. Down to get you anything. Everything you say. Promise. To be. You only. Too. Mission. Thank you. Doc. Daughters, less Jarl highbrow both right now. I mean talking about my live I'll use this jar high. But on Friday now. John. Pride. But i'm. Heavy. Fame. I. Catholic. Down freezing. That's how we already know. When my daughter, Patty, Louis them, that's your Saudi Dono Methuen. I've tried to show. Yeah. I've tried to show. Yeah. Get get with the pick and Ronald young aflame here. Civil JT JT. Both at the gate out. Savigny? Thank you mean boys as boys up coast play to be we give. Rimi at post down the nose. You may know most now is. Beco- popular into crew headed. John Joseph and color as in my junior Senator froze any you know, the. Two. Please. Play to form or no, I don't follow. Stacey dash most. He's got a clue. Polities off on my on my input. All grow group him. I say I need the boat. Turn. You come in to enter three. Oh, five K means like a monk along. Top off his just a road from what we go in. Wean even make it to Rome. And she thought it was ocean. Just abo- now got open. It's just a ghost who put together on the go sell short face. Tommy blue. Sewing said someone said. Yes. Baby..

"ronald young" Discussed on Power 106 FM

Power 106 FM

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"ronald young" Discussed on Power 106 FM

"When it was. I got a plan. To prevent your friends. Greatest at it before it all is how much money coming. How many people have data? How many? How many? Many. How many times? How many? Change. Zana's Dom freezing crowd. That's how we already know when Donald product. Louis. Dash assadi. No, he don't know. Nothing else. I've tried to show. Yeah. I've tried to show. Yes. Yes. Get together gonna pick and Ronald young sick. Drake. And right now. Both at the gate outside. Yeah. Jump busboys as you boys. Way too. Rimi post. The knows now is. Jumba Joseph in color. Senate froze any. Mchugh? Hey to form or Yano follow. Stacey dash Mercedes got a clue. Does on my take. Grow. Grow him. I say. Turn his function. You come into the three zero five creamy like among. He's just a road. Are we going? Wean even make it to. And she was ocean. Gotta open, and it's just a ghost who put together. I'm sure he faced Tommy. Sewing sewing. Silence. Yeah. I remember, sir. Mike accounting. I'll say. Taste. AM? Eighty. I still. Jess. Rush out baby. Oh, he's levels poet. Ombo? I'll sit down low..

"ronald young" Discussed on Power 106 FM

Power 106 FM

03:58 min | 3 years ago

"ronald young" Discussed on Power 106 FM

"I just bought something. Thank you. Stuck? Different. Thing. All I got it doors for my mind. Kesse. Like, all my S's. Is a body. Highway. Mind. Oh, I know you work. Hey, no part in it. Jay. We're just so much smarter than them. Maybe I just needed you. Drank a Latin nine, oh, she can go take you you on though first off. I'm stop by saying is. Down freezing cloud. That's how we already know. Donald. Donald nothing now. This show. Yep. I've tried to show. Yes. Yeah. Get to give Ronald young aflame here. This is awesome. Both at the gate outside when? Yeah. Coast to be. Rehmi post. The nose. Now is going. The girl. John Joseph in color. Pros, and they may not. John. Did you? To fall more Yano. Don't follow. Stacey dash said. He's got a go. Does on my take on? Grow. Grow him. I say I need the boat. Turn is. You.