32 Burst results for "Ron Elving"

"ron elving" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"ron elving" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"And Ron Elving. Let me enlist you in this conversation. Uh, President, this president can't even get every member of his own party in the Senate to support his spending bill. Yes, And and you know that 10 minute span in which these people got to know enough about each other to know that they were going to risk their lives or give their lives together. Clearly the difference between those 10 minutes and Perhaps the 20 years we've had since, and the years we will have going going forward is that they had a shared realization of the shared threat, and they could clearly see what they were called upon to do. Now we have we have heard it speculated that what it would take to get Americans together. Today would be perhaps an interplanetary alien threat. You know something from the movies that would get everyone on earth or everyone, at least in this country. To feel a common threat. In that sense, some people would think that a pandemic would do it. Some people might think that the threat of climate change would make people see their shared fate. And yet, that has not been our experience with those issues thus far as my colleague in his Prepared remarks that were on video. The president made a point of mentioning unity and invoking that spirit so many Americans felt following The attacks of September 11th. Didn't he? America at its best? Wasn't that his phrase? Exactly. I mean, there does seem to be this level of nostalgia that I think we've heard from some of the people who spoke today, You know George W. Bush camel hairs but also from the president himself in his prepared remarks, speaking about the fact that there was this rare moment of national unity. This guy I am struck by this this sort of group recollection that we have of how United the country was 20 years ago, because, you know, I think in the intervening years, you look at some of the consequences. Some of the decisions that emanated from that Rare blip of unity and you look at the fact that the decision to go to war in Afghanistan was agreed upon by all but one member of Congress, you look at such unanimity in passing things like the Patriot Act. And I do wonder to some degree that the sense that the unity that we had in that moment had ripple effects and repercussions that actually created helped create some of the divisions that we see today, and I think that's something that we're all kind of collectively trying to figure out. And as much as there seemed to be some Some inspiration to President Biden stepping back a little bit from events and letting other people speak today. Do you think and letting other people take center stage? You know, the White House says that he was trying to reach in and visit all three of the September 11th sites Today. New York City Shanksville, Pennsylvania. And then, of course, as well, the Pentagon right here outside of Washington, D C, and that the schedule just didn't allow for prepared remarks of that sort. But I think it's also significant that the person we're hearing from today prominently. The form only for former president was former President George W. Bush, who was in office that day. Well, thank you very much.

Ron Elving George W. Bush Patriot Act Congress 10 minutes White House Afghanistan 10 minute Biden Senate 20 years ago Today today 20 years earth September 11th President George W. Bush The attacks of September 11th New York City Shanksville, Pen America
"ron elving" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:29 min | 1 year ago

"ron elving" Discussed on KQED Radio

"American and coalition forces are in the early stages of military operations to disarm Iraq to free its people and to defend the world from grave danger. Bush was reelected in 2000 and four largely on the strength of his response to 9 11. But even then support for the war on terror was waning and repulsion was rising as Americans heard reports of torture, such as waterboarding and other techniques used to obtain information about potential attacks. The administration denied allegations of torture. This is CIA Director George Tenet in 2000 and seven on CBS's 60 Minutes. We don't torture people. Let me say that again to you. We don't torture people. Yet as early as 2000 and four CBS News and others had obtained photographs of life inside a prison in Iraq, known as Abu Ghraib. Where U. S personnel had subjected prisoners to physical and sexual abuse. Documents, known as the torture papers would emerge years after the invasion of Iraq to show the use of torture had been accepted. The theory was that the Geneva Convention The international rules of war did not apply. But the U. S Supreme Court would hold in 2000 and six that the rules indeed did apply. And by 2014. The agency admitted that it did use those techniques. Over the course of two decades. Such moral conflicts and other forms of fallout from 9 11 have become a permanent part of our history and a part of who we are. And while we observe the day of 9, 11 and honor all we've lost that day. We also count the costs that came in the years that followed. NPR's senior Washington editor and correspondent Ron Elving. Since the Department of Homeland Security has created, it has grown to become the third largest Cabinet department in the U. S government. Its responsibilities include everything from disaster relief to border security. Alejandro Mayorkas as secretary for Homeland security. When we spoke yesterday, we asked what he thinks is prevented another attack on the scale of 9 11. The agencies and departments across the federal government learned to share information to learn how to identify threats before they materialize. And we've also learned critically to share information with our state and local tribal territorial partners. It requires an all of society. Vigilance and response is domestic terrorism a larger threat right now than anything from overseas. We do think it is, of course, for a number of years after 9 11, we were focused on the on the foreign terrorist threat. We saw that evolved to the individual radicalized here in the United States by foreign terrorist organizations. And now, over the last few years, we've seen the rise of the domestic violent extremists drawn to violence because of an ideology of hate, You know, Scott, the evolution of the threat doesn't mean that the prior iterations have disappeared. But we've just seen a different threat rise to prominence over time. What about cyberwarfare? Are there elements in Russia and China already waging what all carefully call a kind of cyber warfare in the United States? I think they are in the consumer, small business, the large enterprise, our critical infrastructure. We're all vulnerable, and that's why we all have to be vigilant. Increase our cyber hygiene and build stronger and better defenses. Was the department surprised but where they directing so many resources say toured combating Islamist extremism. That the cyber threat was discounted for a while. I think quite frankly, our focus has grown as the threat has increased, and it was really the colonial pipeline attack that impacted the American consumer that brought cybersecurity and cyberwar If you will. To these top of the American public's mind there as I don't have to tell you, Mr Secretary, tens of thousands of Afghan refugees now and resettlement centers in the U. S and U. S bases overseas. You've been charged with leading what's now called Operation Allies welcome. Give us some idea of what your agency has to do to help. So many people make new lives in the U. S a privilege for us to leave this effort for screening and vetting. The Afghan nationals who are coming to the United States to protect and ensure the safety of the American public and the homeland. Then we are addressing their immediate needs with providing them with food. Water town selling covid testing vaccination We're moving them to military facilities if they do not already have family and friends here in the United States, it's really an extraordinarily moving Operation and effort. What do you What do you say, Mr Secretary to those voices that have, um and you've heard them? I'm sure who raised concerns that there might be aspiring criminals or even terrorists embedded with Afghan refugees. What I say in response scarred is that that's what we do in the federal government. We screen and we ensure that the individuals who are coming to the United States do not seek to do us harm I have to share with you. If I may story, though, you know what Fort Lee, one of the military facilities where the Afghans are brought to decide until the resettled. They get off the bus, and American soldiers give the Children and American flag And the Children's fathers. Instinctively put their hands over their hearts. In reverence and in gratitude to the country that has given them safety and a place of refuge. That's who we are. Alejandro Mayorkas is secretary of Homeland Security. Thanks so much for being with us..

Alejandro Mayorkas Ron Elving 2014 2000 United States Scott CBS Bush U. S Supreme Court yesterday NPR CIA CBS News Russia George Tenet Geneva Convention Department of Homeland Securit China Homeland Security tens of thousands
"ron elving" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"ron elving" Discussed on KQED Radio

"With respect to covid. We've got about half the population vaccinated far higher percentages among adults, far lower among young people, and there's a wide divide among the states. Really saddens me to listen to Dr Frederick. Personally, My heart goes out to the people in Missouri. I went to high school in the Kansas City area. Missouri is also called the Show Me State. Leyland. It's proud of being hard to convince But facts are facts as the doctor said. Covid is coming back where vaccination rates are low and vaccination rates in Missouri are among the lowest under 30% in many rural counties of the state. So we got more good economic news this week. Friday's job numbers beat expectations is the country on solid economic ground. We do seem to be getting there. The jobless rate is still elevated, and some employers say it's hard to find people to fill jobs, at least at current wages, But the trend line is remarkably positive. 850,000 is a lot of new jobs in one month. The stock markets are setting records week after week, and people are expecting to be back at work back in school and back on the ball fields. This fall. The Supreme Court issued the last batch of the sessions big rulings this week and the court sided with the state of Arizona and one of them, the court said Arizona could throw out ballots that were mistakenly cast in the wrong precinct and limit the collection of ballots for delivery by others. But the larger fear here is that this ruling, the way it was worded is a kind of green light to the states that want to tighten restraints on voting in all kinds of ways. Now, the court said. Even if these measures affect people of color disproportionately, which they did, that did not necessarily mean it violated constitutional rights. Now that is quite a departure from the spirit of the Voting Rights Act, and the way that act has been read by courts since 1965, including the lower federal courts in this very case, so look This decision was 63. But it is hard to imagine it would not have been just the opposite 63 the other way if the 2016 election had come out differently. It's going to be a select congressional committee to investigate the January 6th attack on the capital when Trump supporters tried to stop Congress and the vice president from certifying the results of the 2020 election. What are your hopes for that? In terms of settling the debate or healing the partisan divide. This panel does not offer much hope it would have been much better to have an independent commission. But Republicans by and large said no to that, they said it was time to move on. Stop talking about January 6th. So now we have this version. Instead, it does have a Republican Liz chaining from Wyoming who is going to be part of it. But of course she was one of the people who did hold President Trump responsible that day. And so this will not please many Trump supporters. But it could bring a wealth of information to light and perhaps in a way that will reach people and reveal the reality of what happened. And for that, I do have hope that's NPR's senior Washington editor and correspondent Ron Elving. Ron..

Missouri Congress Ron Elving Kansas City Trump Voting Rights Act 850,000 Covid Ron Frederick Republicans Wyoming January 6th Arizona NPR Liz Friday one month this week covid
"ron elving" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:01 min | 1 year ago

"ron elving" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Research that improves pre K to 12 Learning more at edge utopia dot org Win today again with 30 mile per hour gusts expected later on this afternoon. And some sunshine. Some clouds, especially some morning clouds, temperatures ranging from the upper sixties at the coast to the low to mid eighties inland. This is weekend edition from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Thanks for joining us a busy week in Washington, D C. Infrastructure talks collapse Oh, come on, but long live infrastructure talks. It's going to take more than just 10 Republicans. I think the Republicans will tell you that, because quite honestly, there is no guarantee we're going to keep all the Democrats Montana Senator Jon Tester, who is one of the new gang of 10, now trying to pick up a bit bipartisan flag on infrastructure. Also more troubling revelations about the Justice Department's actions during the Trump administration. And, of course the president is in Europe. Try to reassure allies and prepare for a meeting with Vladimir Putin. We're joined now by NPR. Rana NPR's Ron Elving. Ron, Thanks so much for being with us. Good to be with you, Scott and let's begin with the president at the G seven. Is this the world stage debut that that he would like? It's certainly the stage he would like and that he's been hoping for. It's all but tailor made for a new president to step up and step into the role, especially a new president with all of Biden's experience. Now these relationships the UK the G seven, the NATO heads of state. These ought to be his wheelhouse, and these meetings are an excellent chance for relationship repairs. After the frictions of the last four years, and then on Wednesday, Biden takes whatever momentum he has gained into the big showdown in Geneva with Vladimir Putin and this morning, the White House indicated there would not be a joint news conference after this meeting, which might be an indication they're expecting some stormy weather in Geneva. While the president's away, there seems to be a growing scandal left over from the previous administration, the the Justice Department under President Trump Trump reportedly had been collecting by subpoena data of journalists and lawmakers. What have we found out? This is the kind of tool federal prosecutors usually used to go after law breakers, not lawmakers or journalists, for that matter. But this data seizure began fairly early in the Trump administration, when Trump was accusing some of his Democratic critics on the House Intelligence Committee, in particular of leaking sensitive information to reporters. So we learned earlier this spring that the phone and Internet data of some reporters had been secretly seized during the Trump years. Now we know they were doing the same with at least two members of Congress. Along with their staffs and even their families, Children. This apparently led to no action against any of these people, and it has ended. But the new management at the Department of Justice says it will conduct an internal investigation anyway, to see how all this began and how extensive it might have been. And what about the reaction? I will not be surprised to hear the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee. That's California. Congressman Adam Schiff has called this an outrageous abuse of power. He and his California colleague, Eric Swalwell, on the committee, where the two targets And meanwhile, Democratic leaders on the hill want to have an investigation of their own calling in the two men who ran the Department of Justice through nearly all of the trump term. That would be attorney General Jeff Sessions and William Barr. We've made people wait for the infrastructure discussion. Let's hold the mirror into the nose of an infrastructure deal. Is it still breathing? Well look, the big multi trillion dollar bill that bill that Biden has been pushing the American jobs plan that it does not seem to have the votes as proposed. So the question is whether a smaller scale effort might have a chance. You know something that's far less ambitious on climate change and includes no tax increases. And now in the Senate, we have a new bipartisan team. He referred to these new power brokers on the scene. Five Republicans five Democrats. We still haven't seen their details, and there's no guarantee they can get the boats for their ideas any more than Biden can for his Finally, Um, if we need money to pay for infrastructure, it comes from tax dollars. Um, And there was a big report this week that there are any number of big name billionaires. I suppose they're all big name. Who reportedly have not been paying any income tax. Tax avoidance by the ultra rich. It's not new, but we've rarely seen the numbers laid out so clearly as we did this week, the nonprofit reporting organization Propublica Got a huge download from an unnamed source in the IRS, and their report indicates the richest of the rich Warren Buffett, Jeff Bezos, Michael Bloomberg paid shockingly little income tax to the federal government in recent years. Far less in percentage terms than ordinary Americans and in some cases in some years, literally no tax at all. So it's possible for a super billionaire to see their wealth increase at the same time, minimize the kind of income that has to be taxed. And that's one place Congress could go if it wanted to change the law. And if it could get both parties to agree to do so. NPR's Ron Elving, thanks so much. Thank you, Scott. India's outbreak of coronavirus, which is the biggest and deadliest in the world, may be easing. Today. The country confirmed about 84,000 new cases. That's high But far less than what India saw during its peak last month. Some Indian states are beginning to lift lockdown measures. But there's a challenge ahead, getting more than a billion people vaccinated. NPR's Lauren Frayer reports. Thanks to its a rainy monsoon morning.

Jeff Bezos Eric Swalwell Michael Bloomberg William Barr Lauren Frayer Warren Buffett Adam Schiff Vladimir Putin Scott Scott Simon Wednesday House Intelligence Committee Ron Ron Elving Europe Democrats Biden Department of Justice Today NATO
"ron elving" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"ron elving" Discussed on KQED Radio

"So getting back to the issue of surprises today. I mean, You know, we we did get one on the floor. Washington State Congressman Dan Newhouse, who who who admitted that with a heavy heart he was going to vote for impeachment. Had most of the Republicans speaking really from the far right pro Trump loyalist wing. And we hadn't heard from the top House Republican leader Kevin McCarthy, who's basically been M I A He did show up and do something that he hadn't been willing to do in a while he while he didn't support impeachment He pushed back in his colleagues who were making false claims about what happened and about the president. Let's let's listen to Kevin McCarthy. Some say. Riots were caused by Antifa. There's absolutely no evidence of that. Conservatives should be the first to say so. Conservatives also know that the only thing that stops mob violence is to meet it with force rooted in justice and backed by moral courage. And last week we saw mob violence met by courage, sacrifice and heroism from the brave men and women who protect this institution every day. Michelle. Might want you to have to step in here and talk to Ron Elving. If we could. Okay, let's go to Ron Elving on talk about some of the themes that we've been hearing throughout this Thursday of debate first on the rule. And then on the article of impeachment itself, But I do have to say that there was a very different tone this morning when there was initial debate on the rule, Ron, it seemed that That it was much more of the kind of kind of bipartisanship and uh, kind of mutual courtesy that many people have covered the Congress for sometime expect to see and in the afternoon it took a very different turn and one of the major themes of this afternoon, which, as was said earlier was very much. It seemed focused on the president's most loyal, most fervent supporters in the Congress the most hard right Was this comparison between the invasion of the capital and the property destruction that we saw earlier in the summer that these members attributed to black lives matter Protests and I just want to play a bit of what Matt Gates of Florida had to say about that. And here it is. Denounced the political violence from all ends of the spectrum. But make no mistake The left in America has incited farm or political violence than the right for months. Our cities burned police stations burned. Our businesses were shattered and they said nothing or their cheer lead for it, and they fund raise for it, and they allowed it to happen in the greatest country in the world. Now, some have cited Some excited the metaphor that the president let the flame will they let actual flames actual fires and time from out Spire Della Bea Warner in the House. Okay. Want to point out here that in that case made a number of unfounded and debunked of statements about election fraud, And so, but that's in part. What sparked the intense reaction he got on the floor. But Ron talk about that, if you would, if The debate in the morning was, as you say much more civil. It was led by Tom Cole, the chairman and the Republican ranking member on the Rules Committee, a very gentlemanly member who looked at the legality of all of this very dispassionately. In the afternoon. The Republicans were led by Jim Jordan, who is now the ranking member on the Judiciary Committee. And that is the warfare committee. That's where the impeachment trial was a zit were held on the House side. It's not a trial course. But it was hearings. And that's what people saw a television and that is really one of the places where the partisanship Congress burns brightest. So when Jim Jordan took over, and as you said earlier, he was calling primarily on the people who are the fiercest loyalists. They engaged in a lot of what about is, um, you've heard that expression Well, all right. What the president did maybe wasn't so great. And maybe it was bad And certainly what happened last Wednesday was a terrible threat to each of us as individuals and to our democracy. But what about? And what about? And what about all those other things that happened last summer? And didn't the Democrats call for de funding? The police are on a need to test they wanted to go. I need to interrupt just briefly to say that we have lots more discussion and analysis to come. But we need to take a short break Right now. You're listening to a live special coverage from NPR news. We.

Ron Elving president Congress Jim Jordan Kevin McCarthy Congressman Dan Newhouse Matt Gates Spire Della Bea Warner NPR Michelle Washington Judiciary Committee fraud America Rules Committee Tom Cole chairman Florida
COVID-19 stimulus deal remains elusive as Trump signs 2-day spending bill to avoid shutdown

Weekend Edition Saturday

02:06 min | 1 year ago

COVID-19 stimulus deal remains elusive as Trump signs 2-day spending bill to avoid shutdown

"Congressional lawmakers avoided a government shutdown by giving themselves two more days to agree on a $900 billion covert relief bill. Or not, it's financial relief. The American people have been waiting on for months and months. Joined now as we are most Saturdays by NPR's senior Washington editor Ron Elving. Ron, thanks so much for being with us good to be with you. Scott. Negotiators said They had a framework for this package a few days ago. What's in it? About a trillion dollars scot a little less so, so it looks a little less expensive. That keeps some of the senators on board who said they would never vote for another trillion dollar bill, and it is a lot smaller than the Leave package we saw last spring. This one has about 300 billion for businesses. Another 300 billion for unemployment benefits. We expect there to be stimulus checks again. For individuals. They'll only be about $600 this time, about half assed much his last spring. But aid to states and localities has been dropped for now, as well as liability protection for employers, and it's all attached to a stop. Gap funding bill passed just last night, And when we say stopgap, we mean Just a little bit of stopgap. It only lasts until tomorrow night, which is kind of a nice metaphor for how our federal budget has been working in recent years. Democrats won't get all aren't getting all of what they want Republicans already there. I'm not sure where they couldn't have just recognized the obvious six months ago and passed a bill. But is this exhausted? Kind of compromise? A preview of how the incoming congressman work? Oh, you have to hope not. But on the other hand, why expect better? Unless the Democrats can win both those runoff elections in Georgia in January, there will be divided government and if the Democrats are nominally in charge, their margin in the House is only going to be a handful of seats. And in the Senate, there would be no margin at all. They would be 50 50 with the vice president would be Kamila Harris by then, breaking the tie. So everything will be a negotiation with Republican leader Mitch McConnell, much as it is now

Ron Elving NPR RON Scott Washington Georgia Kamila Harris Senate House Mitch Mcconnell
"ron elving" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:24 min | 1 year ago

"ron elving" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Us. It is a sad and sobering week. Number of deaths from covert 19 has never been higher in the United States on Thursday alone, 2753 people died here. For context. 540 people have died in South Korea from covert since January. And public health officials say the situation will grow worse. NPR's Ron Elving senior Washington editor and correspondent joins US run Thanks so much for being with us. Good to be with you, Scott. Millions of Americans were sick, too many or dead millions more out of work food lines along. Why can't the U S Congress Congress, which yesterday in the House Bipartisan support voted to decriminalize marijuana. Not able to agree on a bill when Americans needed most, you know, Congress has a house in the Senate. They share a building, but sometimes they don't seem to share much else. There are a few reasons to be more hopeful about a new relief package. But you mentioned the marijuana bill that passed in the house. They're not gonna pay any attention to it in the Senate. The House passed a big relief bill last spring. The Senate didn't want to have anything to do with the bill that the House passed. So we we look for change, and we have seen some change in the last month. Number one. As you say the pandemic. It's worse than ever, really throwing shade on the holidays. At this point number two is the economy. The jobs number this week was really disappointing. And that's all on the virus to plus one big hang up on the earlier efforts at a bill last summer and fall was the aid to states and localities that were hurting the most well, now the states and localities that are hurting our Well include places like the Dakotas, and that's making at least some Republicans more willing to the deal. Speaker. Pelosi said the Democrats were willing to settle for limited relief bill because the Biden administration Well work quickly on more aid. But does that just kick the can down the road could be and the Republicans may not go for that. Right now. You have roughly half of the Senate Republicans still on that page where they say they don't want to do anything more. They just think enough has been done. Too much of it has been done on the cuff and they just don't see any need for that much further commitment. But we also see Wall Street expecting some fresh stimulus because of the factors that we just mentioned a moment ago, particularly the softening of the economy, and there is that special election coming up in a few weeks in Georgia. We're two of the Republican senators. Incumbents are in jeopardy. So all of that means that Mitch McConnell, Senate majority leader has a little bit different calculus than he had a month ago. As we note the virus grows, many parts of California intensive care units are approaching capacity, new stay at home orders and restrictions. Um, I raised the question again because there's three prominent Democratic politicians have had two of them. California have had to apologize in recent days. For urging their constituents to stay at home than going out to Michelin Star restaurants. Governor Newsome of California mayor of San Francisco, London Breed and then The mayor of Austin, Texas, took a private plane to a Mexican resort. We have a woman on our show today unemployed worker who lives in Arizona who said to us the people who make the rules don't have to live by them. Scott. There is no excuse for that kind of hypocrisy, no matter who is guilty of it, And it's the kind of thing that voters remember, regardless of party. Donald Trump has reportedly raised more than $200 million since election Day. For what 200 million and counting. No end in sight. The fundraising appeals keep coming several every day if you're on the right lists. So that money is ostensibly to fight legal battles against the election result and against its certification, But that fight is largely over something like 50 different legal actions have been dismissed and even ridiculed by the courts, including by conservative justices are judges. I should say, some of whom some of them appointed by Donald Trump. But you know $200 million. It's an awful lot of money. The Trump campaign has been fighting this largely with a ragtag little band of ultra loyalists that keeps getting smaller. Big League law firms that were on board at first had been involved. They all bailed out weeks ago. So where does most of that $200 million go to a political action committee that Trump can use for later campaign? Or convert to other uses. Once he's out of office, you can expect there to be more stories and more legal wrangling about that in the months to come, Run, Elving. Thanks so much. Thank you. Scott. NPR's science correspondent Richard Harris has been monitoring vaccine progress. And now, of course, the rollout. Is nearly at hand. Richard Good morning. Good morning, Scott. We have heard and absorb so much devastating news about the worst thing of the pandemic this week, But so let's try to look instead on potentially encouraging news. Yeah, that works for me for sure is hope, really, just around the corner. Well, I can't promise. But all indications are we are moving in the right direction. And at a remarkable speed, I started the week talking to the president of modern a doctor, Steven Hogue about the prospects for his company's Cupid vaccine. New data showed that it was 94% effective overall. And among the relatively few test subjects who took the vaccine and gotten sick anyway, he says, not one of them had a severe case. So it looks like in the trial. We've been 100% effective at preventing severe covert 19, which is really what's driving the burden of disease in hospitals and ultimately straining our public health systems. The FDA has now reviewing what sounds like really encouraging data. And the Fizer vaccine had similar results. In fact, health authorities in the United Kingdom approved visors vaccine last week and the FDA will now review it at a public hearing this coming Thursday. If it looks good, and okay from the U. S could come really almost immediately. And when, When would people begin to get it? Well, people at the top of the list like health care workers and older people who live in nursing homes and other group facilities like that they could get the first dose of their first two shots this month. List after that is long and will take many months to go through. It includes essential workers, people with underlying health conditions and those over the age of 65. Beyond that, is everyone else, though. You know, there are still big questions about pregnant women and Children because you know they were not part of the original studies. What happens to them into this scenario? Well, it's not entirely clear when it comes to pregnant women. The FDA could simply leave that choice up to the women and their doctors. Vaccine researchers don't expect the shot will put the mother or newborn at risk, but you know they don't have a lot of data to draw on. Now Children are trickier Question. One school of thought is they are unlikely to get seriously ill, so doctor should take their time to study this group carefully and not being a rush to vaccinate them. But in a federal advisory committee meeting yesterday, Dr Stanley Plotkin from the University of Pennsylvania, said kids do spread the disease and they do face some risk, according to several studies. He cited About 2% of the Children or admitted soup, pediatric intensive care There was very low mortality 20.8% but nevertheless Dead child is not a happy thing. Certainly not. Well, what do we know about the safety of the vaccine and adults? Vaccine. Researchers say that most serious side effects and vaccines have tended to show up within the first two months in the FDA already has data about that period for many of the study participants Be safe. The government has also particular a very elaborate system to follow the health of people once they've been vaccinated. For example, the CDC has developed a smartphone app that vaccine recipients can use to track their health after getting a shot. Dr. Tim Shimabukuro at the CDC said it will send out frequent text messages asking for health updates if they report that they missed work. Or unable to do normal daily activities or receive medical care. We consider that a clinically important health impact and at that point we will reach out and call the individual. Now people will have to opt into the system, but the CDC hopes a lot of people will. At any rate, those safety data will be collected with a whole bunch of other systems. NPR's Richard Harris. Thanks so much Hey, anytime, Scotland..

Senate Scott FDA NPR Donald Trump marijuana United States Richard Harris Senate Republicans CDC U S Congress Congress Congress South Korea California Washington Mitch McConnell
Michigan officials call for audit after state certifies election results

Snap Judgment

00:58 sec | 2 years ago

Michigan officials call for audit after state certifies election results

"The chairs of the Republican National Committee and Michigan's Republican Party are calling on Michigan's boards of state canvassers. Delay certifying results of the presidential campaign for two weeks to allow for a full audit of votes in Wayne County, the state's largest. They cite unsubstantiated claims of irregularities alleged by losing Republican Senate candidate NPR's Ron Elving says other legal efforts by President Trump and his supporters to de Legitimize election results have not been successful. In Pennsylvania, you got a blizzard of court filings of the state and federal levels that have produced basically nothing. One after another has been withdrawn or dismissed with no change. Georgia certified its results on Friday, so another one in the barn, the Trump campaign could still seek another machine recount there after the hand recount that's already been done. But all the relevant statewide officials have already signed off, including the governor, who is a major

Michigan's Republican Party Ron Elving President Trump Republican National Committee Wayne County Michigan NPR Senate Pennsylvania Georgia
"ron elving" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"ron elving" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Are told free number is available. It's 8667336786. I'll repeat that. 8667336786 if you'd like to During the program, and if you would, and we'd like to hear from you can also get in touch with us, and we can hear from you on Twitter and Facebook. We're at KQED Forum or email Any questions? You may have to forum that kqed dot or talking with Seema met a political reporter for the L A Times. And Ron Elving, senior editor and correspondent on the Washington desk for NPR News. Number of emails Coming in here, Let me read at least a couple of them before we go to a minute break, Nick writes. Trump's aim is to insure sufficient level of resentment and fury. Is established within his base. It's a strategy that has little to do with the reality of the election, and Davey writes. Consider the Gordon not concede until mid December. 2000 consider the Hillary Clinton spoken, stated The 2016 election was stolen from her. I don't want to hear Trump concede too early and then claim for the next four years that he was cheated. We'll hear from or of you When we return, looking actually had a quick question. Maybe Ron, you can answer. David wants to know what recourse well, President Biden have on inauguration Day regarding Trump putting people who are loyal to him and keep positions at the Pentagon. Does this pose a danger to the peaceful transition of power? We're coming up on a break here, but your thoughts I would say that there is real concern, particularly with regard to intelligence and the Department of Defense because if the president is planning and I'm not saying saying that he is planning, But if he is planning to somehow defy the decision of the electoral College, then, of course. The disposition.

Trump Ron Elving KQED Forum Hillary Clinton Twitter Seema President Biden NPR News Facebook Davey Department of Defense L A Times Washington president senior editor reporter Gordon Nick
"ron elving" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"ron elving" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That every vote counts that has been the promise of democracies in 17 87. It's still the promise of democracy and I intend here in Pennsylvania. Make sure we keep that promise. In Pennsylvania Mail in ballots postmarked on Election Day will be counted if received by Friday. Rachel Lucinschi. NPR NEWS Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. The electoral vote tally stands at 264 for Joe Biden and 214 for president Trump. Biden has stopped short of declaring outright victory as Trump seems to have done, But he projected confidence during a speech in Wilmington, Delaware. As NPR's as Mahala reports, The Associated Press has called Michigan and Wisconsin for Joe Biden. He's now just one state away from 270 electoral votes. I'm not here to declare that we've won. But I am here to report The count has finished. We believe we will be the winners. Biden also called for calm and seemed to be trying to tamp down some of the heated rhetoric and dubious allegations from President Trump. Trump's campaign is calling for a recount in Wisconsin and lawsuits toehold ballot counting in Pennsylvania and Michigan. Meanwhile, Biden is insisting that although he is running as a Democrat, he intends to govern for all Americans, and he encouraged people not to see their political opponents as enemies. Asma Khalid NPR NEWS voter Turnout for this year's election has already surpassed 2016 levels. Both campaigns fought for support among blue collar workers. With Joe Biden pushing for high participation in urban areas and President Trump seeking to boost turnout in rule communities. NPR senior editor Ron Elving says the result she was a highly Divided electorate. It's hard to imagine it being more starkly divided not just by race or gender or income inequality, but a breathtaking urban rural divide. It is becoming the most important divide in our politics, diametrically opposed worlds of people in the metro population centers. Opposed to those who live somewhere between those centers, and they're as different as the north and south were before the civil War, NPR's Ron Elving in California voters have sided with aunt based companies, insisting that their drivers are independent contractors. They rejected a state law that would have required the companies to treat those workers as employees. Entitled to benefits. This is NPR news. The AP is declared re election for the mayor of Portland, Oregon, Ted Wheeler faced a tough challenger to his political left and anger from moderate voters and business owners who were frustrated by months of protests. You know important, authorities say the Oregon National Guard has been activated tonight after protesters began riding in the city's downtown area. Protests over vote counting and other issues played out in several cities across the nation Wednesday in New York City. Thousands took part in a largely peaceful demonstration along Manhattan's Fifth Avenue. But police made arrests during a smaller protest against police misconduct. Many parts of Central America remain on high alert as the now.

Joe Biden President Trump NPR Pennsylvania Ron Elving Wisconsin Michigan Oregon National Guard Asma Khalid Rachel Lucinschi New York City president Bethlehem Manhattan Central America Delaware
Rep. John Lewis Makes Final Stop in Atlanta

Morning Edition

24:00 min | 2 years ago

Rep. John Lewis Makes Final Stop in Atlanta

"Rights activist and icon who became a moral force in the United States. Congress will be laid to rest. Today. He's been celebrated in a series of memorials this week and this past Sunday, he received a hero's sendoff in his native state of Alabama. And on Monday, Congressman Lewis was honored in Washington, DC It was an emotional Ceremony with lawmakers. His colleagues Speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi, played a portion of a speech that Lewis gave to graduates at Emory University in 2014. As young people. You must understand that there are forces that would take us back to another period. But you must know that would mark warned by way made too much progress and we're going to make you some step back. Some delays some disappointment, but you must never give up. I give in. You must keep the faith and keep so eyes on the prize. That is so calling. That is your mission That is tomorrow. Obligation that is oh, man. They get out there and do it getting away. Lewis lay in state in the Capitol Rotunda following the ceremony, making him the first black lawmaker to receive that honor. And today, Congressman Lewis comes home to Atlanta, Georgia. The funeral service is being held at the historic Ebeneezer Baptist Church, where the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr was once co pastor and joining us Now is Emma Hurt. She's a reporter with our member station W. A. B in Atlanta, and she joins us live from outside of Ebeneezer Baptist and Emma describe what it's like there where you are right now. Hi, Emma. Can you hear me? Emma will be joining us shortly. She is outside of Ebenezer Baptist Church. Now let's go to Debbie Elliot. We'll check back in with Emma. And just a few moments. Hi, Debbie. How are you? I am good. I know that you spent a lot of time in Alabama over the weekend. There were several memorials and services. It was quite a scene. Right. You know, I think the thing that stands out the most was was when he was in Selma and his casket was on this horse drawn carriage. And it crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge, of course, that iconic place where he was met with state troopers and sheriff's deputies who beat him up in a peaceful march for voting rights. Back in 1965 and people had come to sort of witness him make that Symbolic final crossing. Yeah, you've been You've known the congressman for for many years. You spoke with him back in 2015 at that. Edmund Pettus Bridge. Tell us about that. Yes. So this was in advance of 50th anniversary celebrations marking You know, 50 years since the Voting Rights Act passed because of that horrible incident on that bridge. The nation in the world really became aware of the brutality against African Americans who were pushing for equality in the American South. And so I met him there. We stood at the foot of the bridge, and we had a conversation about what it was like back then. And let's listen to a little bit, and he describes what happened on that came before. Beating us. Shrimping with horses. Releasing the tick and I was getting here. A state trooper with the night stick. My legs went from under me. I thought I was going to die. I thought I saw death. He thought he saw death, You know, and this was a moment where he had been that the the sheriff's deputy in the state troopers told them you have to turn back. We're not going to let you march to Montgomery. And they asked to kneel in prayer and as they went to kneel in prayer before they were going to turn back and go back to their churches. They were told. The meeting started. Tell me what's so powerful about that moment in history is that it was it was. It was a time where people were able to see for the first time the brutality. Those images were so powerful. It was labeled bloody Sunday and it sped up the passages you said of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. Debbie will will come back to you a little later to talk more about that. That's NPR's Debbie Elliot. We now have with us in the hurt. She is a reporter with our member station W. Abe in Atlanta, and she's outside of Ebeneezer Baptist Church where services will be held today. And Emma describe for us what it's like for you out there right now what you're seeing. Okay. Hi, Emma. This is Tanya. Can you hear me? Hi. Yeah. Can you hear me? I can I know that. It's It's quite a crowd. Okay? Can you tell us a bit about what you're seeing out there? I'm seeing I'd say about 200 people out here and we've kind of got to groups. We've got the people that are starting to gather at the Jumbotron, which has been set up right outside the church. I'm waiting to watch the service live there. And then we've got a crowd of people who are who are welcoming people as they arrive, welcoming the VIPs on presidential watch. Right now, I would say, waiting waiting for the three former presidents who are going to attend today and speak and the mood here is is really. I mean, it's it's serious, but it's also so joyful. It's about singing, and the stories that people have been telling me are just really powerful stories of how much Congressman Lewis meant to them. How much his message means to them in this time. And how much they want their Children and their grandchildren to make sure to remember him and what he stood for. What's really powerful, a swell about his home state of of his home state of Georgia and the city of Atlanta. Is that so many people felt like they knew him because they met him. You're hearing all of those stories from folks, I'm sure their interactions with him. Ebeneezer Baptist has so much history is I mentioned earlier, Martin looking Junior was a co pastor their share with us the significance of that church. Well, this was this was more Luther King Juniors from church. He grew up in it and was pastor as you said. It was also John Lewis's Home Church, where his wife's funeral was held in 2013. And it's really special. I think for these two figures overlap in this In this part of Atlanta to on Auburn Avenue, which is really the centre of Black Atlanta life, and some would argue the center of the Civil Rights movement and the two figures. I mean yesterday what was so powerful about Congressman Lewis lying in state in the Capitol in Georgia was that this was an honor denied to Dr King when he died. So I spoke to people who said I'm here because of all the people like Dr King who were denied that honor. And here we are giving Congressman Lewis most them may be the most honor. That we can right now. Sure, Let's listen to some of those folks that you spoke with you. It was amazing. It was amazing. All people on the young people. A lot of my friends has passed away. But I remember him from there. So that's why you mentioned This church being in the Hart. I just want to tell you that was Patricia Spicer, who's here, and she was talking about seeing Congressman Lewis speak at the 1963 march on Washington and that that's why his words were so powerful then and grabbed her then and she had to come today. The body of John Lewis was brought to Atlanta yesterday, and as you mentioned, it passed a number of important landmarks in the city. Walk us through. Some of those final landmarks that this journey to finally to Ebeneezer Baptist Church. There were there were quite a few stops because, as you said, Congressman Lewis has been such a presence in his district for, you know, 30 plus years. There was a pause at the Rainbow Crosswalk in Midtown, which you know, celebrates LGBT Q. The LGBTQ community here they passed by his downtown congressional office and a major street here that was renamed after him in the John Lewis Freedom Parkway on DH. It was there was also a big stop at a mural that you, Khun see driving down the interstate that runs through Atlanta. It has a picture of John Lewis and the words hero and, you know, it was really powerful. Tio. Watch him land for the last time in Atlanta and to watch him, you know, make his his final journey around the city. That's Emma hurt. She's a reporter with our member station. W. A. B in Atlanta. Thank you so much. Thank you. We're going to bring in another voice to our conversation. Remembering today the life and legacy of Congressman John Lewis Bishop Leah Daughtry is with us. Now. She's a political organizer and strategist. She ran. The Democratic National Convention is in 2008 in 2016 and she is the presiding prelate of the House of the Lord Churches. And there is perhaps no one better to talk about the intersection of faith in politics in this moment, which is what's so much of John Lewis's life really represents Bishop. Doctor. Thank you for being here. Good morning to you. And thank you very much from including this conversation. I guess I would just start by asking where your thoughts are this morning. Oh, you know, in the it's Ah, it's a powerful day. In the African American tradition. We call this the services home going And so they are mix of sorrow and sadness, but also great joy, particularly when it's someone like Mr Lewis, who has lived his life in such an exemplary way and in keeping with the principles of his faith that we know that he And our tradition. He's going home to be with the creator. And so we rejoice in bed and in the deeply held idea that we will see him again. So the mix of emotions on and I'm looking forward to the servants and being able to worship with those who have gathered To celebrate his life. The the word and his faith came before politics, did it. Not that was with what guided him first? Yes, yes, And I think that's so instructive for all of us who are people of faith. He was deeply guided by the principles of the face that he held so deeply and so closely and though that is what informed him and informed his action. Informed his decision to get involved in the civil rights movement on then to pursue a career in electoral politics. It's because of the ideals of of of our faith of our share faith that God intends for all of us. To live a full and abundant life. It holds us equally ah, in God's eyes and ah, divinely created and therefore in endowed with these Possibilities of being hole and equal. And then we have an obligation to pursue of society that sees us as God. And so for John Lewis that meant getting involved in the civil rights movement. That meant going on the bus boycotts being part of the leadership because it was he was pursuing the principal's off his face. And then in his later life, Of course, he came to Congress again, seeking ways to create a just society, a beloved community that treats all of its citizens equally. That has got had intended them to be he. It was almost a joke near the end of his life. How often he was asked to talk about preaching to chickens as a child on how readily he wanted to share that story, right? It was, he just he reveled in it of the idea of Off the joy he had as a very young man. I mean, eight years old, even sharing what he believed to be the most important important message there, Wass and and it helped him. Negotiate through through Washington. It helped him find ways to communicate with people with whom he disagreed. This's a very important part of his legacy is enough. It is it is, you know it and it tells you how deeply held his faith was. You know in these days, particularly when people are chasing followers, and ah likes and so forth on social Media network to think of this young man who who so loved his face. It was so impassioned by that any audience any Opportunity. He had to share his fate. Even with the chickens, Wass and was a chance to home his craft was a chance to get his ideas out was a chance. The tests, cadences and rhythms of words was a chance to share was the chickens and with those around the pick of the air, the grass the field how passionate he was about things that he believed and then bringing those ideals to Congress and understanding again. The people I help The idea of our faith that God has created a so equal And so if this idea that you don't have to be just like me to be just like me, there's something we have in common with each other. And if we can just talk if we can just be in conversation, we can see each other perhaps here because we may not still agree, but at least The tendency to demonize the unknown goes away lesson diminishes in the conversation. And who could refuse the conversation with Mr Lewis, who could refuse to just sit and talk and listen, and he was as good a listener. As he Waas a conversationalist. So you know, I think the Congress was richer for having him there on the Congress was Richard that his colleagues were Richard for just being able to be in conversation with someone who has deeply held ideal of deeply held conviction and experience. We should point out. Three former presidents are expected to get the memorial today. Bill Clinton. Barack Obama and and George W. Bush. I mean, just exemplifying the way that he he was very firm about what he believed and believed in his party, but he would work with Republicans if it meant Getting getting through the legislation he thought was most important. That's right. I mean, red and blue. These sorts of lines. These artificial divisions that we create among ourselves to categorize each other didn't really existed. Mr Lewis's lexicon. It was all about the humanity of people, and so has admit moving communities forward if admits Getting everybody the rights they deserve. Then he was willing to have the conversation. He was willing to be engaged and involved. And we see that in the folks that are going to speak today that are going to be present today at the tone and the tenor of the service, which he himself Designed. He spoke to his his closest staff. A. Stephen knew his time was shortening and said, who he wanted to be there. And what's the one of the elements of the club is to be what we see. Today is of Mr Lewis's own crafted bishop. Doctor, Can I ask one quick question if you were involved in the ceremony today, Realism putting you on the spot. But is there scripture that you think represents this moment, something you can point to that that carries the weight of history with it, but also Is about hope is about the future. You know, The thing that comes to mind for me is the passage and Hebrews. There's a chapter the faith chapter. We call it. Chapter 11 that talks about all the icons of our faith. Abraham and Sarah and getting and so forth on a long litany and in the middle of verse 13 says these all died in the faith, not having received the promises. But having seen them afar off, and for me that speaks of the hope. That was Mr Lewis's life. He stood on the shoulders of those who went before who didn't see freedom who didn't think the achievement of our civil rights. He followed them and he lived his life in such a way that he advanced the faith. He advance the causes, but he didn't see all of the achievement. And now we come behind him on continue his legacy. So he believed he held these convictions didn't scenes didn't see everything he fought for comes repair, But he still believed he still continue fighting. And henceforth Scripture goes on to say there was laid up for me A crown of righteousness was the Lord. That right? Justo shall give me on that day. And not to me only bought to all those who love disappearing. And so we look forward to seeing the two of us again in the future. Bishop Leah Daughtry. Thank you so much for sharing your reflections with us on this day. Thank you. Yes, very powerful. Let's go now to NPR. Congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell and NPR's senior editor and correspondent on the Washington desk. Ron Elving. Hey, guys. Kelsey. Good morning. We've heard so many powerful tributes from people throughout the country and the world. But But Louis is home state of Georgia. His presence and work had an especially profound. Meaning for his home state of Georgia for his district. Tell us a little bit more about his time there. You know, I am reminded of a couple of really, really standout moments of. I think one of the things that I think about a lot right now is the tribute that that they delivered for Johnny Isakson, who was a Republican senator. Of from Georgia, who retired last year, and in 2019 it was in November. So just just so a bit ago, Johnny Isakson was being was being honored and John Lewis Delivered this speech explaining how they could work together and and how there was an opportunity for anybody to find spaces where they agreed. And then, at the end of his speech, he walked across the Isaacson, who was in bad health and who had had trouble with his spine and said I will come to you brother and walked over and gave him a hug. That was really very much representative of the way. That John Lewis approached, you know, working on problems was what he wanted there to be bipartisanship. He wanted to be the person who came across, walked across and shake somebody's hand gave them a hug and said We can get something done here. He was also the kind of person who, whenever you saw him in the capital. There would be some person some tourist or a constituent who wanted to come and talk to him, and there was always had the time he had the time to tell his story had the time to talk to people about their story. He was extremely generous with his time and his constituents were known to come up to the capital and spent time directly with him. There was never a moment when it team like he was bigger than anybody else. Yeah, it's been Ah, so enriching and so fun over the last week to hear how so many people that I personally no have have met John Lewis, whether it's in Washington whether it's in Atlanta. New York Across the country. People have had a chance to meet him, but also have these intimate one on one conversations with him A CZ. We've learned he never turned anyone away. He was always willing to stop and have those conversations. One of the things that jumps out to me was a story about Congressman Lewis. When Hey, was in his district and he would spend a day doing a job in the district so even way back in the seventies, he would do things like drive a ups truck for a day to get a sense of what his constituents were up against. That is something that so many people feel is that he was of the people. Absolutely, and a lot of members of Congress that I speak to say they learned from that approach. They learned from John Lewis not just from the work that he did in civil rights, but the way he had a relationship with his constituents the way that he continued to speak about issues that meant something to him and then became active in them. I am reminded of the sit in on the House floor. On gun violence. He led House Democrats in a sit in and following. I believe the pulse shooting and they said that this was not a time when they could leave, and then he wanted to be the person who, you know who did the good trouble that he always talks about. He did not want to just be a person talking about it. He wanted to be a person involved in it. And you know so many members of Congress on Democrats and Republicans who felt inspired by that personal connection to his beliefs. The service eyes expected to begin shortly, and about 10 5 or 10 minutes. Ron, I'd love to go through with you what we can expect for today's service. But I want to talk first about Lewis's time as a civil rights activist, part of the movement back in the sixties. We expect to hear a lot about that today during the service, right? Yes, indeed, his life traced if you will, the trajectory of the African American experience over the last 70 80 years in American history. He was one of the group sometimes referred to as the Big Six, of course, beginning with Martin Luther King, whose name will be invoked. Many times today, but also Whitney Young of the National Urban League. Roy Wilkins of the CP. James Farmer of the Congress of regular Racial Equality and a Philip Randolph from the Pullman Porters Union. They were in many respects the Giants. Of the civil rights movement, as it took shape after World War two and rose in the fifties and sixties. Of course, John Lewis was there for most, all of it. He was part of the citizens at lunch counters in Nashville. He was one of the original 13 Freedom riders in 1961 integrating bus travel in the south. He was the youngest speaker on that day in 1963 when the march on Washington for jobs and justice featured Martin Luther King's I have a Dream speech. John Lewis spoke that day was the youngest speaker. He's the last person surviving from the speakers Dyas that day. And then, of course, the 1965 moment we have referenced Many times his beating on the Pettus Bridge. And, of course, his career in Congress, As Kelsey has described and then his links to the Black lives matter movement, which he paid tribute to In death as his cortege was coming to the capital earlier this week and paused on black lives matter Plaza in front of the White House to pay tribute to the movement and the people who are carrying forward his ideals today. Yes, And as we

Congressman Lewis Atlanta Congress Emma Hurt Martin Luther King Jr Washington Civil Rights Movement Debbie Elliot Ebeneezer Baptist Church Georgia Reporter Congressman Alabama Kelsey Snell John Lewis Bishop Leah Daughtr W. A. B John Lewis
"ron elving" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"ron elving" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Americans look at the dramatic rise of covert cases in the US and wonder, as they have since been March when things will get better. Millions were unemployed. Those who do still have jobs worry along those jobs will last Meanwhile, the White House response this week to these interlock crisis is has been Well, what confused, contradictory counterfactual. NPR's Ron Elving will help the search for the right adjective. Thanks so much for being with us. Good to be with you. Scott. Have what words What words do you have to describe it? Denial comes to mind. But how about delusional? The president still seems to think this disease is going to dissipate on its own, the CDC says. If people wore masks, we could get the virus under control in 4 to 6 weeks, But the president rejects that flies to Atlanta defies a mask requirement there. He says he wants people to have quote a certain freedom. And certainly people have that we're seeing where it's gotten US 75,000 new cases on Thursday alone, a new high 15,000 Justin Texas fatal cases have nearly doubled since early July, back to almost 1000 deaths a day. So one final word for all this Scott, tragic. Dr Anthony Fauci is still on the job, despite some some pretty high placed efforts to undermine How she lives and found she works and how he holds his ground with amazing resilience. First, the White House handed out a hit piece this week, saying found she was wrong on some things early this year that the president straight advisor writes a Yusa today piece saying found she was often wrong and yet found she did not take the bait. He did not resign. He said. Stop this nonsense. And at week's end, the White House seemed to have done so. Congress returns next week. Ron, what's in front of them? What can they do to help American survive this pandemic? They could do a lot, maybe not to defeat the virus but to deal with the economic shock of it. Reopening too fast brought the virus back, and that's going to bring back business closings as well. We're already seeing some terrible numbers for the second quarter, and people are going to need relief checks to get them through. So when their jobs come back, so the Democrats bottom line is half a trillion dollars for states and localities. The Senate Republicans want liability protection for businesses and the president wants a payroll tax cuts, so it's either a three way compromise or a three way standoff and time is running out fast. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is dream is being treated for cancer once again. Yes, She's already a survivor of several other cancers, and she revealed yesterday that she's been undergoing chemotherapy in recent months since lesions were found on her liver. But she added that they had responded to the treatment and she intends to stake on the court. And if there were not enough already riding on this election, Scott Now we have this reminder of President Supreme Court appointment Power finally ran your thoughts for John Lewis, whom we just remembered with representative Sewell. We overuse the word icon, But in this case, it's barely adequate. Let's listen to some of John Lewis right now. My philosophy is very simple when you see something that is not right. They're not just.

Ron Elving president Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg White House Scott US Dr Anthony Fauci John Lewis NPR Atlanta CDC Justin Texas Congress Yusa Senate representative Power advisor
"ron elving" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"ron elving" Discussed on KCRW

"Many Americans look at the dramatic rise of covert cases in the US and wonder, as they have since been March when things will get better. Millions were unemployed. Those who do still have jobs worry how long those jobs will last. Meanwhile, the White House response this week to these interlock crisis is has been Well, what confused, contradictory counterfactual. NPR's Ron Elving will help us search for the right adjective. Thanks so much for being with us. Good to be with you. Scott. Have what words What words do you have to describe it? Denial comes to mind. But how about delusional? The president still seems to think this disease is going to dissipate on its own. The CDC says it people wore masks. We could get the virus under control in 4 to 6 weeks. But the president rejects that flies to Atlanta defies a mask requirement there. He says he wants people to have quote a certain freedom. And certainly people have that we're seeing where it's gotten US 75,000 new cases on Thursday alone, a new high 15,000 Justin Texas fatal cases have nearly doubled since early July, back to almost 1000 deaths a day. So one final word for all this Scott, tragic. Dr Anthony Fauci is still on the job. Ah, despite some some pretty high placed efforts to undermine How she lives and found she works and how he holds his ground with amazing resilience. First, the White House handed out a hit piece this week, saying found she was wrong on some things early this year, then the president's trade advisor, writes a Yusa today, piece saying found she was often wrong and yet found she did not take the bait. He did not resign, he said. Stop this nonsense, and at week's end, the White House seemed to have done so. Congress returns next week. Ron what's in front of them? What can they do to help Americans survive this pandemic? They could do a lot, maybe not to defeat the virus but to deal with the economic shock of it. Reopening too fast brought the virus back, and that's going to bring back business closings as well. We're already seeing some terrible numbers for the second quarter, and people are going to need relief checks to get them through two when their jobs come back. So the Democrats bottom line is half a trillion dollars for states and localities. Senate Republicans want liability protection for businesses and the president wants a payroll tax cuts, so it's either a three way compromise or a three way standoff and time is running out fast. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is dream is being treated for cancer once again. Yes, She's already a survivor of several other cancers, and she revealed yesterday that she's been undergoing chemotherapy in recent months since lesions were found on her liver. But she added that they had responded to the treatment and she intends to stay on the court. And if there were not enough already riding on this election, Scott Now we have this reminder of the president's Supreme Court appointment. Power finally ran your thoughts for John Lewis, whom we just remembered with representative Sewell. We overuse the word icon, But in this case, it's barely adequate. Let's listen to some of John Lewis right now. My philosophy is simple. When you see something that is not right. Not just stuff stamping.

president Ron Elving Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Scott US White House Dr Anthony Fauci John Lewis NPR CDC Supreme Court Congress Justin Texas Atlanta Yusa Senate representative
State Department inspector general is latest watchdog fired

Weekend Edition Saturday

01:21 min | 2 years ago

State Department inspector general is latest watchdog fired

"Of new and stunning move overnight by president trump he announced there would be a new inspector general at the state department he gave no calls for the removal of the veteran who was in that job this would be notable under any circumstance but it is just the latest in a series of watch dogs and other government officials have been forced out in the trump administration and Pierre senior editor and correspondent Ron Elving joins us Ron thanks for being with us good to be with you Scott I don't know how to begin except to say what what's going on here so the president is asserting control exercising the full extent of his powers over the executive branch including people whose job is to keep an eye on other officials one of whom was Steve clinic the inspector general it's day two was fired late last night members of Congress are telling us this morning that clinic had opened an investigation of secretary Mike Pompeo close ally of the president over the alleged use of the department staff but we have seen the president fired the watchdog in other departments as well as you say last month it was Michalak consent the intelligence community I G. who process the whistleblower complaint last year became an issue in the president's impeachment Christy Graham at health and Human Services who would criticize the corona virus response and the president also removed Glenn Fein who was supposed to oversee some of that two trillion dollars that Congress approved a spending dealing with the corona virus

Senior Editor Scott President Trump Steve Clinic Congress Christy Graham Glenn Fein Pierre Ron Elving Executive Secretary Mike Pompeo Michalak
"ron elving" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:33 min | 2 years ago

"ron elving" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Scott Simon this hour Ron Elving on the week in politics and later opposition movements in other democracies try to gain support in the pandemic also a newly graduated young doctor from Texas on her way to New York where she's needed most in plans to bring what she learns back home how do major league players feel about plans to return to the field without fans in the seats and with medical tests every day and Gabrielle Barnes who sings acapella Galen how her group's new rendition of old classics stirs souls now tools and gospel hymns have always been sung in times of joy but also in times of struggles first we have our newscast today is Saturday may sixteenth two thousand point live from NPR news on trial Snyder on Capitol Hill some in Congress are raising the alarm about the trump administration's move to Alice the state department's inspector general NPR's Michele Kelemen has that story a state department spokesperson offered no reason for Steve Lennix Alistair saying only the department is quote happy to announce that Stephen Akers will now lead the office of the inspector general a group currently runs the office of foreign missions Lynette had been on the job since twenty thirteen and recently issued reports criticizing some trump appointees of retaliating against career public servants the chairman of the house foreign affairs committee Eliot Engel because Lennix firing an outrageous act of a president trying to protect one of his most loyal supporters secretary of state Mike Pompeo angle says the IG's office had opened an investigation into Pompeii Michele Kelemen NPR news Washington house Democrats a past another corona virus response bill it's a three trillion dollar relief package but it's already being dismissed by the GOP led Senate Republicans call it a democratic wish list ahead of the November election the White House has announced that it is adding five new members to the coronavirus task force in Pierce Amy held reports the new members market shipped in the panel's focus the new members include agriculture secretary Sonny Perdue and labor secretary gene Scalia who says he's looking forward to getting Americans back to work safely president trump announced earlier this month the task force would be shifting its attention to the country's re opening most states are in some stage of ending a weeks long shut down at that's devastated the economy trump says the task force will also focus on vaccines and therapeutics as the country's confirmed covert nineteen cases near a million and a half and deaths top eighty five thousand the new task force members also include national institutes of health director Dr Francis Collins and Dr Peter marks of the F. T. Hey Amy held NPR news overseas now the man accused of being a major funder of wonders for genocide in the nineteen nineties is now under arrest police vehicle Google allegedly financed the malicious at mac and that that massacred some eight hundred thousand people the BBC's will Ross reports he been in hiding for more than twenty five years Philistia kaboom a businessman from the Hutu ethnic group is accused of being one of the main financiers of the Rwandan genocide paying for the militias that carried out the massacres he also founded and funded the notorious Reggio Emelia Colleen the Rwandan state broadcaster that actively encouraged people to search out and kill anyone who is from the Tutsi ethnic group the fact that he's being found on the outskirts of Paris living under a false name is surprising for many years Phyllis you know Google was thought to be living in Kenya where powerful politicians were accused of thwarting efforts to get him arrested more than a quarter of a century after the genocide Mr Caputo will go on trial at an international court this is NPR this morning's launch from Cape Canaveral has run into a weather delay but officials are still planning to launch an uncrewed space plane into orbit for the U. S. space force this morning officials say the next window of opportunity will be in about an hour and a half India is reporting a spike in corona virus infections the health ministry said today that nearly eighty six thousand cases have been confirmed surpassing China where the virus was first detected in the central city of Wuhan the government of prime minister Narendra Modi is to announce a decision this weekend on whether to extend India's locked down stocks recovered from an early selloff to closed modestly higher Friday Steve Beckner says the Dow Jones industrial average rose a quarter of a percent while the standard and poor's five hundred gained a third and the nasdaq composite three quarters of a percent deflation not inflation is what the federal government's price indices show at both the wholesale and retail levels in April the labor department's producer price index fell for a third straight month by one point three percent its consumer price index fell eight tenths in both cases lower energy costs accounted for much of the drop reflecting plunging oil prices but even excluding volatile food and energy a deflationary trend was evident the core CPI declined at a record pace import prices also fell for a third consecutive months falling prices might sound good but when they reflect economic weakness they can be troublesome for NPR news I'm Steve Beckner and on Giles Snyder this is NPR news support for NPR comes from NPR stations other contributors include Morgan Stanley with their thoughts on.

Scott Simon Ron Elving
"ron elving" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"ron elving" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Everything okay everything's going to be today she has that kind of company the respect but things are not going to be okay not today on the ground there we proudly present watching over mountain billets judge with storytelling B. some of sound right after this short break snow but stay tuned live from NPR news in Washington I'm Nora Raum Joe Biden handily won the democratic primary in South Carolina Saturday it was his first win in the first four contest for the presidential nomination NPR's Ron Elving reports the former vice president attracted support from a broad range of democratic voters this is truly a across the board triumph for Biden he's winning in every category he's not just winning in the most important category which would be African American women which is dominating and but he's also winning among African American man he's winning among white people and so forth the only group in which he is not dominant is the youngest voters NPR's Ron Elving Bernie Sanders came in a distant second well billionaire businessman Tom Steiner finished third later Steiner analyses getting out of the race saying he can't see a path where he can win democratic candidates are now turning their attention to the fourteen states holding primaries on Tuesday Biden is one of several candidates visiting Virginia where ninety nine delegates are up for grabs Ben heavier from member station VPM.

Washington Joe Biden South Carolina Ron Elving vice president Ron Elving Bernie Sanders Tom Steiner Virginia Ben NPR Nora Raum
Trump says the coronavirus is Democrats' new 'hoax'

Weekend Edition Saturday

01:21 min | 2 years ago

Trump says the coronavirus is Democrats' new 'hoax'

"The stock market plunge this week is the corona virus spread rapidly across Europe and the Middle East and of the Americans last night president trump referred to the virus as the Democrats knew hoax even as he appointed by president Mike pence to oversee America's preparedness voters head to polls in South Carolina today for the state's primary in Pierre senior editor and correspondent Ron Elving is in Colombia at one of the many voter events taking place today run thanks so much for being with us good to be with you from chilly south Carroll a chill oh I'm sorry you mean it's cold in South Carolina and I mean Ising early surprisingly brisk Columbia South Carolina Scott and president trump is also there he held a campaign rally and he tried to frame the corona viruses a democratic conspiracy that's right just down the road from where I'm standing the president told Israeli crowd it was quote the latest hoax although it is now in fifty six countries and new cases have been reported overnight in San Antonio and there are cases reported in California with no known links to foreign travel in the hole well the World Health Organization is saying the novel coronavirus poses a very high global risk a rather colossal hoax to be sure but in the past the president has labeled climate change a hoax as well Scott so he may be using that word as a synonym for inconvenient

San Antonio Donald Trump Ising Ron Elving Pierre World Health Organization California Europe Carolina Scott Colombia Senior Editor South Carolina America Mike Pence President Trump Middle East
Trump declares victory following acquittal in impeachment trial

Political Breakdown

04:32 min | 2 years ago

Trump declares victory following acquittal in impeachment trial

"We begin tonight with the conclusion of president trump's impeachment trial in the Senate on Wednesday the Senate voted to acquit president trump of obstruction of Congress and abuse of power met rami was the lone GOP lawmaker to join Democrats in finding him guilty of abuse of power the next day president trump appeared at the White House to celebrate his acquittal and denounced Democrats and the investigations that have dogged his presidency president trump also deliver his third state of the union address on Tuesday night he claimed credit for the stronger economy and vowed to quote never let socialism destroyed American health care the issue has taken center stage in the twenty twenty presidential race here to discuss this politico senior writer Carl Ameren Nucci and NPR senior editor and correspondent Ron Elving he joins us by Skype from the nation's capital welcome to you both Ron let's start with you we are hearing today that lieutenant colonel Alexander vin men who and his twin brother are being fired and removed from the White House he was one of the witnesses called during the impeachment investigation he provided very damaging testimony against the president what is this firing tell us about how trump gonna act moving forward and could there be any repercussions for the president or his administration you know there were two theories on the part of the senators who were voting on impeachment one was that the president was going to have learned his lesson and that he was going to moderate his behavior that does that does not seem to have been borne out by his behavior thus far at the prayer breakfast on Thursday or at his victory lap speech in the east room or now today as he has begun and we don't think he's finished cleaning out some of the people that he thinks betrayed him and the impeachment proceedings including a lieutenant colonel Benjamin and his brother who was actually on staff over in the Senate for some other people but seems to have lost his job in the same hour I mean it's not just the president that could potentially suffer repercussions we have senators like Susan Collins from Maine who it said she hoped the president would learn lessons she is one of a handful of senators that Democrats hope to defeat in November what do you think this means for them look I think it's gonna fire of the Democrats they are already donating in record amounts to the on the opposition in all of those cases when you talk about college attack on more than like Sally this is this is but it's going to keep the Republicans fired up as well this whole week is an example of of the kind of I mean a rancor and hostility we seen between the parties it is not going away anytime soon it is going to extend probably on the next election I think we've we've gone the other residents a suite yeah it definitely feels like we are already in the selection run I wanna bring you back in here the impeachment vote was on Wednesday the only person who you could say maybe didn't act in a partisan manner was Utah senator Mitt Romney he was the sole Republican vote on that first article of impeachment on abuse of power do you think that in anyway rob's trump of this talking point that this is a purely partisan witch hunt it doesn't seem to have deterred him from using exactly that language what it does add a note an asterisk if you will Mitt Romney was the first person to vote to remove from office a president of his own party we've had party lines stepped over in the past in previous impeachments but always to defend someone not to remove them so he does become a unique voice in all the history of impeachment that's not something we're going to hear from the White House White House is in some sense is trying to ignore him but is also made some rather direct shots at him hiding behind his religion or using religion as a crutch because he mentioned his Mormon faith when he gave the speech on the floor and was quite an emotional speech about why he felt he had to follow the facts that had been presented to the Senate and vote for the president's removal from office Carlos you think there could be any political repercussions for Ronnie I mean obviously he has a target on his back when it comes to the White House look his own newspapers in Utah have stood up for him but there's no question about it there's going to be political repercussions for him and for his state and that's I think going to be of concern to hand the president has already mentioned is such an antibody I think that he's getting support from Democrats it's interesting to watch but it was also interesting to watch the silence the came out of the Senate people that have known him for years people have respected him for years have not come forward to to to the firm for him in any way so I think we're going to see how this plays out he but he's willing to take the heat he made

Donald Trump Senate President Trump
An deep dive into Trump’s 2020 State of the Union speech

Q

12:10 min | 2 years ago

An deep dive into Trump’s 2020 State of the Union speech

"I'm Audie Cornish in Washington earlier we heard from president Donald Trump and we just heard the voice of Michigan governor Gretchen Wimmer who presented the democratic response to president trump stated the union speech we have several folks here tonight to do some analysis about all that we heard we're gonna start within the within eighteen L. Shammi who was the chief of staff to speaker of the house Nancy Pelosi and Brendan Buck who was a spokesman for the former house speaker Paul Ryan bring you guys both in for your expertise how what we heard tonight now if you're on Twitter there were a lot of conservatives you you're you're using a lot of exclamation points and saying this is the best thing that they've ever heard Democrats not saying the same I want to start with you Brendan what did you make of the president's focus tonight how we deliver that yeah and this is certainly a confident president in a way that you know you might expect a president who's at his all time high in in the latest Gallup poll who is just really defeated impeachment and have the Democrats sort of in disarray he started off with all of those economic status just making the case that things are going well in this country talk about how we're we're not gonna turn back and really was just riding high right some of his quotes it insane three years of my administration three and a half million working age people of join the work force in leaning really hard into that at the top in it and it was a lot of job well done on my part and very little agenda going forward I counted this is not an official count but I counted only ten things in which he is calling on Congress to do anything in a lot of those were relatively small ball usually a president comes in with a big agenda here's all the things I want to do and you really have to dig in there to find them some of it is funding neo natal research funding a child tax credit sanctuary cities sending Americans to Mars things like that that don't really come together in a real way but another take way as as sue was talking about from the room if I've seen a lot of state of the union this was as divided and cold as I've ever seen you could almost hear brewing from some of the Democrats and that is just really stark and the Nancy Pelosi interactions yeah she she tried to shake his hand and he did do it she actually tore up his speech at the end that that's remarkable I've never seen anything like that the team let's have you jump in on your former boss there people were watching her and her behavior very closely but first your reaction to some of the things you heard tonight shoring it was a fascinating speech the king can I give you a look into president trump's mine and that we were hoping that he would meet the commander in chief test but then said that I believe he produced a speech that was made for TV made for TV moments and Brandon is exactly right some of the big issues bi partisan issues that he could work with Democrats on infrastructure he had two lines and infrastructure of prescription drugs he really did not go into specifics as to get me a bell and I will sign it these are opportunities lost a lucky get a showing at age she has to do is to tell Democrats thank you for working with me on U. S. M. C. A. and he didn't right you mentioned that it was signed by it was that yeah and and I and also in terms of I've I've seen many states to the union I've been there and I think this is stands up to when president Obama was to during the ACA negotiations and trying to get the bill passed it was it was that same feeling that you had in those to complete the process I want to take a moment now to fact check some of what we heard both the president's speech in the democratic response NPR's Scott Horsley is here to help us do that welcome Scott they do with it this speech was kind of the theme of it was the great American come back the president spent considerable time talking about the economy both his and the prior administration's but here's a sample of that in just three short years we have shattered the mentality of American decline and we have rejected the downsizing of Americans destiny we have totally rejected the downsizing we're moving forward at a pace that was unimaginable just a short time ago and we are never ever going back Scott who was Anderson economy were looking at the one the president's describing characteristically here Donald Trump exaggerates how strong the economy is now and how weak it was when he came into office the fact is the economy was pretty good in twenty seventeen and it's still pretty good now the economy last year grew two point three percent that is exactly the average for the last decade the U. S. added six point seven million jobs in the first thirty five months after trump took office pretty impressive but not unprecedented in the previous thirty five months the U. S. added nearly eight million jobs so really less of a comeback than a more less straight line continuation a lot of people also measure the economy by the size of their own paychecks right in this president described this as a blue collar boom after decades of flat and falling incomes wages are rising fast and wonderfully they are rising fastest for low income workers who have seen a sixteen percent pay increase since my election Scott Horsley is our chief economics correspondent and of course was a long time White House correspondents so to help us understand how he's trying to frame these specific numbers wage wages have been rising faster than inflation that's good for workers there read real purchasing power's been going up but wage gains of actually moderated in recent months in the twelve months ending in December average wages rose just two point nine percent compared to three point four percent earlier in the year and that deceleration in pay hikes is a little surprising given the very low unemployment rate we have now is encouraging as the president says that wages for people at the bottom of the income ladder have been rising faster than those the top that's partly because a lot of states have raised their minimum wages the present also talked about the very large stock market gains that we've seen since the election of twenty sixteen it is way up not seventy percent as he said but the Dow's up fifty seven percent stock ownership are is heavily concentrated among the rich eighty four percent of those gains have gone to just the top ten percent of earners and forty five percent of Americans don't own any stock at all I want to pause for a second and go to Ron Elving because when you think about the last impeach president he was giving a seat at the union is also the person we attribute this it's the economy stupid kind of sloganeering and so is this something that the president should lean hard into especially given what his democratic rivals are talking about why would he not why would he not take credit for where the car a condom use today presidents have suffered when the economy was poor even if it wasn't their fault and even when it wasn't really that bad and even when it was recovering I'm thinking here by George HW bush in nineteen ninety two very short very shallow recession and yet he was pummeled with it and that has happened in other occasions and we've also seen presidents come and office riding on a long recovery such as the one from say about two thousand nine two thousand ten forward into two thousand seventeen and tack on a few more years with policies and there's no question that this president has cut regulations and cut taxes what particularly for a corporations and to some to be wealthy individuals which has juice the economy if you're further but he did come in riding on a long recovery which may be slowing down a little bit now but he basically takes credit for all of it and says that when he came into office it was a situation of American carnage I want to come back to Scott Horsley here because another issue one of factcheck health care promises the president spoke about also Michigan governor Gretchen Widmer who delivered the democratic response here's an example of something the president spoke about one hundred and thirty two lawmakers in this room have endorsed legislation to impose a socialist takeover of our healthcare system wiping out the private health insurance plans of one hundred and eighty million very happy Americans to those watching at home tonight I want you to know we will never let socialism destroy American health care members we talk about the language is using their this is obviously divisive issue even within the Democratic Party some of the presidential candidates on the democratic side Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warren have favored a single payer plan that would eliminate private insurance in warrants case over a period of time other Democrats though want to preserve a role for private insurance for those people who want it we should also point out the president did make what he called an iron clad pledged to protect patients with pre existing condition did he explain how we do that he he did not in this this is surely the biggest Whopper in tonight's speech the president knows a protection for patients with pre existing conditions as popular so he pays lip service to it but if anything his administration has has whittled away at those protections and of course they're they're fighting to overturn the affordable Care Act which is where those protections come from I want to talk about another big issue border security the president talked about this one even before he you know what it was the nominee and hit that thing again tonight my administration has undertaken an unprecedented effort to secure the southern border of the United States this statement seems vague but it's got I believe you've kind of dug into it what do you know the administration has made a series of sweeping changes to limit access to asylum seekers at the border I'd sent tens of thousands of migrants back to Mexico to wait for their day in immigration courts and administration credits those policies for a very sharp drop in the number of migrants who are being taken into custody the border in a last may we saw that number peek at a recent high about a hundred forty thousand last month the number was down to around twenty nine thousand so a drop of about eighty percent our allies in this gets at some of what we would call kind of red meat or culture were issues that we heard the president talking about he said he was calling upon members of Congress to pass legislation banning late term abortion of babies he talked about the idea of a sanctuary cities and kind of going after sanctuary states how did he balance this part of the speech with what we heard about the economy well I think those are the two parts of the president's campaign message one is to say you're better off now than you were four years ago the economy is great he said it's greater than ever before in American history but also the president is at heart a culture warrior and he believes that cultural issues are more powerful than economic ones and there is some evidence that might suggest he's right for instance the parts of the country that are reaping the most benefits from the trump economy are the ones where his approval ratings are the worst and the parts of the country that are not reaping the benefits that are doing badly record farm bankruptcy is a manufacturing recession those are the parts of the country where his numbers are the highest why I think because of the cultural issues he's pretty face the voters in those places think he's protecting them against criminal immigrants he talked about those he highlighted once again this is a staple for him a family whose family member has been killed by an undocumented immigrant so these are the two parts of his message one is you never had it so good and the other is you know the Democrats want to ruin your your way of life and that's the message to the public we want to talk about what it was like inside the capitol congressional correspondent kills the smell is there tonight moments ago she spoke with the second highest ranking Republican representative in the house that Steve Scalise we did see a pretty tepid response from Democrats on most things including things other were bye bye things that should have been bipartisan that always have been bipartisan it almost is is like they have this personal hatred against the president and they're letting it see through where they're opposing good policies and you should always put your personal differences on the

Audie Cornish Washington President Trump Donald Trump Michigan Gretchen Wimmer
"ron elving" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"ron elving" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Correspondent Ron Elving will come back to you both thank you for being here and also with us two pros from Hilda Dino show me who was chief of staff to the speaker of the house Nancy Pelosi welcome back thank you and Brendan Buck who is spokesman for former house speaker Paul Ryan welcome to you and then lastly joining us tonight from Capitol Hill we have NPR congressional correspondence kills the smell and Susan Davis we will be talking about what's been going on on the hill the entrance and now as president trump is exiting the chamber I'm Susan Davis I want to start with you because you have the best view tonight I'm can you talk about some of the the protocol what happened as a president walked in and how people reacted to the speech you know already I had said earlier today that I've covered eight this is my eighteen state of the union and most of them are boring and forgettable and I want to take that statement back that was the one of the more fascinating and wild to the union speeches I have seen inside this chamber the two takeaways I have from this are one it was one of the most Hardison rooms that the president has addressed we even fall some democratic lawmakers walk out of the state of the union something I had not seen before Tim Ryan a Democrat from Ohio was one of them there was a guest speaker Nancy Pelosi in her box removed by security for shouting out at the president during his speech at the same time the president received a raucous raucous reception from Republicans here I think a testament to his standing among Republicans and it really was the reality T. V. evocation of our politics right he has to give people some idea of what you're talking about midway through the speech conservative radio host Rush Limbaugh who was a guest was awarded the presidential medal of freedom which is placed on him by the First Lady in their seats right now he's currently dealing with a cancer diagnosis president also surprised a woman named.

Ron Elving Hilda Dino Brendan Buck Susan Davis trump president Tim Ryan Ohio Rush Limbaugh chief of staff Nancy Pelosi Paul Ryan
"ron elving" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:47 min | 2 years ago

"ron elving" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It doesn't sound like a quite how longer when they expect these quality checks to be resolved Ron Elving now I I I I assume that they probably have had a lot of media were no enquiries about this and they want to get something out I assume we'll hear a lot more in the next hour or so you know even before the trump campaign started to make an issue or an insinuation about this they were bound to get a lot of impatient people in the media if you talk about having results around nine thirty and you don't have them when you're approaching eleven o'clock east coast time east coast time I'm sorry with both of those times I'm referring to the east coast time at you're bound to get some questions now there are two pretty obvious possible explanations one would be overwhelming turnout looks like that's not it looks like it's closer to twenty sixteen than two thousand eight and therefore it should have been what they anticipated or lower and the second one is to speak for a generation of non native adapters to all digital technology if you take a record high number of candidates and feed them into three streams of data instead of just one and you do it on a brand new apps that you're just now trying out for the first time you might be inviting a little bit of delay well it seems that what's happening tonight and miles park to cover voting maybe you can weigh in on this it illustrates that the the problems that the challenges for voting are manifold right I mean there is sort of the technical challenge of getting the results reported there is the security challenge and then there's the sort of what you might call the PR campaign right that the fact that there are questions I think in many people's minds about the security of our system and here we see the trump campaign raising questions without evidence about why this is all happening can you talk a little bit about some of the challenges that voting officials across the country are gonna face this year I feel like sometimes I'm the only person in like a group of a thousand people who is like having a different opinion on this stuff in terms of everyone the last couple weeks has been talking about the idea that we were going to get results earlier and I'm thinking wait I cover voting for a living and you mean to tell me that we're gonna change the entire system from how we did it for years ago we're gonna train all these people we're gonna give them new technology that has potentially never really been tested on a large scale before and you expect us to have the results in faster I'm like a gas that anyone expected anything other than us sitting here what is at eleven PM eastern time still waiting on results to me this isn't surprising miles I have a question for you a quick question a quick question you said that no one knows who made this app I mean that is shocking I mean that's that's the the Iowa Democratic Party is basically hurting shooting itself in the foot if they're not gonna be transparent about that how will anybody trust what they're doing we can't say for sure who developed that we don't know who did any tests on it we don't know we literally lots more to parse tonight as we digest this latest news the Iowa Democratic Party acknowledging a delay in the results from the carcass because of unspecified quality checks were gonna stay on that and all the news out of Iowa tonight you're listening to live special coverage from and we are waiting to hear who the voters will choose in Iowa tonight but let's take a quick look now at endorsements from some of I was big political names of the fifty most wanted Democrats listed in the des Moines register only fourteen have publicly endorsed candidates five of those have gone to Elizabeth Warren including do you draw to juror she was the twenty eighteen democratic nominee for I was secretary of state before that the Iowa director for senator Kamel Harris your shoes and a video posted to Twitter I was originally enforcing a center comma hearings.

Ron Elving
"ron elving" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"ron elving" Discussed on KCRW

"The extreme the way that Republicans can't because of the sorrow vantage of we're gonna cause that thought there that is more alliance in and Ron Elving I'm very dubious Kelly was server Kaman stay with us more live special coverage of Iowa coming up this is NPR news alright moralizing and Ron Elving I want to turn us to the issues and the question of the economy and whether that will as it has proven many many many times in many many elections of past been the thing that gets people up in the thing that drives their vote Ron is that front center in people's minds this year yes it is because it always is unless there's some terribly unpopular war going on the number one issue is the economy and the economy right now as the president will no doubt remind the nation tomorrow night is doing are unusually well it's at the end of a very long expansion period that was mostly under the Obama presidency but which has persisted in three years under Donald Trump and he gets the credit with the voters you can argue back and forth with economists and experts as to whether or not he deserves it or whether the tax cut did but it was supposed to do or whether it's the low interest rates but in the voters minds if you're president and the economy is going gangbusters which is has been for these last couple three years growth is slowing but it's been good steady growth and the unemployment number is very very low and the job number is very high so in the voters minds that's going to be a strong endorsement of Donald trump's presidency Mara please I don't know what's interesting about that is you know we ought we kinda learned through the Clinton years it's the economy stupid and that is the number one thing and I do think that the president has that as the wind at his back on the other hand we could be entering an election where it's not the economy stupid it's the culture stupid because Donald Trump as a culture warrior he's gonna run an us against them election its campaign it's going to be about immigration the border wall school prayer abortion socialism those kinds of issues and when you look at the places in the country where Donald Trump has his worst approval ratings they are the places that are doing the best in the so called trump economy and the places that are doing the worst where farm bankruptcies are at record levels where there's a manufacturing recession those are the places where his numbers are the highest so in some ways you could say that the economy and culture are are separate and culture trumps the economy are going to end at the end of the trump has made the economy a pillar of his first campaign of his presidency of certainly this reelection campaign how much is he going to continue to work that I think that the the first paragraph will always be you're better off than you were four years ago this is the best economy in the history of the United States he will he will brag about that and he has some numbers to point to that that are good unemployment is at record lows now the median income of an average family in America has is flat since nineteen eighty nine some huge amount of the growth in GDP since the the the crash has gone to the top one percent but and most and many people are losing faith in the American dream that if they work hard and play by the rules there kids can do better than them but yes he's going to have those bragging rights but what the trump campaign things are the issues that really will motivate people that are more emotional are the cultural issues you know Steve Bannon was famous as the former trump adviser was famous for saying that politics is downstream from culture okay all right let's just take a moment now and pause at Maura to remind people of what exactly is happening in Iowa we're a little bit later than we thought we were going to her for the first election the first results coming and we're waiting what what exactly we're waiting for the first results Roger for second and just let people know this is special coverage from NPR news and this is KCRW KCRW sponsors include Netflix presenting the Irishman nominated for ten Academy Awards including Best Picture Best Director Martin scorcese adapted screenplay Stevens alien and supporting actors Joe Pesci and Al Pacino Hey it's Josh pharaoh it's crunch time for the presidential primaries and it could all.

Ron Elving
Impeachment trial: House managers push for witnesses

The Takeaway

07:46 min | 2 years ago

Impeachment trial: House managers push for witnesses

"Right now lawmakers are taking a break Senate stands in recess they spent much of the morning hearing from house impeachment managers of people like house intelligence house intelligence committee chairman Adam Schiff also congressman chasing crow of Colorado and Akeem Jeffries Democrat from New York they talked about the two articles of impeachment they're winding down on the first which is abuse of power to Davis can you talk a little bit about one or two of the points they made a little along those lines in in terms of the abuse of power charge in the piece of power well I think what she was trying to do today I mean the first two days of this of these arguments Democrats laid out a very meticulous timeline of what happened to the key players were and what and what was wrong about it today was really I think that it time to hit the sort of constitutional high notes what are the bigger constitutional progress here what are the bigger at national security questions and I think Adam Schiff in his closing arguments sort of pulled no punches this was his last best case to make and it was really striking to hear him not just talk about the articles of impeachment and what's outlined in the July twenty fifth phone call but to go back to things like president trump's comments standing next to Vladimir Putin in Helsinki when he questioned intelligence US intelligence about Russian influence in trying to hack the twenty sixteen election I think we have that moment hold on one second he's promoting this cookie crazy server theory cooked up by the Kremlin right next to the guy the cooked up it's a breathtaking success of Russian intelligence I don't know if there's ever been a greater success of Russian intelligence whatever profile Russia did of our president boy did they have him spot on the kind of evokes the days of the Miller report what what do you think she was trying to do here is focusing so intently on trump's relationship with Russia I think he was trying to make a broader case that the president is a threat to the country and that his argument here is that if you have a president that welcomes foreign interference and then also has a president that seeks it out to benefit himself over the national interest which is the case the Democrats have been trying to make then that is the most impeachable offense because once a day elections in a democracy are in question that's sort of the whole ballgame right so I thought his rhetoric was at least I think he took some risks here I think it is the kind of rhetoric that could alienate some of the senators he's trying to appeal to although I also think that shift knows what we all know is that there are not sixty seven votes to remove this president from office I wanted before we get too far down that road I do I want to bring in the east Orozco because this gets at what the White House has to accomplish in the next few days from its legal team are they going to for instance defend against those kinds of moments right moments that are on tape our that our public it's not a denial of things the president has done what I I think what they will do and especially with the you know him with shift bringing up Putin is they will argue that this is just an extension of of the the mylar at the mall or special counsel investigation that Democrats weren't able to get the president with that so now they're trying to get it with to get him will on Ukraine this idea that Democrats really overstepped a when they were talking about the Russian investigation that the the president of the Russian asset is is that what you're saying I think you'll hear a lot of that sort of thing and I think when it comes to these ideas of like the tape that they were playing you already see some Republicans pushing back not necessarily on what the president was saying but pushing back on like some of the the the the witnesses that testified like you ambassador Gordon sorry because we should say throughout this opening statement period we have been seeing clips from the house intelligence committee and the Judiciary Committee hearings and they've been playing almost like a highlight reel from that period yes and so what they're going to point to is silence saying that he was never told directly that aid was linked to up the aid was linked to the opening of these investigations or to the White House visit that this was his presumption so you're going to hear a lot of people saying that they didn't know directly that there was bribery or that there was anything like that going on and that some they're going to argue that these were assumptions being made to Matt can I bring you in on this because the other defense kind of force they are if the president's proxies that people in the gallery right senators who were coming out in between breaks and let X. essentially defending him right well that there are a number of different groups among Republicans some who say they're concerned with the president's conduct but this is not something that that we should remove the president from office over and then there are other Republicans who say well you know there's that the president did nothing wrong from beginning to end in a big a big line that's being used right now is on the issue witnesses and on the issue of the subpoena documents is look if we do go forward on this issue we had we pretty much know the president isn't going to be removed from office and subpoenas for documents and witnesses we'll just read this process out even when we know what the conclusion is going to be that it's going to take weeks and weeks and weeks to get additional evidence and come to the same conclusion this is something that congressman Adam Schiff tried to head off a little bit this morning said he said that that line of argument was nonsense that this is quote not a trial over a speeding ticket or shoplifting that an impeachment trial was very serious and it takes more time essentially it should take more time I want to play one more clips from the leading peach men manager Adam Schiff here's what he said in his final remarks the president trump used Ukraine's leader for political favor and with held critical military aid to an ally in exchange for that favor he did exactly what our framers feared most invited foreign interference in our elections and sold out our country's security for his personal benefit and betrayed the nation's trusts to a foreign power Ron Elving this essentially sums up the week so what should what are you going to be looking for listening for next today was the day that the issue moved on from Ukraine to really being focused on Russia and suse already mentioned the really moving tape that we saw from John McCain and this is ultimately why this all matters a great deal more than it might if it were strictly a technicality the Russia issue the Russia relationship the Russian confrontation and the suspicion that works around this president that he is not sufficiently confrontational with Vladimir Putin and that he's done many things that have helped Putin's world planning so this is a critical moment really if if that issue can break through if that can be the salient that senators take home with them then this will be a very different three days then it would have been without that particular connection so we'll see now in the remaining hours whether or not the obstruction of Congress evidence the extraction of Congress descriptions that we'll hear from the Democrats will be equally effective were equally powerful as what we just heard from Adam shin right although that charge is essentially saying to the White House the White House did not cooperate with the investigation into itself that is correct little different from

Senate Adam Schiff Chairman Congressman
Second full day of Trump impeachment trial under way in Senate

Reveal

06:48 min | 2 years ago

Second full day of Trump impeachment trial under way in Senate

"We've been listening to house impeachment managers present their case to the Senate should convict president trump on two articles of impeachment they are now we believe adjourning for the day the president is charged with abusing the power of his office and with obstructing Congress democratic house impeachment managers spent the day laying out the case for the removal of the president from office house lead impeachment manager Adam Schiff open the day's arguments and made this case against the president president trump has acted in a manner grossly incompatible with self governance his conduct has violated his oath of office and his constitutional duty to faithfully execute the law he has shown no willingness to be constrained by the rule of law and has demonstrated that he will continue to abuse this power and obstruct investigations into himself causing further damage to the pillars of our democracy if he is not held accountable I'm joined now by senior Washington editor and correspondent Ron Elving and NPR congressional correspondent because he's now hello do both hi there good to be with you all right let's start with what appears to have been the overall strategy here we're gonna listen again to Adam Schiff the house impeachment manager here at the end of today and he kept on repeating this let's assume you want to know exactly what happened in that conversation when it was fresh in someone's mind and he told Taylor about it and Taylor road in its notes you're going to want Taylor's notes in any court room in America holding a fair trial you would want to see contemporaneously notes this Senate should be no different demand those notes demand to see the truth we're not afraid of those notes we haven't seen them we haven't seen them maybe those notes say something completely different maybe those notes say no quid pro quo maybe does not say it's a perfect call I'd like to see them I'm willing to trust the master sword Taylor's testimony and his recollection I'd like to see them I like to show them to you they're yours for the asking all right Ron what is the strategy here what is Adam Schiff asking for we have waited and been commenting throughout the last of several shift performances of through the day to comment on this particular tactic that he's using which is wouldn't you like to know we've brought shop here is we've brought up that we've brought up this witness this potential document wouldn't you like to know wouldn't we all like to know the answer to what went on at this point and you can do it all you have to do is vote to subpoena these documents and these ones it's been a systematic narrowing of the scope of what documents and witnesses meet because it started out that that's what all we heard we heard that phrase repeated over and over and over by Democrats in the house and the Senate they want documents and witnesses what shift did throughout the course of today was to say this is the document we need and this is why we need it I think was really well system summed up by the what point when he said do you want to know the full truth now do you want to know just who was in the loop and that is the case that ship was making it's interesting that we are not at this particular point the managers are not so much arguing for the removal of the president from office what they're arguing for is to get the full record to hear from the witnesses to get the documents now course last night there were a series of votes on subpoenaing a number of these documents right and the Republicans voted them all down fifty three to forty seven every single time eleven times over but there's going to be another vote next week about having witnesses about going back over these documents and that's really what the managers were driving that is the crucial moment and they know that a lot of polls are out with something like sixty to seventy percent of the people in the country saying yeah let's have the witnesses let's have the documents let's see the evidence why not how effective has the argument then in your view it it's no mistake that he was making the most pointed argument interim prime time when people are watching and he's hoping that the people watching are people who live in say main where Susan Collins a Republican is up for reelection or Colorado where Cory Gardner another Republican is up for reelection he wants there to be a public pressure campaign on these vulnerable senators so that they come back next week and have to really seriously think about how they're going to cast their vote when a quiet question a witness comes up I mean you mention prime time obviously we know that about seven and a half million people tuned in during prime time yesterday that's a modest number but I mean it still is significant when you think about all the people that this will touch and and you know for the first time people really maybe tuning into this and might not know all the specifics and even people who do not tune in for the moment to moment gavel to gavel kind of coverage that you hear on NPR people who just get it later on before they go to bed in little snippets in a little bit of a news package just the last thing of the day even those people are going to hear the prime time stuff that is emphasized by whoever has the podium on a given day and this day it was a democratic managers tomorrow what will be the next day it will be then we get three days of the Republicans and they will do the same a democratic strategist said to me about a month ago that people largely didn't feel that they needed to tune into impeachment Intel it was actually happening until the present was actually being impeached and we have past that date with past the date when the those votes were cast and people are starting to pay attention in a way that they maybe didn't when it was just theoretical hearing we heard from different people throughout the day but Adam Schiff you know was sort of front and center I think it's three times four times he came to the podium and you know basically laid out the case over and over again he opened he closed he dominated throughout the day this is clearly a case of one impeachment manager being the lead horse now everybody else got a chance we we heard from so Lofgren was the last of the seven to actually get her chance and she's a person who's been around for the Clinton impeachment the Nixon impeachment as a staffer and she was making her side of the case talking about some of the legal of Judiciary Committee kinds of issues that came up a little later Adam ships main purchase here is he's the chairman of the intelligence community a committee rather in the house and so he is really been the driving force in the investigation in the house in two of what exactly went on with respect to Ukraine and the state department and all of these ambassadors and so forth you'll see what they're able to lay out the case in a way that people understood it I mean they were

Senate President Trump
"ron elving" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"ron elving" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Joined by NPR senior Washington editor and correspondent Ron Elving and by congressional correspondent Susan Davis live at seven on KQED public radio Wednesday today whether cloudy areas of patchy fog then mostly cloudy in the bay area today no rain in the forecast the next several days sixties at the coast in bay mid seventies inland our forecast this morning support for NPR comes from total wine and more were in store teams can recommend a bottle of wine spirit or beer for any occasion shoppers can explore more than a thousand lines twenty five hundred beers and three thousand spirits more at total wine dot com little passports a monthly subscription service for kids each package includes games souvenirs and activities from a new country designed to spark curiosity in cultures around the globe that little passports dot com slash radio and Americans for the arts committed to transforming America's communities through the arts and arts education supporting the nonprofit arts industry which employs four point six million people nationwide learn more at Americans for the arts dot org and the listeners of Keiichi we day now six twenty two it's morning edition on KQED I'm Brian what when the camp fire took homes and lives in Butte county it left toxic contamination behind specifically benzene a chemical known to cause cancer the water district in paradise still warns most of its customers not to drink the water he QED sciences Molly Peterson reports that one year and many tests later clean water is a big hurdle to the town's recovery what is your address your water a volunteer named Ron wants creates a steady stream of cars of the hope recovery center that's where the paradise irrigation district hands out water a former mailman he recognizes the drivers a quick pop of the trunk of their car is barely need to stop by one estimate Butte county residents have spent millions out of pocket on water tanks testing kits and filtration systems is here what's lost his house to the campfire he moved to an unburned area nearby rather than rebuild.

editor Susan Davis NPR America Keiichi Butte county Molly Peterson Washington Ron Elving KQED one year
"ron elving" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"ron elving" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Editor and correspondent Ron Elving and by congressional correspondent Susan Davis again it's seven special coverage on KQED public radio eighty eight point five FM increasing clouds today ahead of an incoming dry upper trough is going to bring a cooling trend into tomorrow by Friday temperatures start to rebound leading to another warming and drying trend this weekend the National Weather Service says no rain in the forecast the next several days support for NPR comes from indeed with its skills tests built for employers who want to see a deeper sense of the person behind the resume learn more at indeed dot com slash and PR zoom zoom offers cloud video conferencing online meetings and a video conference room solution in one platform featuring digital video and audio with screen sharing account registration and more Xoom dot U. S. and the listeners and members of KQED public radio eighty eight point five FM in San Francisco and eighty nine point three FM in Sacramento live online right now it cake you we D. dot org five thirty five this is morning edition from NPR news I'm David green and I'm Steve Inskeep good morning Turkey's president he's in Washington today rage of Thai appear to one meets president trump he gets that meeting despite notably ignoring an appeal by president trump the American president wrote a letter warning against a Turkish invasion of Syria including the words quote don't be a full Turkey invaded anyway now the two presidents meet face to face leaders of allies whose relations are under stress Turkey notably agreed to buy Russian missile defense systems awkward for a NATO nation we have reached Republican.

president NATO Steve Inskeep KQED Ron Elving Syria Washington Editor Turkey David green Sacramento San Francisco NPR National Weather Service Susan Davis
This week's new developments in the Trump impeachment inquiry

Political Breakdown

08:48 min | 3 years ago

This week's new developments in the Trump impeachment inquiry

"Earlier today the three house committees leading the impeachment investigation demanded documents from vice president Mike pence about the white house's dealings with you crying and yesterday the committee's interview Kurt Volcker former special envoy to Ukraine among their findings Texan documents suggesting that top state department officials worked on getting a statement of support from Ukraine's president to investigate democratic presidential rival Joe Biden and his son hunter also this week president trump told reporters that China should open an investigation into bite and then his son I mean our KQED politics and government correspondent resa Lagos and joining us via Skype from Washington DC as NPR senior editor and correspondent Ron Elving welcome to both of you things happening pleased to have you both here well I don't think let me begin with you let's begin by talking about the newest the revelation with respect of ice president pence what we know and we're just going the house leaders have sent notice to the vice president saying they want to see every document that might exist that might pertain to meetings that Mike pence might have had with Ukrainian president perhaps with others in Ukraine they want to know everything that he knows about the interchanges between our government at the highest levels that is to say president trump and the Ukrainian president with respect to investigations all the buttons and also with respect to what the president has been saying and we saw this in those envoy messages that you referred to a moment ago the quid pro quo which seems to be quite explicit at least in the minds of those envoys those people in our state department a delegation there in Kiev that the president was saying if you want this aid that Congress has appropriated that everyone seems to be for you've got to give me something on this investigation these are not perfect tax then I take it as a present rises phone call well he called it a perfect phone call some people are calling these smoking texts and a reference obviously to a smoking gun and what do you suspect will go on with Michael I consider who's the I. G. for the intelligence committees can be testifying on Friday this is this is the idea that you have of it is that he's going to defend his handling of the whistle blowers complaint now that complaint came to him directly and he checked it out to his own satisfaction to be able to say he found it credible and urgent and serious and then passed it on to the director of national intelligence his superior for further action a we know that because that individual does requires appeared before the house intelligence committee last week so this is further checking of the legitimacy of the whistle blowers complaint that is driving this whole process Marie said Joseph Maguire didn't find it necessarily all that credible though did he no and I think that this speaks of a different sort of way is that you know different members of the administration are trying to spin this verses the way the Democrats view it but what I would say is that every single piece of evidence that has come out since Adam Schiff first up and sort of made that cryptic announcement about this whistleblower complaint has really played into democratic hands not Republicans I mean these text messages that Ron was just talking about a really very explicit in terms of the concern that was being raised within the administration and their sense that maybe the words quid pro quo quid pro quo was not used but the doubt there was basically a sense that it was that and so I think that whatever the inspector general says it is it has to be taken in the context of everything else as well as the other state department officials including Mike Pompeii who is obviously hit back almost as hard as his boss president trump this is somewhat of a sense the legal your news from helping that maybe China's of being offered a kind of quid pro quo here that is president trump like you did with Hillary Clinton on east said Russia if you're listening where those emails you sort of saying China if you got something on my political opponent here let me know about and which was we going trade war with China well we're supposed to be hearing from some people from China coming to the United States and next week and the context of that request to China came in the same drive way conversation between the president and some of the people covering him in which he said I have tremendous power over these trade negotiations the Chinese really need a deal they need to make a deal I think they ought to make a deal but maybe we will and maybe we won't we don't really have to and then on to talking about China investigating the vines for you were hearing from Adam Schiff and Nancy Pelosi about the president violating his oath of office just keeps coming up came up from both of them what are you making that I mean I think that this is really the crux of why Democrats are moving now with this latest scandal why they did not you know go as far as they have especially pelo see with the Russian investigation with the emoluments questions all these other things they feel like this is a clear cut case that they can make to the American public that essentially by you know making this demand of Ukraine that that is a violation of the oath of office and I think it's really in a lot of ways a strategic talking point from a public relations standpoint as much as a legal argument because they think they can make both and that is something that people understand very clearly and another California the politician Kevin McCarthy the minority leader said that this pope should be dropped is not enough evidence is not enough transparency all things along those lines seems like now is not suppose he dug in but she pretty much said nonsense yeah I mean you know Kevin McCarthy is very close to the president has called him might have been at one point I think that he it you know is doing what the White House with like in sending this letter but maybe bad timing on his part the letter was being transmitted right as the president was making those comments in the White House at outside the White House about China I'm digging on the Ukrainian stuff and I think it gave policy a very clear sort of opening to say look we're not going to drop this it's true you know to to come across these point that in the last two impeachment investigations there was a vote taken to launch those investigations but what clothes he says I don't need to I don't have to and I'm in control which you know we often hear from Mitch McConnell too so that's a that's not unique to one party will these parties are about is antithetical and as far as soon as they can possibly be what does that mean in terms of the fact that we're seeing whistleblower having been identified as a Democrat yeah I mean I think that that is something that the the trump administration and there always are going to keep trying to hammer on I think it will be increasingly hard to make that point when we see mounting I've events like this text messages were that those concerns are actually being called out by the administration officials themselves behind closed doors but certainly you know this is what we saw it during the Hillary Clinton election and and the accusations with the state department and and the various sort of accusations the president made and so I think that that is their political play if we can make this appear partisan then we can sort of take the heat off ourselves and pointed back at the Democrats victory until they run on the let's talk about the role of Rudy guiliani the president's personal lawyer and all those who really kind of got things started with respect to Ukraine any to some degree although it was also started to some degree by some people in the conservative media who had been riding that Joe Biden had some exposure for some of the things that he said while he was vice president with regard to a corruption investigation in Ukraine now what he was trying to do was get the corruption investigation to go forward and get rid of a prosecutor who was blocking it but that was turned around to suggest that somehow he was trying to end the corruption probe that was started some time ago Rudy Giuliani has been part of spreading that particular interpretation he has done it through the media he's done it through and visits with a number of our allies in different countries always appearing only as the president's personal art now it's interesting that he is not part of the government he does not have a role in the government but he is conducting what appears very much to be our foreign policy business as though he had the authority to do so just as the president's personal lawyer and there's also in the background of this some effort that's been made in the past by the Russians to say that the Ukrainians first responsible for the twenty sixteen election interference which all of our intelligence community has agreed was done by the Russians the Russians say no that was the Ukrainians doing that and they were framing us in trying to make it look like we did it and at this point it appears that guiliani and to some degree the president have been playing into that particular interpretation where thousands of thinking of buying campaign I mean it looks bad that he had a son who had no experience got inspirational board in Ukraine getting fifty thousand dollars a month and also the tie to China and investment firm I mean I think that's the problem for by then is not that obviously there's been any fun but you know rendition of wrongdoing but just the appearance of it and I think that every time his name gets brought up in the same sentence as trump and corruption in Ukraine it's sort of yokes them in a way that is not helpful for the

Vice President Mike Pence White House Kurt Volcker Fifty Thousand Dollars
Trump whistleblower's lawyers have 'serious concerns' for client's personal safety

Here & Now

00:57 sec | 3 years ago

Trump whistleblower's lawyers have 'serious concerns' for client's personal safety

"As house Democrats launch their impeachment inquiry this week president trump is attacking the whistleblower whose complaint that trouble leisurely pressure the head of Ukraine into investigating a political rival started it all and here is Ron Elving reports on efforts under way to protect the whistle blowers identity under federal law at this point a legal agreement is in negotiation between the lawyers for the whistleblower the whistle blowers lawyers and these are the people who were involved in writing the complaint as the complaint is very lawyerly and they say that they want to be careful about exposing the identity of the whistle blower which is protected under the law of the whistleblower law and of course you saw how careful Joseph inquire was on Thursday and Michael Atkinson the inspector general of the intelligence community has been quite careful about protecting this identity and at least so far we don't know who this was a blower is and one suspects on the president doesn't either or perhaps we'd already be hearing more specific things about the

Donald Trump Ukraine Ron Elving Michael Atkinson President Trump Joseph
House committees threaten Trump administration subpoenas over documents

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

01:11 min | 3 years ago

House committees threaten Trump administration subpoenas over documents

"Congressional Democrats are calling on secretary of state Mike Pompeii to turn over all documents related to a whistle blower case involving the president as required by law there are reports the government whistle blowers accusing trump of attempting to pressure Ukraine to investigate the son of a political rival ever growing attention to the case it's having an impact on impeachment talk and P. R.'s Ron Elving explains the big question is Nancy Pelosi's view she's been trying to protect some of her incumbents who were elected in swing districts last year going to have a tough race in twenty twenty many of the people in those districts don't understand what this impeachment talk is about so the Democrats are wary they know what happened with the impeachment of Bill Clinton it was never popular and in the end it blew up in the face of the Republicans for going after him so the Democrats don't want to repeat that history and yet one thing after another yet another law that the president seems to be floating in this case the intelligence community is a whistleblower protection act. and what are they going to do they don't have any other tools in the shed they don't have any other weapons in the arsenal impeachment is all they've got NPR's Ron

Mike Pompeii President Trump Donald Trump Ukraine P. R. Ron Elving Nancy Pelosi Bill Clinton NPR
Pepsi’s outgoing CEO Indra Nooyi deserves credit for the company’s big push into snacks

The Takeaway

04:12 min | 4 years ago

Pepsi’s outgoing CEO Indra Nooyi deserves credit for the company’s big push into snacks

"Many ways save the takeaway we'll be, right back after these headlines Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Windsor, Johnston testimony has resumed in the trial of former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort NPR's Ron Elving reports the, jury could hear from, manafort's longtime business partner Rick gates as early as today. Rick h is the key point he's the pivotal point the Lynch pin of this trial the prosecution has already put out a lot of evidence that Manafort made millions move them around to fool people about their source defrauding banks hiding them from taxation and what we're expecting from gates that he'll give us a great deal more detail. And he'll tell us perhaps a little. Bit more about the cast of characters the sources of that income and the defense is going to try to paint gates. As the bad guy who did all the bad stuff and hid the money even from. Paul Manafort whom they, will claim was not guilty of knowing, about any of this NPR's Ron Elving reporting. Metaphor does facing eighteen counts of tax. And Bank fraud. The trial is expected to last about three weeks several tech companies have started blocking content from controversial media personality alex jones from their media platforms joseph lahey from member station k. u. t. reports facebook says it's taken down four pages administered by jones for repeated violations of the company's community standards those included language glorifying violence and dehumanizing people who are transgender muslim or immigrants also today apple confirmed its i tunes platform will no longer offer five podcast series hosted by jones because they violated the company's hate speech guidelines spotify and youtube have also taken similar actions to block his content jones is facing multiple defamation lawsuits in texas district court for making false claims regarding the school massacre in newtown connecticut and parkland florida for n._p._r. news i'm joseph lahey in austin pepsi's long-serving chief injure a new ye is stepping down new He is a rare minority female CEO whose tenure lasted a. Dozen years NPR's, Yuki Noguchi reports she'll be succeeded by another Pepsi veteran Raymond LaGuardia, the sixty two year. Old new year stepping, down as. CEO in October and will remain as chairman into the early, part of next year during her. Tenure new you push the company to expand at. Snack and soft drink empire to include healthier foods as consumer tastes were shifting in that direction she. Helped add products, such as, HAMAs and coconut water to Pepsi's line and its. Stock rose, eighty percent. During her tenure the Indian-born new Ye grew up during food shortages and in a statement called leading Pepsi the honor of. Her lifetime low quarter who replaces her is president of. The company and has been there for twenty two years you can Gucci NPR news stocks are trading higher on Wall Street, at, this hour the Dow is up. Thirty four points the NASDAQ, up thirty, eight the. SNP up nine this is NPR news And this is WNYC, in New York good. Afternoon I'm Sean Carlson New York governor Andrew Cuomo is robust ping the National Rifle rifle association's claim that he tried to put the organization out. Of business by banning sales of an insurance product called carry guard the NRA, says it lost tens of millions, of dollars after New York regulators curb the sale of carry guard which is meant to. Cover the legal fees, for people, who fire weapon in self defense but on MSNBC's morning Joe today Cuomo said the NRA had. Been providing insurance of gun owners who had knowingly broke the law I believe this insurance product is going to be. Illegal from a public policy point, of view and most most states and, now that the NRA said this is. A major. Source of revenue I'm going to pursue it nationwide Cuomo says he's reaching out to other governors. And attorneys general to also ban the. Product city and state officials took a bus ride from Williamsburg to Manhattan this morning. To get a taste of what a commute during the l.. Train shutdown will look like, state Senator Brad Holman said after the ride that he's. Concerned about the pollution. From all the buses, that'll be traveling, up and down fourteenth street. In the morning making up for the loss of the subway we.

Paul Manafort Paul Manafort Npr Andrew Cuomo NPR NRA Austin Pepsi Yuki Noguchi CEO Pepsi Manhattan Alex Jones Ron Elving Chairman Rick Gates Senator Brad Holman President Trump Gucci Npr Washington Rick H Joseph Lahey
Lawyers welcome U.S. court order to slow deportations of separated families

Fresh Air

04:34 min | 4 years ago

Lawyers welcome U.S. court order to slow deportations of separated families

"Vivid Albertine guitarist and lyricist for one of the first all women, punk bands the British band, the slits. Now she's a writer and has just published her second memoir the slits worked hard, not to copy popular male bands and dressed in ways that defied ideas of what is feminine and sexy on the street band members were literally attacked. I'll singer who was fourteen fifteen when we first got together with stop twice in front of me by men, starved for looking like she looked Albertine is in her sixties now has been married, divorced, survived cancer, raised her daughter and stayed best friends with her mother who died for years ago. We'll talk about her life today and what her punk aesthetic and anger mean to her now and David in Cooley reviews a new HBO documentary about Robin Williams. That's on fresh air. First news Live from NPR news. In Washington I'm. Lakshmi. Singh President Donald Trump is drawing bipartisan criticism after he appeared to cast doubt on Russia's interference in the two thousand sixteen. Presidential election NPR's Scott Horsely has more on what Trump said and didn't say during today's joint news conference with Russian President Vladimir Putin after their one on one in Helsinki lawmakers from both parties are lining up to say what the. President did not that they believe the assessment of US intelligence that Russia interfered in the two thousand, sixteen election, Tennessee Republican Bob corker who heads the Senate Foreign Relations committee said Trump's equivocation on that point makes the US look like a pushover and. Democratic leader Chuck Schumer suggested darkly Putin may hold damaging information on Trump the president insists that, isn't so and I have to say if they had it would've been out. Long ago Russia's president was asked directly if he has compromising material on. Trump Putin sidestepped. The question Scott Horsely NPR news Washington in his first remarks since departing Helsinki Trump tweets that he has. Quote great confidence, in. His intelligence people however he goes on to tweet we cannot exclusively focused on the past as the world's two large nuclear, powers we must get along a tweet from President Trump a short time ago as Air Force One makes its way back to joint base Andrews NPR's Ron Elving reports Trump's to meet around Putin appeared friendlier than when he met with. NATO members last week those are our allies twenty eight other countries with whom we are allied largely, against the, threat posed I by the Soviet Union now by the Russian federation under Vladamir Putin and we did not seem to have anything like the. Same kind of chummy relationship with many of those leaders and the staging of much of it brought that out that's NPR's Ron Elving a federal judge in California has temporarily. Halted the deportation of immigrant families that have been reunited after being separated. By the Trump administration NPR's Joel rose reports that decision came from, the same judge who ordered the government to reunite the, families the government is working to reunite roughly two thousand. Five, hundred and fifty immigrant children. With their parents by court order deadline of July twenty sixth what will happen. To those families after reunification is unclear lawyers for the American Civil Liberties union which brought. The lawsuits say they're concerned about rumors of mass deportations, of families that have just been reunited in response judge Dana Subroto said he would order a temporary halt. To deportations for a, week until lawyers for the government can respond to the ACLU's motion the Trump administration says it has reunified all eligible children under the age of five. And it submitted a plan to reunify older children ahead of next week steady line Joel rose NPR news before the close the Dow was up forty five points at. Twenty five thousand. Sixty four the NASDAQ was down twenty points at seventy eight oh five SNP was off two points this is NPR from geeky weedy news Amina Kim San Francisco transportation officials are expected to. Vote tomorrow on a ban on tour buses in. Front of. One of the city's famous. Homes key cuties Michelle Wiley has more The house featured on the ninety s sitcom full house and recent Netflix reboot fuller, house is a major tourist attraction Neighbors say the crowds are relentless visiting day and. Night now the San Francisco MTA, is set to vote on. Whether or not they'll band tour buses on the street. But resident Carla has Hagen says buses aren't the real problem we have people standing. On the street to take pictures we have people double parking..

Singh President Donald Trump Vladimir Putin Andrews Npr President Trump Russia NPR American Civil Liberties Union Joel Rose Helsinki Washington Scott Horsely Writer Ron Elving HBO San Francisco Albertine Chuck Schumer Bob Corker United States
U.S. government says it will detain migrant children with parents

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:10 min | 4 years ago

U.S. government says it will detain migrant children with parents

"Try to do that later npr's ron elving thanks so much thank you scott government says it wants to hold migrant families in detention until their immigration cases complete now that's according to court papers filed late last night should be a big change from past practice because a longstanding court agreement limited the detention of children twenty days the latest move by the trump administration to try to curtail the flow of migrants arriving at the us border in the southern border and it's likely spark a fresh round of legal challenges and barriers joel rose joins us now joe thanks for being with us sure scott the trump administration has backed down from the practice of separating families at the border but they're still about two thousand migrant children in the government's care they have been separated from apparent what is this what does this mean for them well we've been waiting to understand how the government plans to reunify those families that were separated as a result of the administration's zero tolerance policy at the southwest border a federal judge this week gave the administration a very tight deadline told them to reunite those families within thirty days and if the children are younger than five within fifteen days and now we know how the government wants to do that they could the administration has the option of releasing these parents from immigration detention letting them live in the us pending their dates in immigration court but that is not what the in ministration says it wants and these court filings the government makes clear it wants to detain these children along with their parents instead of releasing them wherever these families be detained well the government is running out of space in detention centers for migrant families there are two facilities in texas to detain migrant families but they're at about eighty percent capacity so the government is moving ahead with another option the department of defense announced this week that it plans to start building to tent encampments in texas one at fort bliss in el paso specifically for migrant families so these families may be headed to that post in el paso but the courts have said children could only be held for twenty days right what what what happens thereafter well the government is trying to reconcile instructions from two different courts here one of them is the federal court ruling out this week ordering them to reunify these families and the other is what is known as the florez settlement which limits how long children can be held in jail like settings to about three weeks so in order to comply with the first ruling the government says it needs to hold families longer as long as it takes her their immigration court proceedings to play out and that can sometimes take months even years now i should say it is not at all clear if the judge overseeing the florist settlement will sign off on any of this she could approve longterm detention but she could also order that the parents be released with their children that they'd be monitored with gps ankle bracelets to ensure that they show up in court immigrant rights advocates are already urging the judge to reject the government's plan and their filing last night they say there's no reason to lift the limits and florez just to remedy the chaos as they put it that was caused by the administration's decision to separate these families in the first place and rights advocates also note that the same judge rejected a similar request from the obama administration just a few years ago and they say nothing on the ground has really changed since then joel the the reality not just the idea of separating and detaining families has sparked an outpouring of outrage across the country going to be a number of protests today aren't there yeah immigrant rights advocates are horrified they say detaining these children even with their parents is profoundly harmful they point out that these are mostly asylum seekers largely women and children from central america who are fleeing from violence in their home countries and immigrant rights advocates say we can do better that these migrants should be allowed to stay in the us to ask for asylum and they should be allowed to be free until those claims are heard protests are planned today in washington dc on the brooklyn bridge in new york and in dozens of towns and other cities all across the country npr's joel rose thanks so much you're welcome in annapolis maryland last night where students held a candlelight vigil to remember five employees of the capital gazette.

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