17 Burst results for "Ron Davis"

"ron davis" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:31 min | 11 months ago

"ron davis" Discussed on WTOP

"Right merge lane four lanes for through lines are getting by on the inner loop based on two seventy north bound remain slow from Germantown in Frederick County weather delays no major incidents on two seventy despite the slick and slow conditions ninety five no times to and from Baltimore southbound from Baltimore on I ninety seven the accident near route one hundred piece of debris through a windshield right side remains blocked but most of the respondents are now on the right shoulder route fifty three billion Annapolis no traffic or weather problems back in Virginia I. sixty six the combination of building volume a long term work zones and heavy rain leading to delays same deal on route twenty eight north of sixty six no crashes reported yet thankfully Yates Ford was blocked between bowl Ron Davis mill road and crashed ninety five south bound building volume delays knowing to the Woodbridge delays and Quantico easing the crash near mile marker one forty nine is now clear curbside delivery since nineteen fifty five and meter has been delivering homes for sixty five years they thought they'd seen it all day everything's changed except their commitment to their community as a van metre homes dot com slash curbside Dave told on WTOP traffic that read or tell us about the thunderstorms okay we got a new warning now is for parts of Fairfax county mostly a small but intense thunderstorm that did pop up you're talking about it the last time near Chantilly in Centerville some pretty heavy downpours and also some hail along Virginia route to a twenty eight all the way up to the Loudon county line the layout of the county line is included a little bit in the warning so it's very close to Dulles airport as well and also the Fairfax county parkway getting.

Germantown Frederick County Baltimore Yates Ford Quantico Dave Fairfax county Chantilly Centerville Annapolis Virginia Ron Davis Woodbridge Loudon county Dulles
"ron davis" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"ron davis" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"On the world that's three there really tough shots to make even for demonte green who's in the end is best three point shooter and then the file at the other end is in Minnesota free look here from the strike Michael heard will go to the free throw line he was but a contributor to this ball club the last couple of years not so much this season and that free throws off the mark no go he is hold for three and templates in free throws twenty eight twenty three and the other with a lady to help with the trailing by yeah sure five I should say and they have a basketball he comes over to al durable the right forever he rolls back to the top slides of left throws it inside the Ron Davis for an easy laugh I think we'll have a chance at a three point finally the pick and roll the ball to the other side of the Davis is wide open only after he said this of all screens in the soda job rotating out of that ball screen defense Indiana gets these law so the Ron will go to the line not good if the strike this year at all and when is your it's the three point play that's the reverse yes right there just keep saying that bad all the Hoosiers are two free throws them make them all three six in the US pulled into his car outside the cow sure he drives inside the stop loss to handle got it back fades away throws up a shot will go and I think they called they do in the world another one that's exactly what you gotta do that's great all the way until the very end with the region you got to get her off the three point line make him a driver of the bass voice not nearly as comfortable drum doing nice job until the very end cal sure yet the store now we have up this first for the game from the line have a second attempt coming shooting seventy.

Michael basketball Ron Davis Indiana Ron US Minnesota
"ron davis" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"ron davis" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Me the question mark for Indiana here defensively can Ron Davis Arturo from from her Indiana makeover golden gophers have gone to him the last couple possessions in seven other stores around at all during that time in his reading of the whole and it's an eight point Minnesota Leo eighteen fires at the green on the left he brings it to the top of the queue back outside Al Gore on rise and back to the left in order to run Davis an eighteen foot jump shot by Iran is off the mark family and the rebound is kept away in the markets car sales down the floor comes Minnesota drives into the base line right all the balls doctor for outside no drug charges up to it he feeds it back the car car gets a screen dumps it inside your Turrell all by himself what back the other way green in the lane lost the handle on the Browns and the other will controller now we have a couple subs coming in for Indiana's race time so we'll check against others rob Finnessey Dr Davis will ship as will Al Gore defensively Deanna not quite good enough the thing that's most concerning right now for the Hoosiers for the last three minutes thirteen seconds you cannot hold on these types of stretches all offensively we're not put the ball in the basket expect to win all Georgia to rest here is Jarvis of mercy comes in years of I take remote a quick and got his first basketball game and that was a big three in the ad is down eighteen to thirty now across the timeline markers car with the ball slides left against Minnesota Kerr brings it back to the top right side here is a long shot by you know first asking the game with a three point back down now only one to thirteen years rob Finnessey between the circles takes it to the right side pulls it back to the lab for the past two amante green green will let go another three off the mark taken out of there by you know he gives up the market Minnesota on the attack with the ball on the perimeter right dries it down low spins away from finishing gets inside it'll versus man out of bounds by the Mante green and will belong to Minnesota already thrown basket with forty one on the shot clock Minnesota nine of eleven from the field eighty two percent India not able to get stops here which is what most concerning I actor defense on the road if you expect to win right now offensively for Minnesota's week two easy easy was right around the room race time soon so it is joy broke again and sitting down the stretch Jackson they research car drives right side turns around throws up a shot was going to rebound is knocked away from drawl pottery could say I don't belong to Minnesota we got television the stories Minnesota twenty one thirteen eleven fifty two on the and now another addition of obvious news from geico experts now say that wearing more clothes in the winter will in fact help you be warmer we asked cold victim track Patterson about this and here's what he said it was the weirdest thing I was a little cold put on.

Indiana Ron Davis
"ron davis" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"ron davis" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"His first two points here still the other way and the elites eighteen the for lawyer to children right side past the hole he drives into the lane my response is you will lose your puts it off the glass first two points eighteen is six are you they will ball turns around Roger what's on him between the circles moves to the lab now boxes to the Ron Davis Davis looks inside contracted amante green green rows of another one once back the other way can the smart watch to the court as a lawyer he fires off a three this is George and raced for as one to replace race is really physical in their eye glasses for three down early this morning there's a lot outside past does to Armand Franklin rebels and back out front right side passed to the Monterey green with the rebels now to the top of the lame works of left inside down there one day when she water first two points it is six in the morning with a whole is it all right here here hold download outside the lawyer he the longboard council rock and walks watch has it all the way against watch throws it outside the children now they find lawyers lawyer comes less tries to work inside goes there the nice for his first field goal is four four and here's a steel it's nice to play I don't know who was raised well one of the two got a piece of it rob this is making his way back on the floor here the mobile but this time I finishes with thirty three the first Michigan state this is I you basketball shorts radio network booking dot com there's a booking.

Roger Ron Davis Davis George Monterey Armand Franklin Michigan basketball
"ron davis" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

06:12 min | 2 years ago

"ron davis" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"The war on poverty risi and then in this stuff about d a the democratic primaries moving margins a lot of a political stuff trump's curious ron davis with kim jong hoon i i could only a and then 'em oregon sue nami risk so i did not know about their stories on turkey a the politics going on turkey right now 'em robert carrow in lbj matt just literally couldn't help himself the work of the of the crossword a you know new yorker every time we do in new york at actually i like it's i could have bragging rights would my folks find me think that what i'm doing is legitimate twelve weeks for just six bucks plus the new yorker tote bag weekly home delivery of the print edition and unlimited access to new yorker dot com we tend to fifteen exclusive site only stories every day when you go to new yorker dot com slash majority and enter the code majority you'll be able to access apps online archived crossword puzzle and more again that's new yorker dot com slash majority enter the code majority say fifty percent on eight twelve week subscription and get exclusive to coach i check that out folks will get take quick break when we come back anthony mccann on shadow lance fearing freedom at the oregon standoff you i'm pain radio we we are back sam cedar on the majority report on the phone and it's a pleasure to welcome to the program poet and author anthony mccann author of a western tale of american crisis shadow lance fear in freedom i think oregon standoff of course this is about be the bundy takeover of mahler national wildlife a twenty sixteen anthony welcome to the program thank you accept glad to be here so i wanna start with this a question and then you will get into a part of the story the book comes out i guess it's tomorrow a chance of asking check it out say andrew there's a lot of stuff obviously happening in the news that if not directly related to a this 'em in washington state certainly 'em i guess tangentially so a at least in terms of the spirit of what's going on but i wanna start waves are asking you about a a quote from your book 'em 'cause you did a tremendous amount of reporting you covered obviously the the sort of the things that led to the takeover in then v m the trial itself but there was one guy who as part of the bundy i guy named jason patrick who had sort of join this group 'em as eight m as sort of a a someone who i guess was suspicious not suspicious maybe or maybe suspicious but as a critique of sort of state power in the form of of police officers end at one point 'em patrick tried to make common cause with black live matter in one of the leaders of the local a don't shoot 'em organizations a treasure ray furred i guess i don't you're portland yeah terrific terrific she's actually running for mayor of portland right now oh is that right well she there had she had said his ideas are who he thinks he is well you just talk about that and then let's go into the story 'cause i'm just curious just like we explain to people what that means a big glad you think that's one of my at the fermi that's a real touchstone a quote in the whole book from me and it's so it's such a simple quote 'em but so complex what i think is saying there about jason who is very sincere about his opposition to police militarization and police abuse anderson's here in his desire to you know to lie to race and that causes in has done a lot of work along those lines as part of more of the the libertarian conservative a waiting of police.

eight twelve week fifty percent twelve weeks eight m
"ron davis" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"ron davis" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"That's not like that or that so close to what they want. But then they say well that wasn't what I was thinking about looks lies. And that's when we think well, you're asking for a whole lot here. But we, but we do get a lot more in. This isn't right for you. We don't want you to have. Anyway, our contracts are very aglow. I mean, if you don't want your dog ten years from now, you are supposed to contact us, and we send transport and we picked the dog microchip is never changed your name. So that if that dog gets picked up by animal control run into a shelter for cell phone rings immediately. And like if we get somebody that's lost their dog two or three times. Back to us. You can't go around us right there. Kind of all you're right. You're responsible for the we promised them. They will never end up in a shelter. And they will never want for something. I'll ask you one more question because I know you have to get to the to the other folks out there. But what vice do you guys have for someone who doesn't really know anything about rescue and is looking to get their first stock to go to shelters go to shelters spend a little time hanging out at each h section. There's large dog sections is toy dog sections does females males. However, they divided up but take enough time to hang out at a few of them. And just be there for him. And just don't try to make them come to allow them to come to you. There's no making this. It's all allow and give them a chance. And and you'll intern find out that you may have a little talented this fall in love with something that needs you is much as you need them. One of the biggest. Things. I'd like to say is do a little research on the type of raid likely just took into border collies have lived in downtown Atlanta in a condo. And they lived in cages for fourteen hours because the man worked, and they went crazy crazy. You know, do some research is a working dog that has high energy, you know, and if you really need something for tight apartment, get a smaller dog, something that's very low energy, you know, but the nice thing. I mean, I think going through some rescues is when they've been fostered by somebody or they've lived in somebody's home. They can really tell you a lot about that Doug's personality. Yeah. Her sure thank you guys so much. You so excited to see the film again. We'll remember you. You said we don't care if they a doctor must. Just say. Tag. Adopt. Don't shop. Hi, I'm here with Ron Davis. The filmmaker of life in the doghouse heireann. Hi, thank you so much for having me on it for, you know, paying attention to the film. Of course, thank you so much for having me, I truly do love this film. So whose idea was it to do all these screenings all over the place? It was a combination of I think the teams, but it was something. I from the beginning always wanted to do with the film. Yeah. I knew that the film was not about making money, but was about promoting rescue raising money. So I always wanted to screenings to be about raising money for a rescue. So every screening we've done is partnered with a local rescue. Oh, wow. That's great. So how did you find out about Dan Yan? Ron's rescue in the first place. I had rescued my first dog from a local animal care and control. Yeah. I was looking for a little friend and some do eventually we all get there. We had to. She was traveling everywhere with me, and I think she didn't really like it. And I just thought if I got her a friend, and I knew who Danny and Ron were kind of in the world, I knew of them. Oh, so you're in the horse role as well. I was I wasn't in my past. And it's one of those things where once you were you kind of always aren't they see automated, you should Danny and Ron vast. You gotta get your next dog. So I went, and I told them they didn't ask me what color. I wanted kind. I wanted. They asked me personality. That's what they were. Just telling me, I said, what are you ask people are funny? Yeah. They did. I get told them what I wanted and they took me out..

Ron Danny Ron Davis Atlanta intern Dan Yan Doug Ron vast fourteen hours ten years
"ron davis" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"ron davis" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Ron made my night. This film is coming out this Wednesday September twelfth to listen to Ron Davis and find out where you can see it near you by visiting WWW dot life in the doghouse, movie dot com. Joe laugh, you'll cry and I guarantee you will never so much in one sitting ever again. So that's it. For today's episode of Kansas City on pet lake radio. I'm your host, Victoria shaper. See you next time. When I tell you another fun and exciting tale of the city. Let's talk pets every week on demand only on pet life radio dot com. Talk. Radio. Radio dot com. Listen up. This is Gerald to tally from diva I want you to listen to light radio. I like that the time is now four Victoria, still wells, positively. She's a world renowned trainers. Here have dogs today. She's the host of it's me or the dog coming to train you along with co host Holly firfer, you don't play around with that name. Do you am a fan of Schmidt? She's Victoria Stillwell sheets. Lousy way to start the day. Busy, trimmer whiskers, see some PU I feel a little bit better. He'll stupid during the podcast now. Let's head to the studio and get this positive heavily tasked starting. Hello, miss Stillwell. How you doing? I'm great. You know, why why? Because I have a great book in.

Ron Davis Kansas City miss Stillwell Victoria Gerald Schmidt Joe laugh Holly firfer
"ron davis" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

11:20 min | 2 years ago

"ron davis" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Show with Arden more. We're back from a lot. Just check the paper. And we had our record showing in the box the litterbox that is now back to over. Here's arden. Welcome back to the OB. Hey show on at like radio. I'm your host, Ardmore speaking with Ron Danna, and Danny Robert Shaw, they together make up The Danny Ron rescued that org group in South Carolina. They are now touring the country at film festivals with a powerful documentary about what they're doing. It's called life in the doghouse the movie is called it's going to premiere September twelfth to general audiences. But you know, you guys most people say when they win the lotto they're going to travel the world by Mercedes or of tesla. Okay. Guys. Let's say you have a winning lotto ticket in your pause. What are you gonna do with? My big dream is I would buy a faint Nuder, bud. Okay. And I would have veterinarians and their assistance on the spay neuter bus, and I would send that they knew about all the rural. Areas and spay and neuter cats and dogs for people free because they neuter is the key problem to our overpopulation in the United States in another country. And if we had get most people staying neuter their dogs, we would not have overpopulation, my big dream would be if everyone would get their dogs fate neutered, and they could put shelters out of business and put rescues out of business if there was no need for it. Well, I'm hoping you're going to win that lotto because I think it's well deserved. And the other point in your movie, and I'm not trying to spill all the beans about the movie because it's really good. But speak about the people are all up. You know, it's semantics kill shelters, no kill shelters. The no kills tend the dogs to kill shelters. But can you address that a little bit and shed a little light on who is really responsible for this over influx of dogs cats and other animals at shelters, I feel very sad for most shelters. I mean, just where we live in south. South carolina. They, you know, a county shelter. They have to take. I was there yesterday, and they got three pigs fraud in and six baby pigs, they have to take everything that's dropped off there. Whether it's parakeets goldfish cats dogs donkeys, horses, whatever drives in the driveway, and it's dropped off and surrendered they have to take. And so many of the shelters in America always get fast because they use the night, and I talked to a lot of rescue because there's a lot of rescues and even in our area that will get in the newspaper, and they'll bash a lot of shelters because they have to euthanize, and it's really not the shelters fall. It comes down to the community comes down to education. I mean, there are a lot of people that cannot afford to bay neuter their dogs, but there are many many places I mean, most of your shelters they have low costs van neuter for like ten and fifteen dollars. And if you do a little research, there are places to get your pet they neutered, but I really get very very defensive. Of the shelter because they basically have to do the dirty work because we have an overpopulation, the Knicks conception that. Most people think that the no kill shelter is so wonderful. But what happens is there the cause of more than the kill shelters because they fill up with dogs aren't adoptable eventually, and they have to keep them forever. And so they're no spots there for the little dog that looks like a family pet or that sort of thing to come in because the no kill shelters. Get so booked up with permanence there, and it's like waiting in line to get in. So those dogs have to be referred somewhere else or else, they're just abandoned. And that's so much of what the kill shelters do. And they I can assure you they tried very very hard to keep animals alive as long as they possibly can. And when they reach out to us, sometimes it's because we've had this one so long we really don't want to do something with it. Is there any way you guys could help? And that's where we come in a whole lot of times. So tell us how did you get this? The idea of doing the movie life in the doghouse and youthful dream about doing movies. But getting it done is probably no easy task. So can you guys talk about how you came up with the idea and and got Ron Davis to say, yes, says the producer? Got it back with sorry. Sorry. He didn't come up with the idea. Ron Davis came up with the idea. Okay. Help us out. Yeah. It took Ron Davis two years to get us to agree to do it. He wind and dined us and wind and dynasty. We kept saying, no, no, no. And danny. And I kept saying we weren't interesting enough. How many people want to watch the eighty some dogs? Yeah. So forth. And you know, he kept talking to us. And he said, you know, you guys just have to trust me. You have a beautiful story here. And so we finally agreed to do it. And it took about I don't know two two and a half years of filming, you know, to get a completed, but I do have to say the interesting thing is like the whole time, Danny and I kept saying Ron, and you know, when you have a book on with the wind, and you make the movie it's easy because you have a book with the story. And then you can, you know, make a movie out of it or out of Africa or whatever. Right. You read you can create a movie, and we have no idea how you know. He followed us to the flood zones in Louisiana. We went down to rescue dogs down there. He followed us out in the woods trapping dogs. He followed him under house trailers, he followed us to horror shows followed us all over the country. And we could not figure out how he was going to make this a story. And I do have to say when we saw the movie, Dan, and I both cried because it was no moving that. He really did. Create a story of our live. I kept saying we're just not that interesting. There's nothing interesting. Now, I realize that we were so engulfed in what we did. And it was so natural to us that we kinda felt that everybody knew that. And the most rewarding part of the film is the couple of times we've gotten to see it when people that we know that know us very well are sitting right next to us. And at the end of it is tears running down there. And they said, you know, we know I mean, we thought we know we all have thought we know. And yet we know nothing about what we really do. And come to find out. It turned out. It really is interesting. We were fascinated. Well, I love how you how Ron Davis incorporated, some of your childhood footage. And I know you don't will never hurt a turtle or anything else. But you know, that was wonderful. And then the the way the I don't want to spoil it. But I love the where the camera angles. Are you start off with the movie, and it's almost ad dog level, right? Oh my gosh. That was so much fun. Watching clay westervelt in our house trying to figure out how to do this. And the first couple of times trying to get some of the dogs coming through the doggy door and stuff all they did was stop at lick the camera and jump on his lap. And then we were in hysterics because we thought there's no way that's going to happen. And sure enough I'll you know, we're doing different things and stuff. He he runs to losy buys a PVC pipes and had tracks all over the place and then a drone and so get them right up in the face sleeping and the dogs. Didn't want to go up and look that like they do a human. I it's just that's clever that's clever, and it made it it made it so beautiful. So I know we want to help you guys out. So we want to give them the information and how people can make donations. I want them all to go to the movies. And I know that the net. Proceeds are going to go to shelters like yourself. Is that correct? Yes. One hundred percent Ron Ron Davis is donating one hundred percent of his profits from the movie to animal shelters all over the country. So how do we donate to help your cause in? South carolina. If he does go to Danny and Ron's rescue, we're on Facebook. We also have a website if he does Google and on both places there's a donate button. And if you'd like to mail a check there's also address to send a check to you have fees, right? All of our dogs spayed neutered. Microchips of other vaccines dental everything they need, we did corneal transplants. We do everything to give them site. And anyway, we just survive on donations only, and you have given up a lot of your retirement funds to keep this place in operation. Yes, we did. Because when we started with Katrina, we were not a nonprofit yes than for any donations. And so we wound up both of us spending about forty percent of our retirement fund, which was very costly because then you had to pay taxes on it taking it out to the Katrina dogs because it was so expensive to, you know, get the dogs fading Newton heartworms three doesn't so on and so forth. So it was very costly to us. And so we were very fortunate that somebody saw us in the press and from Michigan and decided to become our attorney pro Bono. And also. We are whatever indentity Danielle McLaughlin. She was she was an angel for us. Well, we give shout out. Yeah. I think fates made it so that the two of you guys got together have this beautiful home and unified mission. And the other thing is these dogs in your home are getting a chance to socialize with other dogs know what life is like in a house, which is your dog house. So doesn't that help with their adoptions? Oh, it helps greatly because a lot of people contact us and tell us that you know, I'd like to have something around this longhaired or allergenic friendly or whatever you wanna call that and about the size, and whether it's with children or whether it's for a mother-in-law had a couch potato and having lived with each dog. We have a report on each dog. And we know what they're like from the beginning when we get them. And how long it took? And how comfortable they are. When new people come in the house, they react with the other animals, and and it's interesting when they like a certain type of person, but not another type and we child test. Them and we test them, and and everything we can try to do to make it where they only go to one home after us ever. And that's in our contracts. We have a very strict contract that you can never give the dog away if ten years from now, you don't want the dog we will send transport and the dog comes back Danny and runs. Rescuing live their life out with us. But you're never allowed to give your dog away or take the dog for the shelter. If you do you agree to pay a five thousand dollars, we have all the dogs on record and in the computer. And and so we we know where who has them and they're micro-chipped in our name, and we leave them in that name. And that way, we'll get the first call because we have twenty four seven access to responding to calls. And for instance, if you were going to France, and you left your dog with a house sitter coming in and out, and they left the door open and got away. Anyway, somebody takes it to a better something and we'll get the call. I and we'll probably find you a lot faster than they would. And we'll make a lot more effort. And so we don't mind getting the call. It's about that. If we can make sure things are, okay. They also asked people to keep a collar on with their cell number. Good. Side of the road and people stop they're happy to dial a cell number real fast. But a lot of people aren't real willing to find a veterinarian or somebody to read chips. Right. I come shelter alums my dog and cat Kona. And Casey now work with me. And we teach pet first aid all over the country. And we also visit their therapy pets now..

Danny Ron Davis Danny Ron South Carolina Ron Ron Davis Arden Ron Danna Knicks United States Danny Robert Shaw fraud Africa Google America Katrina France Casey Louisiana Dan
"ron davis" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

12:39 min | 2 years ago

"ron davis" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"We're back from the lot. Just check the paper. And we had a record showing the box the litterbox that is now back to obey. Here's welcome back to the show on life radio. I'm your host, Ardmore speaking with Ron Danna, and Danny Robert Shaw, they together make up The Danny Ron rescued that org group in South Carolina. They are now touring the country at film festivals with a powerful documentary about what they're doing. It's called life in the doghouse the movie is called it's going to premiere September twelfth to general audiences. But you know, you guys most people say when they win the lotto they're going to travel the world by Mercedes or of tesla. Okay. Guys. Let's say you have a winning lotto ticket in your pause. What are you gonna do with my big dream is I would buy a fait Nuder, bud. Okay. And I would have veterinarians and their assistance on the state new bus and. I would send that they knew about all the rural areas and spay and neuter cats and dogs for people are free because paying neuter is the key problem to our overpopulation in the United States in another country. And if we had get most people in neuter their dogs, we would not have no overpopulation, my big dream would be if everyone would get their dogs fate neutered, and they could put shelters out of business input rescues out of business. If there was no need for it. Well, I'm hoping you're going to win that lotto because I think it's well deserved. And the other point in your movie, and I'm not trying to spill all the beans about the movie because it's really good. But speak about the people are all, you know, it's semantics kill shelters, no kill shelters. The no kills tend the dogs to the shelters, but can you address that a little bit and shed a little light on who is really responsible for this over influx of dogs cats and other animals at shelters, I feel very sad. For most shelters. I mean, just where we live in South Carolina. They you know, like county shelter. They have to take. I was there yesterday, and they got three pigs brought in and six baby pigs, they have to take everything that's dropped off there. Whether it's parakeets goldfish Catholics donkeys horses. Whatever drives in the driveway in dropped off and surrendered they have to take. And so many of the shelters in America always get fast because they use the tonight, and I talked to a lot of recipes because there's a lot of rescues and even in our area that will get in the newspaper, and they'll bash a lot of shelters because they have to euthanize, and it's really not the shelter ball. It comes down to the community comes down to education. I mean, there are a lot of people that cannot afford who they neutered their dog. But there are many many places I mean, most of your shelters they have low cost they in neuter for like fifteen dollars. And if you do a little research, there are places to get your pet they neutered, but. I really get very very defensive of the shelter because they basically have to do the dirty work because we have an overpopulation, the Knicks conception. That most people think that the no kill shelter is so wonderful. But what happens is there? The cause more debts shelters because they fill up with dogs that aren't adoptable eventually, and they have to keep them forever. And so they're no spots there for the little dog that looks like a family pet or that sort of thing to come in because the no kill shelters. Get so booked up with permanent there, and it's like waiting in line to get in. So those dogs are have to be referred somewhere else or else, they're just abandoned. And that's so much of what the kill shelters do, and I can assure you, they tried very very hard to keep animals alive as long as they possibly can. And when they reach out to us sometimes it's because we've had this win so long. We really don't want to do something with it. Is there any way you guys can help us? And that's where we come in a whole lot of times. So tell us how did you get this idea of doing the movie life in the doghouse, and you dream about doing movies, but getting it done? Is probably no easy task. So can you guys talk about how you came up with the idea? And and got Ron Davis to say, yes says the producer it back. Sorry. Sorry. He didn't come up with the idea. Ron Davis came up with the idea. Okay. Help us out. Yeah. It took Ron Davis two years to get us to agree to do. And he wined, and dined and wined and dined we kept saying, no, no, no. And danny. And I kept saying we weren't interesting enough. How many people want to watch the eighty some dogs? Yeah. So forth. And you know, he kept talking to us. And he said, you know, you guys just have to trust me. Do you have a beautiful story here? And so we finally agreed to do it. And it's like about I dunno two two and a half years of filming to get a completed. But I do have to say the interesting thing is like the whole time Danny, and I kept saying to Ron, you know, when you have a book on with the wind, and you make the movie at easy because you have a book with Dory. And then you can, you know, make a movie out of it or out of Africa. Whatever right. You read you can create a movie, and we have no idea how you know. He followed us to the flood zones in Louisiana. We went down to rescue dogs down there. He followed out in the woods trapping dogs. He followed him under house trailers, he followed horror shows us all over the country. And we could not figure out how he was going to make this a story. And I do have to say when we saw the movie, Dan, and I are both cried because it with no moving that. He really did. Create a story of our live. I kept saying we're just not that interesting. There's nothing interesting. No, I realize that we were so engulfed in what we did. And it was so natural to us that we kind of felt that everybody knew that. And the most rewarding part of the film is the couple of times we've gotten to see when people that we know that know us very well are sitting right next to us. And at the end of it is tears running down there. And they said, you know, we know I mean, we thought we know we all thought we know. And yet we know nothing about what we really do. And come to find out. It turned out. It really is interesting. We were fascinated. Well, I love how you how Ron Davis incorporated, some of your childhood footage. And I know you don't will never hurt a turtle or anything else. But you know, that was wonderful. And then the the way the I don't want to spoil it. But I love the where the camera angles. Are you start off with the movie, and it's almost ad dog level, right? Oh my gosh. That was so much fun. Watching clay westervelt in our house trying to figure out how to do this in the first couple of times trying to get some of the dogs coming through the doggy door and stuff all they did was stop lick the camera and jump on his lap and his. We were in hysterics because there's no way that's going to happen. And sure enough, you know, we're doing different things and stuff. He he runs to losy. He buys a PVC pipes and had tracks all over the place and then a drone and so get him right up in the face sleeping and the dogs. Didn't want to go up and lick that like they do a human just so that's clever. That's clever made it it made it so beautiful. So I know we want to help you guys out. So we want to give them the information on how people can make donations. I want them all to go to the movies. And I know that the net. Proceeds are going to go to shelters like yourself. Is that correct? Yes. One hundred percent Ron Ron Davis is donating one hundred percent of his profits from the movie to animal shelters all over the country. So how do we donate to help your cause in South Carolina? If he does go to Danny and Ron's rescue, we're on Facebook. We also have a website if you just Google and on both places there's a donate button. And if you'd like to mail a check there's also addressed. To send a check to you have these right? All of our dogs spayed neutered. Microchips, have other vaccines dental everything they need we did corneal transplants. We do everything to give them site. And anyway, we just survive on donations only, and you have given up a lot of your retirement funds to keep this place in operation. Yes, we did. Because when we started with Katrina, we were not a nonprofit. Yes, an app for any donations. And so we wound up both of us spending about forty percent of our retirement fund, which was very costly because then you had to pay taxes on taking it out to do the Katrina dog because it was so expensive to, you know, get the kind of dog fading Newton hardware, and so on and so forth. So it was very costly to us. And so we were very fortunate that somebody saw us in the press and from Michigan and decided to become our attorney pro Bono. And also. We are whatever endeavour to Danielle McLaughlin. She she was an angel for us. Well, we give a shout out. I think fates made it so that the two of you guys got together you have this beautiful home and a unified mission. And the other thing is these dogs in your home are getting a chance to socialize with other dogs know what life is like in a house, which is your doghouse. So doesn't that help with their adoptions? Oh, it helps greatly because a lot of people contact us and tell us that they you know, I'd like to have something around this and longhaired or allergenic friendly or whatever you wanna call that and about the size, and whether it's with children or whether it's for a mother-in-law had a couch potato and having lived with each dog. We have a report on each dog. And we know what they're like from the beginning when we get them along it took and how comfortable they are when new people come in the house since and how they react with the other animals, and and it's interesting when they like a certain type of person, but not another type and we child tests. Them and we test them, and and everything we can try to do to make it where they only go to one home after us ever. And that's in our contracts. We have a very strict contract that you can never give the dog away if ten years from now, you don't want the dog, we will send transport and the dog comes back, Danny and run threats giving will live their life out with us. But you're never allowed to give your dog away or take the dog for the shelter. If you do you agree to pay five thousand dollars. We'd have all the dogs on record and in the computer. And and so we we know where who has them and they're micro-chipped in our name, and we leave them in that name. And that way, we'll get the first call because we have twenty four seven access to responding to calls. And for instance, if you were going to France, and you left your dog with a house sitter coming in and out, and they left the door open and got away. Anyway, somebody takes it to better something and we'll get the call. I and we'll probably find you a lot faster than they would. And we'll make a lot more effort. And so we don't mind getting the call. It's about that. If we can make sure things are, okay. I also asked people to keep a collar on with their cell number. Good on the side of the road and people stop they're happy to dial a cell number real fast. But a lot of people aren't real willing to find a veterinarian or somebody to read chips. Right. I come shelter. Alums my dog and cat Kona. And Casey now work with me and teach pet first aid all over the country. And we also visit their therapy pets now. And I make sure that they're callers are embroidered with my cell phone number. So it's much easier to read Kona and the phone number. Then try to look under the face of a dog in look at that tagging, you can never. Collartoo? They're all material. Yeah. With my cell phone number across that we do that. We don't allow any dog at the minute. They start to come into the house. That's the first thing they do is. They get an embroidered collar on them. That's really wonderful. So guys. I know we're talking about shelter dogs that you rescued, but there's more than just shelter dogs who land in your dog house. Correct. Correct. The more we've learned in the in the larger we've gotten in the more people know about us people. Find us when they have family problems and want to place their dog, but they really don't want to put it in a shelter people. Find them at rest stops and things in odd places. And we've got calls about it. And we'll go try to find it or or catch it and veterinarians call us when people bring dogs in that are hurt or sick and people don't want to pay for the operation or they can't do it. And and ask us if we want to take this on and try to do that. And so we do pitch in with that as much as possible, we are taking a lot of abuse cases through the court system. And we get a lot of puppy mill Dodd we work. Very hard on trying to put a stop the puppy mill and fighting dogfighting gentlemen, I salute you both have enjoyed having you both on our show..

Ron Davis Danny Ron Danny South Carolina Ron Ron Davis Kona Ron Danna United States Knicks Africa Danny Robert Shaw losy Google America Katrina Louisiana Dan Facebook
"ron davis" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

10:56 min | 2 years ago

"ron davis" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Up The Danny Ron rescued that org group in South Carolina. They are now touring the country at film festivals with a powerful documentary about what they're doing. It's called life in the doghouse the movie is called it's cleaning premiere September twelfth to general audiences. But you know, you guys most people say when they win the lotto they're going to travel the world by Mercedes or tesla. Okay. Guys. Let's say you have a winning lotto ticket in your pause. What are you gonna do with it? My big dream is I would buy a fait neuter, bud. Okay. And I would have veterinarians and their assistance on the bus. And I would send that they knew about all the rural areas and staying neuter cats and dogs for people. Hurry because staying neuter is the key problem to our overpopulation in the United States in another country. And if we could get most people saying neuter their dogs, we would not have overpopulation, my big dream would be if everyone would get their dogs neutered, and they could put shelters out of business and put rescues out of business if there was no need for it. Well, I'm hoping you're gonna win that lotto because I think it's well deserved. And the other point in your movie, and I'm not trying to spill all the beans about the movie because it's really good. But speak about the people are all up. You know, it's semantics kill shelters, no kill shelters. You know? The no kills tend the dogs to kill shelters. But can you address that a little bit and sheds light on who is really responsible for this over influx of dogs, cats and other animals at shelters, I feel very sad. And for most shelters. I mean, just where we live in South Carolina. If they, you know, a county shelter they have to take I was there yesterday, and they got three pigs brought in and six baby pigs, they have to take everything that's dropped off there. Whether it's parakeets goldfish cats dogs donkeys, horses, whatever drives in the driveway, and it's dropped off and surrendered they have to take. And so many of the shelters in America always get fast because they use the night, and I talked to a lot of rescuers. Because there's a lot of rescues and even in our area that will get in the newspaper, and they'll bash a lot of shelters because they have to euthanize, and it's really not the shelters fall. It comes down to the community comes down to education. I mean, there are a lot of people that cannot afford to they neuter their dogs, but there are many many places I mean, most of your shelters they have low costs fan neuter for like ten and fifteen dollars. And if you do a little research, there are places to get your pets they neutered. But. Really get very very defensive of the shelters because they basically have to do the dirty work because we have an overpopulation, the Knicks conception. That most people think that the no kill shelter is so wonderful. But what happens is there? The cause more debts and the kill shelters because they fill up with dogs that aren't adoptable eventually, and they have to keep them forever. And so they're no spots there for the little dog that looks like a family pet or that sort of thing to come in because the no kill shelters. Get so booked up with permanence there, and it's like waiting in line to get in. So those dogs are have to be referred somewhere else or else, they're just abandoned. And that's so much of what the kill shelters do. And they I can assure you they tried very very hard to keep animals alive as long as they possibly can. And when they reach out to us, sometimes it's because we've had this one so long we really don't want to do something with it. Is there any way you guys can help us? And that's where we come in a whole lot of times. So tell us how did you get this idea of doing the movie life in the doghouse and dream about doing movies, but getting it done? Is probably no easy task. So can you guys talk about how you came up with the idea? And and got Ron Davis to say, yes says the producer that we got it back with sorry. Sorry. He didn't come up with the idea. Ron Davis came up with the idea. Okay. Help us out. Yeah. Ron Davis two years to get us to agree to do it. He wind and dined us and wined and dined, and we kept saying, no, no, no. And danny. And I kept saying we weren't interesting enough. How many people want to watch the eighty some dogs? Yeah. So forth. And you know, he kept talking to us. And he said, you know, you guys just have to trust me. You have a beautiful story here. And so we finally agreed to do it. And it's about I don't know two two and a half years of filming, you know, to get it completed that I do have to say, the interesting thing is like the whole time Danny, and I kept saying to Ron, and you know, when you have a book on with the wind, and you make the movie it's easy because you have a book with Dory. And then you can, you know, make a movie out of it or out of Africa or whatever. Right. You read you can create a movie, and we have no idea how you know. He followed us to the flood zones in Louisiana. We went down to rescue dogs down there. He followed us out in the woods trapping dogs. He followed him under house trailers, he followed us to horror shows, you know, followed us all over the country. And we could not figure out how he was going to make this a story. And I do have to say when we saw the movie Danny, and I are both cried because it with no moving that. He really did. Create a story of our live. I kept saying we're just not that interesting. There's nothing interesting. Now, I realize that we were so engulfed in what we did. And it was so natural to us that we kinda felt that everybody knew that. And the most rewarding part of the film is a couple of times we've gotten to see it when people that we know that know us very well are sitting right next to us. And at the end of it is tears running down there. And they said, you know, we know I mean, we thought we know we all thought we know. And yet we know nothing about what we really do. And come to find out. It turned out. It really is interesting. We were fascinated. Well, I love how you how Ron Davis incorporated, some of your childhood footage. And I know you don't will never hurt a turtle or anything else. But you know, that was wonderful. And then the the way the I don't want to spoil it. But I love the where the camera angles. Are you start off with the movie, and it's almost at dog level, right? Oh my gosh. That was so much fun. Watching clay westervelt in our house trying to figure out how to do this. And the first couple of times trying to get some of the dogs coming through the doggy door and stuff all they did was stop at lick the camera and jump on his lap. And in his. We were in hysterics because we thought there's no way that's going to happen. And sure enough, you know, we're doing different things and stuff. He he runs to lows he buys PVC pipes, and he had tracks all over the place and then a drone and so we'd get them right up in the face sleeping and the dogs. Didn't wanna go up and look that like they do a human that's clever that's clever and it made it made it so beautiful. So I know we want to help you guys out. So we want to give them the information and how people can make donations. I want them all to go to the movies. And I know that the net. Proceeds are going to go to shelters like yourself. Is that correct? Yes. One hundred percent Ron Ron Davis is donating one hundred percent of his profits from the movie to animal shelters all over the country. So how do we donate to help your cause in South Carolina? If he does go to Danny and Ron's rescue, we're on Facebook. We also have a website if you just Google us and on both places there's a donate button. And if you'd like to mail a check there's also addressed. To send a check to you have. Fees. Right. All of our dogs spayed neutered. Microchips have all their vaccines dental everything they need. We did corneal transplants. We do everything to give them site. And anyway, we just survive on donations only have given up a lot of your retirement funds to keep this place in operation. Yes, we did. Because when we started with Katrina. We were not a nonprofit. Yes. Ask for any donations. And so we wound up both of us spending about forty percent of retirement fund, which was very costly because then you had to pay taxes on it taking it out to the Katrina dogs because it was so expensive to, you know, get six hundred dogs fading neuter heart worm three doesn't so on and so forth. So it was very costly to us. And so we were very fortunate that somebody us in the press and from Michigan and decided to become our attorney pro Bono. And also. We are ever indebted Danielle McLaughlin. She was she wasn't angel for us. Well, we give shout out. Yeah. I think fates made it so that the two of you guys got together. Yeah. This beautiful home and unified mission. And the other thing is these dogs in your home are getting a chance to socialize with other dogs know what life is like in a house, which is your doghouse so doesn't that help with their options? Oh, it helps greatly because a lot of people contact us and tell us that I'd like to have something around this size and longhaired or allergenic friendly or whatever you wanna call that and about the size, and whether it's with children or whether it's for a mother-in-law does how does a couch potato and having lived with each dog. We have a report on each dog. And we know what they're like from the beginning when we get them in how long it took, and how comfortably are when new people come in the house, they react with the other animals, and and it's interesting when they like a certain type of person, but not another type and we child tests. Them and we can test them. And and everything we can try to do to make it where they only go to one home after us ever. And that's in our contracts. We have a very strict contract that you can never give the dog away if ten years from now, you don't want the dog, we will send transport. The dog comes back. Danny and runs rescue rescuing. We'll live their life out with us. But you're never allowed to give your dog away or take the dog for the shelter. If you do you agree to pay a five thousand dollars, we have all the dogs on record and in the computer. And and so we we know where who has them, and and they're micro-chipped in our name, and we leave them in that name. And that way, we'll get the first call because we have twenty four seven access to responding to calls. And for instance, if you were going to France, and you left your dog with a house sitter coming in and out, and they left the door open and then got away. Anyway, somebody takes it to a better something and we'll get the call. I and we'll probably find you a lot faster than they would. And we'll make a lot more effort. And so we don't mind getting the call. About that. If we can make sure things are, okay. They also asked people to keep a collar on with their cell number. It's on the side of the road and people stop they're happy to dial phone number real fast. But a lot of people aren't real willing to find a veterinarian or somebody to read chips. Right. I calm shelter. Alums my dog and cat Kona. And Casey now work with me. And we teach pet first aid all over the country. And we also visit their therapy pets now..

Danny Ron Ron Davis South Carolina Ron Ron Davis United States Knicks tesla Africa Google America Katrina Louisiana France Casey Facebook Danielle McLaughlin producer Michigan
"ron davis" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

10:40 min | 2 years ago

"ron davis" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"I mean, just where we live in South Carolina, if they county shelter they have to take I was there yesterday, and they got three pigs brought in and six baby pigs, they have to take everything that's dropped off there. Whether it's parakeets goldfish cats dogs donkeys horses. Whatever drives in the driveway and has dropped off and surrendered they have to take. And so many of the shelters in America always get fast because they use the nice, and I talked to a lot of rescue because there's a lot of rescues and even in our area that will get in the newspaper, and they'll bash a lotta shelters because they have to euthanize, and it's really not the shelters fall. It comes down to the community comes down to education. I mean, there are a lot of people that cannot afford to they neutered their dogs, but there are many many places I mean, most of your shelters they have low costs van neuter for like ten and fifteen dollars. And if you do a little research, there are places, you know, that you get your pets they neutered, but I really get very. Very defensive of the shelter because they basically have to do the dirty work because we have an overpopulation conception that. Most people think that the no kill shelter, so wonderful. But what happens is they're the causes. More the kill. Oh shelters because they fill up with dogs that aren't adoptable eventually, and they have to keep them forever. And so they're no spots there for this little dog that looks like a family pet or that sort of thing to come in because the no kill shelters. Get so booked up with permanent there, and it's like waiting in line to get in those dogs are have to be referred somewhere else or else, they're just abandoned. And that's so much of what the kill shelters do. And they I can assure you they tried very very hard to keep animals alive as long as they possibly can. And when they reach out to us, sometimes it's because we've had this one so long we really don't want to do something with it. Is there any way you guys can help us? And that's where we come in a whole lot of times. So tell us how did you get this idea of doing the movie life in the doghouse and youthful dream about doing movies? But getting it done is probably no easy task. So can you guys talk about how you came up with the idea and and got Ron Davis to say, yes, says the produce. We got it back. Sorry. Sorry. He didn't come up with the idea. Ron Davis came up with the idea. Okay. Help us out. Yeah. It took Ron Davis two years to get us to agree to do it. He wined, and dined and wined and dined us, and we kept saying, no, no, no. And danny. And I kept saying we weren't interesting enough. How many people want to watch us? Eat eighty some dogs. Yeah. So on and so forth. And you know, he kept talking to us. And he said, you know, you guys just have to trust me. You have a beautiful story here. And so we finally agreed to do it. And it took about two two and a half years of filming, you know, to get a completed, but I do have to say the interesting thing is like the whole time, Danny and I kept saying Ron, and you know, when you have a book on with the wind, and you make the movie it's easy because you have a book with the story. And then you can, you know, make a movie out of it or out of Africa or whatever. Right. You read you can create a movie, and we have no idea how you know. He followed us to the flood zones in Louisiana. We went down to rescue dogs down there. He followed us out in the woods trapping dogs. He followed him under house trailers, he followed us horror shows followed us all over the country. And we could not figure out how he was going to make this a story. And I do have to say when we saw the movie then and I both cried because it was. So moving that he really did create a story of our live. I kept saying we're just not that interesting. There's nothing interesting. Now, I realize that we were showing golfed and what we did. And it was so natural to us that we kind of felt that everybody knew that. And the most rewarding part of the film is the a couple of times we've gotten to see it when people that we know that know us very well are sitting right next to us. And at the end of it is tears running down there. And they said, you know, we know I mean, we thought we know we all thought we know. And yet we know nothing about what we really do. And come to find out. It turned out. It really is interesting. We were fascinated. Well, I love how you how Ron Davis incorporated, some of your childhood footage. And I know you don't will never heard a turtle or anything else. But you know, that was wonderful. And then the the way the I don't want to spoil it. But I love the where the camera angles. Are you start off with the movie, and it's almost at dog? Level, right? Oh my gosh. That was so much fun. Watching clay westervelt in our house trying to figure out how to do this. And the first couple of times trying to get some of the dogs coming through the doggy door and stuff all they did was stop at lick the camera and jump on his lap and his. We were in hysterics 'cause we thought there's no way that's going to happen. And sure enough I'll you know, we're doing different things and stuff. He he runs to losy buys a TV pipes, and he had tracks all over the place and then a drone and so get them right up in the face sleeping and the dogs. Didn't want to go up and lick that like they do a human. It's just that's clever that's clever and made it it made it so beautiful. So I know we want to help you guys out. So we want to give them the information on how people can make donations. I want them all to go to the movies. And I know that the net. Proceeds are going to go to shelters like yourself. Is that correct? Yes. One hundred percent Ron Ron Davis is donating one hundred percent of his profits from the movie to animal shelters all over the country. So how do we donate to help your cause in South Carolina? If he doesn't go to Danny and Ron's rescue, we're on Facebook. We also have a website if you just Google and on both places there's a donate button. And if you'd like to mail a check there's also addressed. To send a check to you have these right? All of our dogs spayed neutered. Microchips of other vaccines dental everything they need, we did corneal transplants. We do everything to give them site. And anyway, we just survive on donations only given up a lot of your retirement funds to keep this place in operation. Yes, we did. Because when we started with Katrina, we were not nonprofit didn't ask for any donations. And so we wound up both of us spending about forty percent of our retirement fund, which was very costly because then you had to pay taxes on it taking it out to do the Katrina dogs because it was so expensive, you know, six hundred dogs fading, neutered and heart worm three doesn't so and so forth. So it was very costly to us. And so we were very fortunate that somebody saw us in the press and from Michigan and decided to become our attorney pro Bono. And also. We are ever indentity Danielle McLaughlin. She was she was an angel for us. Well, we give a shout out. Yeah. I think fates made it so that the two of you guys got together. Yeah. This beautiful home and a unified mission. And the other thing is these dogs in your home are getting a chance to socialize with other dogs know what life is like in a house, which is your doghouse. So doesn't that help with their adoptions? Oh, it helps greatly because a lot of people contact us and tell us that you know, I'd like to have something around this size and longhaired or allergenic friendly or whatever you wanna call that and about the size, and whether it's with children or whether it's for a mother in law has a couch potato and having lived with each dog. We have a report on each dog. And we know what they're like from the beginning when we get them in how long it took. And how comfortable they are when new people come in the house, they react with the other animals, and and it's interesting when they like a certain type of person, but not another type and we child test. Them and we test them, and and everything we can try to do to make it where they only go to one home after us ever. And that's been our contracts. We have a very strict contract that you can never give the dog away if ten years from now, you don't want the dog we will send transport and the dog comes back Danny and runs rescue. And we'll live their life out with us. But you're never allowed to give your dog away or take the dog for the shelter. If you do you agree to pay a five thousand dollars, we have all the dogs on record in the computer. And and so we we know where who has them, and and they're micro-chipped in our name, and we leave them in that name. And that way, we'll get the first call because we have twenty four seven access to responding to calls. And for instance, if you were going to France, and you left your dog with a house sitter coming in and out, and they left the door open and got away. Anyway, somebody takes it to a better something and we'll get the call. I and we'll probably find you a lot faster than they would. And we'll make a lot more effort. And so we don't mind getting the call. It's about that. If we can make sure things are, okay. They also asked people to keep a collar on with their cell number on the side of the road and people stop they're happy to dial a cell number real fast. But a lot of people aren't real willing to find a veterinarian or somebody to read chips, right come shelter. Alums my dog and cat Kona. And Casey now work with me. And we teach pet first aid all over the country. And we also visit their therapy pets now. And I make sure that their collars are embroidered with my cell phone number. So it's much easier to read Kona and the phone number. Then try to look under the face of a dog look at that tagging can never collar too. They're all material. Yeah. Ours are all in with my cell phone number across do we we don't allow any dog at the minute. They start to come into the house. That's the first thing they do is. They get an embroidered collar on them. That's really wonderful. So guys. I know we're talking about shelter dogs that you've rescued, but there's more than just shelter dogs who land in your dog house. Correct. Correct. The. More. We've learned in the in the larger we've gotten in the more people know about us people find us when they having family problems and want to place their dog, but they really don't want to put it in a shelter. People will find them at rest stops and things in odd places. And we'll get calls about it. And we'll go try to find it or or catch it and veterinarians call us when people bring dogs in that are hurt or sick and people don't wanna pay for the operation or they can't do it. And and ask us if we want to take this on and try to do that. And so we do pitch in with that as much as possible, we are taking a lot of abuse cases through the court system. And we get a lot of puppy mill dog. We work very hard on trying to put up a puppy mill Bill and fighting dogfighting gentlemen, I salute you both. We have enjoyed having you both on our show..

Ron Davis Ron Ron Davis Danny South Carolina Kona America Africa Google Katrina Louisiana Facebook Danielle McLaughlin France Casey Michigan attorney mill
"ron davis" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

11:22 min | 2 years ago

"ron davis" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"The OB move show with Arden more. We're back from the lot. Just check the paper. And we had a record showing the box the litterbox that is now back to Oviedo. Here's our welcome back to the show on radio. I'm your host Ardmore responding with Ron Danna, and Danny Robert Shaw, they together make up The Danny Ron rescue dot org group and South Carolina. They are now touring the country at film festivals with a powerful documentary about what they're doing. It's called life in the doghouse the movie is called it's going to premiere September twelfth to general audiences. But you know, you guys most people say when they win the lotto they're going to travel the world by Mercedes or tesla. Okay. Guys. Let's say you have a winning lotto ticket in your pause. What are you going to do with my big dream is I would buy a faint neuter, bud. Okay. And I would have veterinarians and their assistance on the spe Nuder bus. And I would send that they knew about all the rural. Areas and staying neuter cats and dogs for people are because neuter is the key problem to our overpopulation in the United States in another country. And if we had get most people saying neuter their dogs, we would not have no repopulation. My big dream would be if everyone would get their dogs fate neutered, and they could put shelters out of business and put rescues out of business if there was no need for it. Well, I'm hoping you're gonna win that lotto because I think it's well deserved. And the other point in your movie, and I'm not trying to spill all the beans about the movie because it's really good. But speak about the people are all up. You know, it's semantics kill shelters, no kill shelters. You know? The no kills tend the dogs to kill shelters. But can you address that a little bit and shed a little light on who was really responsible for this over influx of dogs cats and other animals at shelters, I feel very sad for most shelters. I mean, just where we live in south. South carolina. They, you know, a county shelter. They have to take. I was there yesterday, and they got three pigs brought in and six baby pigs, they have to take everything that's dropped off there. Whether it's parakeets go fist cats dogs donkeys horses. Whatever drive in the driveway, and it's dropped off and surrendered they have to take. And so many of the shelters in America always get fast because they use tonight, and I talked to a lot of rescue because there's a lot of rescues and even in our area that will get in the newspaper, and they'll bash a lot of shelters because they have to euthanize, and it's really not the shelters fall. It comes down to the community comes down to education. I mean, there are a lot of people that cannot afford to bay neuter their dogs, but there are many many places I mean, most of your shelters they have low cost van neuter for like ten and fifteen dollars. And if you do a little research, there are places to get your pet they neutered, but I really get very very defensive. Of the shelter because they basically have to do the dirty work because we have an overpopulation, the Knicks conception that. Most people think that the no kill shelter is so wonderful. But what happens is there the cause more deaths? And the kill shelters because they fill up with dogs that aren't adoptable eventually, and they have to keep them forever. And so they're no spots there for the little dog that looks like a family pet or that sort of thing to come in because the no kill shelters. Get so booked up with permanence there, and it's like waiting in line to get in. So those dogs are have to be referred somewhere else or else, they're just abandoned. And that's so much of what the kill shelters do. And they I can assure you they tried very very hard to keep animals alive as long as they possibly can. And when they reach out to us, sometimes it's because we've had this one so long we really don't want to do something with it. Is there any way you guys can help us? And that's where we come in a whole lot of times. So tell us how did you get this idea of doing the movie life in the doghouse and youthful dream about doing movies? But getting it done is probably no easy task. So can you guys talk about how you came up with the idea and and got Ron Davis to say, yes. As the producer. We got it back. Sorry. Sorry. He didn't come up with the idea. Ron Davis came up with the idea. Okay. Help us out. Yeah. It took Ron Davis two years to get us to agree to do it. He winds, and dined and wined and dined us, and we kept saying, no, no, no. And danny. And I kept saying we weren't interesting enough. How many people want to watch the speed eighty some dogs? Yeah. So forth. And you know, he kept talking to us. And he said, you know, you guys just have to trust me. You have a beautiful story here. And so we finally agreed to do it. And it took about I don't know two two and a half years of filming, you know, to get a completed, but I do have to say the interesting thing is like the whole time Danny, and I kept saying to Ron, you know, when you have a book on with the wind, and you make the movie it's easy because you have a book with the story. And then you can, you know, make a movie out of it or out of Africa or whatever. Right. You read you can create a movie, and we have no idea how you know. He followed us to the flood zones in Louisiana. We went down to rescue dogs down there. He followed us out in the woods trapping dogs. He followed him under house trailers, he followed us to horror shows followed us all over the country. And we could not figure out how he was going to make this a story. And I do have to say when we saw the movie then and I both cried because it with no moving that. He really did. Create a story of our live. I kept saying we're just not that interesting. There's nothing interesting. Now, I realize that we were so engulfed in what we did. And it was so natural to us that we kinda felt that everybody knew that. And the most rewarding part of the film is the couple of times we've gotten to see it when people that we know that know us very well are sitting right next to us. And at the end of it is tears running down there. And they said, you know, we know I mean, we thought we know we all thought we know. And yet we know nothing about what we really do. And come to find out. It turned out. It really is interesting. We were fascinated. Well, I love how you how Ron Davis incorporated, some of your childhood footage. And I know you don't will never hurt a turtle or anything else. But you know, that was wonderful. And then the the way the I don't want to spoil it. But I love the where the camera angles. Are you start off with the movie, and it's almost at dog level, right? Oh my gosh. That was so much fun. Watching clay westervelt in our house trying to figure out how to do this. And the first couple of times trying to get some of the dogs coming through the doggy door and stuff all they did was stop at lick the camera and jump on his lap. And in his. We were in hysterics because we thought there's no way this is going to happen. And sure enough, you know, we're doing different things and stuff. He he runs to lows he buys PVC pipes, and he had tracks all over the place and then a drone and so get them right up in the face sleeping and the dogs. Didn't want to go up and lick that like they do it is just that's clever that's clever, and it made it made it so beautiful. So I know we want to help you guys out. So we want to give them the information and how people can make donations. I want them all to go to the movies. And I know that the net. Proceeds are going to go to shelters like yourself. Is that correct? Yes. One hundred percent Ron Ron Davis is donating one hundred percent of his profits from the movie to animal shelters all over the country. So how do we donate to help your cause in South Carolina? If he does go to Danny and Ron's rescue, we're on Facebook. We also have a website if you just Google us and on both places there's a donate button. And if you'd like to mail a check there's also addressed. To send a check to you have these right? All of our dogs spayed neutered. Microchips, have other vaccines dental everything they need we did corneal transplants. We do everything to give them site. And anyway, we just survive on donations only have given up a lot of your retirement funds to keep this place in operation. Yes, we did. Because when we started with Katrina. We were not a nonprofit, yes didn't ask for any donations. And so we wound up both of us spending about forty percent of our retirement fund, which was very costly because then you had to pay taxes on taking it out to do the Katrina dog because it was so expensive to, you know, get six hundred dogs fading, neutered and heart worm pre doesn't so on and so forth. So it was very costly to us. And so we were very fortunate that somebody saw us in the press and from Michigan and decided to become our attorney pro Bono and also three we are ever indentity, Danielle McLaughlin. She was she was an angel. Well, we give a shout out. Yeah. I think fates made it so that the two of you guys got together you have this beautiful home and a unified mission. And the other thing is these dogs in your home are getting a chance to socialize with other dogs know what life is like in a house, which is your doghouse. So doesn't that help with their adoptions? Oh, it helps greatly. 'cause. A lot of people contact us and tell us that I'd like to have something around this longhaired or allergenic friendly or whatever you wanna call that and about the size, and whether it's with children or whether it's for mother-in-law, how does it couch potato and having lived with each dog. We have a report on each dog. And we know what they're like from the beginning when we get them in how long it took. And how comfortable they are. When new people come in the house, Honey react with the other animals, and and it's interesting when they like a certain type of person, but not another type, and we child test them, and we test them, and and everything we can try to do to make it where they only go to one home after us ever. And that's in our contracts. We have a very strict contract that you can never give the dog away if ten years from now, you don't want the dog, we will send transport and the dog comes back. Danny and runs rescuing. We'll live their life out with us. But you're never allowed to give your dog away or take the dog for the shelter. If you do you agree to pay a five thousand dollars. We have all the. Dogs on record in the computer. And and so we we know where who has them, and and they're micro-chipped in our name, and we leave them in that name. And that way, we'll get the first call because we have twenty four seven access to responding to calls. And for instance, if you were going to France, and you left your dog with a house sitter coming in and out, and they left the door open and got away. Anyway, somebody takes it to a better something and we'll get the call. I and we'll probably find you a lot faster than they would. And we'll make a lot more effort. And so we don't mind getting the calls about that. If we can make sure things are, okay. Also asked people to keep a collar on with their cell number on the side of the road and people stop they're happy to dial a cell number real fast. But a lot of people aren't real willing to find a veterinarian or somebody to read chips. Right. I calm shelter. Alums my dog and cat Kona. And Casey now work with me. And we teach pet first aid all over the country. And we also visit their therapy pets now. And I..

Danny Ron Davis South Carolina Ron Ron Ron Davis Danny Ron Ron Danna United States Knicks Oviedo Arden tesla Ardmore Danny Robert Shaw Africa Google America Katrina producer
"ron davis" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"ron davis" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"The whole is depth so starting group is going to be really good and that that's the case for defensive line with guys like ron davis i'd say a bug's case at linebacker with guys like mac and dillon moses inside every jennings chris miller terrell lewis outside and then even in the secondary even with them losing their top six guys from last year they're starting secondary is going to be good the biggest question mark for this defense a whole though is death and south from the secondary i would say that did the two biggest groups were death would be a question mark would be inside linebacker and then along the defensive line so at inside linebacker you have mac and doing moses maybe the let inside linebacker tend to in the country to gaza run sub force it's forties at alabama just to really that let it does that would out bamber excited about but some relatively inexperienced john hind them especially cocoa who focused on baseball during the spring doesn't come back marriage just overall in the defensive side i mean obviously a lot of pieces to feel as you mentioned but what's what's the sense inside that building that they're going to be really good again supreme wouldn't expect anything else we have this defense i mean they don't deal with injuries and have anyone the amount of injuries that they had last year they're going to be way game so it seems like it's the case every year and they say the same thing every year that they lose a lot of really kalpa goes but system basing their ability to relate so you lose somebody might around pain long you lose the show on hand to live line it disruption standpoint can end up being even better at this than it was last because of somebody like ron davis who who i name all se last year probably wasn't that featured or most known god because of somebody like rob pain and now as seems to happen every year with alvin that.

mac alabama bamber ron davis chris miller terrell lewis rob
"ron davis" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

02:44 min | 3 years ago

"ron davis" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Homer bush david cone johnny damon ron davis bucket dan al downing brian doyle mariana dunkin we played today we went today does it john flaherty whitey ford jason giambi ron gingy charlie hayes reggie jackson dion james jay johnstone going scott kevin scott campbell don larsen graham would hector lopez lima zilly it's amazing that you don't take phileas the yankee i mean he coached with the yankees but you don't really think resiliency yankee ramiro mendoza gene monahan jeff nelson ponytail andy pettitte lou pinella willie randolph bobby richardson mickey rivers nick swisher marcus teams roy they haven't gerald thomas list which by the way you mentioned masili missoula's a met like period and story no argument okay reggie jackson's not your player either jackson i would argue that he had his best years with the as but again when you have that seventy seven world series we hit three home runs you're gonna forever living yankee war and to enhance the idea even though i think it's ridiculous by the way to go in and hall famous yankee that's ridiculous as well how long has reggie here three five year i've used five years five that's what i thought he should napster hall of fame as a yankee i don't disagree with that but to say that he shouldn't be a part of old timers day i think it's a bit much but the yankees parade him around like he's there player he's not there player but he had a moment in seventy seven in a world series that was gigantic i mean you have to acknowledge they understand but he's not your player is more than a than a yankee but when the player identifies himself that's reggie's delusional while for whatever reason reggie and be doing it in the month of october helps i mean let's be fair bells how many years we've seen oakland do me a favor pull it it's gonna take me to own a pull it up to my computer is like it's slow as molasses i'm gonna say reggie was for like eight or nine years anyway let's head to woodbury billy up next on billy john how you doing billy what's going on i'm so upset with this stuff what they're doing phil mickelson i mean it's ridiculous i mean they get on their high horse these guys it's a bunch.

mariana dunkin billy john oakland napster hall gerald thomas bobby richardson jeff nelson hector lopez lima don larsen graham kevin scott campbell whitey ford jay johnstone ron davis Homer bush phil mickelson woodbury reggie jackson missoula yankees
"ron davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"ron davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Chicago pd so we need to if the federal government's not going to engage that at the state level and at the local level we need to make sure that there's continuing pressure to make the kind of investment that we know necessary and the good thing is is that we do have best practices we have we have some research dented how to reduce force we have successes we know we have some good policies and so to the extent law forced wants to go in this direction there's a lot of resources for that but it's going to have to be at the local state level quick question before a single by ron davis one of our listeners james writes what are your thoughts on the effectiveness of policy requiring officers to exhaust all other options before discharging weapons i think that's a good positive recommendation from james i think you'll see policies well have changed languages to study using just the least amount of force or the reasonable force that it makes it a last resort so here's the challenge talking clearly with this idea i think the leader the nwpp mentioned that is there's the criminal standard and then it's a professional standard and right now there's people look at this case too often we we look at it through the lens of the criminal exposure we should do that but even if it's legal and jack alluded to this the partner is still have to hold office accountable for the excellence that the profession demands that they deescalated that he used all the reasonableness before using force so it can be legal that doesn't mean that there's still not some accountability and so a policy that suggest or that requires that you exercise you think through that you consider that you make use of force a last option enhancer that kind of accountability should also know that there'd be held accountable not just some criminal statute but also from administrative one that says we want excellence we want you to think through we went we're gonna hold you accountable even if you don't go to jail you may still lose your job because your decision making process was flawed judgment with questionable good to have you with us appreciate very much your being with us again ron davis is former director of the community oriented policing services office at the us department of justice let me go to your.

james partner ron davis director Chicago jack us department of justice
"ron davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"ron davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The discussion ron davis is former director of the community oriented policing services office with the us department of justice former chief of police with east palo alto and a nineteen year veteran of the oakland pd currently he's visiting senior fellow at harvard law school and ron davis good to have you aboard here welcome thank you good morning to you let me get a sense from you i mean you've veteran of many of these kinds of tragic incidents what goes through police officers minds and hearts really when they are in this kind of situation where they feel perhaps they need to use lethal force and are being confronted with the possibility of somebody holding a gun i think that mentioned earlier that it's like any other any of the person that had the racks the flight and fear but i think what goes through our mind survival it also goes through their mind the greatest thing in my opinion that goes through your mind is the training that you train so that you reacted in in a real scenario the way you were trained but there's one part that i think that i think professor was alluding to that also was in her mind that creates a lot of the urgency and the exigency even before the incident and that's implicit bias and that's the part we need to focus more on with the training if you fear a young men of color even before the stop then a lot of reaching for a while it looks like furtive movement a cellphone like gun so we can focus on training but until we addressed at a very core issue of how do we view young call him this country then we're not going to get to the heart and soul and that's why he has such despair numbers when it comes to shooting of unarmed african american men yeah the bias is certainly integral and paramount in many ways but why not train through example excuse me a disabled to shoot a leg or an arm i mean at twenty shots were fired and they were essentially lethal force right i've never speak to the individual tastes but i think in general training is is the deadly force it to stop an eminent threats that would be serious bogging three.

ron davis director palo alto professor us oakland visiting senior fellow harvard law school nineteen year
"ron davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"ron davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The discussion ron davis is former director of the community oriented policing services office with the us department of justice former chief of police with east palo alto and in one thousand nine year veteran of the oakland pd currently he's visiting senior fellow at harvard law school and ron davis with the heavy board here thank you good morning to you let me get a sense from you veteran of many of these kinds of tragic incidents what goes through police officers minds and hearts really when they are in this kind of situation where they feel perhaps they need to use lethal force inner being confronted with the possibility of somebody holding a gun i think earlier that it's like any other any of the first one had the racks in the flight and fear but i think what goes through their mind and survival it also goes through their mind the greatest thing in my opinion that goes through their mind is the training that you train so that you reacted in a real scenario the way you were trained but there's one part that i think that i think professor was alluding to that also was in her mind that creates a lot of the urgency and the exigency even before the incident and that's implicit bias and that's the part we need to focus more with the training if you fear a young men of color even before the stop then a water reaching for a lot of looks like furtive movement a cell phone like gotten so we can focus on training but until we addressed at a very core issue of how do we view young going to call him this country then we're not going to get to the heart and soul and that's why you have such despair numbers when it comes to shooting unarmed african american men yeah the bias is certainly integral and paramount in many ways but why not train for example excuse me too disabled to shoot a leg or an arm i mean at twenty shots were fired and they were essentially lethal force right i speak to the individual tastes but i think in general training is is the deadly force it to stop an imminent threat step would be serious bog injury to you or another person so the also trained to stop and candidly if you shoot someone in the arm that doesn't mean that they're stopped and.

ron davis director palo alto professor us oakland visiting senior fellow harvard law school one thousand nine year