35 Burst results for "Romm"

"romm" Discussed on The Emma Guns Show

The Emma Guns Show

07:45 min | Last month

"romm" Discussed on The Emma Guns Show

"At the lowest, and our ability to muscle repair is at the highest. So toward what you were saying, mid cycle is a great time to start like if that's when you want to first get on some kind of more intense exercise practice. That's a great time to do it. Interestingly, also, peri ovulation around that time of ovulation are appetite is lower. And so if you're wanting to do something, you know, lightening up what you're eating for a minute. So you just kind of like doing a little bit of like, I don't know, I don't like to use word cleanse because I don't like to think of us as not clean, but if you want to do like a little fasting something something or just a little lighter eating, cleaning up the spring, cleaning out the closet for spring in your diet. That's an optimal time to do it, whereas premenstrual when you're kind of wanting the carbs and the chocolate, it's almost like you're setting yourself up for a failure. And there are reasons that we want those carbs premenstrual, interestingly. Serotonin is the hormone that makes us feel good. It's one of the hormones that makes this or neurotransmitters, I should say, it's a brain chemical that makes us feel good. When estrogen goes down, estrogen is one of the building blocks of serotonin. So as our estrogen goes down, our serotonin goes down. What foods help keep our serotonin up? Healthy carbs. So chocolate also does that. So eating healthy carbs and some chocolate premenstrual is great. And if you know that, that's the research, if you know that, you can do it, preventatively. Or if you know that you typically just don't feel like going for that run or going to the gym or whatever it is you do for movement, do restorative yoga for a few days. Leading up to your moon time. If you do struggle with motivation, for example, it could be that your testosterone is a little bit low if you mid cycle don't feel your best. It may be that some of the hormone shifts that you're experiencing are giving you messages through how you feel. So there's a lot that we can learn if we understand the sort of personalities of the hormones and how they show up when they're either a little higher a little low. That's them talking to us. Very, very cool stuff. And keeping again, keeping a menstrual cycle journal is one of the best ways to just start to pay attention to yourself. It's phenomenal information. I'm sure there'll be people listening to this, you think. They maybe have got the short end of the stick that their hormones affect them more than other people and they seem to have higher highs or lower lows. That's absolutely true. So many women do. And is there something, is that just your are those just your factory settings? Or is there something that you can do with those? Can you influence those by making lifestyle changes or changing your diet? I know that you've talked about the link between the microbiome and the way that our hormones function. So if someone is listening to this and they think I do feel as I'm on a roller coaster every month, are there changes they can make? So yes and yes, for some women, those are factory settings. If your mom and your sister and your grandmother all had hypothyroidism, you doesn't mean you're going to have hypothyroidism. You don't have to just inherit all that. You don't have to have all the traits that you inherit become manifest. But you are more at risk. If your mom has endometriosis or your sister has endometriosis, there's a much greater chance that you will because of those factory settings. Inherent inflammatory changes that may be preset genetically, either in the family lineage or maybe something happened during your mom's pregnancy. She had gestational diabetes. Of course, no fault of hers either. That happened, now you inherited more inflammatory changes, maybe her gestational diabetes affected your insulin settings and now you have PCOS polycystic ovary syndrome, which is why I think it's so important for us not to blame ourselves. I also think it's really important to recognize that we have to be very careful when we hear people in the wellness space, whether it's an MD, a health coach and nutritionist celebrity anybody say I've cured this and you can too. If you just do what I say because they may have had a milder case, they may have had a different underlying reason that something happened for them. We're all different. And so it's really important. I don't want anyone to feel like a failure. If they need the medication because they tried everything and it just didn't get them where they needed to go. Or the diet alone just didn't do it. But that said, there are a lot of things that we can do. So just for example, we know that women who have higher levels of inflammation are much more likely to have worse period pain or period pain in general. Women who have higher levels of estrogen which could be due to environmental chemical exposures, dietary factors, gut microbiome factors may have higher estrogen as a result and because of that may experience heavy periods or more breast tenderness. We know that women who eat more red meat rather than more fish and more vegetables and fruits are more likely to have endometriosis and more likely to have worse endometriosis symptoms and that by making some of those changes we can reduce the severity or the intensity of endometriosis pain, for example. So there's a lot that can be done. In my practice, I look at stress, I look at diet, I look at gut, I look at sleep patterns, I look at environmental exposures and also our own innate detoxification systems. And I also look at the stories and beliefs of the culture that we live in and our own body beliefs that we have from our culture or that we may have inherited through expectations from our moms or grandmothers. It's so complex, but actually, as you're saying, there are so many little clues along the way. It is about maybe keeping that diary and understanding, doing a bit of questioning to your relatives may be. And you can begin to piece things together that could be really helpful and you referenced it earlier. Sometimes people go to the doctors and they don't feel as though they're heard and as much information as you can take and say I'm presenting you with this and I would like to feel better than I do. Please can we please can you help me? I love that. It's so it's so humble and vulnerable. Like how could somebody say no to that, right? And it's so much what we want to receive unfortunately most western physicians aren't trained in the nuances of nutrition or what we might be able to do with the microbiome, even things just as simple as adding more fiber or diversifying our diets just to help that microbiome along or they're not familiar with the impact of stress or circadian rhythm disruption, sleep problems, on women's hormonal cycles, menstrual cycles. So often we need to get the information from our doctors that we can get from them. And then piece together.

gestational diabetes polycystic ovary syndrome endometriosis symptoms endometriosis pain
The Dangers of the Hustle Mentality With CEO/Entrepreneur Chris Voss

The Bacon Podcast | Brian Basilico - Marketing Strategy Expert Interviews to CURE Your Marketing

01:52 min | 9 months ago

The Dangers of the Hustle Mentality With CEO/Entrepreneur Chris Voss

"There's always been a discussion in my head and a lot of friends. I've talked to that are entrepreneurs. We kind of joked about gary. Be because he he. He's great being like tony. Robbins georgia. I won't even call them. Be i would say is beyond tony romm because read twenty. Ron's books tony gives me a lotta has given me a lot of ways to Exercise the skill of beam Master my internal brain and stuff Gary is really good at kind of a hype. Rod cheerleader There's some mechanisms. He does teach in out of think or how to approach stuff but he he's just. There's just a lot of hype raw cheerleading. And that's there's something wrong with that. There's there's something fairly good about it but the This gentleman gentlemen natty in rhode article on medium Porn talking about how What are the dangers of some of the stuff that gary puts out there is He and i'm going to quote from the article here. He says. I called the struggle porn. It's masochistic obsession with pushing yourself harder listening to people To tell you to work harder and broadcasting how hard you're working he addresses in here that a lot of people that you meet that. Talk about how they're working. They're always bragging about unless lead mostly muslim. They're used the people that are failing. The most in i never talk about how successful doing business. I don't claim to be bazillionaire but I just don't have time because i'm making money. You're trying to make money. I mean. I'm not if i if if you ever saw me wind around pretend to be a ball or all the time claiming balling and shit. Then you brought me. Should really wonder how while i'm doing successful and you probably have friends like

Tony Romm Rod Cheerleader Tony Gary Robbins Georgia RON Rhode
"romm" Discussed on The Mom Room

The Mom Room

05:47 min | 11 months ago

"romm" Discussed on The Mom Room

"Some people say the fifth vital sign. There are number of authors out there lisa hendrickson. She's a phenomenal fertility teacher. She's got a book called the fifth vital sign which i love and so it's not wrong. It's just that in medicine. We consider paying the fifth one so the sixth one is really probably a little more accurate but somewhat semantical. I like the six vital sign because it also can be reminds me of the six cents to like remember that are menstrual cycle. Not the movie. Six cents like our measure cycle. Is you know something to pay attention to like. We were talking earlier. It's like six cents an innate knowing that we can tap into. Is this common. Because i think about girls turned sixteen if have a heavy period. If you have any kind of issue or your parents just want you to be on birth control to avoid pregnancy. So so many of us are getting on birth control at a really young age and then because it's hormones that would cause these issues were kind of masking it for years and years and years. And then you know someone's thirty-three wants to come off birth control and get pregnant and now that problem kind of resurfaces and there's a bigger issue like does that happen often like probably half my patients who are trying to get pregnant at least who are in that situation and sometimes it's exactly what we were just talking about you know. They had all these signs when they were teenagers. They had a lot of weight gain. They had cystic acne. They had some facial hairs. They had really crazy irregular periods thirty days one month sixty five days the next month eighty days the next month twenty four days next month all over the place and nobody said. Hey maybe this is. Maybe we should do something about it. It's like no take the pill that'll fix ya. That'll regulate it. And so you spend all these years having your hormones cycles surpressed never really treating those underlying factors and then when you come off of it they just kind of rise right back to the surface because they were suppressed the whole time. And i'm not against the pill. I think there is a time in a place for all kinds of pharmaceuticals and surgical interventions. I just don't believe for most people especially with most common hormone guy knee problems that they should be the first line right. They should be like we've tried everything else. That's pretty benign and helpful. And now we're moving up but i see that all the time so if somebody was let's say they're seventeen eighteen. They're having issues and their family. Physician suggests going on the birth control. But let's say their parent is listening to this podcast. So what is something. Would you ask to have hormones tested like what's the steps that you would want to take before just going on the pill yes so it depends on what the symptoms are but it could be anything from having blood sugar and insulin tested to hormones. Tested to. Somebody is really suspecting enemy. It could be a laparoscopic procedure..

lisa hendrickson cystic acne
"romm" Discussed on The Mom Room

The Mom Room

02:20 min | 11 months ago

"romm" Discussed on The Mom Room

"Which is a holy grail for skin. Care so not only. Are you removing the hair. But you're doing something special for your skin. The athena club razor kit is only nine dollars comes with two blade heads and a magnetic hook for shower storage. Also you can choose your handle color. They come in a variety of pretty colors and also black and white so that you can choose a razor that will match your bathroom. Aesthetic by joining the athena club. You will never have to worry about running out of refills or being stuck with. Dull overused. Razors. you can choose. How often the replacement blades shipped to you for free. If you check out their website. You'll see that they also have everyday essentials like body care wellness and period care. They have a whole page on their website that is dedicated just to ingredients that they use their very transparent with what goes into their products plus they are cruelty free and vegan..

"romm" Discussed on The Mom Room

The Mom Room

04:45 min | 11 months ago

"romm" Discussed on The Mom Room

"It can be a medical website like pubmed and find one or two articles. And that's why like in my medical in my articles on my website. I always put references because you can either print out my article with the references and take it with you or you could click over to one of the articles and find the actual journal article abstract in print out two or three of those. And it's not like you're going in and saying you know in your face doctor. Here's i've got the proof but it's more like hey. I read about this and i really loved to have your thoughts on this. I don't know if this is something you've explored read about but it really loved to include this as part of my care and really saying to your doctor. You know i'm here because of what you have. But i also want to be a responsible partner in my care so i want something a little different than the traditional medical model and i know there's a lot to take in and i write it all out for you all the book and i have like three articles on this on my website but these can really make a difference in you getting the care that you need at an appointment and getting heard me and feeling to be heard in a way that you're not like bumping up against the person but really trying to actually go for a relationship that serves you my husband's a urologist. They're the most fun doctors world. I call him a doctor. At the time. I was rotating with the urologist. I had the best time was all guys and they call them. The golden balls were so they always had the best p. jokes. I tell my husband not one. Maybe he can start a club. People get referred to him from a family physician and sometimes the patient doesn't even know why they're seeing my husband. Which is you know like. There's a lack of communication there and the family physician is just sending them to a specialist..

"romm" Discussed on The Mom Room

The Mom Room

03:21 min | 11 months ago

"romm" Discussed on The Mom Room

"Looking at on. Your website was the cycle. And it's funny. Because i was on birth control for a long time and then now that i'm off of birth control. I really notice my cycle and how different things can get throat the cycle and that's all hormones and so i was looking at one of your blog posts on your website about kind of like living with your cycle. Can you talk a little bit about that. Yes so if. I came to my attention when i was actually about seventeen years old i had a wonderful mentor. Who was a midwife an herbalist. Also shoshoni medicine woman actually. I don't know if she would call herself a shaman but she was a shaman and healer and a teacher and at that point i was already paying attention and tracking my menstrual cycle. I got an early start on this stuff. And so she taught me to start paying attention to things like what foods my craving. What colors am i wearing. And it was bizarre was started paying attention. I noticed that every time like right before my period would start. I would grab out this red sweater that my grandmother gave me and it wasn't just that it was comforting for me. But it was she had given me a red one and a green one and they always went for the red one. Right around that time it was really strange and i just started paying attention to these sort of almost natural proclivities that i would have but i would also notice things like really men are really checking me out when i'm at the middle of my cycle not so much one on premenstrual. It's just different. And so she started to teach me what is now becoming increasingly well-studied mardi hazelton. Who's a researcher at ucla completely dedicated to studying. How our behavior changes through our cycles and she has discovered things like or based on research. She has absurd things like we are more likely to go on. Spending sprees prematurely. Why is that well. It's really interesting because if you were living in sort of like a more indigenous tribal way. Let's say you were to get pregnant mid cycle which is when we get pregnant when we're ovulating by the time you are entering into like before that premenstrual period. If you're pregnant you won't menstruate. And the idea is that we would be biologically primed to give gifts to our partners family as a way to endear ourselves to them or we have higher sense of stranger danger when we are oscillating and the theory behind. This is that we actually are able to read other people's facial expressions and the thought is that what we're ovulating. Were more likely to be attractive to males because that's how procreation works and so we're more apt to be able to pay attention to which wants to avoid and which ones to trust not that it's a science that keeps us safe but it is really really interesting. We also know that how we feel around food or exercise changes. So let's say you're trying to start a new diet or like eating healthy even if it's not a diet and you're trying to start like three days before your period but now your hormones are changing and what you really want is a lot of carbs and you want chocolate and you want sugar not the easiest time to.

mardi hazelton ucla
"romm" Discussed on The Mom Room

The Mom Room

02:08 min | 11 months ago

"romm" Discussed on The Mom Room

"Youtube can say goodbye to bad hair. Days with dew spice up your daily wardrobe with funds crunchy or hair accessory us. One time code scrunchy gang fifteen for fifteen percent off your first purchase with them subscribe to their newsletter all newsletter subscribers get early access in front of the line priority with exclusive access to shop. All their drops. I so go on and do it. This episode is brought to you by better help. Is there something interfering with your happiness or anything preventing you from achieving your goals better help can assess your needs and match you with your own. Licensed professional therapist. You'll be able to connect in a safe and private online environment. Which is extremely convenient. You can start communicating with your therapist and under forty eight hours after signing up. It's not a crisis line. it's not self help. It is professional counseling. An added perk. Is that you can send a message to your counselor anytime and get a thoughtful response. Plus you can schedule weekly video or phone sessions and you can do all this without having to wait in an uncomfortable. Waiting room better. Help is committed to facilitating great therapeutic matches. So it's easy and free to change counselors if needed counseling through better. Help is more affordable than traditional in-person therapy and the service is available for clients worldwide. There are licensed professional counselors who specialize in things like depression stress anxiety relationships sleep trauma anger and so much more and just like traditional therapy. Of course anything you share with your therapist is confidential. I want you to start living a happier life today as a listener. You'll get ten percent off your first month by visiting our sponsor at better help dot com slash mom room join over one million people who have taken charge of their mental health again. That's better help. H. e. l. p. dot com slash. Mom room something. I was.

"romm" Discussed on The Mom Room

The Mom Room

04:41 min | 11 months ago

"romm" Discussed on The Mom Room

"I hope you enjoy this. Conversation with dr aviva romm. You are a medical doctor. A midwife a herbal list and you have four kids so i couldn't let this interview go on without asking you just to tell us a little bit about your story and i guess the order in which all those things came long story short a long story but i grew up in new york city actually in a housing project with a single mom sharing a bunk bed with my brother till i was fourteen and i was in a school in new york city. That's very famous. It's a public school but you have to test into it. So it's like a very science ski school so when i was fourteen i wrote a letter to johns hopkins university. And ask them if they would take me early. Admissions not to college to the medical school like ninth grade. I'm just going to skip it all. Just go right into medical school. Because i know what i wanna do. It's so funny. I was so self-assured just like. In retrospect i laugh about that but actually someone wrote me back and keep in mind. This was a letter that you had to put a stamp on lick and put in the mail and then someone had to open it and read it and right you back or type it back and send a letter back this in one thousand nine hundred right so somebody did. Someone actually wrote a letter back and said we can't take you to medical school. You have to go to college. I and you're too young for the college early admission you do have to at least go to high school i they are at least some of it and but there's this school in massachusetts ironically two towns over from where i now live and have settled but they take gifted and talented kids so i applied and they got a scholarship and so september three months. After i turned fifteen i was off to college. And within a couple of months. I got exposed to out as jokingly say but kinda sorta really liberal hippy. Dumb and i was like by. Then you know wearing birkenstocks and then chinese slippers. I wasn't gonna wear anything with leather. Vegan grew dreadlocks. Thing i learned how to like four edge and about plant medicine. And i got exposed to midwifery all in this three month period so i finished my first year there but then by the end of my first year. Now keep in mind. There was no naturopathic medicine in the united states. Yet best year hadn't even opened up his first class. The big naturopathic college alternative medicine integrate. These were not terms that existed yet. So for me to study this stuff. I had to dig in like old bookstores with weird. Arcane books and i found like three bucks to from europe one from the united states old old books what..

dr aviva romm new york city johns hopkins university massachusetts united states europe
"romm" Discussed on The Mom Room

The Mom Room

04:09 min | 11 months ago

"romm" Discussed on The Mom Room

"You can read her history and her education and a little bit about her life story and it is fascinating. I told her it should be a movie. And i honestly believe that she is a medical doctor. She's a midwife and herb list and what is so nice about that. Combination of things is that she looks at healthcare from both perspectives so a holistic but also medical like western medical perspective but then the holistic side of it as well. We had such a good conversation about advocating for your own health. When you visit a doctor. I love that conversation because it is so important and i think so. Many times. we go to the doctor's office and we feel uncomfortable unprepared or like we're being rushed through the appointment so we don't always get out of the appointment what we had initially hoped to get out of it. So that is a really important conversation and topic that needs to be talked about her stats and research that she shares with us about women's health when it comes to hormone imbalances and you know gynecologic issues. That women seek help for is shocking. We also talk a little bit about infertility. And i asked her. You know at my age. I'm thirty six now. I feel like i hear about infertility so much. And it's so common. I feel like i know more people who have gone through fertility treatments then have not which is wild if you think about it and so i asked her like is this because of my age and people around me are older or has infertility actually increased over the last few years and she gives a great answer she talks about you know things in our environment that are hormone disruptors and now i to go through my house and get rid of all the things that are highly fragrance and that is how i used to live my life..

"romm" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"romm" Discussed on Good Life Project

"There's almost like this not almost. We're kind of being told that we're irrational and unpredictable and unstable but one of the things that really came through for me as i was crafting. This book is that it's it's actually exactly the opposite. There's this biological blueprint that has existed hormonally in women since time immemorial it hasn't changed. So why is it that suddenly. It's entirely predictable. You know certain things happen when you get into puberty. Certain things happen when you've been in puberty for about three or five years. Certain things happen when you get pregnant. Certain things happen when you go into menopause. The same it shows up a little differently for each of us depending on our in our history our medical staff and all of that. But it's the most predictable human biological thread so the idea that were unpredictable is really fascinating to me. It's i think. I'm trying to reframe that for ourselves as women's actually no. I'm pretty predictable. Here yeah i know. It's how certain sense making element to it. We could go a lot of differ rabbit holes here. But i think this is actually a really nice place for us to come full circle I have asked you this question in the past but it was a number of years ago. Now so I'm gonna ask you again. Because we are evolving human beings so sitting here in this container of good life project. If i offer up the phrase to live a good life what comes up. I remember when you asked me this. The first time and i remember saying presence. That being present was really so powerful and so important and in some ways jonathan. I don't i know. I i mean i've evolved and changed so much but i i really feel like if i would add that presence meaning that i am so here right now in this moment giving data time and experiencing that time and connection from you i would say that if i would shift anything i might just say authentic connection because i think what i was talking about presence many years ago it was really about making time for that authentic connection i think time and space for authentic connection in life to me is living a good life. Thank you thank you. Hey before.

one five years each jonathan about three many years ago number of years ago first time things
"romm" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"romm" Discussed on Good Life Project

"It seems part of the relate the the master regulatory piece of this also use the word endocrine disruption endocrine system a number of different times. I think phrases like your your chemistry but the the notion that year. We've got all these symptoms at show up on the surface we have all these potential contributors but underneath it. There's this survey of there's a constant. There's a dynamically changing soup of chemistry. That's happening our body that is like provides this regulatory role for everything. And if we're sort of like always looking at the stuff that's happening outside and always looking at just the symptoms and never actually looking at this. This constantly changing chemistry system within body. We never really get to. What's going on. I think that is really. That's where so much of your focuses. Right now is what's actually happening on that level. You know it's really interesting about around. Twenty two thousand seven and then again in two thousand thirteen two major medical organizations i the american academy of pediatrics. Then the american of the american college of obstetricians and gynecologists identified the menstrual cycle as women's sixth vital sign so we have blood pressure heart rate respiratory rate temperature then pain is actually considered the fifth vital sign and menstrual cycles as the six vital sign so when our mental cycles are awry. You know too much pain irregular periods heavy periods. Whatever it is. That's going on and not just menstrual cycles but what we're going through gynecological early which is a reflection of what's going on hormonally but what they identified is that what's going on. Hormonally is a reflection of yet underlying causes that if we can pay attention to early on. We may offset some of the downstream problems. So if you know that you're having heavy periods every month and they're really painful you know that you there's a very good chance you have excess. Estrogen will where is that coming from often from these endocrine disrupters or the bodies lack of nutrition or microbiome to break those down and eliminate them. Well so you're overwhelmed by them but we know that too much. Estrogen is a long term. Risk factor for developing uterine fibroids breast cancer and mutual cancer. So we actually have an opportunity to identify things early. That may actually help us. Prevent some of those bigger chronic problems. And it's interesting men. Don't actually have that. We have a monthly opportunity to kind of can almost like a scorecard that we can look at it and go check check. That's going pretty well or This actually seems to be a little off or a lot off. Let me realign. What i can do to bring myself back into some harmony here and and then you see you see the improvements where you see the changes. I just want to be careful to say that because of endocrine disruptors and a lot of other factors sometimes these things are set in motion before a woman is even born before she's even hit puberty and puberty is like the switch that sets everything off but we now know that things like polycystic ovary syndrome and endometriosis may actually be happening a couple of generations back so it may be that. Our mother was chronically exposed to something. Our mother had a medical problem. That caused a lot of intrauterine inflammation that nobody identified. And now you're in your mother being stated you have all your ovaries that are forming while you're still in your mom. Hers formed while she was in her mother. So we literally have situations that can be intergenerational like the tracks are laid down but then when you hit puberty it's like the train could go this way or the train can go this way and now you've i'm doing hand gestures for those of you guys who can't see me because i talk with my hands so you can go left or you can go right and it's like you're nature wants you to go right but all the tracks got lay down to the left and then you add to it standard american diet you know the number of antibiotic doses kids get by the time. They're in their teens. That altered their microbiome. The fact that teens are using a gazillion cosmetics that contain these endocrine disruptors. And it's almost like somebody pulls the switch and it goes down that track so as we're talking about healing or transforming and you know taking back our health. I also feel and this is something that i feel so strongly about because i think the wellness movement and maybe a little. The functional medicine movement gives you the sense. If you just do everything right you do the diet right. You do the yoga rate. You sleep the right amount. You do your like app. You get out in nature you're somehow going to have guaranteed perfect glowing half and it can lead to people feeling like what am i doing wrong. What am i not doing enough of or am. I just broken and so important for us to take a step back and say a healthy dose of self compassionate and self love but also perspective that says not anyone's fault and yes doing all. These things is really helpful. But it doesn't mean one hundred percent or eighty we have no measure of like. That doesn't mean you're gonna need the medication or the surgery. Either in a really want there to be like a no fault. No blame approach to healing that so so important whether that's fat shaming in medicine or fat shaming in the wellness space. It's got that's gotta stop for us to live more comfortably in our bodies and minds as you're sharing that i had this. Brief flashback in a number of years ago. I was at a conference a really big event in just sitting in the audience next to someone and the person from the states. We're gonna take five minutes now and turn to the person next to you. And you're like share a bit about yourself and i turned to the person next to me and shared like a typical three minute completely..

five minutes two thousand one hundred percent Twenty two thousand eighty three minute six vital sign american college of obstetrici fifth vital sign sixth vital sign american academy polycystic ovary syndrome gynecologists endometriosis years american two thirteen seven
"romm" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"romm" Discussed on Good Life Project

"Or don't inflame which which sounds like a lot of a lot of what we're talking about here is to tell me if i'm totally getting this wrong. Seminar neophyte year. You're my brilliant guide. Which is why. I'm always asking you. Questions inflammation has had. It seems like it's just popping up everywhere you look in research in popular articles in conversations. So i'm curious because it seems to underlie so many conditions and i'm curious what the relationship is between inflammation things you were talking inflammation and hormones inflammation and your microbiome is it. Is it even or is that like a whole nother conversation. It'll take us our yes and no. Yes yes but so inflammation. Have a dear friend. She's a an herbalist as well. There are actually two of us. Believe it or not and she says that inflammation is like a fire in the fireplace or a fire out of the fireplace if it's in the fireplace it's keeping you warm and cozy and it makes you feel good right to see it if it's out of the fireplace it'll burn your house down so we all need some inflammation right. If you get a splinter you want your body to be able to recognize that as a foreign and get rid of it if you get a cold and your body mounts a response all those things that make you feel achey and kinda crappy. That's all inflammation those are inflammatory chemicals that are circulating that are doing their job and the collateral of them they make us feel eighty and tired and so we rest and our body can really do his job. Hopefully but when it gets out of the fireplace when it starts to be consuming it can overwhelm the body's capacity to maintain it or contain it and so rather than just getting that splinter out because it's recognized that splinter as a foreign object. It might recognizing your thyroid as a foreign object. It might be inflammation in your gut. You mentioned leaky gut. It's a real phenomenon called intestinal hyper permeability. And when there's inflammation in the gut it gets also spongy. If you will and it allows particles that are in your intestine that should stay there or be eliminated to get across the intestinal lining into this very rich tissue called the gut associated lymphoid tissue or the galt and it sounds like a yiddish term. I think doesn't it the galt but That tissue then msa reaction when that happens it can become systemic so a lot of the chronic illness that we see in our culture. Diabetes heart disease dementia. There's strong inflammatory component. That we know can lead up. To those perpetuate those and also can then in a vicious cycle particularly with heart. Disease and diabetes happened as a result of those. But even things like premenstrual pain if it's normal to have a little bit of discomfort. Your uterus is full at wants to empty itself out you might have a little aching a little heaviness in your pelvis. That's normal but if it's causing you'd doubled over in pain or have to take ibuprofen every month. Something else is going on. We're not i in my in say. Being a woman is not a diagnosis. Just because you're a woman doesn't mean it's okay to say yes you're supposed to live with this and that's often a reflection of increased inflammatory kemmel chemicals that are actually causing irritation in the uterus. For example you know i could go on with. That's where we would have hours But yes inflammation. I call inflammation the mother of root causes although it sounds like mothers and but it is it is of all root causes right and the result of most disruption so inflammation doesn't come out of nowhere so we know. For example that exposure to endocrine disruptors causes chronic inflammation. We know that when the gut microbiome starts to get populated with certain organisms. That might not be our best friends that can cause inflammation. We know that diets that are high in sugar and processed flour products in and of themselves cause inflammation but then they can cause something called insulin. Resistance that causes inflammation so it kind of always tied in there. Yeah good led. Project is supported by fund rise. So if you've ever invested you know how important it is to have a diversified portfolio. But what a lot of people don't realize is that these days the traditional mix of stocks bonds and mutual funds.

two conditions
"romm" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

06:15 min | 1 year ago

"romm" Discussed on Good Life Project

"And they look at a lot of different parameters on big surveys around the united states and they found in one study in recent years that in every state in the united states people were only getting sixteen percent of their daily recommended. Vetch vegetables fruits and fourteen percent of their daily recommended vegetables and it sounds so we were in vegetables but actually we really do because the nutrients in them are doing biological things in our bodies that help us maintain hormones that reduce inflammation that. Keep our gut healthy that breakdown and eliminate the estrogen and progesterone and testosterone that were naturally producing in our bodies. We also know from the world of toxicology that there are over eighty thousand. What are called new to nature chemicals in our environment that very few of which have ever been approved. There does grandfathered in by the fda and none of which have been reviewed in any way on their impact on women's reproductive health. And we you know if you think about hormones there. Just tiny little nanoparticles. We don't have their parts per million in our bloodstream. So people will say oh well. Drinking out of plastic water bottles. Couldn't do anything 'cause i mean. How much could you get from that. But you don't actually need that much. You just need parts per million to mimic what's happening in your hormones or imbalance. What's happening your hormones and this has been just beautifully studied. Here's a funny story. When i was applying to residency. I applied in. Ob gyn at my alma mater for med school and the interviewing gentleman who happened to be an endocrinologist and internationally known researcher looked at my application. And he said. I see that you're interested in doing specializations studies in endocrine-disruptors and he looked at me and he said across this big formal dusk. You don't believe in that. Bpa crap do you literally just like these things that you stick because he will never forget exactly what someone said and i was like will actually i do and the irony is about seven eight years ago. There was a huge blow. Up of information at yale. From dr hugh taylor in the reproductive endocrinology department identifying epa as such a significant endocrine disruptor that two states immediately banned its use in cashier receipts and in airline tickets because that thermo covered paper is actually was covered in bpa and most of the people handling it at cash registers or at airline counters. Were women and it was significant enough to be affecting reproduction so scared cetera. So these these are some of the things that are under the hood that i look at that. We have really strong documentation from siloed areas of science. The microbiome is another huge one. If you just get into the piles of research on microbiome go to the good literature. In the good journals you can find powerful connections between microbiome and polycystic ovary syndrome microbiome and endometriosis microbiome and fertility microbiome preterm labor and on and on and on but this information is not making its way into conventional medicine in any more than maybe lip service if anything but certainly not in any clinical applicability where it's happening is in really More environmental science and toxicology. So there's an entire field of medicine or science now called expose home science in it. Sounds just like what you talk about. You know what you're exposed to an meaning the realm of So the microbiome is the realm of your microbes in whatever part of your body the expose them is the is the sum total of everything were exposed to and they're documenting stress as toxin Lack of sleep and circadian rhythm disruption microbiome disruption endocrine-disruptors. And what we eat as core areas that really do contribute. So can i say that changing or microbiome is definitely going to heal this this or that. I can't say that. I mean some studies. Do show really well what we can really do by changing our diet changing these different factors. But what i do know is that why not try if it just means shifting your diet a little bit and doing things that are gentle rather than spending fifteen years on a birth control pill and. I'm not saying those things aren't incredibly valuable and that i don't prescribe them sometimes but let's go as upstream as possible. Yeah i mean it it. It makes so much sense And it's good to know also that there is a part of medicine now that that is really focusing more rigorously on what the what the environment around us does to and for us and trying to actually measure i think oftentimes you know we we try and rush to what do i do and i think the you know the stuff that we sometimes miss is well. How do we really figure out how to identify. Like what are the interacting within. How do we measure them. In a way to that we can then really understand what's going into us coming out of us And what's the effect that it's having In a meaningful way and we talk about food. You talk about Bpa chemicals that are in the environment around us. You talk about the microbiome. Must people that got these days. Although microbiome isn't just the got. I guess that's one big fallacy to in balls. Yeah and the guts. Not just the my right right so really there's intestinal lining and i remember the very first time i had exposure to the notion of the critters in the gut. You know it was like term leaky gut that was in the early days functional medicine and now it's it is expanded and gotten so much more nuanced in granular to really understand what's going on. Yes and it sounds like a lot of this is like all these different things influence the body in ways that also.

sixteen percent fifteen years fourteen percent united states two states one study dr hugh taylor over eighty thousand first time seven eight years ago per million one big million
"romm" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"romm" Discussed on Good Life Project

"Physicians who have women who come in and question are. Those women are often labeled as difficult patients. I mean doctors. Talk to each other with an ira and say oh. It's that kind of patient. She read about that on dr google. So there's a complexity of women keeping ourselves quiet not pushing back but when we do push back we get labeled as difficult and so. Let's say that women who does have chronic pelvic pain and she goes from one doctor to another and it takes her years to get a diagnosis of endometriosis and maybe she ultimately does get it half of all women who were told at least half up seventy percent of all women that were told all along lines that everything was fine did actually have endometriosis but for every subsequent doctor she goes to. It's statistically well documented now that each subsequent doctor is gonna think that she's an increasingly more difficult patient because she didn't believe what the first doctor said she didn't believe what the next so now she gets labeled as having a psychiatric problem through which just compounds everything And then you take that right and at a certain point i have to imagine that. Then you as a patient you start questioning yourself so many women do so many women have come to me and said i don't even know anymore if i'm actually feeling this symptom or if i'm making it up i'm so confused. And even more so if they do look well or they are really highly functional in their lives. Like maybe i am crazy. I've had women say that. maybe i am just. Maybe i am just depress. Maybe i am just anxious. Maybe i do just need to. You know work less or whatever. The things are rather than somebody going deeper and saying. Yeah there's something going on here and when they find out there is you just watch their shoulder shop. It's hike or the tears start rolling the thank goodness. Someone is finally listening to me. Because that's the other thing we know that the average physician has about fourteen minutes to see a patient and the average physician interrupts their patient within ninety seconds to three minutes of asking questions. So you barely even get your words out..

three minutes ninety seconds google about fourteen minutes first doctor seventy percent years one doctor each subsequent doctor women every half
"romm" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

07:35 min | 1 year ago

"romm" Discussed on Good Life Project

"These are things that i didn't know when she was sharing the actual numbers. I was like that. Is you know like you said it's a lot of these problems. They show up in everyday life in the treatment of patients in the interactions and the most fundamental point of service but the real. It sounds like the real bigger solutions. They need to happen like multiple steps upstream from that. They do and also bringing in more people who represent more diverse populations in and of itself could bring significant change so for example we know that black babies newborns taken care of by black medical providers are far more likely to survive against what are already uphill statistics for black babies in this country. Then if they're taking care of by a white provider and that can only be a matter of attention to detail prioritization You know super complex. Systemic racism factors that are influencing how providers treat people. We know that women are treated by other women but people who are treated by women are much more likely to have successful hospitalizations successful discharges and live longer than treated by men so just the diversification itself may diversification but also listening to the voices and paying attention to. What are those people doing differently than people with different outcomes so i know a lot of your focus has really become focusing on women on you both within the profession but also impatience Impatient experiences patient outcomes. And you're describing. How by a shows up in the system. How does that actually show up in the experience of women in medicine when seeking help. Oh my gosh it's let me just give you one example. That's really astonishing so a study was done looking at women who carry pain. That pain could be due to chronic pain. It could be due to endometriosis something like that and this study found that women who go well. We know across the board. That women's pain is treated differently than men's pain so if a woman is reporting that she has shortness of breath and chest pain and goes to the hospital. She's more likely to get an anti anxiety. Medication than a workup for a heart attack. Then a man going in reporting the same symptoms and she's just as likely if not more likely to be having a heart attack so that is one. We know that women wait far longer in the emergency room when they have pain upwards of over an hour longer which is actually serious. If you have something significant going on but this one particular study was fascinating to me. So women who go to the primary care doctor for pain if they look to put together right if they're dressed nicely. They're done their hair and they've done their makeup. They can't possibly be experiencing pain because if they did. They wouldn't have time to put themselves together like that. So dismissed nope you don't get your pain treated conversely women who show up appearing quote unquote more disheveled per this article. Meaning show up in your sweatpants pre cove it but you show up between maybe now. It's okay but you shop in your sweatpants hair is not done. You haven't put on makeup and you're asking for pain treatment now you're perceived as drug seeking so there are these bias sees if you look too good. You couldn't possibly be uncomfortable and if you don't take care of yourself you must be a drug addict so we can't take care of your pain either way. Women are women. Let's just use endometriosis as an example as gynecologic immunologic problem and nine years on average and many doctors to actually get a proper diagnosis women with autoimmune conditions. Five years and four doctors on average to get a diagnosis I've had women had things. I've had one patient. She had hush motos. She had gained a lot of weight in a short period of time like thirty pounds. She went to her doctor. Who basically said you know. What are you eating. And she said. I haven't changed my diet. This is what's happening. I haven't changed my exercise. This is what's happening and he told her. If you would control your fork to mouth problem you'd probably lose the weight. And so she came found her way to me. And she had florid hush motos thyroiditis. Which makes you gain weight and have difficulty losing it. So these situations are on and on then at a at a deeper level when we look at the top surgeries that are done in the united states. Two of the top ones that are most frequently honor. Hysterectomy and syrian section. We know that at least half of all cesarean sections done in the united states are medically unnecessary are overdone. There are economic and time incentives on the part of the physicians but we know that. The syrian section increases a woman's mortality twenty times over a vaginal birth. We know that most women who are offered a hysterectomy and do not need them and a large number of women over fifty in the united states will have a hysterectomy probably thirty five percent or more are completely unnecessary. But interestingly this multi center study done in michigan some years back found that it wasn't just women in their fifties and sixties who were being told they needed a hysterectomy and not given any not dislike alternative medicine alternatives but like conventional terms. Like you can take this medication for six months and have that urine fibroids shrink and you won't need the surgery. And so women were being funneled into these surgeries but even in their thirties. So women who hadn't had children yet might wanna have. Their uterus n not given alternatives then as women were so programmed from our earliest ages to not question authority not make waves not push back not be difficult and at the same time. Physicians who have women who come in and question are. Those women are often labeled as difficult patients. I mean doctors. Talk to each other with an ira and say oh. It's that kind of patient. She read about that on dr google. So there's a complexity of women keeping ourselves quiet not pushing back but when we do push back we get labeled as difficult and so. Let's say that women who does have chronic pelvic pain and she goes from one doctor to another and it takes her years to get a diagnosis of endometriosis and maybe she ultimately does get it half of all women who were told at least half up seventy percent of all women that were told all along lines that everything was fine did actually have endometriosis but for every subsequent doctor she goes to. It's statistically well documented now that each subsequent doctor is gonna think that she's an increasingly more difficult patient because she didn't believe what the first doctor said she didn't believe what the next so now she gets labeled as having a psychiatric problem through which just compounds everything And then you take that right and at a certain point i have to imagine that. Then you as a patient you start questioning yourself so many women do so many women have come to me and said i don't even know anymore if i'm actually feeling this symptom or if i'm making it up i'm so confused. And even more so if they do look well or they are really highly functional in their lives. Like maybe i am crazy. I've had women say that. maybe i am just. Maybe i am just depress. Maybe i am just anxious. Maybe i do just need to. You know work less or whatever. The things are rather than somebody going deeper and saying..

six months Five years thirties fifties nine years thirty pounds michigan twenty times united states Two thirty five percent one patient both first doctor one example four doctors one doctor sixties over fifty seventy percent
"romm" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

09:13 min | 1 year ago

"romm" Discussed on Good Life Project

"I am so excited to hang out with you. We first connected years ago. You were Back when we were filming actually very very early days ago. Light project immediately realized that we had known each other in a past life. and we're family and Have been kind of jamming ever since then and it's been really fun for me to sorta like watch your evolution also You've got this fascinating history long before we were in each other's orbits you started out. I guess in the world of fiercely devoted to women and women's health care and women's well being in the early days really focusing on midwifery and herbalism and then eventually end up at yale doing your md and then launching into this world of you know it's interesting actually. I'm curious what you call it. Because in the early days it was sort of like well. If you weren't doing the traditional thing but your traditionally trained there was this functional medicine term which came out into the universe feels so heavy and and clunky compared to the way that i know you have really developed a lens on Wellbeing i am calling it the new medicine for women because it's not just the wellness space. It's not all the entrapment of functional medicine that we could talk about. But it is clunky and it's not just conventional medicine and nobody just really goes to their doctor anymore but not many people just go to their acupuncturist either. Most people are doing this new thing right there. They have a fever and a cold and they go to their doctor to make sure there's nothing big going on and maybe get something there then. They go to their massage therapist for that. Then they go to their natural path for the nutrients and supplements and then maybe they get acupuncture up and hit the sauna and so to me. It's this new medicine that is evolving. That is an amalgamation of all of it. The other thing is i'm playing with a term. And i don't like to make up medical terms because i feel like they don't it doesn't really there's not a lot of validity in that to me but there is this concept called expose on science and so i am an in. It's all about how are external and internal ecosystems influence our wellbeing. So i am playing with this term concept more internally with my team and my writing and my audience of ecosystems medicine which is looking at these different internal ecosystems. Whether it's our microbiome are stressor our diet or the external ecosystems that we live in. And you know. I think of ven diagram. I'm very visual. But these van diagrams like you know when you have a circle and then another circle and they crossover. and then there's like eric that area in the middle of the usually like me or where you are or something like that and i feel like that represents it so. Well yeah i mean. It's interesting also because i think on the one hand you could hear this conversation take well. It doesn't really matter what you call it. But on the other hand i feel like language really matters because it creates a perception and it also creates sort of like an openness to engaging in certain practices with certain practitioners or just kneejerk reaction against it based on a lot of the way. That things are communicated you. It's interesting we we see zooming the lens out like we're having this conversation. Twenty twenty one the last five years or so have seen this ground swell of change in society on so many different level and especially in women women. Identifying people changes in politics changes in culture changes in representation changes in work and business. And you've written about this and you've also written about this really interesting phenomenon where you see all this stuff happening but you're not necessarily seeing the same thing in medicine. No in fact. I was thinking about it this morning. that we really need a me to medicine movement really in the and not just in the fact of Women going to the doctors and feeling not seen and not heard but there are actual levels of documented abuses that happen to women physically emotionally an actually sexual abuse to in an environment where you should be able to go and get care and be able to trust that provider. There are changes happening a little bit. I think Particularly the black lives matter shift in the movement. Because i don't want to see the black lives matter movement. It's been going on for a long time. But the real sea change that we started. Seeing last year in twenty twenty with brianna taylor and other very egregious abuses of the system that we saw leading to deaths and and all kinds of situations i think has led to a new recognition of the need to identify bias in medicine if only to be politically correct and not end up getting sued and having you know a backlash against you. It's not always the best intentions that lead to these changes but sometimes the changes happen necessarily and then it leads to that sea change. You're talking about so there's an opening right now to look at bias in a lot of systems but it still hasn't really been focused on women and women's health. Yeah and i mean it. Search that you said you know the the intention behind. It isn't necessarily what you like to see the intention but because almost like for financial and legal reasons and pr reasons. You're seeing some energy put it but it doesn't seem like you'll ever really get the level of attention and funding and devotion and groundswell and mass change until there's something else that's really motivating it. Yeah buckminster fuller you know bucky fuller rights work of course and he had a. He has a quote which. I can't say exactly but basically says it. It's kind of have to wait for the old guard to die out and then actually just create a new system and what's tricky with medicine is it's it's a really system with a lot of entrenched biases against women Racial bias is other biases. There's a lot of fat shaming in medicine particularly against women and what's happening now. Half of all physicians in primary care are women but we're still training in the same philosophical system so we're still internalizing these same biopsies there so so implicit and so tacit. Sometimes they're overt But were so used to ignoring them. like one. Study came out This past year showing a video of Women being spoken with by physicians and physicians saying just completely inappropriate. Things like things that you should not say to another human being or woman in the context of an appointment with her being dismissive or just inappropriate and most of the men who watched that video. Who were physicians didn't even identify that there was a problem. More of the women. Did the problem is that way of speaking and communicating is. What is typical in medicine so we may recognize it but we may still be doing it also right so it's a human if If you're taught that this is the appropriate way to be because that's the way it's been for generations you may not even realize that there's something inappropriate about the way that you're behaving not that they can donate it or dismisses it in any way shape or form but the the. It sounds like the problem that you're identifying really it's much more upstream. Ignorance all the way back to the fundamental education from day. One when you step into mexico. Yeah we bring to any thing that we teach what we believe or what. Our culture teaches us. That's part of the problem. Yeah i mean our You mentioned that something. Fifty percent of practitioners are female identifying women identifying gino at the is it. Is it a similar distribution in med school itself. I'm curious it is probably close in med school. I think that the it depends on what med school. You're at so yes increasingly. It's like in the forty to fifty percent range but increasingly part of why it's interesting part of why more women go into primary care is because it is a little bit more amenable to being mom is competitive of course to be in mexico. But it's a little less cut throat then. Going into a surgical career and those surgical careers are a little bit less tolerant of motherhood for example by the time women identify people end up out of medical school. They're very much ready to have children if they're going to 'cause they're already in their late. Twenties early thirties mid thirties depending on when they finished residency so there is even the fact that more women are in primary care than other professions is part of the bias and the number of women who are leaders in medical education is still significantly. It's in the twenties percent not near the fifties percent so there's a huge disparity in deans of medical schools. presidents of medical schools at cetera. Being women that's interesting we we had Michelle harper on the show last year and she was sharing some of the information on Really representation for black and brown people in the profession also and it was hard finding..

Michelle harper brianna taylor forty last year Fifty percent mexico fifty percent twenties percent fifties percent first this morning last five years years Twenty twenty one twenty twenty Twenties one buckminster bucky thirties
"romm" Discussed on The Chalene Show

The Chalene Show

08:30 min | 1 year ago

"romm" Discussed on The Chalene Show

"What's up buttercup. Thanks so much for joining me here today on the show where we are going to talk about your thyroid. Adrenal glands adrenal failure adrenal fatigue. We're gonna talk about hormones. We're gonna talk about hush motos we're gonna talk about low energy low libido what can be done about it how to fix it how to know what's going on what's contributing to it and so much more i apologize it. We have not gone deep into this topic before today. I've been waiting for the perfect opportunity to speak to the perfect expert. Her name is dr aviva romm. She has been on my list for quite some time. She just super dope. You guys are gonna love her and she's super smart. She is a yale trained medical doctor. She's also an herbalist. How freaking cool is that some things that we don't get into this interview. But i want you to know about aviva so you understand who it is. We're talking to so by age twenty two. She was already a practicing midwife by age. Twenty five she was attending birth as a midwife building her own family so she would do this with their own children like strapped to her. She breastfed her children. She home schooled them. She grew her own garden. She made her own herbal medicines when her kids were old enough she then went back to yale medical school anyways. I'm super excited to have her. I've been listening to podcasts for years. I'm gonna put a link to it in the show notes because it's an amazing resource for you i mean she's like a hippy. Doctor except for. She doesn't look like a hippy. Doctor i don't know what be doctor. Looks like what. She looks hip. She's cool. I just love her i mean. Don't you wanna meet her and her new book is all about hormone intelligence today. I have run the podcast so that we can specifically talk about your adrenal and thyroid health but rest assured. She promised she would come back and talk to me about param pause. Menopause hormone replacements. So that's coming. But get excited for this one. Because i think for some of you who have unexplained weight gain and fatigue and you just feel tired and just no energy no motivation no mojo. You're going to get so many answers in this episode. let's get to it. Well aviva. I wanna start by. Thank you for writing this book. I think it needs to be mandatory reading for all women. It's like the handbook for hormones. And i just love everything about it. I love that you make it so simple to understand. I love all the grass. I love the. I can just look symptoms and understand what that might mean is just really fantastic. But i want to start by saying that. I love that you let us know we're not broken. It's that the twenty first century doesn't fit well with women's hormones. So if you can use. I really want to talk about our thyroid and hp access and the stress and how that is impacting our hormone levels. But can you give us just a very brief review of why it is. The twenty first century doesn't work well with our hormones. Well i thank you for having me on the show. And i love hearing how other people describe my book like what they get from in. It's really exciting and just rewarding. So thank you for that. Yes so we have evolved however you think about science and humanity and all of that we have evolved over hundreds of thousands of years and the fact that we're here today as women means that we have been one hundred percent pretty perfectly able to reproduce if we're alive now we have a perfect biological blueprint in us. And so why is it. Suddenly that one in six women has trouble with her for one and eight with pcs us or one in ten with endometriosis something has shifted so when we look at that like hundreds of thousands of years and the last thirty years. When we're seeing this upturn in these symptoms in what are otherwise normal biological functions. We have to ask what's going on and there have been some very specific. Things that have changed in the last few decades namely are stress is higher and more relentless that ever were more distracted by fomo social media. And i know that sounds so lofty but the reality is that studies are now showing that for example. Twenty year olds are having less sex than any generation in the last few generations before them because they're distracted by social media night. Yeah we know that girls as young as six eight and nine are going into full-on puberty. Something has happened so we have to look at the stress. We have to look at the foods that were eating. We have to look especially at something called endocrine disrupters these chemicals that are honestly everywhere in our environment not to sound like the sky is falling but the reality is there in our food or in our water there are air. They're in our homes in our cosmetics or in our house cleaner. Is there in our body products and those directly interfere with our hormones. So that's why. I feel like it's important for us as women. Do not think there's something wrong with us and to also know that all these things point in a direction of things that we can actually do to be empowered and take back our hormonal health and just listening to that description. Our first reaction might be to like. Just throw in the towel. Like what's the point. Like i have all of these things stacked against me. It's everywhere it's there's nothing. I can do to change these things but your book really does do a phenomenal job of outlining kind of like how to prioritize these things and of take back control. I wanna talk for a moment about look. I noticed you. Don't use the term adrenal fatigue that much in the book. But that's a phrase. I hear a lot of women using like. I'm in adrenal fatigue. Or i've got a thyroid problem so the terms can be used interchangeably. Generally speaking though you describe it as being an epidemic that many women are experiencing so can we for definition purposes. Talk about the difference. Between how do. I know if i'm having a thyroid issue. Or if this is adrenal fatigue or a problem with my hp access yes so to address the issue of not talking about adrenal fatigue in the book. There's a whole chapter on adrenal health and stress but the term adrenal fatigue is one that i'm cautious with because it's not a real medical diagnosis. It's something that we understand. it's like hormone imbalance. That's not a real medical diagnosis. Well know what we're talking about. When someone's his adrenal fatigue we know were burnt out where crispy were overwhelmed or stressed out. We're stress eating. We're not sleeping right. We know what it is. The when a woman goes into her doctor's office and says i think i have adrenal fatigue. Her doctor is going to automatically check off this box in his mind or her mind. That says oh this is one of those people who believes the crap they read on the internet and part of what is so important about this book is not just giving you the tools to take back your own health and a kind of diy way but to go in and get what you need from your doctor. And so many women who are exhausted overwhelmed gaining weight having all these symptoms that we would call adrenal fatigue or thyroid are exactly the ones that often get dismissed and have their symptoms missed and their diagnoses not uncovered. So what we want to understand. What are we really talking about. And you mentioned the hp acts and what we're talking about when we say adrenal fatigue is really a sense of overwhelm deep exhaustion. That we all know and it is a twenty first century phenomenon quite literally. Every mammal has the ability to produce stress hormones. Fight or flight and recover within minutes. The problem with us is that if a lion is chasing gazelle gazelle either gets away or doesn't and if the zealots awake goes right back to its business watering itself at the watering hole and all that stress chemical that it was filling its body. Kind of just settles out and their body relaxes. This can happen within a few minutes but we are under relentless to do and a lot of women who especially between late thirties and mid fifties often have parents who are older that they're taking care of kids who may be teenagers or college now. Who may be going through their own stuff. They're going through their own fertility challenges or life cycle stuff. You know depending on where they are in their life their hormonal their menopause and it can really take a toll and start to affect our sleep are eating can make us gain weight..

today one six Twenty five eight nine twenty first century ten six women one hundred percent twenty first Twenty year olds hundreds of thousands of years dr last thirty years last few decades twenty two aviva romm first reaction one of those people
American Rescue Plan's big winner: Families with children

The Daily 202's Big Idea

01:52 min | 1 year ago

American Rescue Plan's big winner: Families with children

"Congress has approved a sweeping one point nine trillion dollar corona virus relief package. The bill dubbed the american rescue plan passed in the house of representatives almost entirely along party lines. It now goes to president. Biden's desk where he is expected to sign it friday. The post tony romm reports that the american rescue plan is one of the largest economic rescue packages in us. History congressional democrats and biden promised to pass a significant relief package as one of their first acts of governance after securing narrow majorities in the november elections. So what's in the bill. I it authorizes another round of stimulus payments of up to fourteen hundred dollars for most americans. It extends additional enhanced unemployment aid to the millions of people still out of a job and it makes major changes to the code to benefit families with children. Also set aside tens of billions of dollars to fund corona virus testing contact tracing vaccine deployment and the stimulus. Bill approved additional funds to help schools reopen allow restaurants businesses to stay afloat and assists state and local governments to meet their own financial needs. Democrats did not get everything. They initially sought an earlier version of the stimulus which passed in the house. Last month included the first federal minimum wage increase in decades but the idea died in the senate where moderate democrats were unwilling to support the aggressive. Maneuvering that would have been required to pass it on the house floor wednesday house speaker. Nancy pelosi hailed the new version of the bill. Quote one of the most transformative and historic bills. Any of us will ever have an opportunity to support as for the question. We all want answered. When will we get our stimulus. Check biden and his top. Aides have said the next round of stimulus. Checks should reach a large number of americans by the end of the month.

Tony Romm American Rescue Plan House Of Representatives Biden Congress Bill Senate Nancy Pelosi Aides
Google's antitrust battles: Here's what you need to know

Slate's If Then

02:48 min | 1 year ago

Google's antitrust battles: Here's what you need to know

"On Tuesday a sitting on my couch playing with my baby and I got a news alert on my phone that the justice department was suing Google. Phone briefing we understand being led by the deputy Jeffrey. It's the first time. The government has gone after big tech like this in more than twenty years this morning, the Department of Justice and eleven state. Filed an antitrust civil lawsuit against Google for unlawfully maintaining a monopoly general services and search advertising. I wanted to find out more about the and so I searched for the complaint on my phone. And that search was powered by google. You know on one hand your desire your urge to Google to find that information is what millions and millions of people do every day about the most basic queries. That's Tony Romm covers tech for the Washington. Post and they do this at least in Google's is because they see Google to be the best search engine available to people right now. But the thing is Google search engine is on my phone by default. The government basically argues that consumers like me didn't have much choice in the matter that Google became the default not because it's best but because it struck a bunch of unfair deals. Deals with apple and other cellphone makers as well as carriers. Deals that make it search engine and search advertising not just dominant unfairly. So and in addition to that, it's made it hard for any other company any other potential rival to be the next Google. So to speak to put together a search engine that you might find even more effective or you know a company that could have even more useful products that you might be likely to gravitate toward. Here's the thing about antitrust law. It can feel kind of boring and Arcane, but it affects our choices as consumers what we see what we buy what our options are. So a case like this really matters especially because it doesn't happen all that. Often the government really hasn't gone after a company like this in recent memory the last time the Justice Department sued big tech. Company for antitrust violations was in nineteen, ninety eight when it went after Microsoft they just have shied away from those kinds of antitrust challenges. We simply have not seen the US government go toe to toe in a case like the US government is bringing against Google. Today on the show, the case against Google. The government is trying to police big tech for the first time in decades. So why is this happening now? How strong is the case and does it matter that it's coming from trump's justice department? I'm Lizzie O'Leary and you're listening to what? Next td a show about technology power, how the future will be determined

Google Government Justice Department United States Department Of Justice Jeffrey Tony Romm Lizzie O'leary Apple Washington Donald Trump Microsoft
Saying Goodbye

Dear Sugars

11:18 min | 2 years ago

Saying Goodbye

"We think about people our lives dying I think the we see all the time and TV and movie images for instance you know. This sort of the worst nightmare is just receiving. Phone call And you know this is to inform you. I have some bad news for you and you think. Oh my God how Calamitous. You know not even a chance to to say anything. This person's gone But actually this week. We're going to look at what. I think is a far more common scenario and certainly if our inbox is any indication we get dozens of letters of people grappling with what? We're calling the long goodbye when you know that a loved one especially apparent which is what we'll talk about for this episode but anybody who's terminally ill there weeks months sometimes years that you know that you have to say goodbye to this person and they're all sorts of very complicated feelings that come up when you're facing a long goodbye and this is something listeners of the show will now this close to our own hearts because we both have long goodbyes of of varying lengths. Mine was very brief. Yours was many years and we had to say goodbye to our mothers and I frankly feel lucky that I didn't get that phone call with the sudden news that my mom died but also having that long goodbye. How is its own form of sorrow and torture? You have to see somebody. You love very much suffer. So we're actually going to hear one letter that is from a young woman who is facing a long goodbye and the second letter that will here is the aftermath of a long goodbye and I should mention that you know when we recorded. This first letter was several months ago and I was in the situation a letter writer thinking about my mom who was still alive and when we recorded the second letter sadly My mom had died so I was right. There in the middle of that aftermath grappling with some of the same feelings is the letter writer. So let's listen to that letter. Now Steve Stewart dear sugar three years ago. My father was diagnosed with stage. Four cancer when he was diagnosed twenty five and in graduate school out of state. Seventeen hours away. It was hard but as the years have gone by I have graduated and fallen in love in my new state. I'm in a serious relationship and have moved my younger brother out here as well. My Dad says to live my life and he would rather me stay where I am than move closer to home. If it makes me happy. Some days I don't know I have guilt. The type of guilt were all be sitting thinking about how? I'm a terrible daughter and my father is home with my mother. Dying without me. He could die a year from now or ten years from now. Am I being selfish? How do children cope with us? I feel responsible for my parents. Even though I know they only want the best for me and my crappy daughter. I took their son away as well. I feel like I have abandoned them but I don't know what to do. I don't want to move home but I don't want them to feel like I don't want to be there sincerely. Daddy's girl who daddy's girl when I read those words really my my heart hurts because you know I was that girl in my twenties whose mom did die of cancer. My Mom died when I was twenty. Two and she was forty five. And you know the question for me. It wasn't is my mom going to die in a year or ten years. You know I knew that my mom was going to die quickly and she died seven weeks to the day after her diagnosis. And one of the things I want to say to you. Daddy's girl is that the most important thing for you to do in this period of time. It's just a love the people you love with abandon and truth because you know we all could die anytime we all die tomorrow. You know we don't know when that will be but I really do feel so lucky you know that I had that opportunity to know. My mom had that diagnosis. I could say to her how important she was to me. It wasn't about being there every minute. It was about being present emotionally and it sounds to me like Daddy's girl you know certainly does that with her father and her parents well the other thing just to pause a moment and say what a beautiful guy to say to his daughter. Live your life. The problem is daddy's girl. You feel guilty anyway. And that's part of the problem when it's a long goodbye when it's acute and sudden okay. Be there. They're very simple in a way. It simplifies it. She says it could be ten years and it could be a year from now and in a way that really puts the sort of Damocles mostly loaded with guilt overhead which is perfectly understandable and Daddy's girl. You have to recognize the only thing you can do at this. Point is affect your love in the world as well as you can the emphasis when death is there is always On death and what I love. There's this wonderful quote from Joan diddy in that. WanNa read because it seems to me to put the emphasis on the living. What is left of life? She writes. I'm not telling you to make the world better. I'm just telling you to live in it not just to endure it not just to suffer it not just a pass through it but to live in it to look at it to try to get the picture to live recklessly to take chances to make your own work and take pride in it to seize the moment and if you ask me why you should bother to do that. I could tell you the graves of fine and private place but none. I think do there embrace. Nor did they sing their or right or argue or see the tidal bore on the Amazon or touch their children. And that's where there is to do and get it while you can and good luck at it which I think in in his own way is what the father is trying to say to you. Daddy Screw Your Dad is trying to say live your life and the other side of that is being as involved with your dad as you can. Right now lacks connection. You don't have to live in the same town as someone if you just because you love them dearly and I do think too that you know with a long-term Cancer Diagnosis. What you have are very different stages of that kind of dying and there will come a time when it will be appropriate. That she goes to him and maybe stays with him for months. That's a very different prospect than picking up your life and living in a town near father just because he might ten years parish from cancer right and then there's this line I took their son away as well and this is I think what happens when we feel just so much guilt because somebody we love is ill you know. She's taking on her brother's decision making. He's an adult. He decided to this state right. You we take on extra baggage in a certain way. You have an opportunity now that you know there's a limited time horizon where it's much more real to you to talk with your dad about what his life of and what your relationship has been and what he thinks of what you're making your life and the things that you're involved in trying to seize the day after all. I think that's what parents want. Yeah when we were really didn't This letter and talking about having it on the show. I really my mind went immediately to my friend Robin Romm. Who's a beautiful writer? She's written two books mother garden and the mercy papers. Both the deeply grapple with Her own experience with her mother who died of cancer and we have her in the studio today and we should mention mother. Gordon is a collection of stories. And mercy papers is a memoir that I think grapples with that moment. Which is the acute phase after a long illness and what in a very intense beautiful sort of searingly honest way what that is like at the very end but anyway we are so delighted? Robin that you're here and thank you for joining us. I wrong so much for having me. Hi Guys so. Can you tell us first? Your story so. My mom was diagnosed with cancer when I was nineteen. I had just finished my first year of college and I was living on the East Coast and she was in Oregon and it was a pretty serious diagnosis. She got a whole bunch of treatment. It's been a long time now. I don't remember every single piece of the initial few years but she went into remission for about a year and a half an after that was sick for about. Oh I don't know maybe eight more years so she was sick a total of probably nine years all your twentieth all through my twenty S. I was nineteen when she got sick and I was twenty eight when she died and I really related to the Daddy's girl ladder because that question of four. How long am I supposed to put everything on? Hold to deal with this crisis and it's at such a difficult time when you're in your twenties and you're trying to figure out like how you're going to be in the world and you're going to graduate school or you're having children are getting married or you're in relationships or you're moving or whatever it's a very. It's a time of life that I think in this country in our sort of current culture is you're allowed to be a little selfish and to set those things up for yourself and so it's very difficult to figure out how to put all those needs aside and still be. Come the person that you want to be in the midst of being pulled back into the family and pull back into this role that you're now a daughter again. You're back in the family home dealing with family and also your apparent to apparent before you've even parented your own kids or anything like forced to be a parent and it. I found it just deeply difficult to figure all that out. I went home several times. I had gone from working full-time to graduate school and during summer like before Graduate School Semester. I had gone home and my mom was pretty sick. Everybody thought she was going to die and then she took an experimental drug and she got better for a while and so I had to make the decision. Do I stay. I don't know how long she'll be better for or go and do a semester so I went back to graduate. School started my coursework about three weeks in. I got this phone call from my mother's friends hate heard if your fingers turn blue. You've got three days to live and they'd my mother's fingers. They said we're turning blue so through stuff in a bag and drove from Berkeley. Where I lived to Eugene or my mom was and wound up withdrawing from school and staying. I had no idea how long I would be home. But it wasn't the end. It was another you know prolonged period of time. And it's just you can't plan around those things either. Which makes them so difficult. You don't know in a death like that often when it's coming and when it's going to come in three months and when it's GonNa come in six months or two weeks and it makes it so impossible to make like a quote unquote good decisions. And so I think that feeling of like I'm a crappy daughter I can't make the right decision is the only feeling available first of all. I don't think you're gonNA feel like yes now. I've landed on the right thing it's crappy to go home and sit around it's crappy to feel far

Cancer Daddy Writer Robin Romm Steve Stewart Berkeley Amazon Joan Diddy Oregon Eugene East Coast Gordon
Facebook Revises Rules On Political Advertising

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:38 min | 2 years ago

Facebook Revises Rules On Political Advertising

"Facebook announced what it will and will not change as the twenty twenty election arrives. The social media giant says it will let users choose to see fewer political Ads so how does that compare to what its critics wanted Washington Post policy reporter. Tony Romm is with us once again. Good Morning Good Morning. Thanks for coming by. Let's listen to mark Mark Zuckerberg of facebook in an exchange with Representative Alexandria Cossio. Cortez your last year. Let's listen so you won't take down lies or you will take online so I think it's pretty simple. Yes or no hungry woman in Montauk not spin I'm talking about actual yes to democracy. I believe that people should be able to see for themselves. What politicians that they may or may not vote for? You won't take out or for themselves. I read that to mean facebook generally is not going to be taking sitting down lies. That was then this is now. Is that still the policy. It is still the policy. FACEBOOK is not going to take down falsehoods with some limited exceptions. You can't for instance tell people the wrong election date even enrolling out some of these big changes yesterday trying to tighten the political advertising ecosystem ahead of the twenty twenty election sucker. Brook is sticking to this notion that facebook should not serve as the arbiter of truth. It shouldn't be the thing that gets in the way of what a politician is trying to say to the voters taking the position position. That even the politician lying something you might like to know about your politician that they lied but will this policy. Do right the pulse really does two things and I. It gives you more control over the political ads. You see you essentially say you know what. I'm tired of the two thousand twenty election. I WANNA turn off most of that stuff and starting this summer. You'll have an option to be able to do that. Are there multiple options. Can I just turn off the liberal ads or turn off the conservative ads the conspiracy theory ads or whatever category there might in a sense. You can there's going to be one button. Allegedly this is according to the from. Yesterday that has not been fully rolled out yet where you can limits as across the board and then there's a second tool that you can take advantage of that stops. Individual campaigns ends and businesses from targeting adds to you based on your email address or other personal information that they might have on you so I could say I don't WanNa hear anymore from Donald trump or I don't WanNa hear anymore from Elizabeth Warren or pick your person right this is. This is a sort of what facebook is saying here. Based on those ads that are targeted to you on the basis of your email address entirely clear. What is is a political ad because as you know very well? There's so many different kinds of advertisements on issues that aren't necessarily directly from about a candidate. The right facebook has defined this in the sense to include everything from mechanic a campaign and a series a list of issues that include things like immigration and abortion and so forth. And when we're talking about this concern turnaround lying around falsehoods. That mostly involves candidates here. That's a person like president trump and his campaign speaking voters. And we've seen what happens when and facebook's policy really comes to head this occurred last year president trump's campaign purchase a series of ads that included a number of falsehoods about Vice President Joe Biden as it related into the impeachment inquiry underway on Capitol Hill Right now and facebook saw that it received a number of criticisms asking to take it down facebook said no those ads would still. We'll be allowed under facebook's new policy although you can choose not to see them if you decide but wouldn't this just encourage candidates to let other people lie for them which they already do now which they certainly already do within the other concern here. Is that. It's so hard to use facebook in the first place. I mean think about it. How many of your friends or loved ones know how to find their privacy or advertising advertising settings this is the issue that's been raised by experts and lawmakers in recent days? We'll just really matter. We'll see it leaves people to police their own their own

Facebook Donald Trump Mark Mark Zuckerberg Tony Romm Washington Post Reporter Montauk Representative Alexandria Coss Elizabeth Warren President Trump Brook Joe Biden Vice President
"romm" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"romm" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"He's unbelievable and then ladies and gentleman I apologize for such content here but I don't know if I buy this story this is kind of taken off it's gone viral other stories being passed around on the on the Facebook timelines and it's it's it's being shared all over the place story came out yesterday I had it in the pile yesterday I see around to it yesterday and the story is is that a guy has gas is so bad that he's able to kill mosquitoes like twenty feet away I don't believe the story I think this is just a fake story from one of these British tabloids I it came first from the sun and from the sun a daily newspaper in London it says the headline man whose deadly forms can kill mosquitoes hired to create mosquito repellent made from his intestinal gas I don't believe this a man is Ford's killed a ski those claims to have signed up with an insect repellent company so they can probe the secret of his killer gas Joe Romm near Rabat forty eight all of comp hollow Uganda Hey say hi to eating about I mean I understand he has some killer gas as well all he says that a study has been launched into the chemical properties of his son his gas and around this part of Uganda he's known around is the man who you want to be friendly with if you want to get rid of mosquitoes and I guess people bring him into the SKS kills come on this store this is such a crap story literally the odd job man says that no one in his home village has ever contracted malaria because his powers knock out insects over a six mile radius it is S. Ahmad the story says if that's true it's a larger than the fallout zone that happened after the atomic bomb in the hero shima nineteen forty five I.

London Ford Joe Romm Rabat Uganda malaria S. Ahmad shima Facebook
Ex-Fox News Reporter Shreds Network Over 'Partisan Misinformation'

America Trends

00:39 sec | 3 years ago

Ex-Fox News Reporter Shreds Network Over 'Partisan Misinformation'

"A former fox news chief political correspondent is not a fan of his old employer here's u._s._a.'s chris barnes with more in a promotional video for front page live anew left leaning media venture that he's part of carl camera and explains why he joined fox news in the first place and what made him leave the network the idea of fair and balanced news appealed to me over the years right wing hosts drowned out straight journalists with carson misinformation camera now teaming up on that venture with joseph romm and author and reporter on climate science and climate policy for u._s._a. radio news i'm chris

Chris Barnes Carl Camera Joseph Romm Reporter FOX Carson
Have Tech Companies Become Too Powerful? Congress Will Investigate

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:22 min | 3 years ago

Have Tech Companies Become Too Powerful? Congress Will Investigate

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from Google from Connecticut to California from Mississippi to Minnesota millions of businesses are using Google tools to grow online. Learn how Google is supporting businesses in your state at Google dot com slash economic impact. How important have Facebook, Google apple and Amazon become to your daily life. Some in congress think that these companies have gotten way too big and have way too much power to the point that they are snuffing out competition and actually harming consumers. This comes as the Trump administration has also suggested ramping up its antitrust oversight, Tony Romm with the Washington Post has done extensive reporting on this end is here with us in the studio. Thanks for coming in. Hey, thanks for having me, so congress is holding hearings this week on this very topic. What realistically is gonna come from them? Yeah, this is about the walls really closing in on big tech companies here in Washington. We've heard lots of theoretical concerns for a long time that companies like Facebook and Google and Amazon. Are too big. And as a result of that bigness are misusing your data or stifling competition. But we're now beginning to see lawmakers of both political parties putting that into action. And we had this week was an announcement from Davidson cellini, the top congressmen who leads the House Judiciary committee's competition, focus panel saying that they're going to embark on this very lengthy, top to bottom review of big tech companies to see exactly if they're stifling competition, and then to figure out at the end of the line here, whether something has to be done to fix the country's antitrust laws. And so we could see a lot here because see public hearings, we could see the grilling of major tech executives once again, we could even see subpoenas that force these companies to turn over documents. So it could be pretty uncomfortable for tech. I mean, we did see the Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifying in front of congress last year of wanna play a little clip of that. Let's listen overlaps with Porsche, don't think you have a monopoly. Certainly doesn't feel like that to me. Okay. So a Facebook as you point out has long been accused of privacy breaches of spreading disinformation and Washington, kind of just turned a blind eye. Now, there is this change is this all because of the Russian visitation, if feels like they're playing a bit of catch-up here in Washington. It's not all because of the Russia investigation, but I feel. And if you talk to experts, they say, the same thing, there's this overwhelming feeling that perhaps Washington just wasn't paying enough attention to the ills of the tech industry that companies like Facebook had gotten a pretty decent political ride here in Washington. But whether it's what happened with Russia and the spread of disinformation or the privacy violations. We've seen it Facebook. There's down this recognition that perhaps regulation hasn't caught up with these companies. And so this sort of translates, the antitrust conversation with a company like Facebook because lawmakers say, well, if you're concerned with the things that company like Facebook is doing. Where do you turn? What's the other social network that you use? If you find that Facebook is acting in some objectionable way, they think the choices are too few right? Because. Unlike you know. Apple. Which produces the iphone there are other alternatives. Something like Facebook. There really isn't something distinct that, that could provide an alternative for consumers. Yeah. And Facebook bought up some of its competitors. Right. So Facebook, also, owns WhatsApp messaging service, it owns Instagram, which is a photo sharing site that many folks use. And so the concern is that Washington allowed this sort of consolidation to happen. And that perhaps there needs to be a second look at a company like Facebook so separately. The Trump administration is taking these steps at least talking about them to increase antitrust oversight. How is that gonna play up? Yeah. We're sort of seeing the reckoning translate to the Trump administration as well as the Federal Trade Commission and the department of Justice, the two major anti-trust agencies here in Washington are beginning to divvy up their territory, deciding which agency is going to look at Facebook, or Google, or apple or Amazon, and so it's still early days. This is not to say that there's some immediate any trust. Invasive investigation hanging over these companies or that they're going to be broken up or something. But this starts the process, the could lead to the store. Of things that change the way, these companies behave. I mean Donald Trump and democratic contender for the White House, Elizabeth Warren don't agree on much. But at least they're both talking about the fact that these companies have gotten too large. I mean, she's just calling out for the all out dissembling of, of these companies Facebook's co founder Chris, Hughes published an op-ed in the New York Times and talk to us on our show last month, calling for Facebook to be broken up. Let's by that. To be little startup story of American entrepreneurship has become a leviathan and most importantly, Mark, Zuckerberg is unaccountable. And I think government should step up break up the company and regulate it, can you foresee that happening the world long way from that there is a rare political alignment, right now between folks, like Warren and President Trump who feel for slightly different reasons that we need to take a much tougher look at these beat tech companies. But a break-up of Facebook ready of its peers. For that matter is something that wouldn't just happen overnight. I mean remember when the US government looked at Microsoft and embarked on any trust investigation, then it took over a decade for that to even be resolved. So we're talking about a long process and the conversation started really this week, Tony Romm covers technology policy for the Washington Post and he was in our studios. We should add Facebook Amazon, and Google are all NPR sponsors. Tony. Thank you. Thanks, Rava

Facebook Google Washington Amazon Congress Washington Post Tony Romm Apple Donald Trump Russia Mark Zuckerberg Elizabeth Warren Connecticut Davidson Cellini United States House Judiciary Committee Porsche Rava Microsoft
Friendlys Fire: Sudden Store Closings Spark Fury

Business Wars Daily

04:03 min | 3 years ago

Friendlys Fire: Sudden Store Closings Spark Fury

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to show a brand new podcast from octa. Every successful entrepreneur follows a different path. Learn how to forge your own by listening two zero two zero wherever you get your podcasts. From wondering, I'm David Brown. And this is business words daily on this Monday, April fifteenth, there are a whole lot of things happening today. It's tax day patriot's day and the one hundred and twenty second Boston marathon, even for non runners the marathon is an institution viewing it or watching the barrage of ads for footwear, athletic, clothing, and sports drinks can inspire even the most dedicated couch potato to go out for a jog. Well, maybe not the most dedicated couch potato for those of us who rather sit than sprint friendly's, the iconic east coast ice cream chain is offering a celebrate Tori marathon Sunday. So what makes it a marathon Sunday? Try twenty six point two ounces of ice cream. That's one ounce for every mile of the marathon, the six coupe red white and blue patriots Sunday costs almost ten dollars will only be offered today in friendlies Massachusetts stores. Offering marathon theme. Treat is counter intuitive and gives friendly's chance of standing out from the outdoor branding mania surrounding the race. But friendly's has been facing just about as many rivals as any top marathon runner from traditional competitors. Like restaurant chain Bob Evans to a multitude of healthier fast, casual restaurants as a result. What's going on in the friendly's boardroom is well anything but friendly in early April at about the same time that it announced its gigantic Sunday friendlies abruptly closed twenty three restaurants in New England and upstate New York, reportedly without warning employees. I the closure sparked controversy over whether the company had complied with federal law requiring sixty days notice of an eminent layoff friendly's owned by a private equity firm has been on a downward slide for years in the last decade is closed more than three hundred locations leaving it today with one hundred seventy four while every company has its own management. Uh-huh. Friendly's is also struggling with dynamics that are squeezing big food brands everywhere. It's an ice cream and burger place in an era when families are searching out healthier lighter foods, it's been in and out of chapter eleven bankruptcy protection. In the last several years. The company says the closures are intended to help the chain and its latest rebranding effort, but the term challenges friendly's faces could be the eighty year old chains. Heartbreak hill. Romm wondering this is business wars daily take a second away from that. I r s deadline and rate and review our show on your favorite podcast Appalachia. We promise it's a heck of a lot easier than those taxes. Thanks bunch. David brown. See you tomorrow. Businessworld daily is brought to you by zero to PO a brand new podcast from octa a lot of startup stories. Just focus on the big wins. But being an entrepreneur heart, and it can be lonely. If all you ever hear about others, crushing it in zero to PO, you'll hear about the different stages of business growth, and the blood, sweat, and tears. It took for some of the world's most successful. Entrepreneurs to get where they are today. People like VC's, Mark Andriessen, and Ben Horowitz, and Netflix is potty mcchord zero IPO is hosted by Frederick Carris co-founder of octa and Joshua Davis, contributing editor at wired the conversations they have are candid and the learnings are invaluable. You can listen to zero to wherever you get your podcast.

Octa David Brown PO Bob Evans Massachusetts Boston Heartbreak Hill Joshua Davis Romm Frederick Carris Netflix New England Mark Andriessen New York Ben Horowitz Contributing Editor Co-Founder Twenty Second
Trump directs State Department to cut off aid to El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras

The New Yorker Radio Hour

00:57 sec | 3 years ago

Trump directs State Department to cut off aid to El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras

"Romm. The State Department says the US plans to cut aid to Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras. President Trump claims the country's set migrant caravans to enter the US. The announcement is drawing a mixed reaction in Central America. Maria Martin reports many migrant advocates in Central America, say the cut in aid to the northern triangle will likely resulted even more poverty and violence in the region, therefore more migration north, but some say the move may pressure corrupt politicians to change their ways. Pretty similar one runs the parish in where with the Nongo a province bordering, Mexico, which sets a high number of migrants to the US. He says it's time corrupt governments in what a Mullah Honduras, and I'll Salvador stopped taking advantage of foreign aid and provide needed social services and opportunities to their people so said to Americans wouldn't feel the need to

United States El Salvador Honduras Central America Maria Martin Guatemala Donald Trump State Department President Trump Mexico Nongo Romm.
Hydrox Accuses Oreo of Supermarket Sabotage

Business Wars Daily

05:21 min | 3 years ago

Hydrox Accuses Oreo of Supermarket Sabotage

"Business wars daily is brought to you by net. Sweet the business management software that handles every aspect of your business in an easy to use cloud platform net sweet has a special offer for listeners of this show at net sweet dot com slash BW daily. Be sure to stick around to hear more about it at the end of the show. From wondering, I'm David Brown and this business wars daily on this Tuesday, January twenty ninth hydraulics is suing the cookie monster. No, not the Sesame Street character, of course. But Monday's international the company that owns competitor Oreo. It's a rivalry more than a century old in one thousand nine hundred eight sunshine, biscuits, invented the hydroxy cookie so named because sunshine thought a mash up between hydrogen oxygen would evoke purity the cookie with white cream sandwiched between two chocolate wafers caught on with consumers and competitors rival Baker Nabisco debuted. It's chocolate sandwich, cookie. The Oreo just four years later for decades after the two snacks vied for cookie domination with hydro signaling that its name presented some. Challenges. I'm a high drugs cookie. I drugs trucks, some kids have trouble remembering my name. I don't understand why in two thousand three hydroxy then owner Kellogg decided to discontinue the cookie much to the dismay of hydroxides Colt following Kellogg revived it in two thousand eight to celebrate hydroxy one hundred anniversary. But the crunchy treat made little more than a cameo appearance before once again disappearing into obscurity that is until Elliott Kassof CEO of leaf brands bought the trademark for all of two hundred and seventy five dollars. Leave specializes in reviving beloved cookie and candy brands from the past like Astro pops and wacky wafers. Remember those in twenty fifteen Cass off bought up supermarket shelf space and plopped hydroxy next to Oreo and four thousand cookie I'll shelves nationwide hydroxy enthusiast. Sts cheered. But cast-offs good fortune. Didn't last today you'll find hydroxide on only a few hundred supermarket shelves. So what went wrong? Well cast off blames the Oreo last summer. He filed a lawsuit with the Federal Trade Commission. He claims parent company Mondays is stealing hydroxy shelf space to stop hydroxides and kill the upstart cookie competitor. He's spreading the message with a hashtag stop hiding. The hydraulics could monta lease actually be sabotaging hydraulics, theoretically. Yes category winners like Oreo often stock the shelves in big grocery stores, giving them a leg up, but Monda leases Scoffing at the lawsuit. They say stores simply give Oreo better placement because well Oreo is Oreo America's favorite cookie. That's a lie says Cass off. And he wants congress to get involved. He may have to wait in line. In the meantime, most hydroxy lovers have only one option to feed their cookie cravings by hydroxide. In bulk on Amazon and freeze the extras freezer, burn hydraulics and not even the cookie monster would get excited about that. One. Romm wondering this business wars day? Hey, what are you love so much that you freeze it for posterity tweet it at business. Thanks for listening. I'm David Brown back with you tomorrow. Oh, stop hiding hydraulics which. Every company battles challenges as they grow updating manual processes, replacing inefficient systems getting a handle on cash flow as you scale, you'll need software that can handle that growth introducing net suite by oracle the business management software that handles every aspect of your business in an easy to use cloud platform with nets week, you can save time money and unneeded headaches by managing sales, finance and accounting orders HR instantly right from your desk or even your phone right now net suite is offering you valuable insights to overcome the obstacles that are holding you back for free. Those insights come and guide called crushing the five barriers to growth. All you have to do to get it for free is to go to net sweet dot com slash b w daily again. Get nets weeds guide crushing the five barriers to growth when you go to net sweet dot com slash. W daily now. One more time net sweet dot com slash VW daily.

Oreo Cass David Brown Kellogg Hydroxides Colt Baker Nabisco VW Elliott Kassof Amazon Federal Trade Commission Astro CEO Romm Congress Seventy Five Dollars Four Years
Facebook's latest bug exposed the private photos of 6.8 million users

Grumpy Old Geeks

00:37 sec | 3 years ago

Facebook's latest bug exposed the private photos of 6.8 million users

"Facebook said that a new bug allowed apps to access private photos of up to six point eight million users the hits just keep on coming. This is a story buying switched over from Snapchat for sending your news nudes to Facebook. Well, that didn't work out very well for you. Now, this is a story by Tony Romm in the Washington Post and Facebook is saying that it was a major software bug. Oh, yeah. And well, but what's interesting, and and troublesome particularly troublesome about this is that the apps would have access to photos that you didn't even

Facebook Tony Romm Washington Post Snapchat
Patagonia Gives $10m Tax Windfall to Eco Groups

Business Wars Daily

04:25 min | 3 years ago

Patagonia Gives $10m Tax Windfall to Eco Groups

"Business wars daily is brought to you by the podcast the growth show each week. They explore inspiring stories that get to the heart of how people grow a business an idea or movement. Stay tuned at the end of this episode here a little more about this fascinating new show. Brom wondering, I'm David Brown and this business wars daily on this Tuesday, December eleventh Patagonia knows how it spending the ten million dollars. It suddenly found in its pocket. This year. The outdoor clothing company is giving away the money to environmental advocacy groups. The move is a poke in the eye of the Trump administration. The windfall comes from the tax Bill passed earlier this year, which lowered the corporate tax rate that move left many companies flush with cash, but it was also a boon to the oil and gas companies and now Patagonia wants no part of it company. Founder Yvonne Shenar, call the tax cut irresponsible saying the government is ignoring the seriousness in causes of the climate crisis. In a company statement CEO rose macario argued the tax cut is threatening life-giving resources at the expense of our planet as for the money. She said our home planet needs it more than we do. Patagonia has long been known for its. Environmental activism, the company already gives one percent of its annual sales to environmental causes a year ago after the president reduced the size of two national monuments Patagonia blacked out its homepage and replaced it. With the senate's quote, the president stole your land. It's fans instantly rewarded the move by buying more fleas that week sales jumped seven percent, the outdoor clothing industry tries to brand itself as environmentally responsible. Value shared by many of its customers. So does Patagonia most direct competitor the north face though? It's advocacy is more subdued its owner recently announced a plan to reuse materials and try to make its business less. Wasteful Patagonia is privately held. And it's too soon to say whether customers are rewarding the company for its politically motivated gift, but CEO Mark Cario has said that when Patagonia takes his stand. It makes more money not less. Indeed, some research shows that for brands that has spouse values like Patagonia and the north face staying silent can hurt business, but for other kinds of companies the economic effect of social activism is less clear as more and more brands respond to societal issues. You can bet that this debate is occurring in boardrooms across the country, and that we might see more companies speaking up. Romm wondering this is business wars daily. Hey, if you like our show, check out the episodes, just Taffer swipe over the cover art. You'll also see some offers from our sponsors. And we hope you can support our show by supporting down. Thanks for being with us. I'm David Brown. And I'll see you tomorrow. You know, it's never been easier to start a business, but it's never been harder to grow that business. I want to tell you about a great new podcast, call the growth show, which is created by hub spot. They make free and paid tools that help you grow your business each week on the growth show. They explored the inspiring stories behind how people grow a business an idea or a movement. You'll learn about the challenges entrepreneurs space in starting a company and you'll hear about some of the most interesting topics in business like social media marketing, the future of bots and the rise of subscription services. They also have some amazing guests on their show like Allie Weiss of glossier and Joe Dina creator of Spartan race, the growth show is chock full of great stories. Amazing guests and helpful advice. Subscribe to the growth show today on tunein Spotify, Stitcher or wherever you listen.

Patagonia David Brown CEO North Yvonne Shenar President Trump Senate Spotify Government Romm Rose Macario Allie Weiss Founder Mark Cario Joe Dina Glossier
The privacy debate is starting to pit tech against tech

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:12 min | 3 years ago

The privacy debate is starting to pit tech against tech

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by hot cloud storage. If your company is thinking about moving data storage to the cloud. Then you need think about with Sabi, it's less expensive than just the maintenance on your current on premises storage. See for yourself with free unlimited storage for a month. Go to Assab dot com. Click free trial and use the offer code was Sabi. The privacy debate is starting to pit tech against tech from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Ali would. Apple CEO, Tim cook through down about privacy in the tech industry or what he called the data industrial complex. He called for the United States to adopt comprehensive digital privacy regulations. Apple has stressed privacy. As a selling point over the past couple of years. But this was a big broadside at a couple of the other biggest tech firms in the world, namely, Facebook and Google, and it's worth noting that it's easy for apple to tout privacy when the option it's offering is a closed ecosystem where the company controls every aspect of the technology. Let's dig into this in quality assurance the Friday segment where we take a deeper look at a big tech story. Tony Romm is tech policy reporter at the Washington Post. He covered cooks remarks. I think Tim cook is pretty frustrated with Silicon Valley. He's certainly not the only one these days for the company, though, Abba was able to do this because it's business model is so much different than a company like Facebook and Google. Those two companies rely on collecting data about you and turning that data into insights that can then be sold to advertisers. That's how they monetize things with apple. It's different. We're talking about the sale of iphones and ipads in macbook pros, apple CEO. Tim cook has a bit more of a runway to talk about these things than his peers. What did you think about these comments afterward by Facebook's former chief security officer, Alex demos? He said Tim cook is being a little hypocritical because the company accommodates Chinese censorship and essentially saying nobody's clean when they're making billions of dollars off of selling technology dead and even beyond what alexan- was was pointing out in his tweets for member. When you're on your iphone when you're using the search feature you're using Google search there, there's always been terrain between apple and Google with respect to search. So some of the things that Tim cook is lamenting when he talks about privacy or things that in some ways the iphone enables by nudging you towards using Google search in some settings. But I think that it's to the bigger issue here, which is that for many of these companies. Their troubles with governments are very complex, and they're pretty wide ranging it should any tech company be framing the conversation right now, especially a conversation about regulation on privacy. Well, whether they should or they shouldn't be framing it. They certainly are. And that's because these companies don't want to be regulated in a way that affects their ability to collect information and monetize it and many of them are really worried in particular because of what happened in Europe end in California over the better part of the past few years Europe, put in place, very very tough restrictions that how companies can collect in use information, and then California Welden head and did its own version of that sort of GDP are is we call it for the United States. These companies don't want to have to follow multiple sets of rules in different parts of the country. So that's why you're seeing them talk so much about regulation because it's in their interests to set the rules to have a voice in the conversation, so to speak so that they aren't burdened by the regulations put forward by governments. That's Tony Romm tech policy reporter at the Washington Post and indeed while tech. Giants have previously fought against federal privacy. Regulation in recent months, Facebook, Google, IBM, Microsoft, and others have been lobbying the US government for federal privacy law that they have a bigger hand in writing. Now for some related links. Interesting editorial from Cape visine at CNBC saying that if apple stakes its reputation on privacy, insecurity, it could end up with more to lose than Facebook or Google because if it gets hacked or suddenly wants to say monetize data a little bit for its growing apps store at business. It'll be an even bigger hit to its reputation. I guess the flip side of that is the kind of nihilistic argument that at this point we won't be surprised to Facebook or Google or misuse our information on plump, but also this is a bit unusual. But I wanna point you toward a Twitter conversation. I saw you'll find the link at our website marketplace, tech dot org, a reader and venture capitalist was responding to Wall Street Journal writer, Christopher mims about a piece he wrote Thursday on the backlash against big tech. The reader said, maybe we shouldn't think of tech as one category since people aren't really that mad at say into it or Salesforce. And mims responded and said, yeah, you know, maybe what people are really afraid of is specific categories like hem social media. That's a direct quote. I think that this is kind of the heart of this apple versus everybody conversation and something we've been trying to untangle when we talk about the data economy, the business model underneath a few of these huge powerful companies is the data. And as we start to understand the difference. Maybe we can have a better conversation about what we want and don't want in our lives. I'm still not one hundred percent sure that the total control alternative that apple is offering his where I want to end up though, like I wish I could still have Facebook. But with the rules that Tim cook talked about in his tweet storm. I mean can't they make money? And also tell me what information they collect. And why and let me say, no. No, ma'am party is the producer of marketplace tech eve, chose our senior producer, Dan Powell engineered the show this week. I'm Molly would and that's marketplace tech. Enjoy your weekend. Everybody. This is APN sign up for our daily Email newsletter by October thirty first and you could be in for a Halloween treats, we're giving away ten treat bags filled with some great marketplace shag, including our high powered phone charger, a pretty cool. Gadget you cannot get anywhere else. Subscribed today at marketplace dot org for your chance to win and good luck.

Apple Tim Cook Facebook Google Tony Romm United States Sabi Washington Post CEO Reporter Cloud Europe California ALI Twitter Christopher Mims
Tiny Bites, Big Business

Business Wars Daily

04:03 min | 3 years ago

Tiny Bites, Big Business

"Great is Brooklyn's I Nico company, and they are passionate about building the best footwear in the game. At the best price. Greats has a fantastic offer. Just for you, be sure to stay tuned at the end of the show for that offer. And to learn a little bit more about this company that's making waves in the footwear industry. From wondering, I'm David Brown. And this is business wars daily when you think about persuading your baby to eat, mashed bananas or God forbid peas certain tiny jar immediately popped to mind Gerber's baby food, not only is the Gerber baby iconic so too are those little jars of pureed fruit and veggies still made the way they've always been designed to last on your shelf for a good long time, and like all big food companies Gerber is contending with changing tastes and lowering tolerance for chemicals, especially among young parents sales of processed baby food have been dropping over the last several years, but organic food has been flying off the shelves last week. The century-old company finally jumped on the bandwagon with a test of a new line called fresh full start gerbers rolling out the line of fifteen organic refrigerated products in walmarts in Texas, Arkansas, Kansas and Missouri at four to six dollars. Piece for just two servings the bowls pure as and ready to heat entrees, don't come cheap, but shoppers have been willing to spend similar amounts for organic baby food from startups like once upon a farm and pure spoon once upon a farm with actress Jennifer garner as its public face just raised twenty million dollars in funding. The startup will use the money to grow its line of fresh food packaged in BPA free recyclable pouches. Another favourite of on the go parents organic baby food is hot. But there's one market even the most convenient and freshest food company might struggle to crack. Those are the parents who would still rather puree their own organic bananas. Impedes not only to know exactly what they're feeding their kids, but to keep a little more money in their wallets while they do. Romm wondering this is business wars daily. Hey, we'd love to get to know you better. Please take just a minute. Visit us at wondering dot com slash survey. An answer a few questions it'll help us alive. Thanks a bunch. I'm David Brown back with you tomorrow. Thanks to greats for sponsoring business wars daily greats thinks it's okay to buy status as long as you. Don't overpay. The company was founded by two guys who wanted to build a great sneaker brand that made high quality product and sold it direct to the consumer at value prize. Now when they launched this company their footwear became an instant classic selling out of most styles within ninety days. Now, I've got the windward dune. This one is like a classic boat shoe, but updated it's more comfortable and feels more durable than anything else. I've tried and it gets noticed. Now greats offers men and women styles. And I promise you, you'll take one look at their website and see at least one pair you need to have right now. As a listener of business wars daily. You can save fifteen percent off your first purchase by going to greats dot com. That's G R E A T S dot com and using the offer code BW daily at the checkout. That's great Stott com. Offer code BWI for fifteen percent off your. I purchase greats. Classic styles. Made the best for less.

David Brown Gerber Brooklyn Jennifer Garner Romm BWI Texas Missouri Arkansas Kansas Fifteen Percent Twenty Million Dollars Ninety Days Six Dollars
Rachel Martin Twitter, Twitter and Jack Dorsey discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:19 sec | 4 years ago

Rachel Martin Twitter, Twitter and Jack Dorsey discussed on Morning Edition

"Martin Twitter has permanently suspended conspiracy. Theorist Alex Jones and his info wars channel from its platform. Info wars famously promoted the fraudulent idea that the sandy hook shooting was faked. It took Twitter month longer to ban Jones than it. Did apple Facebook YouTube even Pinterest all barred Jones

Rachel Martin Twitter Twitter Jack Dorsey Alex Jones Washington Post Facebook Reporter Tony Romo Tony Romm Tony Paige CEO Senator Marco Rubio Apple CNN Congress Harassment Pinterest Google
Scooter Wars: Lyft looks set for new battle with Uber

Business Wars

02:23 min | 4 years ago

Scooter Wars: Lyft looks set for new battle with Uber

"Romm wondering, this is business wars daily. I'm David Brown and it's Tuesday, July seventeenth. If you're a city dweller, you may have noticed neon, green scooters, lying around in random places. Lately, those little electric scooters are at the heart of what shaping up to be a huge business battle between Uber and lift the to ride sharing services have started a ground war for two wheeled customers. They're betting that urban residents would like cheap environmentally friendly way to travel short distances, like from home to the subway station, that sort of thing. Earlier this month, Uber invested in lime bike, which makes those bright green scooters Uber plans to slap its logo on them. Customers will locate a scooter with Uber app, take it for a spin, drop it wherever for the next rider to grab wherever Uber goes, lift follows. While left hasn't jumped in with two wheels, just yet it's applied for a scooter permit from the city of San Francisco. So stay tuned to some scooters might still feel like toys but their toys with big dollars. Lines attached Wall Street is valuing the biggest scooter companies at upwards of a billion dollars each. And at least one investor says, the scooter market feels like the early days of the worldwide web. So headed to main street headed to Wall Street. It any case you might want to make sure that helmets on tight things could get bumpy real fast.

David Brown Romm San Francisco Billion Dollars
How Europe's New Privacy Law Will Change the Web

The Takeaway

02:16 min | 4 years ago

How Europe's New Privacy Law Will Change the Web

"Are lots of instances where there's some overlap between the work cambridge analytica was doing and russia one of the things that wiley was alluding to was the fact that alexander kogan our researcher who developed the app that facebook are that cambridge analytic had used on facebook had traveled to saint petersburg his work was known in russia and so one of the fears there is that you know either by choice or by force russia may have acquired some of the insights from cambridge analytica they may have key logged or hacked cogan and others who had access to the data it's unclear there was a later exchange about the extent to which russian trolls who sought to stabilize the us election whether they had access to some of that information but wiley told members of congress that it was not clear to him that the internet research agency had ever obtained that data i think more than anything though it just shows us that there are so many unanswered questions here about the tactics that cambridge analytica employed and the extent to which the space book information may have been weaponized two or three steps removed from those who had it in the first place tony romm technology policy reporter for the washington post's thanks for joining us tony thanks for having me online platforms terms and conditions present users with a false choice because using the internet is no longer choice americans cannot opt out of the twenty th century whether or not you watch christopher wiley testimony on wednesday you might feel the same see when you click agree on the dozens of sites you visit and subscribe to you don't really know what it is you're agreeing to or whether or not you even have the option to decline it's something that i noticed especially over the past few weeks companies present new terms and service agreements to online users but the new agreements aren't result of facebook state of breach natasha who is a senior writer for wired covering silicon valley you are part of the millions probably billions of people that are getting these annoying emails right now and the reason for it is an upcoming privacy law in europe called the general data protection regulation or gdp are for short so it's a set of privacy laws that will go into effect on may twenty fifth and it requires companies to have a legal basis for.

Researcher Facebook Russia Cogan United States Congress Reporter Washington Post Writer Alexander Kogan Cambridge Analytic Saint Petersburg Cambridge Tony Romm Christopher Wiley Europe Twenty Fifth
Seoul, Ildefonso Guajardo and Mexico discussed on Fred and Angi

Fred and Angi

02:34 min | 4 years ago

Seoul, Ildefonso Guajardo and Mexico discussed on Fred and Angi

"From npr news in washington i'm nora romm negotiators from the us canada and mexico have yet to reach an agreement on arena goshi ation of nafta despite reaching today's deadline set by congress but as james frederick reports from mexico city some negotiators are still hopeful mexican economy minister ildefonso guajardo says although there are still major issues to work out he thinks it would be possible to reach a new nafta deal by the end of the month mexican officials are eager to finish the deal as soon as possible since elections for a new president as well as hundreds of legislators happened on july first it's a big day in the central african country of burundi npr's eyder peralta says amid tension and fears of violence burundians are voting on a controversial referendum so far there have been no reports of violence but the runup has been marked by intimidation beating and even the murder of opponents of the referendum the proposed change the constitution would give more power to president pierre including see some and it would also extend his rule until twenty thirty four a spokesman for the chinese commerce ministry says china does not want increase trade tensions with the united states but it will defend its interests the comment came as the us and china resumed talks aimed at heading off a trade war the trump administration is threatening to impose tariffs on as much as one hundred fifty billion dollars of chinese imports china's threatening to retaliate i'm nora raum npr news on the next fresh air trump versus the deep state we talk with evan osnos of the new yorker about how hundreds of nonpartisan civil servants considered not loyal enough to the administration have been sidelined or pushed out of government key positions have been left open to an unprecedented degree leaving the president with few restraints on him join us here fresh air this afternoon beginning at one followed a two by the world here's a preview next time on the world south koreans flocked to a movie set outside seoul it's a full size replica the place where kim jong hoon shook hands last month with south korea's president visitors can now do their own handshakes for the cameras why some people in south korea say they like kim jong un it's the world i'm judy woodruff on the next news hour we continue our series inside yemen with a.

Seoul Ildefonso Guajardo Mexico James Frederick Canada Nora Romm NPR Yemen Judy Woodruff Kim Jong South Korea Kim Jong Hoon Washington Evan Osnos United States China Chinese Commerce Ministry Pierre