24 Burst results for "Romer"

"romer" Discussed on Capitalisn't

Capitalisn't

02:15 min | Last month

"romer" Discussed on Capitalisn't

"Today google took that idea step further and said that it would not use other invasive ways to track and target users as it phases out those third party cookies instead it will rely on anonymous and aggregated data using a program that it is developing internally called privacy sandbox so we don't even need to be concerned about this anymore. Do we google's going to fix all our problems for us. This issue is going away honestly. I'm still struggling to digest the news. The titles seems to be they. Celebratory the details much less saw if the only thing they do is stop third party from putting cookies to trace you the basically increasing the monopoly. Have your information not using it. You can argue that at least in part targeted ads based on geolocation are useful. If i want to find pizzeria. I would like them to know where i am because finding some whereas in the planet is not particularly useful so there are definitely useful targeted as i would like to be able to choose when i received them or not and then particularly nabi trace to know where i am in every moment on my life. But that's a different story. Yeah i wasn't sure what to make of the announcement either struck me as one of those things where they might be getting more mileage from the headline than they deserve based on the actual substance of what they're going to do. I didn't quite understand the notion that while they're not going to track you anymore. They are going to bundle your information into a cohort with those of other people like you and then sell that to advertisers. So that seemed to say to me. Although i could be wrong but it seemed to me that google still gotta have all your information. There may be not selling it individually. But they're selling you as part of a group. I don't know. Would you rather be sold individually or sold as part of a group. I'm not sure. Capital isn't as a podcast from the university of chicago stiegler center in collaboration with the chicago booth review also check out pro-market dot org a publication of the stiegler center. Don't forget to subscribe. And we've reviewed capital isn't wherever you get.

Today stiegler center google pro-market dot org one chicago chicago stiegler center
"romer" Discussed on Capitalisn't

Capitalisn't

04:05 min | Last month

"romer" Discussed on Capitalisn't

"We saw two cases where people alleged that the trump administration was pursuing a trust cases purely because of political reasons not because of the purported reason about trying to protect competition so whether or not that was true. This is now at least a live issue. So the way our system has always dealt with the risk of prosecutorial discretion is to make sure that it's pretty hard to win a case you know if the prosecutor decides to bring a case to court judges in the process. Don't make it easy to win win. One of those cases. So i think if we use the judicial system. I'm afraid we're almost always going to be stuck in this situation. Where either is very hard to win a conviction or if it's not hard to win a conviction then we're in a situation where the government could prosecute almost any firm and then if it just prosecutes firms that for example on a news outlet which is criticizing the administration than the administration can basically intimidate firms into changing how they how they covered the administration. So even though i'm willing to explore some of these slightly more aggressive methods of anti-trust enforcement the whole system based on conviction for violation of law is just too crude a tool for these kinds of subtle issues issues that we're facing and we've always been worried that if we strengthen the law without that really does is give unchecked power to the executive branch and what i like about the tax solution. Is that it it. It rather works through the legislature instead of regulators in the executive branch or prosecutors in the executive branch along with judges in the judicial system to me it parameters argument was pretty convincing because i worry a lot about putting a regulator in charge of the kind of content. We wanna see. I wasn't even one hundred percent. Happy about twitter's decision to ban. Donald trump i understand. I can argue it both both ways but it is scary when a private company has that much power. But i think it's even more frightening if the government regulator has that much power so that to me isn't a great solution either. So i like this idea of tax deif yes. We economists call this type of taxes gouveia taxes after they famous british economists of the middle of the maybe part of the twentieth century cecil pigou. Who had this idea that whenever there is a externalities you tax that particular activity because the tax can help you internalize that externally. The example is the example of the so-called carbon tax to tax we don't internalize as consumer the damage due to her by producing more to the moment. Every activity that produced to is tax. We are going to start to internalize that cost. And so we're gonna start eating beans. Is that stakes because being put us last year tuna steaks especially because they're gonna cost much less now. What is interesting is that for me. Economic point of up gouveia and taxes are fantastic because they do the right trick so they intervene minimally to fix the problem without too much. Overhead cost politically the starter. Why because you are going to penalize a lot if you people and you're going to benefit a lot of people and as a result political economy calculus is exactly against those in taxes because if you start to tax stakes because they produce yo to ula the entire family industry. Happy nomin screaming. Who is going to be on the other side. Defending this idea in principle of us but we know that the spurs interests are not exactly volka. Concentrated one yeah that does get into a slightly different aspect of this conversation though..

twitter Donald trump two cases twentieth century last year both trump one hundred percent both ways british One of those cases
Long Haul Trucking Means Better Prices For Consumers, But Drivers Suffer Low Wages

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:21 min | 7 months ago

Long Haul Trucking Means Better Prices For Consumers, But Drivers Suffer Low Wages

"The stuff that you buy in stores, close food electronics almost all of it got there on a truck long haul trucking is getting cheaper and that's good for consumers. It means stuff is cheaper, but it's not so good for truck drivers because this is happening at their expense. Here's Keith Romer from planet money. In two thousand, seventeen Kimberly Sikorski decided she was going to become a trucker she called Prime Inc. no relation to Amazon prime because they offered free training prime seemed eager to have her literally I think I called on Thursday night and they were ready to buy me a greyhound ticket for Sunday to start on Monday Sikorsky took classes and drove with a trainer for three months. But before she could go out on her own, she had a choice to make your given the option to either be accompanied driver or a lease operator option one she's a regular old. Employees. Paid based on how many miles she drives option to. She gets to be her own boss. She'd have to lease a truck through prime but then after expenses she would share of whatever her loads brought in in the form of a weekly check from prime. They say if you're not stupid and you're not lazy then you make a lot more money being released operator and you're Kinda dumb if you pass that up. So Secorski chose option to she picked out her truck finance through prime a brand new blue freightliner that she named Sapphire. Then she hit the road. But when she started receiving her weekly checks, something didn't seem right a lot of times when I'm expecting to see a check for a couple of thousand dollars, I'm getting a bill for like two hundred dollars or five hundred dollars or fifteen hundred dollars a bill before Secorski got her cut prime deducted truck payment's insurance equipment cost and primes percentage as a broker also for an independent contractor it sure felt like she worked for prime. So they say that you're not their employees but you're. Completely bound to them. You're not allowed to take loads from anyone else. You're not allowed to ask for different loads than what they're giving you. Secorski works seventy hour weeks for six months at the end of it. She had earned just nine thousand dollars. It got to the point where I would be sitting in my truck crying because I'd be afraid to buy a hotdog when it gets to the point of your electricity being shut off and your grocery bill not being able to be paid. There has to be something better finally she quit. Steve Sally a sociologist at the University of Pennsylvania specializes in the industry. He says that four higher long haul trucking has become a commodity and customers only really care about price. The way that the market has been constructed requires that you compete on the cost of labor getting Sikorsky to lease a truck from prime and then work as an independent contractor. That's a standard part of the business model for a lot of trucking companies. Now, like having a, you know a truck for free an paying the driver less than you would have to pay an employee. Some of those drivers though have started to push back in recent years there's been a wave of class actions lawsuits against some of the. Biggest long-haul companies in July Kimberly Sikorsky's old company prime settled a lawsuit in which it was accused of Miss classifying its employees and violating minimum wage laws. Prime did not admit wrongdoing as part of its settlement and they declined to be interviewed for this story. But in an emailed statement, a lawyer for prime wrote quote, we have thousands of highly successful independent contractors and company drivers who thrive within our business model. The class action that was settled is completely unrelated to Miss Sikorsky's allegations. The litigation was seemingly endless and was best resolved as part of that settlement forty thousand former drivers for prime are eligible for a share of twenty, eight, million dollars, which means it's like seven hundred dollars a person. Does that seem like enough? No Honestly It's kind of laughable. Kimberly Sikorski is driving for a different company now and this time she's an employee Keith Romer NPR news.

Secorski Kimberly Sikorski Kimberly Sikorsky Keith Romer Prime Inc. Sikorsky Amazon University Of Pennsylvania Steve Sally
"romer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:12 min | 9 months ago

"romer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Radio. Here's your host, Stephen Dubner. Christina Romer, former top White House economist, has spent her career analyzing the causes and consequences of recessions and depressions. In light of the fact that the economy has become much more globalized. In recent decades. I asked Romer to describe how the U. S economy is unique and how that will affect our recovery from the cove it crash. Traditionally, the American economy has been What I want to say more vibrant, more dynamic. So if you want to compare us to Europe, we have more flexible labor markets. It's easier to start a business here. It's easier to close down a business here. And that has often served us very well because capitalism is good at some things, and especially at figuring out what consumers want. But it does mean that it makes an economy much harder on workers is a lot easier to lay people off. You don't have the same employment protections. It certainly has been very hard on workers in this downturn compared say to a lot of European countries with the governments have just been paying employers to keep people on the books. So what thing I could imagine is we've discussed it. Some industries may never come back. Brick and mortar retail. It may come back some, but it'll never be like it. Wass and I think the positive would be that the U. S economy may be better at Adjusting to such changes that we are a dynamic economy. And so when there's an opportunity, American firms were pretty quick to step in. But if you're going to be a dynamic economy, you also need to think about how do you protect The people that may be harmed by all of that dynamism and don't move as easily from one industry to another, and we have to have a way to protect them and make sure that they're able to keep body and soul together and retrained for whatever new jobs air coming down the line. I asked Romer to think back to the great recession and identify the mistakes that she and her fellow Obama economic advisers made or at least the ideas that didn't work out so well. They're couple. We had the making work pay tax credit. We thought rather than write people checks and have thumb arrived in their mailbox are in their account. We would just No slip it in, So it's just going to show up in lower withholding, and we thought people would just noticed they had more money in their bank account. And maybe that would have a good effect on spending. As it turned out, most people didn't seem to even know they'd got it or worse, yet they thought the Obama administration and raise their taxes. Which they hadn't We cut them by a lot. So that was one that just didn't work as we'd anticipated. And was that a communication failure, perception failure. How did that happen? I think some of it wass a communication failure. I think some of it. It turns out economic theory doesn't give us good. Insight. It's really in some sense of behavioral question. Do people respond? Maur? If they see the cheque in their hands, or do they respond? Maur if it just shows up in their paycheck a little bit every month, and I think it was partly we're just learning. There was another idea that looked good but never gained traction. We we're trying a lot, especially in 20 tend to think of another fiscal stimulus that maybe would not be terribly expensive but could have a big bang for the buck. So we were very interested in a new hiring tax credit away toe convince businesses to hire workers and You know, we really did due diligence on this one. We ran surveys and we spun the CPS tapes. CPS stands for current population Survey. Just all the research we could think of. We were just desperate to get them over the hump and ready to hire again. We ended up getting a small kind of pilot program through Congress, but nothing on a big scale. So I'm not sure that we ever learned whether this wouldn't work. But that was a policy that I was Very excited about so maybe that's still something we could have in our arsenal and try at some point. Rumor also thought that more could be done around public employment, which she thinks played a big part in the U. S recovery from the Great Depression. Because you know what Roosevelt was able to do of putting just millions of people directly on the government payroll. I think wass incredibly valuable. This is the W P A. W P, a civilian conservation court. But in a modern world trying to figure out howto higher, millions of people quickly is something that seems really hard. And I think it's something President Obama would have liked to do. And we thought about it. We tried. I remember having a conversation with some other Cabinet secretaries. I'd say if money was no object. How many people could you hire? They'd say, Oh, lots, you know, 20 30,000 like There's not going to do much when we've got millions and millions of people unemployed. Why is it so hard? I mean, I realize you're talking about the federal government hiring people versus private firms, But you have been extolling the virtues of Our nimble and robust capitalism which can, you know? Move fast break things, hire and fire lots and lots of people. Why is it so hard for the federal government to do that? Big. Partly, we have different standards for the federal government. So I think we try to do things probably more carefully Think about the civilian Conservation Corps. So that's the hiring program from the Depression that built a lot of the buildings in our national parks and things like that. It hired mainly young men. It Took them out into the woods to build roads and log cabins, and it sent 3/4 of their paychecks home to their mothers. And it was, by all accounts incredibly successful. And you know, I've met with some of these people that were on CCC projects there now in their eighties and nineties, and it was life transforming. But can you imagine proposing that today of let's you know, hire young men, send them out to the woods and send their checks home to their parents. That just I think is not in the modern American way of doing things right. But there are certainly modern equivalents. For instance, one problem with dispersing aid money has been that It needs a lot of manpower. One problem with contact tracing is it needs a lot of manpower. So is it really so hard to imagine a kind of massive shift from private to public hiring over the next couple of years? Because this is not going to go away? Unemployment is not going, I assume 345% Any time at all soon right now, I agree, And so contact tracing is a great example. That is something that we ought to be able to use lots of people and put them to use very, very fruitfully. I think even if you were to think about Reasonable numbers. I suspect that you're not going to be able to deal with millions and millions of people that we're currently unemployed. I'll give you another example of one of the ideas I was thinking about back in 2009 was so how about just a massive program of hiring people to be teacher's AIDS and I was really very taken with this because so many of our public works. Jobs tend to be fore. You know, construction workers, male often oriented jobs, and I thought this was a great way to make sure that we were getting some balance and something that might be particularly good for female employment in a tough time, and we ran into a certain amount of Opposition from, you know, think about local school districts that are laying off teachers and you say, But I have this great program. I'm going to give you all these teachers aides. They tended to say what we really need is the money so we can keep our teachers employed, so it is hard to figure out What's the right way to do this? And I came away thinking well, let's give more money to state local government, so they're not laying off teachers that maybe they could hire the teacher's AIDS..

Christina Romer Obama Stephen Dubner Europe Wass civilian Conservation Corps Obama administration U. S White House government CPS Depression President Congress Cabinet Roosevelt
Massive explosion damages mall in Florida, injures at least 20

The Designer Yard Show with Bret Achtenhagen

00:59 min | 1 year ago

Massive explosion damages mall in Florida, injures at least 20

"Authorities are combing through the debris after an explosion today at a mall in plantation Florida this man named Raleigh was at an LA fitness gym located just across the street from the sight of blood when I went out right on it's like a war zone the blast he says was strong enough to blow in the windows of the gym people were still in stock and crying and screaming very confused everyone was rushed some people were rushing out the door the city's fire department is reporting at least twenty people were hurt at least two of them seriously injured A. B. C.'s Roy Romer's on the scene right now there are no reported fatalities but there are several injuries we're told that several people have been transported the hospital right now will work together more information as to how this explosion started now in stable firefighter short time ago he did tell me that he believes this may have all started from a Pizza Hut it is directly across from that LA fitness thirties are telling people to stay away from the scene Terry Alden or ABC

Florida Raleigh A. B. C. Pizza Hut Terry Alden Roy Romer LA ABC
"romer" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

14:25 min | 2 years ago

"romer" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Welcome back. We are here with CJ Romer from ace app, and we're talking electric people, I was just reading an article online, someone actually calculated because, you know, there's a lot of electrical activity in our brain with all these eight hundred billion neurons firing and every time on your on fires it produces. I think what they call a gradient of about one hundred and five Milli volts. So if you had eight hundred billion neurons, all firing at all of that energy was directed towards charging your cell phone, you could, of course, that would leave nothing for anything else like breathing. But if you directed all of that energy towards charging your cell phone, you could charge it with your brain, the electricity in your brain in just under seventy hours. So there you go. What do you think about that? CJ. I think it would still be more efficient. Plug it into the plug. But, but that's no fun. That's. Some, some CI subway will decide k-y-k-o sakes. That's right. Shove. I'm glad she said, what you off officially. My reaction. Exactly. Why exactly that's the question? Let's let's dive into the phones. And let's see west of the Rockies Barbara is in mount Shasta, California Barbara. Good morning. Welcome to coast to coast AM. I would love to teach every one of your listeners how to light up a light bulb. You know how are you ready? Yes. You go to the hardware store tomorrow, and you get a nine inch fluorescent fold and tomorrow evening when you go to bed, you put it between your legs while you're going to bed under the covers until you light up that light and get it the same body heat that your body is putting out and as you as you rub that light with your hands. It will light up for everyone. Now, that's with fluorescent. What about an incandescent? You're on your own with that one. I've been struck by lightning twice. And I've had five out of the body experiences, one I had several weeks ago. The last one showed me a shortage in my electrical system. I went to the doctor I'd had one operation now and gotten rid of it. A shortage in your electrical system. How'd you meet her? Your body is an electrical system. Sure. I mean, that's that regulates. Your heartbeat. It's just how you concentrate, your energy darling. All right. Barbara. Thank you. That did you want to weigh in on that CJ at all? Quite a bit concerned about try flair some tape why shots? Got. All right. East of the Rockies. Jason is in Syracuse New York, go orange. Hey, Jason welcome to coast to coast AM, Richard. Thanks for having me by what the topic and Finally, I could talk to somebody about what actually happens at six. It's weird. Glad together talking about this. I've had stuff like that happened. My entire life with the street lands as an adult and constantly affecting computers. And I walk into places and stuff shuts down, and people like look at me like this time for happens, and I'm like, it's probably me. Don't worry this happens all the time, and they kinda giggle, but I'm serious when it happens differently. Sorry jason. Do you feel any different when, when you're having this electrical impact? Did you feel any differently actually I actually feel it coming through me? It's weird. It's like I love joking. That was kind of laughing earlier, because when you guys were talking about the negative effects. I don't really produce it. I more or less kind of the kind of drains through me. I guess that's what it feels like at least. One instance, it kind of confirmed it a few years back. We have a local casino was kind of funny that has. Thousands of these electron a game machines and my wife and I were sitting there playing, and then I felt this sensation and then the entire casino, literally shut down all the screens went blue. And I looked at my wife and I said, I think I just did that he's like, yeah, right. And then after about five minutes security, surrounded, my me and my wife and I could hear over there little earpieces. Yeah. We're there were at the machine now stand up. And. Yeah, it was quite quite the to do. So what do you make of that? CJ. Experience. People and explained. It is a big studied. Yeah. It must be very, very difficult. The computer break style, regular Vallon. I don't even use it anymore. It's kind of funny say that because it's hard even watching television with my wife because every time I walk into the room, I literally, we don't get any reception. And even I thought it was just maybe the TV or the end town about it even happens when we have the DVD player going shuts everything down. It's I can't I'm always blowing light bulbs and even even the LED light bulbs, they're supposed to be graded for so many hours. And then short lifetime in this house. Yeah. Anyway, she could write to us because. It must be difficult to deal with. To feel sad. It just happens. Yeah. It's weird it, you know. It's hard to explain. I mean, I guess I, I it's, it's more of a feeling I guess, I mean I know when it's when the feeling comes up like oh, you know, something it's going to happen again. And I've had I've blown ignitions and cars. I know when that's going to happen. And then we I've been stranded. It's just it gets very frustrating. And you know, it's tough going until even like hospitals. I have I have a cousin that, you know, requires me to help them out. And every time we go to the VA, you know, we're, we're sitting in the in the office, and if somebody goes to use a computer and like they kind of have this deranged look on their face, like Jesus never happens. This this, you know what there's something wrong with the computer, and I'm like Thomas. That's all right. I have that kind of fact on the what kind of giggle, but I'm serious. If it were not happening outside the home as well. My response might be, you know, have the heavier electrical system in your house checked, you know, for for power surges, and that sort of thing. But, but that doesn't explain why it's happening at the casino in the hospital. Inning your car. No, no. I've had I've tried to, you know, when I was younger, these things just kind of happen. But as an adult, you know, I noticed things more often than trying to put two and two together. I mean, I was I was electric electrocuted. A couple times. I was a child. That's interesting. Yeah. I've had some other strange things happen to in my life. There's an instance a couple couple years ago about two and a half years ago, my wife and I were coming back home for dinner. We're about oughta mile from home and driving. Our van in the entire inside of the van went up like somebody was arc welding. Wow. Yeah. And I looked around I thought you know. Getting pulled over you how like the spotlight's on you. It was it was even brighter than that. My wife kind of looked at me like what's going on? And I don't know. Amazing. I still haven't been able to really explain that one. Have you had any other unusual experiences of I mean just outside trinity? But just generally a building, you might consider power dole status anyway. Yes. Yes. And yes. Okay. Very well. Yeah. I've, I've tried to look into a lot of other things too. I mean, blood types lineage, you know, all all sorts of things, but, you know, trying to find answers and trying to find people to talk to take serious, another thing CJ wondered about a paranormal experiences. In addition. Have you had when you can share? Yes. Yes, I have. I've had I've had being shop at the side of my bed. I've had been an would call paralyzed in the middle of the night. Brush, it off his sleep apnea, but they're yell sleep paralysis, but it's but it's not that. It's nicer connection do suspected, there's a connection here CJ that all of these things somehow related. Obsessed by the, the whole personality foundation down in North Carolina a website. He's access. But if he would get hold up until about your experience that could go. Greg overall. Sure. Seriously? But everything to help you. And. People really nice. But if you're very, very welcoming if there's anyway. It was something we could do the help, but it stays all we can do with site and tried. Really good that you're sharing the experience. And again, C J. How would Jason contact you at ace app? Well. Alexa, he could just say. Phenomena, a good that would probably get the address on the website. It's WWW a s a pay AC. Don't UK but I mean. Yeah. Yeah. Well, well past case of what could win this. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you for that Jason. He certainly ticked all the boxes didn't he? Let's see. Let's say hi to on the wildcard line. We have James in Kansas City. James, welcome. Richard how you doing terrific? Thank you. I cannot wear watch LCD watches wrist. Battery-powered analog, watches drying. I haven't won watching thirty years. I'm fifty one now and I have a medical condition that nobody can explain. And it's documented in my medical file. I have they call it a heart mom, but they don't make can't explain why my heart will and this happened in front of doctors. I was in hospital under observation because I was complaining about my about having chest pains, and I was I'd been in there for two days, laying in bed, and there was a nose in my room and my heart went into it started fluttering I think the call it. Relation. And then after about thirty seconds of ad it's my flat line and then see right down the hallway screamed at him that is going into cardiac arrest came down the hallway with the crash card and the pads jump starts with and the doctors rain in there. And they, they had they were going to try and. Sock me bring my heart. And I told the guy with a paddle if you. I'm gonna hit you so he stopped and then. Fifteen to twenty into the flat line. It went back into and then went back into normal rhythm. Oh, my word. Yeah. How, how often do you go into this? This sounds like attack, Accardi or something. How often does this? It's happened. Probably. Dozen times maybe fifteen times in my life. Okay with the flat line. Now, part it'll do that twenty times a year. Wow. Yeah. No, I haven't known a normal size. Okay. Away about one hundred eighty five pounds, six foot quarter inches tall. Seriously, healthy guy. Yeah. My oh my in her. My fat body weight ratio is probably about nine or ten percents. Yeah. Went. Functioning. Thirteen. Yeah. I've been working for somebody as money when cassio LCD watch and within about an hour and a half that broke the screen.

Jason CJ Romer mount Shasta Richard California Vallon Alexa VA Barbara UK James North Carolina Accardi Syracuse Thomas Greg Kansas City New York
"romer" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

12:50 min | 2 years ago

"romer" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Welcome back. We are here with CJ Romer from ace app, and we're talking electric people I was treating an article online, someone actually calculated because there's a lot of electrical activity in our brain with all these eight hundred billion neurons firing and every time on your on fires it produces. I think what they call a gradient of about one hundred five Milli volts. So if you had eight hundred billion neurons all firing at all of that energy was directed towards charging your cell phone. You could. Of course, that would leave nothing for anything else like breathing. But if you direct all of that energy towards charging your cell phone, you could charge it with your brain, the trysofi in your brain in just under seventy hours. So there you go. What do you think about that? CJ. I think it would still be efficient plug it into the plug of the wood. But yeah, but that's no fun. That's. Some, some subway, we'll decide k-y-k-o sakes job is to study the corner at charge over. That's right. I would say, I'm, I'm glad she said, what about off officially my reaction here and got wall? Exactly why xactly that's the question. Let's let's dive into the phones. And let's see west of the Rockies Barbara is in mount Shasta, California Barbara. Good morning. Welcome to coast to coast AM. I would love to teach everyone of your listeners how to light up a light bulb. You know how are you ready? Yes. You go to the hardware store tomorrow, and you get a nine inch fluorescent bulbs and tomorrow evening when you go to bed, you put it between your legs while you're going to bed under the covers until you light up that light and get it the same body that your body is putting out and as you as you rub that light with your hands. It will light up for everyone. Now, that's with fluorescent. What about an incandescent? You're on your own with that one. I've been struck by lightning twice. And I've had by out of the body experiences, one I had several weeks ago, the last one showed me a shortage in my electrical system, I went to the doctor I'd had one operation now and gotten rid of that. Shortage in your electrical system. How do you mean? Your body is an electrical system. Sure. I mean, that's that regulates your heartbeat. It's just how you concentrate, your energy Darlie. All right, Barbara. Thank you. That did you want to weigh in on that CJ at all? No. I'm a bit concerned about try flair some tape shots. Then we got another. Thanks. Yeah. Yeah. That's try. All right. East of the Rockies. Jason is in Syracuse New York, go Orangemen. Hey, Jason welcome to coast to coast AM, Richard. Thanks for having me. I love the topic. I'm Finally I could talk to somebody about what actually happens with me it sits. It's weird grad together talking about this. I've had stuff like that happened. My entire life with the street Lance as an adult I'm constantly affecting computers, and I walk into places and stuff. Shuts down and people look at me like this happens, and I'm like, it's probably me. Don't worry this happens all the time, and they kinda giggle, but I'm serious when it happens. Do you feel differently? Sorry, Jason feeling different when, when you're having this, electrical impact you feel any differently. I actually I actually feel it coming through me. That's weird. It's like I've, I was joking that was kind of laughing earlier, because when you guys were talking about then of enoug- effects, I don't really produce it. I more or less kind of it kinda drains through me. I guess that's what it feels like at least. At one instance, it kind of confirmed it few years back. We have a local casino. It was kind of funny, that has thousands of electron a gaming machines and my wife and I were sitting there playing, then I felt this sensation, and then the entire casino, literally shut down all the screens went blue. And I looked at my wife and I said, I just did that he's like, yeah, right. And then after about five minutes security, surrounded, my me and my wife and I could here a motor over there little earpieces. Yeah. There were at the machine now stand up. And it was quite quite the to do. So what do you make of that? CJ. Exactly the kind of experience that happened. And you know. A big studied. Yeah. Very, very difficult. Heightened computer break style of the regular bicycle valley. I don't even use it anymore. And it's, it's kind of funny, you say that because it's hard even watching television with my wife because every time I walk into the room, I, I literally, we don't get any reception and even I thought it was just maybe the TV or the end town. But it even happens when we have the DVD player going like shuts everything down. It's, it's I can't I'm always the one like light bulbs, and even even the Halley delight Bob seeing they're supposed to be rated for so many hours. And then they have such a short lifetime in this house. Yeah. One lady, we used to write typewriter. The way she could write to us because I it must be difficult to deal with. It's. Betas. Haffey aside. It just happens coast. Yeah. It's weird it, you know. It's hard to explain. I mean, I guess I, I it's, it's more of a feeling I guess, I mean I know when it's when the feeling comes up like oh, you know something that's going to happen again. And I've had blown ignitions and cars. I know when that's going to happen, and then we I've been stranded. It's just it gets very frustrating. And you know, it's tough going until even like hospitals. I have I have a cousin that, you know, I regret requires me to help them out. And every time to go to the VA you know, we're, we're sitting in the in the office. And if somebody goes to use the computer and like they kind of have this deranged look on their face, like Jesus never happens. This, this, this, you know, there's something wrong with the computer. And I'm like I said, that's all right. I have that kind of affect on what kind of giggle, but I'm serious. Jason if it were not happening outside the home as well. My response might be, you know, have the heavier electrical system in your house checked for, for power surges. And that sort of thing, but, but that doesn't explain why it's happening at the casino in the hospital inning your car. No, no. I've had you know, I've tried to, you know, when I was younger, these things just kind of happen. But as an adult, you know, I, I notice things more often than, you know, trying to put two and two together, I mean, I was I was electric electrocuted a couple of times. And I was a child, and that's interesting. Yeah, I've had some other strange things happen to in my life. There was an instance, a couple couple years ago about two and a half years ago, my wife and I were coming back home, mom for dinner. We're about about a mile from home and driving. Our van and the entire inside of the van lit up like somebody was. Arc welding. Wow. Yeah. And I, I looked around I thought, you know, I'm getting pulled over like the spotlight's on it was, it was even brighter than that. My wife kind of looked at me like what's going on? I'm like, I don't know. Jason amazing to I still haven't been able to really explain that one. Have you heard any other unusual experiences of I mean, you know, just outside of that. But just generally building you consider. Power dole mysterious anyway. Yes. Yes. And yes. Okay. Very well. Yeah. I've, I've tried to look into a lot of other things too. I mean, working blood types lineage, you know, all all sorts of things, but, you know, trying to find answers and trying to find people to talk to you. That little take serious another thing. Jason CJ wondered about paranormal experiences. In addition, have you had shared? Yes. Yes, I have I've had I've had being up at the side of my bed. I've had been I don't know if you would call paralyzed in the middle of the night. I know people want to brush it off as sleep apnea, but they're yell sleep paralysis, but it's but it's not that. Connection suspected, there's a connection here CJ that all of these things somehow related. Entirely by the, the o- personality shows down in North Carolina. A website. Easy to access. But if he was get hold of potable about your experience that pretty good, guys. Actually, I've been calling them. See, that's Greg over. I'm sure they would take you seriously. But to help you and you know, people really nice. But if you want to, so you're very, very welcome. It if there's anyway, I just wish there was something we could do to help, but it stays all we can do with what you say and try. Say you'll about this. People really good. You're sharing the experience. And again, C J. How would Jason contact you at a sap? He just too well by Esa, he could just write city if they say should five six phenomena England that would probably get the address on the website at WWW A. S eight pay don't UK, Bobby. Yeah. Well, well past the case with this. Thank you. Thank you for that Jason. He certainly ticked all the boxes to me. Let's see. Let's say hi to on the wildcard line. We have James in Kansas City. James, welcome. Richard how you doing terrific? Thank you. I, I cannot wear watch LCD watches break on my wrist. Battery-powered analog, watches drying. I haven't won watch and thirty years. I'm fifty one now and I have a medical condition that nobody can explain. And it's documented in my medical file. I have they call it a heart mom, but they don't they can't explain why my heart will, and this happened in front of Reebok. There's in hospital under observation because I've complaining about my dot having chest pains, and I was I've been in there for today's laying in bed, and there was a knows in my room and my heart went into started fluttering. I think the call it relation. Yeah. And then after about thirty seconds of it's my flat line. And then see right out in the hallway screen that, that is going into cardiac arrest came down the hallway with the crash card and pads jump starts with and the doctors those rain in there, and they, they, they were going to try and shocking. Bring my heart back, and I told the guy with the paddle that if you touch me while I'm awake. I'm gonna get you. So he stopped.

Jason CJ CJ Romer mount Shasta Richard California Reebok James Bob Barbara Lance North Carolina Syracuse dole Kansas City Greg Esa UK New York Bobby
"romer" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:46 min | 2 years ago

"romer" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by. Indeed, are you hiring with? Indeed, you can post job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist. Qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today and indeed dot com slash marketplace. That's indeed dot com slash marketplace. And buy evidence evident provides a simple secure platform that lets businesses confidently know who they're dealing with without the risk and expense of handling sensitive personal data from identity and credential verifications to background checks and everything in between. Businesses of all sizes can get the answers they need easily and securely visit evident ide- dot com slash tech to sign up and start running verifications today. Wanna know how an economist things will get more privacy from big tech taxes from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Ali would. This week. Google showed off lots of new privacy oriented, tools, and products and user agreements at its big developer conference Google. I o apple is marketing privacy Facebook as promising privacy. Eventually federal regulators are still trying to figure out privacy laws and regulations, but Nobel prize winning economist, Paul Romer says company promises and even regulations won't actually change anything because the ad supported business model is what's broken? He argued in the New York Times this week that the US should tax revenue from targeted advertising, we called Paul rumoured to talk more about this idea in quality assurance the segment where we take a deeper look at big tech story. He says companies need to creatively. Evolve their businesses boo ad model was very important it made possible. The emergence of Google and Facebook and supported open source software. So it was very valuable it a crucial point in time. But we've outlived the usefulness of this model we need to move. On what we're stuck in right now is a bad equilibrium. And we got us think creatively about how are we going to get back to the vision? And the optimism that many of us had when we first saw the potential of digital. Well, then tell me more about the creative solutions that they might come up with to change the business model one of the models. That works is a subscription model. People pay to have access to a music service to game supplier of this lots of workable subscription models. If you tax Adra eventually it'll be in the interest of these firms to develop subscription models. The other thing that is if you make that tax on the ad revenue. Progressive what happens is you're gonna end up with a version of the remember the marriage penalty onto p with income get married and their total tax Bill goes up with progressive taxation. We want a marriage penalty in the market because if two firms joined together, we want their total tax Bill to go up because we don't want more big firms would actually. Like to have lots more small ones. So really creative innovative firm that keeps you know, developing new products, it can just off independent firms get the value when it when it's been those off and keep the total tax Bill though by not letting any one of them get too big. There is I wonder what you there is. Also, an argument though, that subscription models are themselves kind of inherently regressive, and that increasingly actually we're finding that access to good information is almost based on your income level. And I wonder what what your responses to that? If this would put information services out of reach. I'm sorry. I just have trouble with this idea that these firms her in jeopardy tens of billion dollars for a relatively small number of people were doing this as a an effective policy for redistribution. Just I just don't think that that argument you passes the left. That's not what I'm arguing. I'm just saying that a lot of information is now stored within these platforms that people may no longer be able to access if they have to pay for it. But but look I mean who who really provided the world's information to everybody on earth Wikipedia. Right. And if you're asking what could we do to make the digital world work for people? You know, the Wikipedia model is great. It's a donation model a subscription model would work a combination of subscriptions and donations on all of those things are possible. This ad model is not helping the users and or they wouldn't be called users. And it's not helping the most vulnerable users. Either is the business model the problem here. Or is it the scale is that the size of these companies always both, but the point of progressive revenue tax is that you create incentives both for breakup, you can allies. The acquisitions and you encourage the development of models where the customers are customers. And they know what they're giving up and they can compare that with the services they get back. I'd rather live in a world where firms don't have these enormous incentives to spy on individuals. So if we had that at advertising model that didn't involve all of this, you know, deep surveillance of individuals. I'd be more comfortable with that. I still think a firm that's collecting revenue on that scale is probably not a healthy thing for a society where we want to have competition and free discourse. And you know, freedom to take unpopular stands Paul Marilyn the Nobel prize in economics in twenty eighteen the union has also been debating at three percent tax on digital ad revenue for big tech companies.

Google Nobel prize Facebook Bill Paul Romer New York Times apple Ali Paul Marilyn Adra US developer Paul billion dollars three percent
Nobel economist Paul Romer says the path to tech privacy may be taxes

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:32 min | 2 years ago

Nobel economist Paul Romer says the path to tech privacy may be taxes

"Week. Google showed off lots of new privacy oriented, tools, and products and user agreements at its big developer conference Google. I o apple is marketing privacy Facebook as promising privacy. Eventually federal regulators are still trying to figure out privacy laws and regulations, but Nobel prize winning economist, Paul Romer says company promises and even regulations won't actually change anything because the ad supported business model is what's broken? He argued in the New York Times this week that the US should tax revenue from targeted advertising, we called Paul rumoured to talk more about this idea in quality assurance the segment where we take a deeper look at big tech story. He says companies need to creatively. Evolve their businesses boo ad model was very important it made possible. The emergence of Google and Facebook and supported open source software. So it was very valuable it a crucial point in time. But we've outlived the usefulness of this model we need to move. On what we're stuck in right now is a bad equilibrium. And we got us think creatively about how are we going to get back to the vision? And the optimism that many of us had when we first saw the potential of digital. Well, then tell me more about the creative solutions that they might come up with to change the business model one of the models. That works is a subscription model. People pay to have access to a music service to game supplier of this lots of workable subscription models. If you tax Adra eventually it'll be in the interest of these firms to develop subscription models. The other thing that is if you make that tax on the ad revenue. Progressive what happens is you're gonna end up with a version of the remember the marriage penalty onto p with income get married and their total tax Bill goes up with progressive taxation. We want a marriage penalty in the market because if two firms joined together, we want their total tax Bill to go up because we don't want more big firms would actually. Like to have lots more small ones. So really creative innovative firm that keeps you know, developing new products, it can just off independent firms get the value when it when it's been those off and keep the total tax Bill though by not letting any one of them get too big. There is I wonder what you there is. Also, an argument though, that subscription models are themselves kind of inherently regressive, and that increasingly actually we're finding that access to good information is almost based on your income level. And I wonder what what your responses to that? If this would put information services out of reach. I'm sorry. I just have trouble with this idea that these firms her in jeopardy tens of billion dollars for a relatively small number of people were doing this as a an effective policy for redistribution. Just I just don't think that that argument you passes the left. That's not what I'm arguing. I'm just saying that a lot of information is now stored within these platforms that people may no longer be able to access if they have to pay for it. But but look I mean who who really provided the world's information to everybody on earth Wikipedia. Right. And if you're asking what could we do to make the digital world work for people? You know, the Wikipedia model is great. It's a donation model a subscription model would work a combination of subscriptions and donations on all of those things are possible. This ad model is not helping the users and or they wouldn't be called users. And it's not helping the most vulnerable users. Either is the business model the problem here. Or is it the scale is that the size of these companies always both, but the point of progressive revenue tax is that you create incentives both for breakup, you can allies. The acquisitions and you encourage the development of models where the customers are customers. And they know what they're giving up and they can compare that with the services they get back. I'd rather live in a world where firms don't have these enormous incentives to spy on individuals. So if we had that at advertising model that didn't involve all of this, you know, deep surveillance of individuals. I'd be more comfortable with that. I still think a firm that's collecting revenue on that scale is probably not a healthy thing for a society where we want to have competition and free discourse. And you know, freedom to take unpopular

Paul Romer Google Bill Facebook Nobel Prize New York Times Apple United States Developer Adra Billion Dollars
"romer" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"romer" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"I mean government is this radical concept is actually supposed to serve the people, you know, rather than the other way around. So there are lots of. Ideas, better ways to do things that come. But it does require. Not tweaking the system you can't go into a jungle with a pair of sheers and make it into a kind of a straight boulevard. Paul Romer, the recent Nobel prize winner is made this point that basically the only way you succeed with failed institutions is you create a new is to to you keep the constitution you keep the goal. She congress you keep congress, but congress by talking about congress, really. Needs to go back. One point committees had much more power. You have twenty people. And those twenty people could get together, and they basically have the authority to decide how something worked or didn't work. Well, that's a manageable number now all the powers in the leadership and the leadership is completely preoccupied with making the other leader, look bad. So nothing happens. Yeah. Come this past February twentieth for the powers author of the book. Try commonsense conversation with Nora Walker who's the president of New York public radio. More of this conversation is available on our website at C hyphen, spin dot org. WCS from Washington coming up next on book, TV and pan radio..

congress Paul Romer Nora Walker Nobel prize New York president Washington
Nobelist Says System of Science Offers Life Lessons

60-Second Science

03:13 min | 2 years ago

Nobelist Says System of Science Offers Life Lessons

"This is Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky the benefits from science as they show up in our daily lives are just enormous, but I want to transfer you that right now science can do something for us. Give us a kind of hope that goes beyond just those benefits Paul Romer. He showed the two thousand eighteen Nobil will Morial prize in economic sciences. Romer spoke April night that the National Academy of sciences in Washington DC at an event honoring tenuous Nobel and Calveley prize laureates. Now, there's nobody who's got benefits as direct and his immediate as Jim Jim Ellison who was also there and who shared the two thousand eighteen Nobel physiology or medicine for his work that led to new drugs against cancer when you can show there are people alive now because of the discovering you've made that just you know, that trumps everything most of us create benefits in an indirect way. And they come. All steps. So they're harder to perceive warmer than cited. William Nord house with whom he shared the two thousand eighteen economics prize Bill has this beautiful paper that measures a particular type of benefit which is asking how much light and luminaires can somebody get from an hour's worth of work. And roughly speaking from say, the beginning of the Neolithic revolution up to say, the time of the founding of the National Academy. That's about twelve thousand five hundred years ago to eighteen sixty three that went up by a factor of twenty people just bump into things they discover things so twenty times more light. But from the time of the founding of the kademi until now it's gone up by factor twenty thousand so one hour of work translates into twenty thousand more luminaires of light than it did. The time this this institution was founded, so those benefits are just huge. And we need the by the way, it's it's the system of science that made those very rapid ones possible. Not just curiosity not just random search. So they're huge benefits. But right now, I think there's more anxiety about how we're going to interact with each other as people than there is about just can we keep having more material of benefits, and here thing science is maybe even more important because it's very unusual community of people draws on people from all backgrounds from all over the world and unites kind of common purpose, and we get things done because we insist on things like truth and honesty, and we can trust each other because of that instead insistence, and we welcome people in to that community. If you're willing to live by those those norms, and we ask you to leave. We don't pay any attention to if you don't live by those norms. And the goal is really one of offering benefits that can be shared by everybody. So if you think about kind of like the hope for humanity scientists model of what we can accomplish. But who we can be and how we can be with each other for scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky.

Paul Romer Steve Mirsky Jim Jim Ellison National Academy Of Sciences National Academy Washington Calveley William Nord Sixty Seconds Twelve Thousand Five Hundred Y One Hour
"romer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:23 min | 2 years ago

"romer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Joshua Johnson. It's the Friday news roundup with political journalist Todd's willik reporters, Shane Harris of the Washington Post and lily Jamali of California report before we move on from the weather and the climate lily. There was one more thing you wanted to jump. Yeah. I just wanted to to mention Paul Romer. The other guy who won the Nobel prize in economics this week talking about carbon taxes being the solution to to this crisis. At least in part. I think it's important to recognize that sounds punitive. But I think there is a positive message that he's trying to put out there. And that is if you commit to a tax on carbon not only are you dealing with this issue head on. But you're also in his view. Opening up the opportunity for people to make money investors to to make money off of this. Because when money's at stake, you're always gonna find alternatives people will naturally gravitate, and the economic argument is often on carbon tax that it's bad for business. California's the fifth largest economy in the world and Jerry Brown just signed an executive order committing the state to carbon neutrality by twenty forty five which I'm sure sounds crazy to people outside of the state, but that's actually very close to one of the policy prescriptions. The I the IPC set forth, it's kind of crazy until you do it, really. And California's very serious about doing. It is very serious about doing it. You know, Paul Romer talks about the problem isn't going to be solved until you build consensus and political will is really at the heart of that. There's there's really a huge divide in terms of political will not just here. But also, you know, I just moved here from Canada. Same thing there. You have prime minister Justin Trudeau. China impose a carbon tax across the country, and he's running into real opposition at the provincial level there before we move on. Let me get to one more comment. A few more comments on this. Not my economy tweeted, why are we still talking about the credibility of science when it comes to climate change? Good point, not my economy. I don't know if you listen to this program, but we are not questioning the credibility. That's kind of a done deal on this program. But I hear what you're saying. Larry tweeted, it's frustrating to hear criticism of citizens in some of the poorest parts of Florida for not upgrading their homes ability to withstand hurricanes, they may live where other people vacation, but they're mostly stuck. This storm will expose that. Contrast, Shane Harris. I wonder if you could respond to Larry on one hand, I disagree with him as a Floridian like the state of Florida has programs to help you hard in your home. And if you want to live in Florida that is a basil risk of living within yards of a rising coastline. If you wanna live there. You just have to absorb that on the other hand. I totally hear what he's coming from Mexico beach where the hurricane Michael made landfall had to be moved back from the coastline for safety sake. The town could unincorporated it's it's it's a tough one nowadays, really tough. And when we're thinking about climate change in sort of thirty to forty year are Todd and I were just talking about this during the break. There are existential risks that are posed not just to communities close to the coastline the one. We're talking about today, but large cities like Miami in Florida and other places that really in the long term are going to have to make serious profound. Choices about survivability about resilience whether people want to continue living there, and there is an element of risk that you take that also has to give people some agency. And what I think is missing from the conversation about climate change is a real honest discussion about long term risk, and what the responsibility is for people living in these places and their elected leaders both at the logo. And the national level. We are not having that conversation and Joshua Jimmy one small point just to end if you think that that risk and getting your heads around the risk for lower income or poor people here in America is something we need to think about Americans also need to think about what some of our international leaders generals. Like, Colin Powell advisors had been saying for years, if you think it's a risk in this country. Imagine what storms increased drought and conflict means for millions and millions of poor people around the world when they start to migrate when they upset the relationships between countries, and that becomes not just their problem. Terms of life and death. But America's problem in terms of keeping the world in order. We'll listen for those of you who are in an had been in the path of hurricane Michael. We wish you, of course, a speedy recovery. And we'd love to hear from you as you continue to deal with the recovery. Give us a sense of how you're doing. How the recovery is going. What your thoughts are? And how things are going how well fee. Is meeting your needs. State officials how well that's going. We always love to hear from you feel free to Email us one a ads WAM dot org. You can always leave us a voicemail at eight five five two three six one one. A we know connectivity is probably bad where you are. So be careful moving around if you have to find a cell signal, please stay safe do not put your health at risk for the sake of sending us a voicemail. But if you're able we'd love to know how you're doing eight five five two three six one a one a let's move onto the White House where another major official is leaving the administration. Nikki Haley, the US ambassador to the United Nations announced her resignation on Tuesday. A lot of people.

Paul Romer California Shane Harris Florida hurricane Michael Todd America Joshua Johnson Nobel prize Larry Washington Post lily Jamali Justin Trudeau Nikki Haley Canada Colin Powell Miami Jerry Brown
Nobel Prize, Paul Romer and Florida discussed on Bloomberg Best

Bloomberg Best

00:15 sec | 2 years ago

Nobel Prize, Paul Romer and Florida discussed on Bloomberg Best

"In Florida the Nobel prize in economics has been awarded to one American who has studied the economics of climate change and to another whose research on. Ecological innovation raised hopes that human beings are creative enough to do something about it. The one million dollar prize went to Paul Romer of

Nobel Prize Paul Romer Florida One Million Dollar
"romer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"romer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"While there does appear to be a reprieve for embattled deputy attorney general rod Rosenstein before flying to Florida together today. President Trump said this morning he had no plans to fire Rosenstein, traveling abroad. I didn't know rod before. I've got all get along. Very well. Aides say the two men spoke for about thirty minutes on the plane Rosenstein future appeared in doubt. After the New York Times reported last month that he had raised the possibility of secretly recording Trump and trying to build support to invoke a constitutional provision that allows the cabinet to remove the president to Americans have won the Nobel prize in economics for their work showing how climate change affects economies Yale's, William Nordhausen, NYU Stearns, Paul Romer were given the news today by the Swedish Royal Academy of sciences Romer said he was not expecting the prize. Two phone calls this morning, and I didn't answer either one because I thought it was some spam. Call the focus of this year surprise comes as the UN issued a dire warning on the urgent need to address climate change. US interior secretary. Ryan Zinke has approved a twenty year ban on new mining claims in the mountains north of Yellowstone National Park. This after two proposed gold mines raise concerns that the area could be spoilt Zinke signed the mineral band today. Michael has become a hurricane as the storm gets ready to move into the Gulf of Mexico. Forecasters at the National Hurricane Center saying Michael well move over very warm waters and could strengthen into a major hurricane by the time. It makes landfall in the Florida panhandle sometime mid week global news twenty four hours a day on air.

rod Rosenstein President Trump Paul Romer National Hurricane Center Florida Nobel prize Ryan Zinke deputy attorney general Michael Swedish Royal Academy of scien NYU Stearns New York Times Yellowstone National Park UN William Nordhausen president Mexico secretary Yale
"romer" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"romer" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"News won a two communists being honored today. With the announcement of the Nobel prize for economics has written about the effects of technology on the economy. And why us Paul Romer admits he missed the first calls from the Nobel committee this morning because he thought it was spam. And yes, Paul Romer is that Romer Colorado Romer family. He's the Senate. Former governor ROY Romer Broncos coach Vance Joseph is not mincing words about who's to blame for the thirty four to sixteen loss to the New York. Jets defense our defense half the half to be ours. Our savior on Sundays right now. We hadn't done that in the last two weeks. Now, we've given up major major yards, and it's it starts with coaching. And we've got to play better coach said that there will be changes KOA's voice of the Broncos. Dave, logan. Joined us earlier. I think the NFL is is not very forgiving when it comes to games like the Broncos played yesterday. So it was it was an embarrassment the way they played, and they somebody has to figure out what they're going to do about it. Alabama's have now. Lost three straight games. This sunday. The Broncos host the Rams what does get any easier. That's at Bronco stadium at bil-. High. Our coverage at eight o'clock kick-off is at two and let's give a tip of the hat to undefeated CU you footballer five and the bus beat Arizona state on Saturday twenty eight twenty one and they're now ranked nineteenth in the nation. And the people see as she Rams went by the way as well. It's just a shame. Colorado Rockies season has come to an Coors field. The brewers won the game three one game three. I should say six zip Rockies pitcher Scott over it says the brew crew they just put it.

Paul Romer Broncos Romer Colorado Romer ROY Romer Nobel prize Jets Nobel committee Bronco stadium Rockies Rams logan brewers Vance Joseph Coors NFL Colorado New York Arizona Alabama Dave
2 Americans win Nobel for working climate, tech into economic analysis

WBZ Morning News

00:21 sec | 2 years ago

2 Americans win Nobel for working climate, tech into economic analysis

"The Nobel economics prize has been awarded to to academics with ties to MIT Yale. Professor William Nord house and NYU's Paul Romer work knowledge for their respective work at integrating climate change and tech innovations into macroeconomic analysis. Both of them did their graduate work at MIT secretary. General Gordon Hanson of the Royal

Professor William Nord General Gordon Hanson Paul Romer MIT NYU Secretary
"romer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"romer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm David green. And I'm Noel king. Good morning this morning. The winners of the Nobel prize in economics were announced the price will be split by two economists. William Nord house and Paul Romer Nick fountain from our planet money podcast is with me now. Good morning, Nick happy Eka Nobel day before we get to the winners. We should clarify something or I know we will get e mails from communists. It's not actually the Nobel prize in economics. Right. Yes. I'm going to try to pronounce this right now. It's the spare keys Riksbank prize in economic sciences in memory of Alfred Nobel, and that's for a bunch of political reasons. But also because economics really wants to be known as a science and with this year's pick. They went straight towards science. It's interesting one of the economists. William Nord house is known for talking about the economy and climate together. Right. He's an economist at Yale. And he's been thinking about how the economy interacts with the environment and climate for decades. Now this morning I called up Justin wolford's. He's an economics professor at the university of Michigan. And he explained his work to me the so size is if you leak markets alone, you won't get good outcomes on the environmental side. And the reason is simple every time you fire up your factory, you're thinking about your profits. But at the same time, you'll stink it up by greenhouse gases. And so north houses work is about how we need incentives to push us in the right directions. Like things like cap and trade, for instance, really interesting choice, and how about his co-winner Paul Romer. What is he known for? Right. Quick aside here. Paul Romer works at NYU. He got a couple of calls this morning, but he did not answer them. Phone calls this morning, and I didn't answer either one because I thought it was some spam. Call so I wasn't. I wasn't expecting the prize. Anyways, his work is about growth, and why economies grow? And his question is will they grow forever and just in Welford explained to me that his research says it's ideas that make economies grow holding. So is that the infrastructure creating new ideas is the injured Rubert economic growth, we need to pay attention to patents the number of scientists that are out there incentives to do science, and as long as we can keep generating new ideas, we can generate economic so in both of these choices in Nordhausen Romer, the Nobel committee. This year is saying this work about making governments think about how to make have the right incentives for people to do things that we want them to do to prevent climate change to continue to grow. That stuff is really important nicotine's worth noting the economics Nobel is celebrating its fiftieth year this year, and yet only one woman has ever won the. Price. Right. A lot of people thought that we might have another woman this year. The only woman is Elinor Ostrom Ostrom. She won the Nobel in two thousand nine and fifty years is a long time for only one woman NPR's Nick fountain from our planet money team, Nick, thanks so much. Thanks to L. Support for planet. Money comes from his Cox insurance, offering the Hiscox cyber readiness report to.

Paul Romer Alfred Nobel Nobel prize Elinor Ostrom Ostrom Justin wolford William Nord Nick Nobel committee Noel king Nordhausen Romer Hiscox David green Yale NYU Welford university of Michigan nicotine Rubert
2 Americans win Nobel for working climate, tech into economic analysis

WBZ Morning News

00:30 sec | 2 years ago

2 Americans win Nobel for working climate, tech into economic analysis

"Today to Americans have been awarded the Nobel economics prize. William Nord house of. Jail Paul Romer of NYU or acknowledged for their respective work in integrating climate change and tech innovations into macro economic analysis secretary general Goran Hanson of the Royal Swedish Academy of sciences making the announcement today. This year's price is about innovation climate at economic growth, both will share and a one million

Royal Swedish Academy Of Scien Paul Romer Goran Hanson William Nord NYU
"romer" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

13:49 min | 2 years ago

"romer" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"He's Pat, man. Von Miller coming up in a few moments. Romer simpson. The raiders trading. Khalil Mack is such a great look signed the guy who picks the urinal right next to you. Mike in buffalo, helping them on war cuts his lawn diagonally guy. Roam the raiders are so bad. They're losing on nights that they're not even playing Mack was part of a dominant defense performance for the bears. Every sacked by MAC is taking a year off that ten year contract that grew inside wore the Seahawks finding a uniform to actually fit Janna Caskey's fat ass before next week Dan in Denver. I don't know what it is. But ever since Gruden traded Khalil Mack, Dan and Denver's takes actually gotten better like as emails readable. Now. That's so true. I said last night is there. Anything more bizarre than seeing sea bass in Seahawk gear output, where did they get that gear? It's like that bought it in a store on the way the stadium. There's no way that was actually issued by the team. Right. I mean, nothing but respect for this, dude. Still kicking MCI blasted a fifty six yarder nothing, but respect for this, dude. And he's still goes like two fifty but he looked like he bought that jersey on the word of the yard. There's no way that was Seahawk issued. Rome. The Oakland Raiders catering. Staff would like to announce a new weekly feature item served in the coaches lounge. These delicious crow Sandoz are packed with lean protein and prepared posed bear games specifically for head coach chunky food in Micron Toronto chunky food in. So that's going to go. Every time max shows up and especially on a big stage nationally televised game at absolutely dominates the way. He did. And they win. It's another loss for Gruden. So Dan in Denver, essentially repeated what I said, but even when the raiders don't play they lose. Roam the simple math says hindsight is fifty fifty regards hawk the simple Matt says, that's. That is the simple math. I say fifty fifty. On site is fifty fifty I'm not covering that. Again, Gruden said I'm not getting into that. Again. We made the decision we traded him. We're not gonna keep going over. This hindsight is fifty fifty. A mansion and the showdown for LA. You've got a couple of teams that moved up here. The chargers Rams moved back, of course. And you get the power for LA coming up on Sunday. And then you've got college football in this town. Not a good time right now UCLA Owen three USC one and two couple of back to back embarrassments for not going well on the college level really good on the NFL level after going twenty years about having football here. One eight zero zero six three six eight six eight six we are still efforting von Miller. I am no longer efforting. Von miller. I have found von Miller. He is a Denver Broncos. Linebacker. He is a Super Bowl champ. He's a Super Bowl MVP. He's a three time. First team. All pro six time pro bowler already off to a huge this year for Saks. Couple of forced fumbles the second overall pick in two thousand eleven out of Texas. Am today he appears courtesy of old spice and their new old spice fomer body wash. Which of course, we'll get into von Miller is my guest von good morning. Good to have you back. How are you? Thank you. Bano is good to have you here. Beat the raiders von Sunday. You're not start the year. So start off for me with this. How good is it feel to be on Miller and the Denver Broncos right now. I mean, it's a great to be great to be a part of the Denver Broncos and. Great to start off. The league was so hard to win. Great. So you're involved got a huge game a week one. You had three sacks. You've got a couple of floors fumbles a fumble recovery, knowing you von I know you're going to give a lot of credit to your teammates because that's kind of teammate the you are. But when you're having a game like that. What's it feel like when you're in the middle of it? Do you feel like you're in zone? We simply cannot be blocked you just want to keep going. You just want to keep you know sex. You know, they come and go. So you know, if you if you give them sex especially in a game early. You know, you wanna keep it going you want to get as many as possible Denver Bronco. Von Miller, my guests. So had your team may case keenum on the show recently. And we talked a little bit about the fact that he was not unhappy to see Khalil Mack get traded out of the division. I'm kind of curious from where you're standing or sitting. What was your reaction when you saw that trae go down? Israel those fake news. We're a little bit when they. We didn't we turn the TV and. The verify such media size is real. I I just thought it was crazy. You think you there? They're trying to but definitely for this. Do you think? Tradeable? I mean, that's a really interesting point. For instance, we all know quarterbacks von get paid. We know that we know even non elite quarterbacks are getting paid as Neely defensive player. Do you feel like E Lee defensive players get the respect and the money that they deserve you think? So I think I think everything is fair. I mean, if you look at the house. Guys, and everything we're talking about Miller, Yvonne, you, and I have talked in the past about some of the rule changes that have been brought about with the idea of making the game safer. When you see clay Matthews as an example, get flagged for his head Accra cousins. What's your reaction? What did you think about that? You said before you noticed rule changes in place to. Oh, maybe getting safer for everybody. And especially the quarterbacks game game goes quarterback. Goes you know, about the quarterbacks about a great quarterbacks. Tom brady. Aaron Rodgers to drew Brees. The case keenum is about those guys. They can't go out there. And do what they need to do what it is. So I totally understand it, you know, in in the clay Matthews a situation, it's a tough, call call them. Both. For me. What helps 'cause I just go for the ball? I go for the ball. You know, Tom. Let me tell you. I got I got some of the worst refugee passer calls and this is before the new rule change. So I totally understand what it means to protect the quarterback still caught on both are talking to von Miller. So how do you approach it? I mean is a linebacker who is getting the quarterback on a regular basis? Do you have to change? You personally. Have you changed the way you bring down the quarterback? See you don't risk. Getting a flag football go for the ball one hundred percent of the top, and I tackle shack. And you know, whenever I guess for me, especially when whenever I'm playing like that, you know, it really. It really take some of the, you know, somebody offered quarterbacking onto the ball. Assault is one of the biggest plays in football. So whenever I got the opportunity to try to do we're talking to von Miller Navan watching from the outside. It looks like you're having a lot of fun, for instance, you gave your teammate Shaq Barrett, a joking slop and a post game interview on Sunday. And then shack set at that time that will not go unpunished. And then after that, did you know that he was going to come back to get you. And then what was your reaction when he got you in return? I think a lot of guys. I've never never give me back. So I guess I was due. Would do some revenge. It's all good. It's all good. This is the type of locker we get a lotta guys in there. The culture is great song. You win for Evans when you're winning the chemistry. Looks great though. I mean, what comes first what comes first good chemistry or the winds or do? You only have good chemistry when you win. Come. Are the most important thing in football. You can have a horrible locker room a lien and then make the locker room grace before us. That's not the case, we got a great locker from, you know, the first man on the roster to thirty men in a roster taller coaches and everybody in between this agreement from agreement. We're talking about for a few more moments, and we'll get the old spice for sure von after the season opening win. You were making the point that they're just felt like there was something special about this team. You've been on some really good teams. What what have you seen? The makes you feel that this might be one of those special teams. I've been with this one is different. I think go to young guys that we got here. We we did a great job in the draft picking up young guys young talented guys, and they were able to come in and help us right away from your fellow Lindsey too. Jeff. All these guys that came in to help us. They they've definitely given us a boost over the summer. There was this really cool. Video of you listening to Bruce Smith talk about his philosophy. When it comes to gain of the quarterback washer. Biggest takeaway from your time with him. You know being able to spend time with Bruce. It was great. Summit that we have annually at the big cedar lodge and in Ozark mountains, who it was great. You know, whenever you didn't get pros around, and you can talk, you know, football past present future pros is great, especially when you're talking about pass Russia's, you know, we do a pass rush summit in the Ozark mountains that sounds like a blast actually. It is. Yes. Graceful bass pro shops to call heart to everybody involved was it's a great event that we have annually would. Versus renting week. So you're working with old spice and the new old spice former body wash. But it's more than just talking about a body wash. You've got something much bigger cooking with the foam zone. Obstacle. Course. Von what exactly is that all about? The foam zone. Obstacle. Course. It's a football themed. Obstacle course game show covered in foam, mice foaming. And I'm the new oh spice fomer product almost answering lathering body wash is great in the shower. My favorite thing is feeding in back to the phones. Don't you can catch it today on the on the on the old spice media social media pages you too as well from five pm to eleven pm eastern. Let's check that out on their platform. I like that good. 'cause it one last thing a few months west I received the president's award from the American Optum metric association for the work you've done with your Vons vision program where the word mean to you, and why is that session important 'cause to you. It's a great war. You know, when we started off, I wasn't expecting rewards. We started vision was just trying to help you know, one or two kids. Get glasses contracts, free, Lexus surgery, and and our exams and do some of the stuff that we've done with us vision. It's been great. It's been a true blessing and receiver wars like that just shows you the type of team have around municipal has been attributed you Super Bowl champs suppo MVP. And today he appeared courtesy of old spice and their new old spice fomer body washed. My guess von Miller von great to have you back. Have ruined is Dave Andrei talking to you. Thank you. Appreciate you to von take care. Met still an absolute star. Four sacks to force fumbles already this season. And they beat the raiders on Sunday the two now. Oh, and they're out quickly. We set this thing up like this for the rest of the way. So that's your first interview. We have two more interviews, but they do not start until hour number three meaning between now. And then lots to get to what I want to go to next is Josh Gordon, Josh Gordon, predictably ends up with patriots. To me that was no brainer. We knew that was going to happen. I don't know what's going to happen. Now that he's there. I knew he'd end up there. But I don't know exactly. What's going to happen? Now that he is there. I want to get into it. Meantime Antonio Brown. Reportedly did not come to work yesterday. So I'm not going to overreact. I'm not going to get all hot take with it. You know, when you look at the Steelers, and the fact that they're supposed to be a Super Bowl contender. And they're winless. That's not a good thing. It's not a good thing. The he may be unhappy. And that he may not be showing for work, but I'm not gonna overreact to it. However, there was that cryptic trade me tweet. And now he may not be at work. Rome. I can't even believe helped bad Gruden is handling this max situation. Steam is in shambles. Please keep talking about him signed Mike Tomlin Matt in Poland springs. They are winless. They are winless. But at least they have a tie the raiders are own to Gruden is on for Sam shields. Top of hour number three. Devan God Chow talking dolphins football today. They're out to know. Which brings me back to RPO app. Two Trevor Pryce I got into who's fake and whose real of the two teams you wanna listen for the episode was dropped yesterday. Time now for bottom of the hour. Sports update. Here's the latest during the bottom of the hour for our one Andrew bogusch has this one..

Von Miller raiders football Gruden Khalil Mack Denver Denver Broncos Mike Tomlin Oakland Raiders Dan Rome LA MVP Romer simpson Seahawk Pat MCI Texas Micron Toronto
"romer" Discussed on PC Perspective Podcast

PC Perspective Podcast

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"romer" Discussed on PC Perspective Podcast

"Are but so it'll be interesting to see what the effect of of having the speakers to the side where the light is going to be off to the edges and you'll have sort of a dead zone sort of right in the middle your monitor so it'll be interesting to see you know how how that compares to to display mounted lighting for for that bias bicy fat that's in a strip that's the thing yeah i don't know that's a good question but if someone might have to test that yes i'm i'll take a look into it as soon as i get to that part of the testing from what i've seen though the lighting effects seem pretty cool in a just kind of going through the audio section because they just they by default they they beat to the to the music it's an audio visualize our effects and they seem pretty accurate pretty pretty good timing on that so that'll be because so be sure to check pc dot com in the next few days for our review of those and i believe we also have this keyboard in although i'm not sure who's on on deck to review this this is the g five thirteen mechanical gaming keyboard it's got the romer switches and it also has that light sink so this is just like every other company logitech has the their rgb stuff going through their their gaming app or there were they call the lodge gaming software program so with a logitech keyboard your logitech speakers logitech headset watch tech mouse you can get all your rgb all sinked up and blind your your neighbors and your roommates and also i've been told this this is shore's better performance during games it's it's like adding stripes to your car it makes it faster this makes you better so the speakers the g five sixty are going to be two ninety nine one ninety nine two hundred dollars and they'll be soon they're available for preorder right now unless sticks website and the g five fifteen chief five thirteen keyboard will be one fifty when that launches next month.

romer logitech two ninety nine one ninety nin
"romer" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"romer" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"Pushing gossip and romer and all the rest gossiping room on all the rest but you're going to charge the prime minister with favoring one newspaper over another supporting one newspaper and denouncing another that's a bribe in the countries at a bribe it is ludicrous you know by now you've really gotta peel the onion to see what's going on before you buy with the media say i don't care if it's in america or in israel a left wing media media these are goons what they know they are they won't admit they know they are just as the media in this country and the democrats were involved in a sign with kuwait against our president and you know they're while they are there'd every single day and then when you call it on other waas what do you mean what are you not occur tomorrow and then hey 25th amendment hey impeachment hayes deranged hayes mentally ill hayes obstreqted justice has come under what the russians hey you're trying to coup d'etat while he had not parts were not same thing goes on in israel he smoke cigars really and who billionaire millionaire gave him cigars he had wine he had some he did want oh my lord we've never seen anything like this he favorite one newspaper that favorite him against one newspaper the didn't him oh my lord that's up i too must be because our police say so when a grotesque miscarriage of justice i'll be right back.

prime minister america kuwait president hayes israel romer
"romer" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

The Dan Patrick Show

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"romer" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

"Haiti beat her to go on good good good hey listen i know romer noor with korea and get engaged in every thin and also know that there is a discreet rendezvous clash inner tonight with an unbeaten again and i'm just one of our you called registered anywhere life yawned or pottery barn i really really get you something night thank you know you are and of course end up back roku suck it all right and stay any danny calling from thailand thoughtful we have included the rest of the dinitz for tonight's dinner it's not just seat and myself you guys are always invited it just somehow it ends up for the table for too but not tonight fritz he's even coming out about that but i can retire yeah recently said that a third third wheel that kind of ruin their romantic just a couple of nights ago but you did not bring was gonna just be the too yeah i don't know it just we have a a pattern a rhythm down with our conversation more impressive streak ending the astros and the world series are todd coming at the dinner the valid question jeff in portland joins hi jeff whitty have for me hey good morning damage year career highlight heat want any five and i thank you i totally agree with you that that was mistake night on the proposal i think it reminded me of the boise state fear a bullet through thousand seven when they beat oklahoma and the kid for close to two cheerleader that was an epic fail and i guarantee they are not together no no there they're still there together oh well that that then i'm wrong but building got the pardon beating dole unless you want to start a family okay i'm done thank you jeff yeah they have a child to.

Haiti romer noor korea astros world series portland oklahoma danny thailand todd jeff whitty boise dole
"romer" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:28 min | 4 years ago

"romer" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Click on the asked ray button and had over to more questions combination fat tales not belgodere dongo i know what you fellas in the back romer make any it it it it is an interesting phenomenon if he will in investing lemay get a chance to talk about that a c balladur will be joining us i want to ask him about what happens when you lie on your mortgage application i've got a couple of examples of things yes should not wanna do because if you do them you could end up where not just losing the loan not getting a peru you could end up in jail yeah and i've got a couple of examples one in the news recently on a four oral one k plan as a woman was posing rosie's out our brother pose as hearse pals vigor about that so we're gonna talk about that in a little bit and as i said steve will be joining us all these mortgage akram's we started that a couple of weeks ago the few i i want to get back to our with steve but i started today with this question i get it all the time and we may as well get it out of our says the when will the bull market and wave worst shooting on what nine years now when you can end maybe i can tell you maybe i can't setback both relax away her over and helping you better money moves okay so ann cates smith wrote about this rose on cnbc i guess i and i i really found it fascinating and interesting because as i mentioned it's one of the questions i get almost on a daily bump into somebody the grocery store and we started chatting about the house the kid as the baseball team little league whatever and they in variable say i what will you know we've we've done pretty good 401 k is looking great plans it can end when's the market going to crash as if i know seriously so she wrote about this as the secondlongest bull market in history makes its way into its ninth year many investors are understandably asking when will it.

romer peru rosie steve akram ann cates smith cnbc the house nine years 401 k one k
"romer" Discussed on Two Man Weave

Two Man Weave

01:31 min | 4 years ago

"romer" Discussed on Two Man Weave

"I just you know i like what i'm seeing from the golden state warriors and you know we we we see it as defensive lapses on the on the cleveland cavaliers side but i see it as they just don't have the personnel decade guard these guys like the i mean what are you do like lebron james usually the romer now you've got to wash at their position cabinet read is going on here he's clearing out lanes in more directly adam on one wanted taken a natural personally stefka is looking at curry light you remember me like last year when i can introduce you to help now now about the you know now about to put you in the blender all here and show you this handle in now clay is messed around this star seeking shot so now you know they're putting on a demonstration they have fun it unless not us steve kerr back out the right so now they fed off their more metal which we touchstone in their display great basketball right now you've got to head off to the golden state warriors kmart when i asked you a couple of days ago about you know everybody had their predictions at thoughts and and and one of the things that i remember you said before the series started everybody's saying this is going to happen that's can happen but you said as far as the cleveland lineups the trysted thompson is going to get less minutes because the match up didn't make sense so i have two questions i would like you to explain where is tristan thompson and do you think.

lebron romer adam basketball cleveland tristan thompson cleveland cavaliers steve kerr