35 Burst results for "Roman Empire"

"roman empire" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

09:32 min | Last month

"roman empire" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"Diocletian took over in two eighty, four ad Diocletian pretty quickly realized that there is too much strengthen the empire for all of it to be in control. Sorry. In control of one person and that things do you stabilize too much when that one person was inevitably murdered. So he brought in three Co emperors giving each wanted them control of one corner the empire. So they can focus on putting out fires as they came up in their individual regions. Constantine is also well known for being a major persecutor of Christians. After about twenty years in three zero, five Diocletian retired making him the first Roman emperor to not die in office. Three Hundred Years. Wait a second. This week we're we are now like a hundred, three, hundred, thirty ish years into it and they have all died at. Really. High mortality rate. WanNa be an emperor. You're just bound to get murdered in a terrible way. I mean I. Guess You're right. She reluctantly issue got to die of natural causes not that was your retirement package your gold as Harris Shirt. And natural death. So, he moved to a palace he had built in Split in modern Croatia where he would grow cabbages and watch everything he had built go to hell in a handbasket before dying possibly by suicide in three eleven. Oh my God at least he got. Though I mean, that's all. We hadn't Croatia you know. cabbages and potatoes. That's true. That's true. Retirement possibly, not the greatest idea. The tetrarchy Diocletian. Had built fell apart after he retired basically as soon as he left the three emperors and their sons that were left went. So now we fight to the death to see who gets control all this ship ourselves, right? Yeah. Cool. The guy who came out of this unscathed was Constantine who had famously turned the Roman Empire Christian which must have just been seriously great for the seriously seriously anti-christian Diocletian the here in his retirement. Anyway. was famous for having God come to a minute dream and tell him. He would win the battle of the million bridge this bridge outside of Rome where Constantine Bell not some Gothic hoards Sasanid invaders as you might imagine but it was actually against the son of one of Diocletian Co emperors just straight up civil war. Constantine was also known for building and Imperial Palace in the city of by Zante him and renaming it after himself and the name Constantinople would stick for about a thousand years before it was changed to Istanbul. The new palaces establishment also shows that over time the city of Rome itself was becoming less and less important than the Roman. Empire I'M NOT GONNA explore the topic to deeply here because if I went into the little workings of the Empire's here for days but as time went on the major cities, power began to drop and the Senate's power and influence went along with it. In three thirteen constantine developed the edict of Milan, which made the persecution of Christianity and any other religion in the empire illegal. It also returned to the church, its confiscated property. Constantine was baptized just before his death in three thirty seven. He put off his baptism for as long as possible because at the time it was considered that your sins only began accumulating when you were baptized. So that way he could sit in as much as you wanted by being. Said essentially on his deathbed he couldn't really do all that much sitting before a death therefore practically guaranteeing entry into heaven loophole. Yeah loopholes yeah. That's a big one. No word on whether or not that worked out for. So Anyway Constantine left the empire, his sons, splitting it into three parts and they in an absolutely shocking turn of events immediately started fighting one. This cycle would continue for the next half century and the last emperor to fully control of the Roman Empire as a single entity would be Theodosius who died in three, ninety five. By four hundred, the Roman empire was permanently divided between East and West in four prefectures. Ultimately. This was because the empires finances were no longer great. Thanks to years of mismanagement a few and thanks to a few unfortunate plagues. The population had dropped enough that one man simply could no longer raise the armies that were required to guard the whole empire but makes sense. So you heard it here folks pandemics literally led to the downfall of the Roman Empire. So where your masks where your mask everybody wash your Sh. Germanic. Tribes, the vandals, visigoths mainly, we're constantly doing their part in attacking the empire and Rome was just getting worse and worse and worse at defending from them. In Fort. Ten alaric King of the visigoths actually managed to make it to Rome and sack the city. It was the first time. This had happened in eight hundred years and t moralize and already very demoralized populations. Attila the Hun also did some pretty good damage to the empire mainly through demanding a ton of money so that he would actually attack them and because they couldn't handle the hands attacking they just paid him all the money. So they also had no money at all still the as also as the Hon spilled into Europe, a number of barbarians mainly the third by the SAR mations and the goths spilled into the Roman. Empire as they tried to attempt to run from the attacking huns but rather than embracing these so-called barbarians and using them to increase the army and tax space, the Roman Empire did their best to alienate them so that they never developed or loyalty to Rome and so after the Huns collapsed, they left a power vacuum and the goths stepped in taking the opportunity to attack and Rome had nobody to call for to help them. Certain four seventy six ad the emperor. Romulus. was deposed by barbarian general named Oto. Asir and this is considered to be the end of the western Roman Empire and where ending our story today, the Eastern Empire would continue under the name, the Byzantine Empire, and the Holy Roman empire was just its own separate thing, a collection of unified groups and mainly modern Germany and Italy from eight hundred, eighteen o six. Basically it shows how strongly the men in power in Europe still looked at the Roman. Empire 'cause they went. Cool I want us to pretend to be that again and took the name the made it a Wiebe more Christian. Some scholars consider the Byzantine Empire to simply be a continuation of the Roman empire and Merck the end of it as being fourteen, fifty, three year the Byzantine Empire fell to the Ottomans but four, seventy, six C E is the generally accepted year of of the fall. The Goths did. They did the goths did it but also the Romans were. Now. Let's be honest you. My Gosh. That was amazing. I felt like I took a real journey through time and space. Names to Oh. They're great. They're great. I'M GONNA name my kid that Germanic kissed your Mana Kiss Kiss. Kalibbala. Don't have any kids named. Niro out there either. No although. It's only four letters and I could definitely see a Pittsford mom calling their kid Niro. I'm just saying. You know what I'm saying. Hannah. Thanks. So, much basing that was so cute Hubbard. It was my pleasure I. Literal centuries as amazing. So. I hear that you have a quiz for us. I do have a quiz for you. So my quiz is called Vini Vidi beach e a quiz online people with the initials D. N.. Vichy France. Take it away. So now, technically, in ancient Rome, those words would have been pronounced when he weedy week she as the view is pronounced the way we say w but that sounds ridiculous and I refused to do it for you had no idea. I. Didn't know that either that's interesting. Also if I did it that way, it was going to be a quiz on small things and plans that I didn't have anything for wheat she. Anyway. Here's your quiz. Question One. This nineteen ninety three graduate from juilliard was the first African American woman to win the triple crown of acting a competitive academy, Award Tony and Emmy, and acting category while her Tony came from her role in the play fences and she later won the Oscar for best supporting actress for the same role. In the movie adaptation, you may know her better as the lawyer annelies Keating who is this V d? Question to..

Roman Empire Constantine Bell Rome Diocletian Croatia Co Europe Diocletian Co Vini Vidi Milan Attila Harris Shirt annelies Keating juilliard Senate Istanbul Award Tony
"roman empire" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

06:37 min | Last month

"roman empire" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"So I struggle over what pronouns to use Fella goblets. Given evidence from Cassius Dio who says that when at court and conducting business Alibaba's presented as a man. But when in private, they were much more feminine on top of the fact that there is no real way to know. alibaba's was truly chance gendered or if a histories are just tropes that they took really far out, they hated him. Yeah. I've chosen to go with a singular day but there is a very, very good chance that Alibaba's was like one of the earliest transgender figures in history that's interesting I had no, I never heard of them. Yeah well, they were declared emperor as a fourteen year old child and let's be honest. No one should put a fourteen year old in charge of the empire. Already this out meet. I feel like it literally. No. Better. When I was fourteen I couldn't keep my Tamagotchi alive you know. I could barely. On an analogue clock. Yeah, it's too much who knows unfortunately because of their flaunting of traditional gender roles and many Roman customs, well as their open following of Syrian gods rather than Roman ones Ella goblins was hated by nearly everyone in omb and assassinated at. Eighteen. So That asks. From to thirty five to two, eighty, five, there were twenty emperors and most died violent deaths like that. So many select. You WanNa. BE IN THE PRAETORIAN guard. Yeah. That's where you want to get your head on your shoulders, right? Yeah. Exactly. How. This period is known as the crisis of the third century, and honestly it's a freaking miracle of the Roman. Empire comes out of this alive. During this time the goths and the alumini again, invading along both the Rhine and the Danube and room also faced constant threats from this Asana Empire in the East who are the successors to the Perkins. The year two, thirty, eight would become known. Wait for it the year of the six. Yeah, things are getting better. So of these twenty emperors, let's go over some of the more interesting stories share Valerian was captured by this Sasanid emperor empire who kept him as a prisoner of war thrilled with themselves that they actually managed to capture at the emperor and they paraded him around in court when Valerian died the following year this is sonnets had his body stuffed survey could keep him around. You know as you do with your coolest prisoners totally normal also kind of picturing them look like. Like a net leg bitty walked across in the woods like bugs bunny trapped. Swinging. Yeah Weekend at Bernie's him. The guys from the Roman Republic or Have you. No shame. You should have killed yourself rather than letting yourself be captured. A big thing that they actually managed to capture of Roman emperors like it was a big thing and I, guess they decided a year wasn't enough time to like get the full value out of it. So they stuffed instead. Philip the Arab is a notable emperor because he was actually prefect of the Praetorian guard or their leader. A, while no one knows exactly how his predecessor died I mean you probably don't have to think about it that hard figure out what the most likely story is at this point. So he was the first pretorious guard prefect who became emperor it surprising took that long honestly. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Agreed Carris another short lived emperor was likely murdered while on campaign by his generals. But when they told his army what had happened, they told the army that he was struck by lightning and like see Jupiter obviously hated him think. He had to die clearly like, yeah it's probably not true that carries died by a lightning strike, but it's a funny story. However from two, seventy, two, seventy, five or Ralian ruled, and he was probably the only actually good emperor in this fifty year period he basically single handedly took control of all of the issues that Rome faced over. There was five years he expelled the invaders that made it into northern Italy. He defeated the goths in the bulk and south of the Danube and decided to abandon Dacia deciding it was too hard to defend conquered the poll. MIRENA empire. So it's time for another slide note. The Palmer Marina Empire was named for its capital Palmira, which is basically in the middle of the Syrian dealer now, and while it was not there anymore and ruled by Queens and obea mostly through her young son, it stretched from the eastern half of Turkey down the Mediterranean coast of the Middle East and through to modern Egypt the empire only lasted about a year but xenophobia was a pretty cool bad us in her own, right. Nice. Nice. She was pretty awesome. So once the palm Irene Empire was defeated a Raliess turned his attention to the other end and defeated the gallic. Empire. Anyway this good rain by good ruler was cut short when one of his administrators told a lie about a minor issue. A rally and was known to be super strict. So worried about his punishment, the administrator created a false document showing that Ereli. And was going to execute a number of his top people and showed that document to the top people in question including a whole bunch of the Praetorian guard who obviously immediately murdered him chase. There's also evidence that Raelians wife. Old. Pena Severino ruled the empire in her own right for a while after his death before attack intas was elected his replacement although she was never declared emperor. So after his death things back to being not straight. Years Until Diocletian took over in two eighty, four ad Diocletian pretty quickly realized that there is too much strengthen the empire for all of it to be in control. Sorry. In control of one person and that things do you stabilize too much when that one person was inevitably murdered. So he brought in three Co emperors giving each.

Alibaba Danube administrator palm Irene Empire Valerian Palmer Marina Empire army Cassius Dio Diocletian Pena Severino Ella Raelians MIRENA Italy Carris Bernie Co intas Philip Rome
"roman empire" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

04:14 min | Last month

"roman empire" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"This is wonderful because we've actually had some requests Yes for this this topic and neither of us have been able to bring ourselves. . Haven't been have mustered up enough courage. . I can I can do the pronunciations justice. . Oh, , see now that's bullshit. . Tell. . You land. . Will probably bad. . So don't worry. . Yeah that didn't Stop Hannah. . As I have never done a Roman episode either I don't know why I'm up here on my high horse but anyway. . Thank you for this I'm so excited. . Please Hannah we get away. . All right well, , the Roman empire was the Post Republican period of ancient Rome the generally accepted dates of the Roman Empire from twenty seven BC to four, , seventy, , six, , eighty although I'll talk about some of the differing opinions about the exact dates. . Later, , I WANNA start off by laying some of the groundwork of how room operated before we get into the Roman Empire itself. . This city and Kingdom of Rome was mythological founded around seven hundred and fifty BC with seven fifty three BC being the most commonly accepted date. . It was founded by Romulus the city's namesake and his brother Ramos who are nursed by she will after being abandoned on the banks of the river. . Tiber. . ROMULUS ended up killing his brother during a dispute over which the seven hills to build the new city on and became the first. . King of Rome who? ? Start. . Yeah, , just you know as you do murder brother side, , you want to build your city on late normal things normal Italian things I would say. . Yeah. . That's. . That's true. . So. . The Roman Kingdom was the earliest period in Roman history when seven kings ruled before it became a republic. . So in five Oh nine BC, , the monarchy was overthrown and the Roman Republic was established the majority of the former king's functions were passed onto two men named consuls who are elected to term of one year and could be prosecuted after council ships ended if abuse those powers Ooh I like that. . Yeah. . That's a little. . GonNa Balance. Right . there. . Yeah exactly and under the Republic Room also began the practice of assigning dictators basically, , if things got. . So Harry that they're like now we can't risk multiple dudes working to solve this problem. . Just let one guy decide everything. So . elegant stunned, , they could choose a person to be a dictator for six months for six months. . That's Max dictator I think you know yeah, I , like. . It was their choice and also if whatever the dictator was chosen to carry out, , usually it was war like somebody or something I if that finished earlier than the six months period, , the dictator was actually expected to them be like, , okay, , that's it. . I'm done and dislike resigned their dictatorship. . Okay, , that's also something that the Italians are really good about is giving power. . and. . They were actually fairly common until the end of the second punic war, , which is the one with Hannibal and the elephants and actually did work pretty well late the Roman republic was basically constantly at war during this time since it went from essentially being a city sitting on a bunch of hills to being invaded by gulls then they took over the entire Italian peninsula and they defeated Carthage over the course of the three punic worse than they conquered all of modern bakeries and finally they had three different slave revolts with the last one being the one with Spartacus said everyone who's about and. . So obviously that much war and that much rapid expansion meant there is like unrest in the air and it opened the door to a lot of military leaders to make their mark in the world, , which is where we're gonNA start our main story about the empire. . Julius. . Caesar was never an emperor of Rome and died under the Roman Republic and not the Roman Empire that you cannot start talking about the Roman Empire without first talking about my boy JC.

Hannah Roman Empire Rome Hannah twenties lauren murder Hannah McIntyre Amazon Juliet Sh- Martinson Sh- MARTENSSON Samantha Silver Tober Caesar Hannibal Kingdom of Rome Canada Canada Julia
The Roman Empire (with Hannah McIntyre)

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

04:14 min | Last month

The Roman Empire (with Hannah McIntyre)

"This is wonderful because we've actually had some requests Yes for this this topic and neither of us have been able to bring ourselves. Haven't been have mustered up enough courage. I can I can do the pronunciations justice. Oh, see now that's bullshit. Tell. You land. Will probably bad. So don't worry. Yeah that didn't Stop Hannah. As I have never done a Roman episode either I don't know why I'm up here on my high horse but anyway. Thank you for this I'm so excited. Please Hannah we get away. All right well, the Roman empire was the Post Republican period of ancient Rome the generally accepted dates of the Roman Empire from twenty seven BC to four, seventy, six, eighty although I'll talk about some of the differing opinions about the exact dates. Later, I WANNA start off by laying some of the groundwork of how room operated before we get into the Roman Empire itself. This city and Kingdom of Rome was mythological founded around seven hundred and fifty BC with seven fifty three BC being the most commonly accepted date. It was founded by Romulus the city's namesake and his brother Ramos who are nursed by she will after being abandoned on the banks of the river. Tiber. ROMULUS ended up killing his brother during a dispute over which the seven hills to build the new city on and became the first. King of Rome who? Start. Yeah, just you know as you do murder brother side, you want to build your city on late normal things normal Italian things I would say. Yeah. That's. That's true. So. The Roman Kingdom was the earliest period in Roman history when seven kings ruled before it became a republic. So in five Oh nine BC, the monarchy was overthrown and the Roman Republic was established the majority of the former king's functions were passed onto two men named consuls who are elected to term of one year and could be prosecuted after council ships ended if abuse those powers Ooh I like that. Yeah. That's a little. GonNa Balance. Right there. Yeah exactly and under the Republic Room also began the practice of assigning dictators basically, if things got. So Harry that they're like now we can't risk multiple dudes working to solve this problem. Just let one guy decide everything. So elegant stunned, they could choose a person to be a dictator for six months for six months. That's Max dictator I think you know yeah, I like. It was their choice and also if whatever the dictator was chosen to carry out, usually it was war like somebody or something I if that finished earlier than the six months period, the dictator was actually expected to them be like, okay, that's it. I'm done and dislike resigned their dictatorship. Okay, that's also something that the Italians are really good about is giving power. and. They were actually fairly common until the end of the second punic war, which is the one with Hannibal and the elephants and actually did work pretty well late the Roman republic was basically constantly at war during this time since it went from essentially being a city sitting on a bunch of hills to being invaded by gulls then they took over the entire Italian peninsula and they defeated Carthage over the course of the three punic worse than they conquered all of modern bakeries and finally they had three different slave revolts with the last one being the one with Spartacus said everyone who's about and. So obviously that much war and that much rapid expansion meant there is like unrest in the air and it opened the door to a lot of military leaders to make their mark in the world, which is where we're gonNA start our main story about the empire. Julius. Caesar was never an emperor of Rome and died under the Roman Republic and not the Roman Empire that you cannot start talking about the Roman Empire without first talking about my boy JC.

It's the Little Things

Your Brain on Facts

06:39 min | 2 months ago

It's the Little Things

"For want of a nail, the shoe was lost for want of a shoe. The horse was lost for want of a horse. The rider was lost for want of a writer the message was lost for want of the message the battle was lost for want of a battle, the kingdom was lost. Small things can have reverberating effects on history both good and bad. In fourteen fifty three, the great walled city of Constantinople fell it had withstood sieges for eleven hundred years. It had held off fire from the then state of the art cannons for weeks. The Byzantine said even Ford soldiers trying to tunnel under the wall autumn Turks were finally able to overrun the great city because someone left the door open. One of the many gates in the fourteen miles of wall had been left open during the night and the Ottomans flooded in. Killing Constantine the eleventh in the battle and bringing an end to the eastern Roman Empire. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. It was a freezing Christmas night in Trenton. New Jersey during the revolutionary war. The English Colonel Johann Gottlieb Rall. Commander. Of a mercenary infantry regiment of fourteen hundred has seen soldiers from Germany sat down to a good supper and an evening of entertainment. He and his men were celebrating their recent victories over George Washington's volunteer army, and of course, the Christmas holiday. Safe from the bitter cold and the pelting sleet inside a wealthy merchants home that they had commandeered. They relaxed safe in the assumption that no one in their right mind would possibly try to cross the Delaware River at night in a blinding winter storm. Someone challenged role to a game of chess, and before long he was deep in tactics and strategy. There was a knock at the door. And exhausted young. Messenger boy came in bearing a note from loyalist farmer. It's important to remember that about a third of colonists still consider themselves to be British and didn't want the revolution. Raw paid the boy little notice took the note and put it in his coat pocket without opening it. That pocketed piece of paper would cost him and the war effort nearly. Two hours earlier and ten miles away. Washington's men had begun being ferried across the icy Delaware. River. It took over ten hours to get all twenty four hundred men over to the New Jersey side. The conditions were so adverse five men froze to death. Then began the arduous march to Trenton in the dark. The plan had been to attack the town from all sides before dawn, but the troops didn't arrive until eight am. During the attack which lasted only an hour forty of the German. Henson's were killed and the remaining thousand surrendered. Colonel was mortally wounded. When his body was found the unopened note warning of Washington's crossing was still in his pocket. If role had read it, he would surely have had his gross of professional soldiers prepared. He allowed his pride and the weather to lull him into thinking his enemy was not a threat. Had he won the battle he may well have killed George Washington James Madison James Monroe John Marshall Aaron Burr and Andrew. Hamilton The. Second, most common premise in alternate history circles behind what if Germany won World War Two is what if the south one the American civil war? Two pieces of paper dropped in a farmer's field almost brought that about. Confederate General Robert E. Lee. Whose statue in the middle of my hometown of Richmond, Virginia has recently been given the historical context. It's so sorely needed. In the form of tons of. Graffiti. Issued Special Order one ninety one during the Maryland campaign before the Battle of Antietam. In the order lead divided his army, delineating the routes and roads to be taken and the timing for the units to reconvene. Adjutant Robert H Chilton penned copies of the letter endorsed them in Lee's name. Staff. Officers distributed the copies to various confederate generals. General Thomas Stonewall Jackson in turn copied the document for one of his subordinates, major general, D H Hill who was to exercise independent command as the rearguard. A Union soldier Corporal Barton W Mitchell of the twenty seven. Th Indiana volunteers found two pieces of paper bundled with three cigars as he marched across a farm in Maryland an area recently vacated by Hill and his men after they had camped there. The order provided the Union army with valuable information, concerning the army of Northern Virginia's movements and campaign plans. Upon receiving lease lost order. Major General George McClellan leading the Union army of the Potomac proclaimed. Here is a piece of paper with which if I cannot whip Bob Ely, I will be willing to go home. He immediately moved his army in hopes of foiling lease battle plans. When Lee heard a copy of special order one, ninety, one was missing he. He knew his scattered army was vulnerable and rushed to reunite his units Antietam Creek near Sharp's Berg. Lee's troops arrived tired hungry and many were sick. The Battle of Antietam, would go down as the bloodiest battle of the American civil war with casualties recorded as twenty, three, thousand dead wounded, which was usually as good as dead or unaccounted for over the course of the half day battle. That's nearly two thousand soldiers in our one every two seconds. When night fell both sides ceased fire together, their dead and wounded. The next day Lee began the painstaking job of moving his ravage troops back Virginia. Here, some scholars argue another solitary decision had far reaching consequences. Despite having the advantage. McClellan. Allowed Lee to retreat without resistance. From his point of view, he'd accomplished his mission by forcing Lee's troops from Maryland and preventing confederate win on union soil. President, Lincoln however thought McClellan missed a great opportunity to potentially end the war three years earlier than it ultimately would.

Robert E. Lee Army Major General George Mcclellan Maryland Union Army New Jersey Trenton Virginia Antietam Constantinople Colonel Johann Gottlieb Rall George Washington Ford Delaware River Writer Antietam Creek General Thomas Stonewall Jacks Washington
"roman empire" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

08:12 min | 2 months ago

"roman empire" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"Hey everybody today's episode is sponsored by the new Mazda C X. Thirty. So lately, we've been trying to do our part to be cautious and do what we can for public health. So we've been cooped up in the house a lot not a getting out a lot Robert is there anything you kind of miss about the about the road trip or going on long drives? Why do you have to say there's there is something really cool about having a long drive hopefully, you know like a driving through the mountains or something and you get to really dive into a particular album. Experience it beginning to end while taking in the scenery also a great time for the children to learn about metal machine music. So. When Miles Gray and I drove the Mazda six thirty from Palm Desert San Diego, I really enjoyed the scenery along the way and I feel like the car itself helped a lot with that like the interior of the car is crafted with what they call an essential EST approach. So while it's got a lot of features like Wi fi, you vehicle status navigation displays etcetera it really doesn't feel crammed with distracting lights in visual. Decoy. And speaking of features, the thirty also has a really good factory soundsystem. They loaded the car up with some high definition sample tracks for us to try like we listen to. Daft punk and that sounded great. Hey, for everybody else if you want more information on Mazda and the first ever Mazda C thirty, you can find it online at Mazda USA dot com slash Iheart, or better yet. See It in person at a Mazda dealership near you. John Legend. His voice heard no matter who you are no matter where you come from I, don't care if you're voting the same as me or not. We want your vote to be counted. Everyone of us has a reason to vote. That's millions of voices that needs to be heard, and that's why iheartradio launched the why I'm voting podcast a place where music artists, celebrities and people like you talk about why they vote and why it matters. We have to actively maintain our democracy and the only way that we do that we're all citizens. Here and the only Chore Way That We can hold them accountable is to make sure we participate in these elections. We know this is a historic election and our partners at Seventh Generation WanNa remind us that our votes today we'll have an impact on generations to come. So registered to vote at seventh generation dot com slash vote for the future and don't miss the new podcast from iheartradio and seventh generation called. Ym. Am voting where you will hear more reasons to vote iheartradio voting countdown to election day. Your vote is your voice. Hi, everyone. Welcome to this day in history class where we uncovered the remnants of history every day. The day with the eighteenth eighteen ninety-five. Daniel David Palmer et spiritus and magnetic healer who had held several jobs performed the first chiropractic adjustment on a man named Harvey Lillard. Emigrated. From Canada to the US in eighteen sixty five. States work as a teacher ran a fruit and berry nursery APIARY and operated a grocery store. He read a lot about anatomy physiology neurology and pathology, but he also took an interest in spiritualism and alternative medicine. Spiritualism was a religious movement that centered on the belief that spirits of the dead communicate with the living. while. He was an Iowa Teaching Palmer learned magnetic healing from Paul Castor in the city of Tusla. Magnetic. Healing is an alternative medicine practice based on the claim that static magnetic fields from permanent magnets placed closer to the body can. Heal, various ailments magnetic healing is considered a pseudoscience. In September of eighteen, eighty, six palmer opened an office in. Burlington and began to practice magnetic healing. The next year he moved to Davenport in opened a magnetic healing office there. Around this time he became outspoken about his opposition, tobacco, nation drugs, and vivisection. On September eighteenth eighteen ninety-five he gave Harvey Lillard a black elevator operator in custodian his first chiropractic assistant. Palmer wrote that Lillard had been depth for seventeen years when he asked what the cause of his deafness was Lillard said when he bit into a cramped stooping position, he felt something give way in his back and immediately became deaf. homer found in an examination that a vertebra was off its normal position and figure that Lillard hearing would be restored. If he acted into position by quote using the spine is process as a lever. When he did that the man reportedly here again. Homer has told several stories of how he supposedly cured Lillard of his definite from a claim that he performed the adjustment in an elevator to one that he accidentally hit Lillard in the back. Soon. Tomor transitioned from magnetic healer to chiropractor. He initially attributed his breakthrough in chiropractic to Jim Atkinson a doctor who had died years before though he eventually began to attribute the development as the culmination of his own knowledge and experiences. Later He created a journal called the chiropractor. After getting suggestions from Reverend Samuel, we'd a patient and friend of his Palmer coined the word chiropractic from the Greek words meaning hand and done. In eighteen ninety seven Palmer, the Palmer school at Infirmary later renamed the Palmer. School of Chiropractic. The first four students including his son bj graduated in January of Nineteen to. The next year Palmer and his son formed an equal partnership. Palmer proselytized chiropractic and was self aggrandizing beyond the questionable legitimacy practices he was engaged in other sketchy activities related to his business. His advertising campaigns over the top. He faced lawsuits an he had disagreements with his son whom he partnered with to run the Palmer School of Chiropractic. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, six, Palmer was tried and found guilty of practicing medicine without a license. Palmer chose to do jail time rather than pay a fine and the property of the school in clinic with placed in the name of bj's white. homers wife ended up paying the fine after he spent some time in jail. But PJ with let his father comeback to the school. Palmer sold his share of the school to his son and moved to. Oklahoma. T became affiliated with Chiropractic schools in Oklahoma Oregon and California before he died in nineteen thirteen. BJ Palmer considered his father, the founder of Chiropractic and himself developer. BJ was president of the Palmer School of Chiropractic from Nineteen Zero six until his death in nineteen sixty one. Today Chiropractic is considered a pseudoscientific alternative medicine. I'm Jeffcoat, and hopefully you know a little more about history today than you did yesterday. Keep up with a on twitter instagram and facebook at TV HD, podcast. We'll see you tomorrow. More podcasts from iheartradio vis, the iheartradio APP apple podcasts, or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Welcome to teach me something new podcast from iheartradio in Britain co I'm your host Brit, Morin I'm an entrepreneur, a CEO a mom, and I'm curious about a lot of things we've already learned so much together and I can't wait for what's next my co host and best he engine I are back with brand new episodes every Wednesday. Listen to teach me something new on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcast..

BJ Palmer Palmer School of Chiropractic Harvey Lillard Mazda iheartradio Daniel David Palmer Palmer school at Infirmary School of Chiropractic founder of Chiropractic Mazda USA Wi Palm Desert San Diego John Legend Miles Gray apple Seventh Generation Wan Robert
How To Teach History

Layers of Learning Podcast

06:21 min | 3 months ago

How To Teach History

"So, what what do you do with history? What's your basic? Approach, while I will say this, you're the one who taught me how to teach history in my early homeschooling years so I do it very much the way that you Michelle For sure we've always taught history in order when I was in school I was always confused about when things were happening and how things were related to each other. When I learned about historical figure, it wasn't in context of where they were or when they lived and I never knew how things connected I I remember in fifth grade we did this project about the Aztecs and. Each like our teachers split us into groups and each group was doing a different hands on project by the Aztecs and it was a great project. I remember vividly how the Aztecs built their village or town right on top of the lake and that that's what my project was about and I remember that but I also remember having no idea when the Aztecs happened in history, I had no concept of win. That was I thought they were very, very ancient people that was my impression. And that turns out not to be true they actually were. More. In the colonial era, they were much more modern. Yeah I think that was the problem with my early education history is it just lacked connections I didn't understand what history could teach me because I didn't have any contextual basis for the people, the places, the events, I didn't have a complete picture in my mind. So that's been one of my goals with my kids is to help them see the big picture of history and to be able to. Know when and where things happened. So, let's back up and just start with when we say history exactly. What do we mean? First of all history starts with the earliest civilizations and I think that's something that. People. Get confused about because we know that there were caveman and. There's this whole Earth history that happens before the subject of history, but the academic subject of history starts with the earliest civilizations. Well. And that's not because the people who came before weren't important. It's because the people who came before didn't write down their stories in any way we don't have an archeological record of them not much and we don't have. Any records at all of them, they didn't build cities that we can go back and excavate. The academic subject of history is just the story of human civilization. That's what is. I often tell my kids. This is why it's so important for you to write down your stories because anyone who didn't have a record of their people or their lives or anything that happened. That kind of. With time and so history we're looking at, Hey, let's look at the story of the people who have lived on the earth and it's totally find teach about cavemen but there's not a lot of actual information that we know when we don't have any written records. So so layers of learning starts with the earliest civilisation. Yeah. We start with Sumer and the Yellow River valley in China and the Norte Chico People in South America. That's that's the beginning of the subject of history and we're looking at how did people create the first civilizations as they began to settle down and be able to live in a place. How did that happen? What contributed to them being able to do that and so yeah, we always start there in history and then as we go along, it includes the story of human beings, nations, cities, especially the great figures in history the heroes, the even the villains civilians to definitely but we learn about those people who somehow contributed and made a difference in the world whether good or bad. And I think we look at those things because it teaches us lessons for now. It's important to look back so that we can be educated for our lives now. Right right now, we are living at a point in history. We're making history were part of that whole subject, and if we study history, we can study all of the things that led up to. Now we can see this progression and some of its progress, and some of it is regression. We human societies tend to go through these cycles and there's Warren Destruction, and there's also building in great art and looking at all of this together is the subject of history I think that's one of the really interesting things that I have noticed as I've taught my kids history. I think a lot of people believe that we started with almost nothing in the history of the world, and then we little by little built up to this point that we have the Internet and technology and invention, and actually if you look back in history, my kids were amazed when we were studying ancient Greece and ancient Rome and they were saying if they just had the internet, they probably had pretty much what we have today. Mom they were a pre industrial society they had factories so anciently. They were very much like we are, and then it collapsed. Yeah. Followed Rome even before the Roman Empire the Mojo Daro people in India where at the same level that Rome was, but you know thousand years earlier. So it has happened over and over through history. So it's really interesting. One of the things that we learned from that is hey. Next year tomorrow who knows we could be reverting back in the exact same way that they did we are not immune in any way. And it hasn't just progressed and progressed and progressed. It has gone through cycles of change over time, and so there are lessons all along the way if we learn history in that Lens. and. Partly for that reason, Karen that that we can see progression and we can see cycles partly for that reason, we study history in order, and partly for the reason, we already talked about that it's important to have context you need to understand. Things that are going on at the same time in history you need to understand that this person came before that person that this war led to this event. Those progressions are important in history. So to teach it in order, I think vital.

Aztecs Rome Yellow River Valley Karen South America Greece Norte Chico India China
What Ruined City Lies Under Tunisia's Waters?

BrainStuff

03:32 min | 3 months ago

What Ruined City Lies Under Tunisia's Waters?

"Episode from our former host Christian Sagar. This one is about the ruins of a lost Roman city off the coast of Northern, Africa and evidence about what led to its loss a. plus a more fishy finding. FEHB rain stuff Christian Sager here archaeologists recently discovered more than fifty acres twenty hector's of Roman ruins off the coast of northeastern. Tunisia. That's a small country on the northern tip of Africa and situated on the Mediterranean Sea the discovery has researchers believing they may have finally found some convincing evidence that the city of Neapolis not to be confused with the Italian city of the same name that Neapolis was wiped out by a natural disaster about a thousand, six hundred and fifty years ago in addition to streets and monuments. Researchers found about one hundred tanks that would have been used to produce a garum that's a fish based fermented condiment commonly consumed in ancient Rome. In an email, how stuff works spoke to Carlos F Norrena associate professor of history at the University of California Berkeley he says that the discovery is important because it lends support to the theory that Tunisia Neapolis was submerged by a soon Nami in the fourth century. That's a useful reminder that environmental catastrophe is not only a phenomenon of the modern world scientists wrote in a twenty thirteen study in the journal Nature that as soon Nami was caused by an earthquake that occurred in three, sixty, five C E in Crete. There's no sure fire way to know the extent of the quake since measuring tools didn't exist at the time, but scientists believe to separate tremors happened in. Succession and the larger one had a magnitude of eight point zero on the Richter scale. The resulting soon Nami destroyed about fifty thousand homes and killed approximately five thousand people in the city of Alexandria Egypt and because the geological fault at the center of the earthquake was located off the coast of Crete that Greek island was actually lifted up in certain areas by as much as thirty three feet or ten meters. Historian. Honest Mercer lineas recorded the event and the newly found ruins reveal that there's much more to the story. NERINA says, the discovery also illuminates the economy of Roman. North Africa and provides further evidence for the popularity of Garum in the Roman Diet. The detail is significant. Garum was a big deal throughout the Roman Empire and as Italian archaeologist Claudio Geraldino has NPR it played a major role in the society's economy. He says that according to the Roman writers, a good bottle of garum could cost something like five hundred dollars today but that they also had garum for slaves that extremely cheap. So it is comparable to a modern amenity like. For instance, the underwater findings of Neapolis and it's abundant manufacturing materials indicate that the city was a major historical hub Neapolis, which means new city

Nami Garum Neapolis Africa Crete Christian Sagar Tunisia Tunisia Neapolis Christian Sager Roman Empire Claudio Geraldino Mercer Lineas Rome Mediterranean Sea Tremors University Of California Berke North Africa Carlos F Norrena
Facebook Dialogue Platform with Stephen Roller

Software Engineering Daily

15:02 min | 3 months ago

Facebook Dialogue Platform with Stephen Roller

"Stephen Roller welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. You work on dialogue research at facebook dialogue research. I. Think of as a better way of describing chat bots. So I may refer to chat bots and Dialogue Research interchangeably during this episode. Why are chat bots useful? I think it's a longstanding dream in the field of artificial intelligence and computer science. Right? We've we've always had the dream of what if I just talked to my computer like I talked to other people. In converse with them, they would know what are my intentions? Why am I asking them this? What can they do to make my life better or help me along and you know? Programming is fun I love programming, but you know it'd be nice to just communicate with. Computers as well. And what about you? Personally, why are you personally interested in chat bots? Have you pursued this line of work of of all the different kinds of computer science research you could be doing? Yeah. You know I sort of stumbled into this area join fair after my phd where I did work in natural language processing but my my work, my background work was like a little bit more linguistically oriented focused on like the meanings of words a little bit more like what can computers just about language rather than how do we teach computers to understand language? And so you know when I joined. Fair. I was looking for for projects to join projects to collaborate on. So I gave dialogue a shot and it turns out to be a really great ren for me a mix of novel research using using the greatest and latest neural networking and machine learning techniques as well as a bunch of interesting software engineering problems and opportunities for Staley and things like this. What are the domains in which conversational agents or chat bots are actually useful today? What are the places where they're useful versus the places where they're not so useful? Meaning like, what's the? What did they do major? We've actually conquered rather than the ones we're stumbling. Yeah I think you know obviously, you've seen a wave of digital assistance and I think that work is very exciting. a lot of what we focused on in dial in par lay in the dialogue research at facebook is on open domain chat bots, which are chat bots that can talk to you about like literally anything and they're usually not focused on. Accomplishing tasks for you rather like the goal is just to have a conversation with you about anything for as long as possible. So that's primarily where we work and I think we've seen a lot of exciting advances over the past couple years to where I think if you were to try some of these newer chat bots that have come out in the past year you, you'd probably be really impressed with like Oh. Wow. This was further than I. Expect. So I think you see commercially is a lot of digital assistants a lot of success in this a lot of customer service type things when I'm really excited about when I think we've you know where things have made big strides in an big strides in the past year is on these open domain chat bots can actually talk to you about anything. Really so as in I can sit down with a chap today and say, Hey, what's the weather and what is this spot on my skin and recommend me a restaurant that looks appealing. I can do I can ask all of these things of a chat bot today. Yeah. I would put those still in the category of like task oriented Tech Chat bots where there's like some goal in mind like you know answering medical questions or tell me about the. Weather when I really tend to work on and what I'm excited about is these chat bots right so rather instead you might ask what's your favorite chess move and it might go into into detail about like what's its favorite move and why that is or what's your opinion of the fall of the Roman. Empire let's let's debate that. So it's it's it's less about you know what can you do for Maine and more about like let's enjoy the experience together. So, can you give a few more descriptions of what a general purpose chat Bot would be doing? Yeah I think the end game here either. You know wear a true general purpose chapman should do both of these things right? Like if I ask it to to. But Mia, calendar and by then it should absolutely help me out with that where I focused my research is the social part. and. So I think we should see a mix of. The box that we've been developing really focused on I'm having a few different behaviors that I don't think you tend to see any sort of assistant on type chat bots they have consistent persona so they'll have like personalities like. I love basketball or I have. Friends in in the tech industry or something like this, and they can use this information like. Consistently referred to it. You know one of the other attributes that chat bots working on developing and believe Ms really important is empathy bright. So a chat Bot should understand you know as as it's talking with you, what's your mental state like how are you feeling and respond emotionally appropriately to that so no if you say something like my just ran away, you know the chat bots should restall on appropriately with something like, oh, I'm really sorry to hear that have. You say something like I just got a promotion than the Chat Bot should respond Oh. That's great to hear. Congratulations. So responding emotionally appropriately is a really important characteristic of a of an open domain chap on the last one is general knowledge. So you know I think when people talk to to chat bots, they expected to know things about the world some of that's encyclopedia some of its common commonsense reasoning but you know if I ask what's the tallest building in America? You know I sort of expected to be able to have this have this information available to it and be able to answer some questions like that or even integrate this information in in common and common dialogue just oh by the way you know what's what's interesting or you know funny story about that sort of thinks. So consistent personality empathy and a knowledge about the world. These are all things. I think are really important in general demand. You know Geno Purpose Chat Bot. Empathy you mentioned empathy s one of these things that requires some maintenance of context as to what is going on in the conversation. The Chat Bot needs to be able to acknowledge the perhaps sad state or happy state of the person. It's Inter locating with tell me about context how does a Chat Bot retain and understand context in a conversation? Yeah there's a few different ways that people go about it. So one of the more classic ways that people will do and approaches that people will take is they'll do something off dialogue state tracking. So you have like some information about the dialogue like, Oh, the users asking about a restaurant and they wanted to be on fifth street right and you'll have this as some sort of state. That you could do say like some sort of database query about and help them then like when you're doing dialogue research or billion Chapa, the task becomes a lot of like keeping track of that state and updating that state as the conversation goes on. The way that we often approach it is a much more like role neural network fashion. So we just like input all the dialogue context all history as one big stream. You know sort of same person. One said this person to says that person one said this person to said back? What do you say next? So we just treat things as as raw strings and habit. Input that in the model has to figure out Oh, what do we do with fat? How do I respond? Who said what all this has to be from scratch? I'd like to get into. A little bit more of a conversation about facebook. So if you imagined facebook in five years, what are the tasks that you envision dialogue models fulfilling for facebook? That's an excellent question I. Think you know there's all sorts of places where we're dialogue can be helpful to our users. We already have this product called portal. which is a a really excellent product lets you make video calls with people. In. One of the things you can you can do, you can already say like hey. You know call mom. And it starts dialing up on. And that super? Nice, you know some of the other things might be no. As I might have an assistant on on Messenger that that's helping me keep track of what's going what's going on with my friends. You know I might say a assistant you know where the latest updates on my friends and they could. Integrate that information. And you know look through my my news feed for me and say, Oh, Hey, your friend Jim has new photo. He got married right Oh that'd be really cool. So, I think there's a lot of places for for dialogue to be part of FACEBOOK PRODUCTS You work on par lay, which is spelled P. A. R. L. A.. I. What Is Parlay? Parlay is a platform for doing dialogue research. It's an open source platform. It's gotten over one hundred contributors and it's it's got you would need to do to dialogue research so whether that's a collect data set or I want to train a new model, and there's all these data sets out there and I just WANNA use those without without trying anything. I want to create a new new model and I need to compare two baselines compared to other other approaches of people tried before I can just sort try those those different models. It's got a model. Do you know what are the pre-trade models somebody else's released in leverage those when building minute chat? Bot and then it's got everything you will need. To also evaluate a chat, Bot. So you know once you have Chapada unlike a lot of areas in I research it's it's not always clear how to evaluated except the have people talk to it. So we've got all the tools that you need to connector Chapada, Amazon Mechanical Turk and have people chat with it and you give evaluations or give. Performance rating instincts like this. A little bit deeper into the problems that parlay solves for researchers that are using it. Yeah I think quite a few different problems especially in all those all those different spaces you know when you're you're a researcher and you want to create a new data set that you know, let's say you want to create a new data said that teaches the model how to how to have empathy. The thing you're going to do is have humans talk and exhibit empathy and annotate their their their utterances with this sort empathetic information. So we have tools so that you can like creek quickly spin up user interface where you can have that chat where you can annotate that information and sort of build what you need for that. So similarly with evaluation you know I need to connect with the Amazon Mechanical Turk and had people evaluate. You know I don't WanNa have to spend so much time focused on building the UI of this tool or dealing with the engineering of connecting Amazon Mechanical Turk impairing humans together, I. So abstract way from you and when we do that is by treating all. In the in the world as agents so whether you're a data set or Talking to it on Mechanical Turk or human talking to it at your local keyboard or a AI agent everything is agent. So we treat them all the same. This gives us really nice distractions to work with so that we can sort of plug in AI model in place of a human or plug human in place of the model really easily. Parlay makes available a wide set of data sets through its API. How does parley use these different data sets? Yeah, we have over one hundred data sets in parlay. Some of them are from our group some of them are from external groups. And so one of the things we really focus on as a first class feature in. If I want to train the AI that exhibits multiple behaviors. I'm a train, a multiple data sets at the same time. So you it's really easy to sort of say. Okay. That set a data set the set see in start training three of them at the same time and get a model that can do all three of these behaviors on. So that's sort of first class functionality within within parlay. When we were talking earlier about having a model that exhibited the consistent personality empathy in knowledge, we did this with a sort of multitask training as it's called where we train on all different data sets. So if you're a new user or new researcher who wants to come into dialogue, you can sort of take the stock wouldn't data sets out there already and just start utilizing them as needed and if you wanna mix and match behaviors? Hey, no problem. described. The workflow for training chat with parlay. Yeah. So we have a lot of it's very command line, heavy utility or command line heavy platform. So if you want to train a new model, it can be as simple as calling the train model command from the command line and you just sort of say are here the tasks I want here's the model. The model that I want what's the model architecture and things like this? And you know here's the learning rate and all the other neural network parameters and you hit go and start training. alanna researchers went to do a more sophisticated, maybe make a custom architecture or make a custom data set and it's really easy to just sort of build only the part of the data set you need or build only the what's special about your model. She might go right a little bit of custom code utilizing are sort of abstract base classes and things like this. And you'll be off on your way training, your special model, and if you don't WanNa mess with data, you don't have to mess with data you can just use the existing data sets. If you don't WanNa mess for modeling, you don't have the mess with modeling you can just just the data in and start training

Dialogue Research Facebook Researcher Stephen Roller Basketball Amazon Amazon Mechanical Turk Maine Staley America
The Plague of Justinian I

5 Minutes in Church History

04:20 min | 3 months ago

The Plague of Justinian I

"Welcome back to another episode of five minutes in Church history. On this episode, we're talking about a very dark moment in church history and history the plague of Justinian. The first first let's talk about just in the first he was born in four eighty seven. He came to be Roman emperor in five, twenty seven and he reigned until his death in five sixty three at the time of becoming Roman emperor the barbarian tribes controlled much of what was the Roman Empire The ostrogoths controlled Rome in the boot of Italy that extends down into the Mediterranean Sea the visigoths controlled Spain, the vandals controlled what was formerly North Africa the Roman empire was a fraction and a mere shadow of its former self just Indian ruled from capital at Constantinople. He was determined to bring back the glory that once was the Roman Empire. To do so he would need to launch military campaigns to the east into the Iberian Peninsula to the south and the vandals to the West and the ostrogoths into the north. He had to launch military campaign literally in every direction. And he was very successful after a decade or so of military campaigns warfare. Then in five forty, two Justin faced a new invisible enemy. Well, we'll get to that in a moment first a few more points on just in the first, he is known as giving us the Codex Justinian us it's also sometimes called the Corpus juris civilised. This is the body of civil law. Someone took the time to count it. It's somewhere around the neighborhood one million words. It was a massive rule of law to govern the Roman Empire contains laws on criminal and civil matters on trade, but it also controls laws regarding heresy and Orthodoxy, and even laws regulating paganism. Another thing about just in the first is that he is the creator of the Huggy Sophia he was not the architect though he had significant conversations with the architect and was very influential in the plans but it was under his watch that the Haganah Sophie was built from five, thirty, two to five, thirty seven the old basilica had fallen during riots in that city and just in use the occasion to build what was the biggest church the Roman Empire ever saw its length was two, hundred, sixty, nine feet. Its width was two hundred and forty feet and extended a height of one hundred and eighty feet. It was a massive structure. The HAGIA Sofia. Well, that's just any in the first. Now, briefly on his plague in five, forty to the bubonic plague broke out. This is the your cineas pestis. What came to be known as the black plague. It would come again in the thirteen hundreds and it would manifest throughout the Middle Ages and the time of the reformation. Back in five, forty, two, it is believed to have started in Egypt. This plague then carried on merchant ships too many nations and to three continents. Africa Europe Asia it is credited as the first pandemic in recorded history. It brought all of the efforts of Justinian one to a stop it ended the military campaigns devastated the economy. It ended up killing millions at its height. It would take five thousand lives a day in the city of Constantinople alone. Even. Just any in the first contract. Did it. But he survives one of the stories from that time PRA copious notes of the effect of the plague on the people it caused them to shake off the unrighteousness of their daily lives and practice the duties of religion with diligence but sadly, he also notes. That as soon as they were rid of the disease, they went right back to their old ways. Well, that's just any in the first, and that's the justinian plague five, forty two

Roman Empire Justinian Iberian Peninsula Hagia Sofia Mediterranean Sea Rome Constantinople Spain North Africa Africa Italy Justin Egypt Sophie
The City of Carthage

5 Minutes in Church History

04:14 min | 4 months ago

The City of Carthage

"Welcome back to another episode. Five minutes in Church history on this episode. We're going to a place to a very famous city in the ancient world. The city of Carthage Carthage was first settled by the Phoenicians. This of course was a crucial city right as were on the Mediterranean Sea. Carthage came to be known as the master of the Mediterranean. Sea Trade after the Phoenicians was part of the PUNIC. PUNIC empire, and then under Caesar Augustus who reigned from fourteen BC to twenty seven ad. Of course, this is the Caesar Augustus of the Gospel Narratives in the birth of Christ under Caesar Augustus Rome to control of Carthage and it became a great Roman city. It was second only to Rome and the Roman Empire Rivaling Alexandria from time to time for that position, but most give it to Carthage. At any given time in these centuries, the population of Carthage would be two hundred fifty thousand people that had all the telltale signs of a Roman city. There were theaters in the republic buildings. There were the extensive baths. There were aqueducts for. Water across the city, and even into the fields for farming, there was an extensive Roman road system. Soldiers were kept. There was a very busy port city and a very prosperous city. It also has quite a role in church history. It was the home of Talionis. Of course. Is that great church father from one sixty to two twenty as the one who gave us the word Trinity, and brought together all that biblical teaching of who got is in his Trinitaria and being, and so we have the word trinity coined at Carthage and two Oh. Three Carthage was the site of the martyrdom of perpetual and Felisa toss those very brave young women, and the wonderful story of their martyrdom in their courage in their stand for Christ. Well, it was at Carthage. and. The to fifty CIPRIAN was bishop of Carthage. This was on the heels of the decian persecution very intense persecution by the Roman emperor Shas. And after the persecution, and there was some relenting of it, folks were allowed back into the church created quite a controversy was known as the Donna test controversy that raged throughout the church from the fourth to sixth centuries and a key player in that controversy was CIPRIAN Bishop of Carthage. In three ninety seven. It was the site of the Third Council of Carthage. And the topic of discussion was the New Testament Canon and coming out of that council was an affirmation of the twenty seven books of the New Testament, so it played a role in the Canon controversies in development of the Early Church and in four sixteen, the Palais jeans were condemned at Carthage, so it played a role in the development of the doctrine of original sin. So what a fascinating city with rich history both in terms of the ancient world end in church history well as Rome was sacked by the barbarians in four ten carthage was sacked by the vandals and four, Twenty Nine Carthage became the capital of the vandal empire which spanned across that great north. Coast, and of course that North African coast had the Mediterranean Sea to the north, and the vast Sahara desert to the south. Is Long came on the scene, the six hundreds, and began to threaten from the East and Right at the end of the six hundred at the battle of Carthage Carthage fell to Islam. It was dominated by Islamic control. There was a brief time during the Crusades when Carthage was retaken, but only for a short time. It remained Muslim throughout the era of the reformation and right onto the present day. Carthage in the present day is a suburb of Tunis. Capital city of the North African nation of Tunisia. Tunisia's the first government North Africa to give protection for religious freedom. But the nation itself is still dominated by Islam and while there is a church. They're going way back to those early centuries. It is still a church that suffers persecution in our present day.

Twenty Nine Carthage Third Council Of Carthage Ciprian Bishop Of Carthage Bishop Of Carthage Carthage Caesar Augustus Rome Caesar Augustus Mediterranean Sea Tunisia Sea Trade Ciprian Early Church North Africa Alexandria Sahara Desert Talionis Canon Donna Tunis Carthage.
Meggan Watterson | Christs First Apostle and Her Gospel of Love

Hay House Meditations

05:54 min | 4 months ago

Meggan Watterson | Christs First Apostle and Her Gospel of Love

"Hi Megan, welcome to the House Meditations podcast. Thank you, thank you for having me. Yeah. I'm really excited to to speak to you about. Of Topics today that includes your meditation and condemned practices. the life of Mary Magdalene in Christ. Women in early Christianity, and as you write in your book the Christianity we haven't yet tried. We haven't tried yet, yes. I think it might be instructive for our listeners for us to situate our conversation. By talking about the person of Mary Magdalene so, can you tell us who Mary Magwar mangled was? What was her relationship to Christ? Well, I love to start that conversation with. A clarification, which is that Mary Magdalene was not a prostitute. 'cause most people. That's how they have come across our. That's how they've been told about her is that she is the penitent prostitute, the woman who sinned much and was forgiven much So this. was a story of fictitious story created about her around the sixth century it within the Catholic tradition and the Catholic Church has actually. wrote a formal apology in the nineteen seventies and have corrected that misunderstanding of her and then Pope Francis recently rehabilitation sort of rehabilitate. That's the word he rehabilitated her. And she is now officially the apostle to the apostles, and that to me is very significant, not because there is anything ever. It's not that there's anything innately derogatory about sex in the body or you know. Anything having to do with that it the reason why to me it's so significant and important is because it begins to us closer to the truth of who she really was. Which which is the person Christ resurrected to? Right, she was his witness. She was there at the Tomb, not by accident not. Happen to just be in the right place at the right time if we include her Gospel among the other gospels that were co defied in the fourth century, if we if we reintroduce her gospel as just as significant just as worthy of taxed and scripture it. It speaks to Christianity, that included her included her in authority clued included her partnership with Christ, and that's really how I would describe and define them regardless of whether you ever go the sort of Davinci code rabbit hole of Were they married and. Did they have a physical relationship. They have a physical relationship. Physical Child You. We don't even need to go there at this point right now. It's so significant to identify and what we can know. empirically is that they were companions. They were partners and we know that from the. We know that even just from the New Testament exactly that we add these other Gospel, so can you help so for those of us? Who aren't scholars of the Bible or theologians? Can you help situate us? Okay? We have the the new. Testament that actually speaks about Mary Magdalene. Just spoke about that. She was present at at the resurrection, and she was the first person who Christ spoke to right after. They have that. We have that like an that. When I was raised Catholic that was the story was a prostitute who he was speaking to that what I was told. These whole other said of writings of Gospels that were around. There wasn't a codified Christianity after Christ right there were. Complaint Forms of writing. Right. Can you help us understand that? Yeah, I get really excited, sorry. When we talk about this early form of Christianity before it was could have at. It wasn't cofide until the fourth century. So that's important to understand so there are hundreds of years where there's a Christianity that's being practiced that so radical and threatening to the Roman Empire and the idea of. Existence being ranked according to a hierarchy so educated Roman born men are at the top, and then it. There's all different layers in positions of power but women. Prostitutes slaves would be down there at the bottom meaning, having no rights, and not having a sense of. Being able to have autonomy and voice and power themselves so Mary Magdalene would. Be Way down there at the bottom, not because she was a prostitute because she was a woman, women didn't have any rights or own property so. This form this early form of Christianity. If we re introduced scripture like the Gospel of Mary Magdalene like the Gospel of Philip, which names Mary as Kreis companion. The Greek word is Kono's, and that word can be translated as partner, beloved or companion, so the gospel of Philip names. Miriam of Magdala Mary Magdalene as the companion of Christ

Mary Magdalene Magdala Mary Magdalene Mary Magwar Megan Mary Catholic Church Philip Miriam Roman Empire Pope Francis Partner Kono
Heaven and Hell with Bart Ehrman

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

05:44 min | 4 months ago

Heaven and Hell with Bart Ehrman

"Hey welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert Lamb and I'm Joe McCormick and this week. We are going to be featuring a couple of interviews. That I recorded last week because last week Robert, you were out of quote, the office you or at least you off work for a bit and so so I recorded conversations with authors of some books one book. That's already out this year in one book. That's coming up so on Thursday of this week. We're going to be airing a conversation that I had with the author of A. A fascinating upcoming book about the evolutionary biology of cancer, but today we're going to be exploring topic in the realm of ancient history and religion. If you've followed us for a while, I think you probably know this about us that one of our favorite kind of trails to go down his tracing the evolution of religious ideas through ancient history I mean I think I've outed myself on this podcast before. As a the kind of nonreligious person who loves the Bible. Can I love to read ancient religious texts and learn about them and see how the ideas from. From the ancient world of super filtered through to us today and shape to the societies we live in, and that's exactly the kind of thing. We're GONNA be diving into in this episode I'm talking with a secular Biblical historian named Bart Erman about his most recent book, which is called Heaven and hell a history of the afterlife. This book was released in March of this year by Simon. And Schuster, and it's all about the Christian ideas of life after death where they come from ancient history, what influence their development and how they changed over time so? So there was a part that cited in the intro of Bart's book where he talks about a pew research poll that was conducted a few years ago. I think. Maybe it was in two thousand fifteen. Where it found that seventy two percent of Americans believe in a literal heaven and fifty eight percent believe in literal hell, and yet I think most Americans would be deeply surprised, even shock to learn what historians can show about the origins of these beliefs in the strange thing. Is that like the historical conclusions that Bart's GonNa talk about in this episode? Are Not fringe or unusual among secular scholars of the Bible, in historians of the ancient Near East This is utterly mainstream, critical scholarship, and yet I think regular people are especially in the united. States, are going to find it very surprising. Yeah, absolutely, and I want to stress something here for everybody, so I just got back. To work this morning and I plugged into a pre production cut of this interview and it's really it's really excellent, so if you're even slightly scared away by the idea of an interview with a secular biblical scholar don't be because Barda is tremendous. He's he's funny. Very High Energy. I think you're really going to enjoy this chat. Joe Had with Bart here. Yeah, parts full of knowledge, good humor passion for his subject. I think you're really going to enjoy the episode, but before we can do it I'll just give a little bit of background on Bart's here's his biography Bart. D Ehrman is a leading authority on the New Testament and the history of early Christianity, and the author or editor of. Of more than thirty books, including the New York Times bestsellers misquoting Jesus, how Jesus became God, and the triumph of Christianity, and that last one's really interesting. It's about how Christianity took over the Roman Empire and went from a really small religion, too dominant religion of the empire, and just a matter of a few centuries anyway, so he is a distinguished professor of religious studies, the University of North Carolina Chapel, Hill and he. He has created eight popular audio and video courses for the great courses. He has been featured in time. The New Yorker The Washington Post and has appeared on NBC CNN and the daily show with Jon Stewart as well as the history channel National Geographic Channel BBC NPR, all the hits his most recent book is Heaven and Hell just one more thing before we get into it I. WanNa mention obviously we are dealing with. With the audio constraints of of remote recording in the age of Covid, nineteen, so for example around the twelve minute mark in the episode there is briefly some background noise that sounds like a fan was turned on or some rain. It only lasts for about a minute or so, and so please just put up with a little bit of background noise, and it's very brief I promise. It's not the sounds of hell right. Now audio recordings of the underworld leaking up through some sort of mining microphone right? The well to hell was not unleashed office. So yeah, I would say without any further ado. Let's jump right in. Bardem and welcome to the PODCAST. Thanks so much for joining us today. Yes, thanks for having me so your Book Heaven and Hell I just finished reading yesterday, and I I really really enjoyed it. and I want to say that I started reading this book. It very opportune time because though I didn't plan it this way. I'm also currently in the middle of rereading. Rereading the divine comedy, actually my wife and I are reading it together and of course, the divine comedy Dante his wonderful poetry, but it's also psychologically fascinating because when you go through the theology of Dante, you get the sense of somebody who is simultaneously ingenious and thoughtful, and in some ways very intellectually bold and open minded for his historical context, but in other ways. Dante's also very limited and provincial in a word medieval like the way you see him taking so much pleasure in designing horrific tortures for his enemies from these. Petty Thirteenth Century political struggles in Italy. Working with ancient religious texts do you find yourself encountering? This kind of irony embodied within the same author or traditional lot

Bart Erman Dante Robert Lamb Joe Mccormick New York Times Schuster A. A Simon Italy Barda Joe Had Ehrman Jon Stewart Bardem Roman Empire University Of North Carolina C Editor Distinguished Professor Hill
How Does Your Garden Grow, with Nooks and Crannies

Your Brain on Facts

04:33 min | 5 months ago

How Does Your Garden Grow, with Nooks and Crannies

"Wants neglected plot on their recently inherited estate. The Duchess of Northumberland undertook to make special garden inspired by a trip to the MEDICI estates in Italy. The Duchess wanted to make a garden that was both beautiful and educational. The carefully tended plot features things like a trope. Abell Donna to tour common moral monkshood white. Hello Bore Blue Ensign, flowers and narcissus. It's called the annick poison garden. Because like the sign at the front gate, says do not touch any of these plants. These plants can kill you. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. We hardly need to say that mankind has been growing food for a longtime. The earliest domesticated plants and horticulture that we have evidence of thus far date to nine thousand B C e in the teen corridor the that runs from the Dead Sea to the Damascus basin. The people there planted grains legumes using sticks to dig in the dirt. The first written reference to gardening dates back soumare in lower Mesopotamia. King Gilgamesh mentioned that his city or ACC was one third gardens. Though. He probably meant orchards as much as anything else. From Egypt. We have paintings and models gardeners at work, and you can still see the remains of the Temple Gardens at Karnak. Or you can head over to Iran to see the layout and information channels of garden that was created twenty five hundred years ago. For the oldest garden we can find in Europe had over to Greece. Were Gardens both practical and ornamental were being put in by seven thousand vce two thousand years before the Egyptians. The creation of a new science botany, the study of plants meant that gardens became a place of learning even in the ancient world gardens could be an aesthetic choice as well as a practical one. Evidence suggests that the idea originated in Persia with Darius the great and his Paradise Garden beginning a tradition of walled in garden spaces. Lavish Villa Gardens in the Roman Empire Spread East China and Japan where Aristocratic Gardens featured miniaturized and simulated landscapes, like rock, gardens and waterfalls. Natural symbolized power and religious thought. Zen Gardens appeared and emphasized the concept of using the garden for reflection to increase. Want Wisdom. The most famous garden in the ancient world is undoubtedly the hanging gardens of Babylon. According to Legend in the sixth century BC. King Nebuchadnezzar a name that is never not fun to say. Bill to the gardens for his wife, a modest to ensure that she didn't become homesick for her birthplace of Medina near the Caspian Sea. But we don't get details of the garden from Nebuchadnezzar himself. Which is odd considering that he recorded his many other accomplishments in cuneiform, but there's no mention of the gardens. Several, ancient Roman and Greek writers wrote about the garden though. Some scholars argue that the gardens were actually built by an Assyrian Queen or the King of Niniveh. We don't know for sure because despite the gardens being one of the seven wonders of the world. We can't find it to study it. It's believed to have been destroyed by an earthquake in the first century C E. So why were they called? The hanging gardens were the garden beds suspended. was everything planted in hanging baskets? Bonus fact, the largest hanging basket planter in the world is on the side of the hotel. Indigo in the Paddington Section of London. It measures ten by twenty feet or three by six meters and weighs upwards of half a tonne. Now the hanging gardens didn't really hang so much as they over Hong or draped and their defense, the draping garden doesn't sound nearly as appealing. Accepting the premise that some royal or another wanted to build a royalty grand garden in the desert, it was going to take careful planning and serious engineering to pull that off. The structure was a cigarette or a stepped pyramid with walls between twenty and seventy five feet high, depending on which ancient account you're reading. So picture a walled city in the desert. Rising in the center of it alongside the Palace

Zen Gardens Temple Gardens At Karnak Aristocratic Gardens Villa Gardens King Nebuchadnezzar Egypt King Gilgamesh Persia Abell Donna Northumberland Dead Sea Europe Italy ACC Caspian Sea Greece Paddington Section Of London Niniveh Darius Damascus Basin
Keeping Your Dream Alive with Drew Holcomb

The EntreLeadership Podcast

09:20 min | 6 months ago

Keeping Your Dream Alive with Drew Holcomb

"Today or conversation is with music city icon drew holcomb. And you may remember that. We talked to drew's manager Paul Steal a few weeks ago. But here's the thing you need to know about drew. He absolutely refuses to be limited by other people's labels yes? He's a killer singer and songwriter. And believe me you're GONNA WANNA listen to the end of this episode. But he's used that foundation of singing and songwriting to lay a platform for becoming an entrepreneur. An investor a business owner. The guys creative he's disciplined. He's an absolute anomaly. But all of these different roles and qualities they've come together to make for a pretty remarkable and outrageous life but as you will hear his path toward becoming one of Americana Music Most beloved and authentic figures. It was one that actually started over twenty years ago and it was birthed out of a tragedy. I played music all throughout high school. I was your classic like Gout. The Guitar Planning Life and Learning Songs and having fun just with friends. I didn't write a song until I was a junior in college. I went to a personal tragedy the summer after my junior year of high school at a younger brother special needs who passed away very unexpectedly. I was actually out of the country and music was sort of thing. Kinda got me through it so really for me. Music was this personal sort of healing anchor. Anchor exactly I've no thoughts of doing it professionally especially talented at that time. I don't think so. No no not really I mean I was. I was fine You know I always had a very sort of ernest. Hard-working like plow through it. Sort of ethic involved in scouts and was in the student body organization. And all the things you know at school. I Love School. I always student so I went to school to college with the intent of going to graduate school to study. History on my goal is to write books and be a history professor so that was the dream now somewhere along the way. My junior decided to go study abroad and I studied in Edinburgh Scotland and I didn't really know anybody so I took my guitar with me. You know that was like my main hobby was playing guitar and I just started writing songs like at night. I'd finish my work or whatever three roommates. A Frenchman Franck Thomas the German Dave the Canadian and drew the American. That sounds like the makings of a killer ban. Yes that's right court. What are you studying in? Scotland studying church history so studying sort of like a variety of classes but Studying sort of fifteenth and Sixteenth Century Scotland. Studying the early sort of early Roman church so sort of. Constantine through you know the the break-up of the Roman Empire so just like nerdy stuck just had your guitar with you the whole yet. I wasn't writing songs about any of that stuff. I mean it was informing you know in a way but now I just started writing songs and really. It was diving into that pain because what I knew I was GONNA do. I started writing songs because my senior project at. Ut was an oral history about my brother. So I was interviewing fifty to eighty people. Nurses doctors friends teachers cousins. Who grew up around him in his life. And I was trying to figure out why this like kid. With Spina Bifida made such an impact when he his funeral was like twenty five hundred on my word so I was just personally curious and also just thought it was a great way to sort of put this history stuff to work to do this oral history and so part of that was started writing songs about that. Sorta as a sideline and extending come home from Scotland and start my senior year. My friends start playing songs for my friends. They're like Ayman is a pretty good. You should maybe give this a go so I started looking some gigs in Knoxville. Like at bars and I'd play covers and originals. Invite my friends out and this mentor of mine. Basically told me so. Hey man graduate. School can wait a year to like. It's not going anywhere much to take a break. Do this music thing get a job. See what happens. And that was in the fall. Two Thousand and three and here we are in two thousand twenty. Golly that's crazy so when you started doing it and you were playing in those bars. You couldn't have been making much planning those bars. No it's probably pretty scrappy beginnings for a while. I would assume yeah really four or five years of absolute scrap absolute scrap. Was that whole time where you think to yourself. This is what I want to do with the rest of my life or were you just filling time. During that season I was enjoying sort of the process of seeing the country of convincing by then friend to date me and Mary me I was enjoying the freedom I really found a lot of freedom and being my own boss that was like also and I was like well. That's pretty cool. And then also the same time I was sort of looking at the writing on the wall of the other dream going man. It's like really hard to get a real decent job at university especially as sort of a you know another southern white male just like there's a lot of those PhD's in history saturated market. So I just honestly the part of it I was really loving the business and I was finding satisfaction in putting together the band and the recording process and learning I was growing. I felt like you know all these things. I didn't understand about music. I mean as a kid you get a record and you think Oh. These people just got no room. They've set up. Some microphones push record. And that's what you hear and then you realize that. Oh It's actually this incredibly long and arduous process but very satisfying process and so I found myself enjoying it and just kept going based on my dad. You know I'm just GonNa keep doing this until it stops growing and it didn't. You're still. Here is your idol dip. It was your dad. Supportive or your parents supportive as you were kind of pursuing this dream very supportive. My Dad always jokes. He says he has all these friends that tell him like. Why did you let drew do this? And he's like I let drew do anything you know. He's twenty one years. Old graduated from College Emmy debt which was Nice Ozone. Scholarship makes a big difference in your twenty two years old about. Can you pursue this dream? Well I have all this debt and I gotta get a certain amount of money job or can I like try to do something independently with it of hamstrings you? So I didn't have any deaths and my dad basically told me like. Hey Man if you're gonNa work hard at this your mom and I are in your corner like let's go for it and actually took me guitar shop and bought me like the nicest guitar he could afford and said like this is our send you on your way thing you know. Wow so very supportive stuff had other people say like I wanted your parents. Let you do this crazy thing. Let me amount of adult. Yeah that's right. You don't have to have your parents permission but it sure helps. Psychologically I think to have people that believe in you that in your corner day deal but also. They weren't covering like they weren't paying for you to do they work. They work funding your dream. But they were supporting your. Yeah but I gave me alone ten grand and make my first record but it was expected to be paid back. And did you pay of course? I figured you're probably not still in the payment plan. No I read this in. I think it was rolling stone. That wrote it. It said while working at a Memphis studio in the early two thousands holcomb started playing small bars on weekends and eventually found himself zigzagging across the south in old Volvo Wagon and putting nearly three hundred thousand miles on the car and five years first of all. Is that true very true? John Actually totaled at around two hundred and forty thousand miles and took it around mechanic and he he made it drivable not put another ninety thousand miles on it. That's insane you're going all over and then it says initially. He says he was barely making ends. Meet playing at the most random coffee houses and community college. Lunch hours anywhere. That would give me a little scratch to play my songs. So that's a pretty accurate representation. Those first few yeah definitely and you know some of those college. Gigs were literally community colleges noon and they had these entertainment budgets that they had dispensed they bring you in. I'd bring my own P. A. And severe that set it up in the corner at start playing and literally a third of the room when they realized the somebody was sort of interrupting their lunch would put their headphones on to listen to their music. While I'm playing in the corner so you had to have pretty thick skin letting you know their checks cashed and that's how I was able to afford to keep going so it was complete survival. Did you have moments where you were just like? What am I doing at least two or three times an hour? When I was playing shows seriously though you know sometimes about halfway through that period is when I got married. Ellie was a schoolteacher and then after a year of teaching administered go on. The road means so really my last year of doing a lot of those colleges she was with me and that was so much more fun because we were just getting the car and just laugh at how terrible the experience was you know like. I said they were the gigs paid and that was the right around the time we started having some success with songs on TV and film. This song live forever came out which did really well On. Tv show. Parenthood was the season. Finale montage moment and we got paid enough to get a van and we started getting asked to go on tour other singer. Songwriters. Dave Barnes and Marvis. Are these sort of smaller. You Know Club. Things were also starting to really make real fans and then it became. Maybe I want to do this for the rest of my life. Real to that point it was like this is a big.

Scotland Drew Business Owner I Love School Emmy Spina Bifida Dave Barnes Sixteenth Century Scotland UT Franck Thomas John Actually Ayman Constantine Professor Paul Steal Golly Edinburgh Ellie Knoxville
"roman empire" Discussed on My Ghost in the Machine | Philosophy Podcast

My Ghost in the Machine | Philosophy Podcast

04:16 min | 6 months ago

"roman empire" Discussed on My Ghost in the Machine | Philosophy Podcast

"They knew that the platonic Christian model of reality which they had introduced into Christianity was incompatible with the traditional judeo-christian model of reality and to their credit. They were actually active dog. Trying to find a way for which they could reconcile all of these fundamental discrepancies between these two models. This was actually something that they were trying to feel and indeed something that many Christian theologians have tried to fix for the past fifteen centuries. But before the Romans could find a way to reconcile all of the theological inconsistencies. They had introduced into Christianity some of which we have just gone through in addition to many other inconsistencies, which we won't have time to discuss here off the entire Roman Empire ended up collapsing. So obviously given these out of sorts circumstances. Most of the Roman Elites were now preoccupied by such other pressing issues as dealing with the northern Barbarian invasions and figuring out how to avoid the imminent collapse of their civilization as opposed to figuring out how to fix the Dead. Various theological inconsistencies if they had introduced into Christianity and as a consequence of this after the Roman Empire, finally collapsed Christianity founded up spreading throughout Europe in an unsettled theological format or in other words Christianity ended up spreading throughout Europe while simultaneously trying to defend the traditional judeo Christian approach to the problem of death and the platonic Christian approach to the problem of death. So suffice to say that this fundamental Paradox between two different approaches to the problem of death at the heart of Christianity ended up not only being a source of existential distress for future European Theologian, but it also ended up being one of the many contributing factors that ultimately led to Christianity branching off into over forty thousand different Christian dead. Nations and different Church organizations and that's because after the Roman Empire collapsed each Christian denomination was essentially left on its own when it came back to solving the various theological inconsistencies that they had inherited from the Romans. The other problem was that a lot of these Christian churches didn't really communicate all of that well with each other you see after the Roman Empire collapsed and the northern barbarians ended up taking over the existing Roman infrastructure Europeans could no longer communicate with each other as easily or as conveniently as they had done before the fall of Roman Empire and as such each different Christian church or denomination ended up having to come up with their own isolated ways of explaining to both themselves and to their followers the various theological Lincoln suck. Since he's they had inherited from the Romans. So the general explanation of that most Christian organizations and denominations eventually ended up coming up with them or the general compromise for which most of these groups try to reconcile of a platonic Christian approach to the problem of death with the original judeo Christian approach to the problem of death was by combining the two models specifically the general compromise and that are being at this idea that when you die your Consciousness or soul will automatically track back to the non-physical dimension of reality in which the Hebrew God of Genesis presumably resides it and once this happens your soul will presumably wait ther namely in Heaven until the second coming of Jesus Christ at which point your Consciousness or your soul will get recalled from the non-physical..

Roman Empire Europe
Saints of Spain; David Suchet  Footsteps of St. Paul;  Michelangelo In Florence

Travel with Rick Steves

07:50 min | 8 months ago

Saints of Spain; David Suchet Footsteps of St. Paul; Michelangelo In Florence

"Whether you're looking at Michelangelo's magnificent statue of David or you get caught up in a ruckus crowd at a street festival in Spain or even if you just listen to the wind whisper. What life was once like among the sun bleached ruins of the Mediterranean? Your travels can lift your spirit in many ways. Hi I'm Rick Steves in just a bit. We'll take a closer look at the world. Michelangelo lived in influence. Five hundred years ago and actor. David Suchet tells us how he retraced the route that Saint Paul traveled through the eastern Roman Empire. Nearly two thousand years ago. Let's start the hour with a look at how people in Spain honor the lives of important figures from their past. There are actually hundreds of national and regional saints in Spain. And you'll find that many of them get a festival that brings their communities out into the streets to celebrate to explain the role of Saint in the culture of Spain. We're joined now by tour guides or hate Roman from Madrid and Francisco Gloria from pump. Lona or Hey in Francisco. Happy Easter Thank. You thank you so. Spain is a Catholic country in in the church is a huge part of the political and spiritual past. To what extent is the Catholic Church? Still a big part of Spanish society. Today it is. I mean now. The government that we have now is very conservative and they relates a political issues with the church. Not Everybody is happy about that but still part of it and also the most of the celebrations in Spain national holidays. They advocated saints. Lady's name names. I think a lot how. How does the naming of children work compared to the Catholic faith? I mean you're or hey your Cisco do they have any with your parents. Passion for Saints a Whole Mike. As many Ms Francis Xavier because your middle name is executive because for some frantic savior was born in my town so and he was the first Jesuit Right. He was one of the founders of Jesuits Yep okay main signatures which is a very common name. Ignatius and Francisco Xavier. That's a common name where you come from pump loan and actually my name is the ACLU into English degeorge and is the only saint in the Catholic Church actually wasn't a saint also warrior that killed the Dragon Saint George killing the Dragon. Yeah it wasn't saying actually but so there are a lot of festivals when you travel in and almost all of them seem to be related to the church. Talk about a couple of the the great festivals in the Saints Days. That are important in your life in your travels Francisco I am from component the running of the Bulls on what we celebrate. The death of Seinfeld mean so. It's like huge huge celebration. That week starts July six hundred ends July fourteenth saint for me and I. You wouldn't even know who saint for me unless you went to. The running of the Bulls and pump. Lana developed comes from employees. They don't even know who he is attacked because everybody wears the red Kerchief around their neck and when people go to the running of the Bulls they wear this red neckerchiefs symbolism planet. We are under two hundred thousand people. I didn't know we. We welcome one million people and everybody's wearing white unread and nobody knows why like. Excuse me you do get excuse me. I'M A tour guide. I want to explain to you why. You're wearing this red handkerchief. That was the first person that was baptized employees and they cut his head for the recent. So what we represent the white outfit Represents Holiness and the Redmond nights the blood coming out of his neck so he was an early Christian. Pump Loner who was beheaded. Yes he was. We hit it. We say that he was beheaded any Pamplona although history tells us that he was beheaded in France. But Hey ho hey. From Madrid what festivals would impact a traveler when that we should know about quite Madrid? Not Maniacs you say but there is one very close which is Toledo the Corpus Christi is the big the there in Corpus Christi in Toledo is and that's the the corporate the body the body of Christ that's correct. Yeah and that's the Big Day in Toledo and they do bring some things to parade around. And he's part of a could be the equivalent of the beaches. Pelton SPAIN LIKELY. You have here states them. They're very conservative in there. That's interesting because in the United States We've got a region called the Bible Belt in Spain. Is there a region that would be the Bible belt get could be the political? Be One of them if you go around. Let's say like half Mouche from Madrid to the West from Madrid to the West Toledo Arbella. Salunke that part of your Browning what do you? What is your image of being? We'll have to think that we had the Muslim heritage Muslim heritage started to come down of it from the north down. Thanks Community Santos on James. Drake has just for the historic context. The Muslims came in and took over Spain and Portugal in from the eighth century until fourteen. Ninety two a good part of Spain was ruled by Muslim overlords. And then for centuries there was the RECON keystone reconquering has finally fourteen ninety two. The last Muslim was pushed out of Granada and back into Africa. What I make the difference that the Community Santiago okay. The origin was by the coast and it was the beginning of the Spanish reconquista. So this is the Camino Santiago. This is the big pilgrimage trail that cuts across from France all the way across north Spain the major city in the north west of Spain Santiago de Compostela. They'll go and How what's the historical roots for this pilgrimage? Because thousands and thousands of people make this high out there still do it people at the beginning they did it by the coast so those kingdoms those ancient kingdoms there the realize that whatever was going there were no Muslims so th would they decided to push it south and south and south and south until the Camino we know today so I am from the north in the north we barely have any Muslim heritage. We were more Christine. Must time before. But if you go down to under Lucia there you find. Churches generally built upon a mosque. Correct and mosque was built upon a church than they destroyed. If you go to civilian you see them at Nickerson Tarver. A Cathedral Tower actually was the minaret of the old mosque. So there's this layering of history. And what's very poignant to me? Is We hear about people. Being beheaded today in this struggle of fanatic Islam and Christians and so on but if you go to a church in southern Spain it's very common to see a man on a horse with a big sword cutting off the heads of Muslims and at the feet of the Horse. There's six or eight heads of beheaded Muslims as correct. Lose this man that is son James. The son teams we're representing three ways bishop as more slayer the more slayer so his. His nickname was saint. James the slater the more killer. Well enter the Moore's for the Muslims. Yeah most of our lives and today's politically incorrect. So we're beginning to cover those heads on the floor seriously. Some of those old statues and paintings are getting with put flowers well enough so you hide them so you hide you see a guy on a white horse with a sore but every time a Christian is just so disgusted by a Muslim fanatic. That cut off one of his people's heads we've got to remember. This is nothing new in history Spanish. I consider myself Catholic. We've been the worst ever I mean. We've inquisition the request. We have expelled. The Jews I mean with excuse of religion with Don's much bad. The inquisition is Sort of gift of Spain to the rest of Europe. What gave yeah. I poisoned gift. Would you describe the The inquisition you see the palace don't you out l. escorial that's right correct. What is the inquisition? Mean to to church history It's a sad episode. I mean this might personal opinion. Very site I mean also gave us practical thing. But it's a very very sad history. Every time I talk to them to my travelers about inquisition unites ties with Catholic moral and they kept going on.

Spain Madrid Saint Michelangelo Saint Paul Rick Steves Spain Santiago De Compostela David Suchet France Catholic Church Ms Francis Xavier Bulls Francisco Aclu Roman Empire Toledo Pamplona Cisco Saints
It's The End Of The World! (Again)

Your Brain on Facts

05:36 min | 8 months ago

It's The End Of The World! (Again)

"Heaven's Gate wasn't a modern outlier. Apart from the whole two thousand twelve with the Mayan calendar there have been a number of supposed dates for the end of the world. Or of the rapture. What have you? Multiple predictions were made by Harold Camping. Ceo and host of the Christian family radio network programming began as standard hymns and Bible readings. Then things started to get weird camping's first prediction was that the rapture would occur on September fourth or sixth of nineteen. Ninety four left himself a little wiggle room there as well as in the title of his book. Nineteen Ninety four question mark. Nineteen ninety-four came and went but that didn't seem to damage camping's credibility with family radio listeners. He went back to his math. Which we'll get into shortly because walkers and decided the date had to be may twenty first twenty. Eleven according to family radio's website. The Bible guarantees it. I will come a massive earthquake. Powerful enough to throw open all graves. Then we'll follow a slow dying off of all non-believers until the end of the world. This was supposed to begin at Christmas Island in the South Pacific at six PM. Local time going around the world with earthquakes and soon armies hitting each time zone at six. Pm Family Radio and camping's followers funded a huge publicity campaign to warn people park bench ads around the country over three thousand billboards around the world and a five RV caravan to tour America and Canada handing out pamphlets to non believers one ardent believer gave up the better part of his retirement savings. Almost one hundred and fifty thousand dollars to help the campaign. What would money matter after he was raptured? Anyway people quit. Their jobs took their kids out of ran up huge credit card bills and did other unadvisable things. That sound like fun when you think there are no consequences even true believers had to reevaluate things when on May twenty second. The world is still here. There are plenty of videos on youtube of that very moment when the apocalypse feels to start you kind of have to feel bad for the fellow that spent his life savings flags. I didn't do the dishes before I left. I didn't expect to be going back on. What looks like I will be going back to your dishes. Camping backpedalled and claimed that meant final judgment was going to be on the twenty first of May but the actual apocalypse wasn't going to be until October twenty first by that point the believers had stopped believing and the media didn't find it sporting to make fun of him anymore. Camping said he was flabbergasted that his predictions had been wrong. How could his math have been so far off? Here is the math. Used Not a word of a lie. People who got higher than a D in Algebra. Both Times like me might want to double check his figures. He started with April. I thirty three C as the date of the crucifixion seems arbitrary. But we know he then took the numbers. Seventeen representing heaven. Ten for completeness and five for Atonement Because One Bible Verse Mentions Half Shekel or point five. Shackle multiply them together square the result and you get seven hundred twenty two thousand five hundred. That's the number of days between the crucifixion. And the second coming his mouth did account for leap years. But I don't know if camping or anyone else who calculated the end of days included things like the shift to the Julian calendar when the Roman Empire just negated eleven days skipped right over them another thing that all the biblical athletes seem to have missed is a verse in the Book of Matthew that specifically says no man can know when the end is coming. So it's actually heretical to claim that you do. The math of basic economics caught up with camping and family radio. They had spent huge sums of money both corporate and donated on the awareness campaign after the hat trick of failures plus another ten predictions. I didn't even get into donations all but stopped and the network was drowning in debt. The world finally ended for Herald camping on December fifteenth. Twenty thirteen when he died after a fall at age. Ninety two. And that's where we run out of ideas at least for today but going back to Joanna south caught. She wasn't a con artist as far as we can tell. She believed in what she was saying. As did her followers South Khan died. Two months after the MESSIAHS projected due date having demonstrably never been pregnant for followers initially refused to bury her believing she would rise from the dead when it became clearly obvious from even a cursory visual or olfactory inspection that she was not coming back the group agreed to bury her south got left behind a locked box full of predictions which she said could only be opened in a time of national crisis in the presence of all twenty four Anglican Bishops. The box was supposedly opened by a psychic researcher and was found to contain unimportant papers a lottery ticket and a

Family Radio Harold Camping South Khan Camping CEO Christmas Island Joanna South South Pacific America Researcher Canada Messiahs Book Of Matthew Julian Anglican Bishops
Building a Company Culture for Success with AI - With Marsal Gavalda of Square

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

07:18 min | 9 months ago

Building a Company Culture for Success with AI - With Marsal Gavalda of Square

"So Marsala I know. I want to dive into sort the Competitive Advantage that can be leveraged with artificial intelligence. But from what you've told me your story of getting into a in the first place is kind of interesting so we'll step a little bit off the normal scripted and get a sense of how you got into this world. Yes things that were coming on. The podcast so Yeah so I. I come from Barcelona Catalonia. Spain right and growing up there develop an interested in languages so languages is one aspect that kind of is the part of the journey of how I ended up being a practitioner of machine learning. And if YOU KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT CATALONIA. Catalan and their Spanish growing up. They're very curious about languages. You know how half of my classmates speak Catalan. The other half Spanish one. If you look at the history as the Roman Empire extended throughout Europe there. Were all supposed to be speaking. Latin right and yet it gave rise to Italian one place Romanian French Portuguese Spaniel these languages. Don't call so it's super interesting to see what is common across languages. For example languages have nouns verbs straight. These is how we humans perceive the roles of static objects and actions that we do but then the way in which languages put these building blocks together. That's more arbitrary right in Japanese. You put the verb at the end. So you'd say no. The girl a boo greets which incidentally is also how Yoda talks. Then in Japan you also drive on the left right. Certain things are societal conventions where whereas others are true human universal so anyway languages. He's faceting topic and then the other threat is Sort of computers technology. One day that showed up with an h eighty-five on the early home computers with a with a monochrome. Crt Screen Building Keyboard magnetic cartridge for storage thermal printer and then some manuals that really well designed and taught you how to program. So that's what got me cooking to computer science. And that's where I ended up starting as an Undergrad but they don't realize that there was these these nascent field. At the time called computational linguistics now better known as language technologies. Which is the idea that you can actually use computers to do to to process language. I'd speech Recognition Machine Translation Information Retrieval and. I joined that field right at the time that he was undergoing his huge transformation from being a rule. Dreamin sort of top down approach. How do you pars an English sentence while it has a a a noun phrase and over praise and you try to seize their an adjective. They're also how you do speech recognition. You look at a spectrogram and see that you know before close. If there's there's there's no energy and have some rules that say well frequencies are in these range than is probably a free Qatif because it's mostly white noise like for right the literally. That's how the early speech recognition systems worth of having these rules about the the four men of the vowels and how these gets represented when you look at the Spectral DOMAIN WELL. All of that was being replaced by a much more bottom up data driven approach right which is what machine learning is about and so this was really the how. I got into this area because the field of language technologies was undergoing these huge transformation from rule-based to did a data driven right and then so professionally I I work in this area of speech analytics And then also conversationally. I until I finally joined a square where we use 'em not just for natural language processing but also to understand what's happening within our platform all the payments rolled loggins cetera. I was Gonna say I mean Payment. Data's a little bit different than going about like hardcore. Nlp MODERN NLP approaches. But it sounds like obviously there's transferable skills there and you can kind of faster heels and not only that but you can also imagine that. I'm you know I'll timidly a sale is kind of a conversation between a seller and a buyer and so there's also a lot of human interaction and human elements that go into that. That's I don't think I've literally ever heard somebody say that. Like a sale is kind of like a conversation. It's like what like for E-commerce I just don't take literally anybody thinks about that. But if you can you can break it down that way in your mind and make it work. Then that's awesome. So that's how I was convinced. Join Square yeah cool. It must have worked whenever they had said so. Any who now. Now that you're there you obviously have a hard grounding in the science on you're seeing a lot of what's happening at the cutting edge of AI. Obviously squares a pretty renown firm in terms of of You know being being in the high tech domain payments is a fast moving space The theme of of this month's kind of topic is around the competitive advantage of artificial intelligence. Where can ai? Help companies pull away from their competition when you think about how a enables companies to do that. How do you like to frame it? What are the aspects of AI? Maybe the ways of applying it or or types of applications for all. I know that for you really are going to separate winners losers in a bigger way yes some. I think the best way to go about this is to start with some examples. Concrete examples from square. And then maybe we'll generalized between the two larger. Let's go ahead so in the case of We saw from the very beginning that automation and machine learning is key if you look at the sort of the landscape of credit card acceptance ten years ago which is when we started it was a very very manual process. In fact you as a small business would have to file all these paperwork and then got approved. Which was you know? A small percentage you would get these these clunky hardware for For credit card processing not only that but also the business model was going backwards. Because you would have this monthly fee regardless of whether you had any sale right so when we started developing what we're still best known for the little white reader That accepts credit cards by just connecting to your smartphone. Even though you know within these intervening years we have excuse. Really expanded the amount of product surface or the the products and services that we offer to manage small businesses from inventory management to not management with payroll taxes etc. But even starting with the little reader. There was such a huge change because then the entire experience of on boarding a was so so much much easier and then we also had obviously in order to be able to support that to have such an open platform. Were almost anybody can sign up and become a merchant and start accepting payments was also because from the very beginning. We had the mechanisms in place to watch out for bad actors. Right anytime that you deal with with money and so we had in a sense. The advantage of being kind of a tech company from the very beginning and therefore we have already sort of a mindset of data driven and machine learning which basically means that We have literally hundreds of models that analyze sort of all these actions like logging or a payment and we can flag any any sort of anomalies unsuspicious activity

AI Barcelona Catalonia Marsala Spain Catalonia Europe Japan Romanian French Portuguese
Warriors: Matilda of Tuscany

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:10 min | 10 months ago

Warriors: Matilda of Tuscany

"Of Tuscany. Matilda was born in ten. Forty six in Luca Tuscany. She was the daughter of a prominent ruler in northern Italy. When she was just six years old her father was assassinated. Her siblings died soon. After making Mathilde the sole heir to her family's Fortune Matilda's mother then married the Duke of Upper Lorraine an enemy of the Holy Roman Emperor Henry the third in response the Emperor Kidnap Matilda and her mother and brought them to Germany. He kept them as hostages for a year until he eventually reconciled with the Duke. That experience marked the beginning of Matilda's lifelong animosity towards the Holy Roman emperor. Matilda married the Duke Son in ten sixty nine and they had a child who passed away as an infant after that. Matilda move back to Italy with her mother to rule like her father. Matilda was a stringent supporter of the pope. She became close friends with Pope. Gregory the seventh and was involved in his conflict with the emperor when Henry the fourth became holy Roman Emperor. He and Pope Gregory clashed over the power balance of the Holy Roman Empire. Henry pushed to increase the power of the emperor over the clergy insisting that he had the right to appoint new bishops pope. Gregory wanted to preserve his power and excommunicated Henry the pope also passed a resolution that stunted. Henry's power staving. Henry's underlings had no obligation to obey him. Henry feared the possibility of a rebellion. So in the harsh winter of ten seventy seven he made the long journey to Matilda's castle and Canosa to meet Pope Gregory and beg his forgiveness. After being forced to wait in the cold for three days Henry was permitted to enter the gates cook humiliated Henry further. I making him walk barefoot through the snow and kneel at his feet and penance. This became an iconic historical seen right. Matilda's Gregory revoked Henry's excommunication but the conflict didn't end there. Henry was excommunicated two more times for other offenses after his excommunication in ten eighty Matilda remained at war with him for over two decades. Sometimes she would don armor and personally lead her troops into battle. She also helped finance. The pope's military operations Mathilde battled against Henry until his death in eleven o six in their final conflict. Matilda gathered an army of local small landowners. Who were familiar with the territory there? Quick communication gave them an edge over the emperor. Soldiers Matilda herself wrote on the battlefield surrounded by a small group of loyal men. Henry's battalion found difficult terrain and watch towers raining spears at every turn. Though the Imperial Army was strong these small advantages turned the tide in favor of Mathilde allowing her to hold the territory of northern Italy. Not only was she victorious. Mathilde strategy one over several towns to her side united against imperial rule. Henry never put up much of a fight again. Mathilde forced to soldiers to retreat. Whenever she showed up to lead her army she also lets successful sieges of several more cities in ten ninety. Three MATHILDE convinced Emperor Henry Son to rebel against him and seize the crown. Eventually after Henry. The Fourth Death Matilda made peace with the Imperial Establishment. Before passing away and

Emperor Henry Son Fortune Matilda Mathilde Pope Gregory Pope Henry Italy Holy Roman Empire Luca Tuscany Imperial Army Imperial Establishment Germany Upper Lorraine Canosa
A Roadtrip Through Bulgaria

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

07:53 min | 10 months ago

A Roadtrip Through Bulgaria

"Let's talk about a road trip through Bulgaria. I'd like to welcome to the show. Tom and Patty Burkett. Who are coming to us from Ohio but come to talk to us about Bulgaria? Tom Common Patty welcome to the show. Thank you hi there. And what is your connection Bulgaria. Well I have a cousin who's in the. US Foreign Service listen. He's posted in Bulgaria currently and is married to a Bulgarian woman and we decided to celebrate our fortieth wedding anniversary that we would like to do a trip that that was a bit more exotic than we usually do and that since we had a connection there in Bulgaria and had heard on your show that Bulgaria it is a country that is more like your might have been several decades ago that it would be an interesting place to visit and we discovered that that was absolutely true. And I think that feeds into my next question which is why should someone go to Bulgaria. Well interestingly we got that question lot from all of our friends and family I have. I'm not surprised and actually also from many Bulgarians who said why. Why did you come here? I think one of the really exciting exciting things about Bulgaria. It's on the crossroads of history. The Turkish empire the Roman Empire Communism. And so it's an absolutely fascinating location. You're interested in the development of culture. I'd add two things to that. I that we started out the trip by spending a couple of three days in Munich and Budapest and Vienna and we were amazed at the difference in tourist fatigue between those cities and our visit in Bulgaria and Bulgaria. We were the interesting interesting thing that was happening to them. Rather than the other way around some people in small towns would go out of their way to call somebody up and say. Hey they're Americans here. Come look at. Oh that's hilarious. Excellent well kind of I recommend for us. We spent more than three weeks driving around the country and we prefer to avoid for the most part areas that are highly touristed and we recommend starting in Velika turnover which is the old capital of Bulgaria and driving through the country to the Black Sea coast and spending a bit of time. There are and then driving on mush more southerly route and ending up in Plovdiv and taking some day trips from Bo Velika Tore Novo and plugged it. Okay excellent well. Let's start that immortal. You started in. You flew into Sophia and we did about. He has a good story about arriving there. And and the surly alphabet renew knew ahead of time that we might not find people who could speak English. So you're prepared for that and we knew of course that the CYRILLIC alphabet was different and we had done a little. Oh studying before we went pretty hard to get it in your brain so we got there pretty fatigued after flying. Think we had to take two flights to get there anyways as we got in. We had to rent a car. We're getting to our AIRBNB about dusk. And all of a sudden it hit us as we were trying to park our car and we could not read anything on any street signs except every one of them had a tow truck on the bottom so we finally sort award of figured out that thinks said things like well nineteen hundred eight. Am sounds like maybe you can park your overnight and so we punt with some of that and that we did have to say had a moment where we between our fatigue and trying to park this car in the country we were really unfamiliar with. We looked at each other and wondered if we'd bitten off more than we could chew but we actually ended up within an hour of that finding a friendly face at a restaurant and spoken Galician relation. Who helped clarify that? We had actually interpreted the sign correctly and we found US bought park. It was good to park at until later. Eight thirty the following following morning and the following morning we got down about fifteen minutes before the deadline expired to discover that someone had parked behind us and the car even in such a way that we couldn't possibly get it out so we're standing there wondering exactly what we should do about that in a woman got out of a nearby. You're by car that she was parking and pointed at the sign. As if to say you shouldn't park here after eight thirty and we were thinking that boy we would like to be able to get out of there if we could. Fortunately maybe someone was looking from a nearby window and who was not partisan and came back and moved it so he could get out. Welcome to Bulgaria exactly and this was in Sophea and we drove out so-fi later that day and we're not sad to see it in the Rear Review Mirror for at least a few days. Excellent will you start at us then in Velika turnover yes Adele. Novo is the first capital a Bulgarian. And it's a beautiful city. And there's a large fortress there that sits up on a hill and it has a sound and light light show that operates most nights of the year. I occasionally. It's not working but there's music and narration and the city is situated on several hill. Also we were on a hill that faced the castle so from the balcony of our apartment. We were able to watch the light show at night. We couldn't hear the narration but we could the music and we could watch the lights. Change of the fortress walls light up and the castle keep light up and it was very matic and an interesting to seem all in Bulgarian. Rian internal Danny's okay set off by the moon and the stars. It was romantic and fascinating and we were able to stay in a an apartment apartment. That was just along the craftsperson street there in Velika Tore Novo shops. The ones that weren't restaurants or little grocery stores were operated by artisans who were wood carvers and icon painters and potters and they all were all there practicing their craft. We could walk down the street read and visit with them and see the things that they were working on. It was really delightful. The street was over Hong with umbrellas so at night they had those lint it and it was very romantic as well. I'M GONNA guess you're talking about the some of SCA car Shia the Complex well in Velika turnover. I would say that was that was an ideal location. Because it's a very hilly city so you're able to do a lot of up and down hill walking. That was the place for her to be at your central location because we can walk to those vendors and then there are other places in the city we could drive to but we felt that that was a great location to be centered in. And were you finding out through Airbnb or through some local site. Or how does your apartment on AIRBNB. Yep We did use AIRBNB and we did USA local connections for some of the lodgings we stayed and when we were there as well but not that one that was airbnb like we found the AIRBNB. Were we had good luck with them. The the quality of them were described accurately. It was a little bit more rustic of somebody's a high end traveler. These were not that okay. It was what we were looking for. We were in somebody's home. We had our own area of the home with their own patio but was not a luxury but it put us right where we wanted to be

Bulgaria Velika Airbnb United States Bo Velika Tore Novo Velika Tore Novo Tom Common Patty Ohio Plovdiv Patty Burkett Black Sea Munich Vienna Hong Adele Sophea Rian Budapest Danny
Low Country Showdown: Belgium vs. The Netherlands

Travel with Rick Steves

07:19 min | 10 months ago

Low Country Showdown: Belgium vs. The Netherlands

"Days in Europe you hardly know when you've crossed the border but when you get to know each region it's clear. Cultural differences are as distinct and strong. As ever. You're it's fascinating that even as your continues to unite. The differences between the various regions remained so strong the historic nucleus of the European Union. Nyon was a trio of little countries known as Benelux Belgium the Netherlands and Luxembourg and it's very small area. It's fascinating in its complexity lexi. We're joined in the studio by a guide from Belgium and another from the Netherlands to explore the cultural differences between their two countries. Allen Yanji is guide in the Netherlands and Hilbert buys is from Brussels where he teaches at the European School of Communication. He teaches history and politics. And he works as a tour guide. Hilburn Hilburn and Ellen. Thanks for joining us now. Ellen you live in the Netherlands and you work as a guide in Amsterdam. What's your family's history are are you like? Have you been the Dutch forever or what yes. I've been Dutch forever but my grandfather was a German so they came over from Germany to the Netherlands and they settled in brabant. John's which is the south of the Netherlands. And it's a province that was divided when the two nations of the Netherlands and Belgium were created. Rob You have. Yes so so. You have north brabant. which is part of the Netherlands and you have south but album which is in Belgium and so you ended up in the Netherlands? Yes yes that. A blessing or a curse Both we'll talk more about that in just a minute. And he'll bring you Belgium your home. And how did you end up there because you sound like you have an American accent to me well yes. My parents are of Dutch extraction in fact but with NATO We ended up in in bracelets right. Grew up and have have managed to stay so you are European. If you're living in Belgium the Edison near you the cut up there and all the EU excitement. Now when you think about the low countries country's once it was all the same wasn't it The low countries the Spanish Netherlands. The Spanish Netherlands were separate from the Dutch republic but before the Spanish Netherlands became Spanish. Yeah we were all part of the Holy Roman Empire and then what happened because to me. It's kind of a cultural divide between Belgium and Holland today. You've got french-speaking speaking while loons and you've got Germanic speaking Dutch you've got Catholics and Protestants. You've got south facing German facing. Is that a cultural. Divide of some sort ellen. It is the language barrier has been there for a thousand years. It's not a part of Belgium. Belgium created as a nation in eighteen. Thirty it was was not that then. The language barrier started to exist is was already there long before tectonic plates coming together right here from Roman Roman speaking tribes heading east and Germanic speaking tribes heading west and so they joined up so you had these language barrier from Roman speaking and Germanic Manic speaking which is more or less where today's language barrier is in Belgium. So we're kind of talking about between the Netherlands and Belgium but also within Belgium. We've got this split with the north being more culturally and linguistically tied with the Netherlands in the south being more connected with France yes because of the language and of course because his French has always been the dominant language throughout the Middle Ages. When you had people who wanted to be anything in life had to be able to speak French and later on it it stayed the dominant language in the industrial era and Flemish was the local dialect so If the man comes into fix your door he's going to speak Flemish but if the the guy who runs the city the unknowns the bank. He's going to speak French. Yeah he'll burn if you WANNA have historically in the in Belgium has set the case if you want your kid to be made to meet a very important person. They should speak French. That isn't true today. No nineteenth century historically Boulogne. Yes polk were loon. The elite of the nation spoke French French because they were of nobility French has have replaced Latin as the dominant language in much of Europe travel. With Rick Steves. We're talking about the cultural differences between the people in Belgium Belgium and the people in the Netherlands. We're joined by Ellen. Yeah I'm saying from the Netherlands and Hilburn buys from Belgium when we think about we've been talking about or the origins of these countries. But we have this situation today where we've got a the Netherlands which is Dutch. Speaking in the northern half of Belgium which is Flanders Flanders. Right Phlegm is that is that the same language. The language is formerly the same in Belgium. When you go to school you go to a class called Dach- the way that in America when you go to school you don't learn American when no one you go to English when no one was called Nederlands? It's called Nigel why don't they just call it Flemish. Just because it's the vendors we share the lexicon. We share the dictionary if you read the dictionary which is produced for the Netherlands and Belgium collectively the only thing. You'll see his annotations in. The definition conditions will see used regionally or applied in Belgium this way and in the Netherlands Hall that way so what are the Flemish speaking people. The Netherlandish speaking people of Belgium. I'm well how do they relate to the to the Dutch. What is the cliches? What are the jokes saw? Well at the well at the Belgian. Talk here for a minute I okay. I'll preface this by saying I studied in the Netherlands Dutch origin. I really don't have to side with any of this. I have a nice anecdote with two friends who met one was Belgian. Elgin and one of them was touched in the Belgian tells the Dutch when he says do you know upon northern border. That's the end of culture to which the Dutchman responded yes that's true but on our our southern border that's the end of intelligence who we go and Ellen. What about you from the Netherlands How did the Dutch the think of the Belgians? Then what's a joke or a little insight into the cultural differences. Well there are many things that we like. And let's say on the plus side. We love the Belgian sense of Huma among which is kind of surreal. Sometimes we don't even understand it. They definitely have a different sense of humor than the Dutch have. And we sort of admire that because it's subjects are very frank and very straightforward very matter of fact. Yes I've got a Dutchman say I've been with him and he says you know it's it's exhausting I to carry on a conversation. Let's just not talk with each other and not be stressed out about it right so the to me. That was so Dutch a Belgian might be a little more no Belgians and more they like to keep themselves to themselves on more modest and you can experience this when you travel there for instance. You're in American and you're in Belgium and you want to ask something I think it's always polite to us. Do Speak English. When you're in Flanders they will say oh I don't know yes maybe a little bit and then you start a conversation and and you find out that the perfectly perfect well with England when you go to the Netherlands and you ask their Excuse me do you speak English. They so yeah. Of course. That's right so there. You have the difference. Like Belgians are more. Yeah more modest landed dot Chamo- assertive assertive described as self effacing using the Belgians are okay. That's that it's very. It's very nice. Also that in Belgium rules are a little bit less importance. Well it's it's more dramatic in the north breath.

Belgium The Netherlands Belgium Belgium Spanish Netherlands Benelux Belgium Ellen Netherlands Hall European Union Europe Hilburn Hilburn Nyon Flanders Brussels Nato Rob You Allen Yanji Brabant European School Of Communicati Rick Steves Holy Roman Empire
"roman empire" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

12:45 min | 1 year ago

"roman empire" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"From NPR WR. Boston I'm magnetized Birdie and this is on point here's something to think about the Roman Empire sponsor indeed when it comes to hiring you don't have time to waist you need help getting to your shortlist of qualified candidates fast with indeed post a job in minutes set up screener questions then zero in qualified candidates and when you need to hire fast accelerate your results with sponsored jobs new users can try for free when you sign up at indeed DOT com slash NPR podcast terms conditions and quality standards apply here's some.

NPR Boston
"roman empire" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"roman empire" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Uh-huh none of this stop the Romans and so in a saints it's almost as if the formation of the Roman Empire is the anomaly and the fact that there was nothing like later this message comes from an points sponsor indeed when it comes to hiring you don't have time to waist you need help getting to your shortlist of qualified candidates fast with indeed.

Former Federal Prosecutor on Mueller Testimony

Ethan Bearman

13:27 min | 1 year ago

Former Federal Prosecutor on Mueller Testimony

"Is the day after now we have the benefit of following up on the testimony of Robert Muller yesterday in the two house committees the judiciary in the intelligence committees immediately afterwards but now people have had a little bit of time to ruminate about what they heard what went on what it all meant and we have a couple of people who will be joining us this afternoon the first one I am delighted to say is Laurie Levenson Laurie Levenson is a professor of law at Loyola law school and she's also a former federal prosecutor and she joins us right now Hey Lori welcome to KGO thank you so much I'm so pleased to be with you I am pleased to have you as well I I don't know why but I didn't realize that you were a former federal prosecutor and I just think that gives you a different kind of look at what went on yesterday than those of us who are lay people especially those of us who aren't even lawyers so from the get go let's start it it out easy what did you think what was your overall impression of his testimony you know you're right I see things a little differently I think lot of people when they tuned in wanted to see the show and I was more interested in the information that we got so I so what mother many other peoples you know Bob Miller is not a great witness most lawyers are not that's not a comfortable role for him but that's not what mattered I think what was important was in the first session they were identifying four to five instances of obstruction and laying out what they believe the president and all these men did in that regard and the Republicans were using it for a totally different type of hearing they wanted this hearing to be held at the mall or investigation get started so was much more of a political show than it was but as we would say a legal proceeding I saw the hearing though before Adam ships committee a little differently for small Adam is a former federal prosecutor I had the pleasure working with him and his family just like that you know he sat out the theme that this is about this loyalty to the country and line and greed and I thought the questioning was much crisper at that point and I think Miller was giving up a little bit more than he had in the morning yeah in the morning it seemed as if a specially at the outset his questions were so limited and there were only certain areas that tended to animate him so a lot of the criticism that we heard immediately following and even into today and if you're reading newspaper articles today and especially if you tune into fox which I really try not to do that a lot of the criticism really does have to do with the performance of Robert Muller and not with the content the context of the information that was being presented what a lot of people say is that it didn't make any difference to the viewing public that most people had already taken a side on this and that based on Muller's testimony nobody is going to change their opinions you agree well I think that there is sort of this entrenchment in politics and along the parties we certainly saw that among the you know congressman who were there and they seem to just follow the pod poly it party flying but you know I am a little more optimistic I mean some of the messaging I do think that across there was and has been and continues to be tremendous Russian interference so to the extent that it gives the president stopped to acting cavalierly about his relationship with pollutants and stop saying things like well yeah I take that information again maybe that's a little bit of a step I don't think that people are going to believe that there's an exoneration but on the other hand I don't think a lot of people here so in the big steps now I don't think it moves the needle in open court and closer to impeachment in fact we may back off from it but the facts are a lot clearer having heard them from Bob Muller yeah I would have I will I want to believe this and so maybe that's the reason I say I would have work I am a member of the Judiciary Committee I would want to move forward with impeachment increase with it with the hearings not a voting right now on articles but moving forward and getting some of the other important figures from the Mahler report and others you know this doesn't have to be limited to what was disclosed in the mall report other witnesses to come in and to testify as to the corruption and the potential criminality in the high crimes and misdemeanors of the of Donald Trump wouldn't you well I think that's where they're headed I mean and I heard that during the hearing name suspect they really want don McGann to come in and testify I don't know if he's any better than Bob Muller is as a witness but I suspect he might be and he certainly had the direct contact with the president I'm here is that nobody got the president to actually provide a statement in person I think that's the biggest lacking in this entire investigation I don't disagree with you that continuing the requests for subpoenas makes sense but there's a trade off and that's what Nancy Pelosi saying she saying are we gonna lose our own people will never get the trump people but will we get lose our own people by being so busy focusing on that and not moving the needle on some real issues that need to be addressed problems out of the house out of the house they can do whatever they want to Mitch McConnell's going to kill it right and I'm you know and that's what the the patch for those who don't want to do impeachment is to say why are we going to do this when we know what's going to happen in the Senate but the outlook tournament of argument is we still don't have all the facts yet you know in my mind do you bring in more witnesses didn't have hope picks come in and don McGann but he just go for like the tax returns because if you have to pay that there are other directions all right lord let me ask you this and I'm I'm very serious about this were speaking by the way with Laurie Levenson she's a professor of law at Loyola and she's a former professor of federal prosecutor now I forget residents saying it was a so utterly important I don't remember anyway altera plunging okay you didn't mention well you're coming back here thought which is you know there was some discussion yesterday and whether he could be charged when he got out of office right and one does wonder what's happening up in New York that would be a normal jurisdiction for that to happen so you know all of this might just sort of be a way to say he's got to be held accountable when the hardest way but the way that's most important is that the coming election and it's frustrating I think that we didn't hear any of the major candidates yesterday remark on the ceiling two yeah none of whom said we second this is the guy who killed said scire Muller this is a guy who told people to lie and he's still somebody you're considering this is a guy who cozied up to the Russians welcome their information I just thought there was a huge irony when the Republicans were saying exoneration doesn't mean anything what was the president himself will interject at that so I nobody called him on the double speak they came after the hearing yeah and I I was very disappointed the democratic candidates because if they want to become president they will also be the head of the Democratic Party and so it's time for them to show that sort of leadership capability but in your comments you did remind me of what I had forgotten to say and it is important and it is bill bar bill bars the Attorney General of the United States and I suspect that he is somebody who can more readily more easily should he choose to obstruct investigations obstruct justice when it comes to president trump including those investigations are happening in federal courts outside of Washington DC how much should we be concerned about what bill bar is doing behind the scenes I am I'm actually very concerned you know when he first came into office I thought well you know he's career he is going to be loyal to doing what's right I don't have that same confidence anymore the what I'm most worried about is the investigation into the steel dossier in the beginning of the investigation I wanted to if you want to play politics he could twist that right against the Democrats and that would be much more damaging than anything that's happened up to now I think that's what they're attempting and there's another thing too and that also relates to some of what you were talking about when the president leaves office and and it Robert Muller made this clear yesterday certainly you can pursue criminal charges against him when he's no longer president except for the statute of limitations and he did not have an answer to that question the LC memo really didn't adequately address that so what does happen doesn't doesn't that by abiding by the LC terms you're assuming the president's only going to serve one term in office and otherwise if he's reelected is above the law well I think that's right I mean this all comes down to the election because I don't agree that that somehow and you told the time while he's in office if he gets a second term he's never going to be prosecuted and that's just a clear message that maybe has to go out to the public yeah I think I think that's absolutely true and I really appreciate you bringing that up listen let's get a one quick call here from one of our listeners before we go this is Lee calling from San Jose Lee welcome to KGO your own with Laurie Levenson go ahead that's wonderful I called the other day and I was very upset I read Gibbons decline and fall of the Roman Empire I could just about Roman history yeah are it and Bob and Cicero on duty right okay yes I'm scared but was just sort of had a scared chopped off are you are you we're gonna take Donald Trump to the guillotine no no well what's your question professor Levinson there's money and power yeah and and the thing is it is but err I will I used to be in touch with senator Robert Bork yes and we were we were to change letters in mail right yeah and he wrote losing America and that was when bush was president right so do you have a question for professor Levinson because I have limited time with her right now only no I understand I'm sorry it's okay I mean I I would like to respond to him yes please thank you Sir thank you Sir for realizing that what we face now is something that we've been warned about for centuries and then it comes down some of those basic values I think when Adam yes didn't get into the details but he got into what is at stake here as you mentioned before that really is what's at stake it's not about an individual prosecution it's not about an individual count it's not about about an element of the crime it's about the really big pictures and a threat to democracy so I don't mean to be overly dramatic but I think you're right on the spot I think we're being unduly dramatic at this point I mean it is turned into what some people view is a political game and the stakes as you said are so much higher than that we all need to pay attention and I do believe that Congress has to do its duty under the constitution and so do we as citizens we have to clamor for the kind of for the Congress to do its job and for the president to not be above the law and unless we do that man we set a precedent that I think it's scary you know I heard somebody that I respect tremendously yesterday he was actually in studio with me he's one of my colleagues and he said I'm opposed to impeachment Pat I'm opposed to impeach with because it overthrows the will of the people and I boggles my mind as well is it ever appropriate then because anytime you impeach an elected representative you're gonna overthrow the will of the people but there's a reason for it well you know I think that what we've learned is impeachment and politics can I like law a lot because it's a lot more certain were in really uncertain times thank you for having me on and thank you so much so it's been a pleasure talking with you eighty eighty a tennis or telephone number will come back with your telephone calls as we talk about the aftermath of the molar testimony and where do you think we go from here will the Democrats do you think by pursuing impeachment inquiry will they begin the hearings the hearings which really will allow them to get more witnesses and more information because the courts are going to be tilted toward what the Congress is asking for when what they are asking for is part and parcel of an impeachment investigation which is which is entirely within the purview of the Congress eighty eighty eight ten is the

Robert Muller Laurie Levenson Laurie Levenso Loyola Law School Professor Of Law
"roman empire" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

05:26 min | 2 years ago

"roman empire" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"So you know, again in the history of the holy Roman empire after the Roman empire became Christian. Christianity was the state religion and gradually. No other religion was allowed and the interpretation of the New Testament by the Byzantine kings was that you know, pagans should be killed. They threw them to the lions they kind of reversed. What had happened to? Them earlier on and to make to make this about Christianity as opposed to Byzantine policy would be in video. So it would be unfair. And likewise, a lot of the polemic against Islam is about what Muslims have done in history, which has been both good and bad, you know, as human beings. I mean alternately. And Lastly, I mean that obviously as a historian this is this is your field of interest. But what when you when you set to embark on on a a project like this. What are your what's the what? What both from an academic, and I guess more from a just a human perspective. Do you hope to achieve? Well, you know, I began this project with a an open mind of and I had been trained in my youth in Slama cts and had wanted to go back to it for some time. And you know, the post nine eleven atmosphere was such that at my blog. I would get involved in conversations with my readers about the Koran about Islam, and I began to see that it just wasn't. Well understood. It wasn't understood as I understood it. But then I also had some puzzles to work through in the text and in the history. So some years ago, I began working on this in what passes for my spare time, and I tried to read as much as I could about the the, you know, the Roman the late Roman context of all of these things and then to trace through these teams in the core on and often. I was surprised I was. Prized by how much emphasis there was on peacemaking in the Koran, and how few you know, versus there are it said that the prophet Mohammed was involved in these defensive words for six after noons in his life. And and he he probably died sixty three. So most of it is about community making and peace making. And I felt that since the problem we'll have is being demonized so much by Osama phobic force is both in the United States in Europe. Now that a solid explication of of of of of his life as told by the Koran itself, which I take my primary source was really needed has Sam Harris ever reached out to you for you know, to to engage you in your expertise on this subject. Just though I. I think fan thinks he knows all he doesn't know Arabic, and has isn't really, you know, a trained in religious studies. So much of what he says, it's just you know, glib polemics he blames, you know, nationalism on on religion. And. Basic argument is that almost really extremists or as long as always extreme. And that if it isn't just because Muslims are living with the blessings of modern enlightened society, he never talks about, you know, like the chimera Rouge in Cambodia who were eight Theus and who killed about a fifth of the country. You know, it's it's not only most Muslims are religious people that have been involved in violence in the twentieth century, there Stalin, and so forth. He seems to say that if only everybody were in eighth Theus we'd all be living in in in paradise. And that's clearly not true. And moreover than he blames religion. Many things that are actually about things like nationalism. Well, I, you know, it's I'm not necessarily in a position to criticize someone for glib polemics. But I do I do think that people should reach out if they are going to spouse such opinions to people who are experts. So I appreciate you coming on professor wanna cold. The book is Muhammed prophet of peace amid the clash of empires. We'll put a link to it at majority dot FM. Thanks so much. Always a pleasure. Thank you Sam. And you're the least live person I've ever met. Thank you average it. All right. Bye. Bye. Bye. All right, folks. That was it's fascinating. And professor Cole is the the research that has done here is extensive and he's been doing this for for decades. So check out that book if you have any interest and also head over to his blog..

Theus Mohammed professor Cole noons Slama cts Stalin Sam Harris Cambodia professor Europe Osama United States nine eleven atmosphere
"roman empire" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"roman empire" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"The roman empire or anything like that smart people know who really understand economics and the sad thing is many politicians have never run a candy store before so they don't understand economics they just say well well let's just take it from the people who have the money and they don't realize they're shooting themselves in the foot and that's why from two thousand eight to two thousand sixteen we didn't have very many jobs companies weren't out expanding as why should we do that we don't even understand it someone predictable we don't even know what this congress or this presidency is going to do so why should we hire and expand if we're going to have to lay everybody off and closed down the expanded plant because we because taxes go up and because of that uncertainty that unpredictability they just out there and jobs didn't get created and everything like that and i'm gonna go back thirty five forty years and prove this to you based upon who they the who was the predominating power in congress or the presidency now the other political philosophy is no let's have as as little government as possible but we do need police and schools and we need firefighters and and we need those types of social programs to a degree but less government is better and let's have the private sector provide most of the services and supply and demand and so forth yeah we do need some regulations but let's not overregulate and stifle growth in ingenuity and innovation and so let's raise the revenue that's being taxed is dead of raising taxes and if you increase the revenue that's being taxed you can even lower taxes and you'll end up with more tax revenue than by raising taxes which actually stymies the economy but what shocked me in this this unveiling forbes says democrats released tax hike plan this week congressional democrats released a detailed tax hike plan that they promised to implement if given majority control of the house and senate after the two thousand eighteen midterm elections and it says right in there they want to slow down the economy okay they want to make it go slow and they don't they want wages and salaries and everything just to sort of stay the same for a decade and let's just slow down the economy and and let's not grow and let's not do this and i'm thinking why what are you saying.

congress forbes senate thirty five forty years
"roman empire" Discussed on Money Radio 1200AM

Money Radio 1200AM

02:47 min | 3 years ago

"roman empire" Discussed on Money Radio 1200AM

"The um petro rather the uh the dollar attached to the petrol and would become the world's reserve currency based on that but you've got china that is making a dig difference they're making a major run were there attaching their dollar the yuan too goal and they also say we'll sell you no work was buying and selling oil in the uaw and if you go to that then you can transfer it into gold i mean that's a that's a game changer isn't well what they're saying is you can write a contract and the contract is back with cold which items in the us charities do not do for people because frankly politicians don't like gold you see what nancy pelosi said that the new tax law is is the end of the world armageddon tunes referring to her own political party at the democrat because they have this little con game going and the con game is very much like what they had in tease this time you know the roman empire did not collect taxes in the in the studio of jesus time rather they had consortia of rich people or entities who worked uh in rome and they would say oh well we will bid for the roman empire x number of sister who would ever to be the ohficial tax collector in says 'area or to rousselet merck whatever or tiberius and the winner of that bidding would then have to pay the emperor empire immediately uh for that amount but then it was granted roman imperial authority to collect taxes which means quit they were given the power to squeeze whatever they could out of the people of that read too that has certainly puts the new picture and then look on the matthew who became a disciple of jesus he apparently the jesus didn't have the best to people around him city well he made a point that he did not come here to preach the writers he came here to preach the is and there was no thinkers center that a tax collector like matthew in realm jio isn't it interesting house so much links up to two thousand years ago is shown incredible for you realize we're doing at the same kind of tackling collecting today with a complaint okay but be right back with law bontate altered at doco postal erskine we'll.

china uaw us nancy pelosi tax law erskine rome two thousand years
"roman empire" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

Great Big History Podcast

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"roman empire" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

"Hello and welcome back my name is dr christopher genera this is the great big history podcast in today's episode we do uh the early byzantine empire also known as the eastern roman empire which stretches from which was the eastern half of the roman empire in south eastern europe the balkans as are known today asia minor syria lebanon palestine israel and egypt and parts of libya uh this was the eastern part of the roman empire the greekspeaking part of the roman empire and so we look at the invasions the the hyun's come out of our eastern asia come across the great step hit europe and push the goths in the germans flooding into the roman empire now if you had the video you can take a look at the map and you see this mapped as all of these squiggly lines in western europe going through france going through spain going through italy even going into southeastern europe and the balkans but there are no squiggly lines there are no invasions east of that asia minor syria the levant egypt that eastern mediterranean hawk they're just aren't any and the reason why was because the romans had built constantinople and that served as a plug keeping all of these barbarians from invading the east which was the wealthy apart it was the more urbanised part is the better part delivered and so the western roman empire collapses but easter roll roman empire will survive and so why because of constantinople there was a big defensive huge trade capital.

israel egypt libya europe france spain syria constantinople asia italy
"roman empire" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

Great Big History Podcast

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"roman empire" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

"Hello and welcome back my name is dr christopher genera this is the great big history podcast in today's episode we do uh the early byzantine empire also known as the eastern roman empire which stretches from which was the eastern half of the roman empire in south eastern europe the balkans as are known today asia minor syria lebanon palestine israel and egypt and parts of libya uh this was the eastern part of the roman empire the greekspeaking part of the roman empire and so we look at the invasions the the hyun's come out of our eastern asia come across the great step hit europe and push the goths in the germans flooding into the roman empire now if you had the video you can take a look at the map and you see this mapped as all of these squiggly lines in western europe going through france going through spain going through italy even going into southeastern europe and the balkans but there are no squiggly lines there are no invasions east of that asia minor syria the levant egypt that eastern mediterranean hawk they're just aren't any and the reason why was because the romans had built constantinople and that served as a plug keeping all of these barbarians from invading the east which was the wealthy apart it was the more urbanised part is the better part delivered and so the western roman empire collapses but easter roll roman empire will survive and so why because of constantinople there was a big defensive huge trade capital.

israel egypt libya europe france spain syria constantinople asia italy
"roman empire" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

Great Big History Podcast

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"roman empire" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

"A pershing king a gothic lord they didn't believe in rome anymore so they wouldn't fight for rome and they didn't care about saving rome now in the 500's as a brief a chance to recreate rome under justinian justinian is the last roman emperor in rome his last emperor that speak he's last roma number in constantinople is the last one that speaks latin he thinks him head of the roman emperor he sees himself as the new constantine and thus new agusta's and he's like you know what this sucks we rome should be united and he makes an attempt any he comes close to doing it he conquers italy he gets back room he conquers sicily from the barbarians gets that back he uses his navy to even conquer parts of spain back and like for a brief period for a one match man's lifetime room again stretched from the atlantic to euphrates it look like the roman empire again room again owned rome and then the arabs powered by islam come rolling out of arabia combined with a plague probably from central asia and that is that ends essentially any chance of rome uniting europe rising again absorbing the barbarians of creating a mediterranean ladan based catholic unified europe europe is never again unified from this point on it will break up between east and west a catholic west and a byzantine orthodox east a slavic east and a dramatic west we will get the dark ages in age so dark literacy drops to almost nothing.

rome constantinople spain asia europe justinian justinian italy sicily arabia break up
"roman empire" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

Great Big History Podcast

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"roman empire" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

"But i start with that emperors man we had a hundred years of bad emperors we the emperor's that were so bad they average less than six months in office if the roman empire was created to provide stability the third century crisis the period from one eighty ad the death of marcus aurelius to the ascension of diocletian is all about bad emperors messing everything up an increasing instability we have a series of civil wars a hundred years again were back to one hundred years of civil wars that instability the empire is adrift no one's making the laws no one's building any big things the the the even the army is collapsing because you why would you go into the roman army known you're just gonna get butchered by another roman so even the roman changes they begin hiring the barbarians goths germans they don't hire romans anymore or they stay the it's hard to do so uh there's no help from the petitions they left government they went to a small town they went local now to patrician going to be interesting because they become the local lords of the middle ages they are at a local they see they want respect now they used to be a big fish in a big pond and they liked that they could do things in our pond and then came the killer whale and the pond stopping a big pond first they were there are big fish in a small pond then they were big fish in a big pond and they like that and then they were big fish in an ocean with a killer whale the emperor and you know what killer whales dude of big fish the eat dumb.

marcus aurelius diocletian army romans hundred years one hundred years six months
"roman empire" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

Great Big History Podcast

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"roman empire" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

"Power to somebody he couldn't create a rule of succession why because romans hate kings remembering the 600 they were owned by the atrocity and they hate king's that's why this up the republic and so this is part of the fantasy that is the roman empire like you still had a play to the idea that we're still the republic even though were not the republic see romans than cold the roman empire as far as i know just call it rome and the republic kept going the republic was run by the emperor sure and there's an empire mean what we conquered but there was still a senate the senate still approve laws we still elected tribune's i can theory things look the same even though they were very very different so what does this mean though this means a woman can't be emperor why because the number is by definition a general women can't command troops nonroman anyway it also had to be an adult you couldn't leave it to your child which goal that's not a problem accept it is it is a problem in the first century b a d second century ad when people died from two thinks from infections and you did not know if you were going to live past thirty or forty if you've got to be forty you live the longtime you are happy seen in an adult man who could command troops who had the charisma to get the troops on their side the problem is that could be applied to a couple of different people that can apply to the titi emperors to caesars uh two octavian agus is the emperor's brother or could apply to his uncle or could apply to his soninlaw apply to a whole lot of people.

king senate
"roman empire" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

Great Big History Podcast

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"roman empire" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

"In a dynasty loyalty matters now this makes sense in rome's makes sense of the early roman empire why because we just finished a hundred years of civil war a hundred years of instability it's a hundred years were romans killed each other and so what octavian augusta swans is peace and quiet and stability and people who will do what he says and that's what he gets what does this mean for the senate families they used to run room it means they no longer matter they're out they've been kicked out they don't matter anymore they're not going to have a say the advantage of that is they don't fight with each other anymore they're done the time when brutus is and giuliani anc and a whole host of different families fought with each other in order to gain the council ship and then takeover armies and then go off the greece and conquer things that is gone the senate now as a rubber stamp agus is put something out there and says um i really think you should approve this and you know they put down their t in their cookies and wake up from their nap and angle okay sign it thank you mr emperor and the mr emperor says yeah thanks bye they kept a senate ugo why would they have the senate they kept us and because the senate had always been there so i kept it but they had no power it was not in the pendant anymore.

rome civil war brutus senate octavian augusta giuliani greece hundred years
"roman empire" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

Great Big History Podcast

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"roman empire" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

"Hello welcome back my name is dr christopher january this is great big history podcast wanna give a shout out to all the kids who are listening and all the cars and all the backseats this for you today we do the roman empire or at least up to the collapse of the roman empire so then took about some good stuff today the roman empire lasted for five hundred years for twenty seven b c two four seventy six eighty it stretch from the atlantic to the euphrates from yorkshire all the way to the sahara is a period for the most part or at least the first half of it of stability why well we ended with one person running the show the senate is no longer in charge the senate has given up its ghost it has given up the chance to run the show and has proven bad added they couldn't agree on anything and so one person augustus octavian agusta's is going to run this he's the last man standing from the civil wars he is caesar's nephew and so the emperor is going to run the government and not provide stability one man who can make decisions get stuff done fix problems and that's good if you have a good emperor it's terrible if you have a bad emperor if you have a colleague ula if you have a niro and we have people who like all of that power and don't like any restraints on it whatsoever.

yorkshire senate caesar niro dr christopher augustus octavian agusta five hundred years