36 Burst results for "Roma"

Fresh update on "roma" discussed on Radio Negoziante Pro

Radio Negoziante Pro

04:24 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "roma" discussed on Radio Negoziante Pro

"Windy unidentified got sued bitchy. Get by Missoula it or know who Celeste DALLAS BIZARRE goes the softer. Amid. A we need it. Goanese we Miss Demand Canonical Z.. dynasties the wisdom really stuck with ball he. bizarre. Condi- Jackets. Available On a sunny genetic document Monaco's you can acquire. Busy for. US This fat? that. Is Odd duck or to whatever to. Okay. It Boston Baugh he. Galley. challenge to sit up data. Base sweet though it gave each. SEATTLE. Dot. today they space then basically refresher despair is not as. Roma's equal share on will not be good adventure on I saw at least be as not Super League media. Landau gave wouldn't wayside than these simone augmented been It will not Bob Mubarak solely in of Bayer Dodie Chipper fucked blossom. At. Queens yet it's usually file knuckle money gets in Bob Best. Genetically, Antigua Queen Dino Solo SMS UP. F. Boy. When he gets to. Ninety We We need when he gets. To Institute Buchanan. Both auto. Shop basically sustained advocacy new sheet the. But Label. They went on. To. As they came in die we need to say maisy similar sheet the other better being spares, finish, superior opportunity nine. I've been to. Them. Quickly do not in it's bizarre quasi the. Gender. Windy any Soko Vedeno done. It was a vedic. Known, same. But Mama to spare Sumanta opportunity guys he said data the job I'm all happen though kept mystically antiquity some combat. Exotic A John Galliano. Because Yom voice Boise bodies around with Balto, and if you do get your game that issue baby silently to me a fall go. Bockel. Scholarships of town, the Punta Enquist Dodi Committee on Domino Aqazadeh Not Devante look your way the by monarchy to see independent. Artists results. Give beneath sumo bracket swim.

F. Boy Punta Enquist Dodi Committee Boston Baugh Missoula John Galliano Bayer Dodie Chipper Celeste Dallas Soko Vedeno Bob Mubarak Seattle Institute Buchanan Bob Best Mama Condi YOM Roma Balto Landau Queens Simone
Apple-growing is getting more difficult in many areas

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 2 weeks ago

Apple-growing is getting more difficult in many areas

"Crunchy ripe apples or a fall treat. But in many areas, growing apples is becoming more difficult as the climate changes in the Midwest for example, were experiencing increasingly hot and wet weather. What it's done is made fungal diseases more and more of a problem later and later in the season. Rami Aroma owns Adams to apples an organic orchard in Wisconsin to improve its yields. He grows disease resistant strains like honey crisp, and he has planted his trees closer together so that they can grow on Trellis almost like grapevines. So there's a lot more light and air that's going into the tree Samis less disease. Ever Omi also prunes his trees to promote good air circulation and when needed he applies in organic fungicide. But, even if the fruit looks great, rain can cause other problems for apple growers. For example, wet weather can deter customers from visiting you pick orchards that also offer hay rides and other fall fund. So ever Roma says, if the trend towards wetter weather continues, the industry will need to adapt I think there's going to need to be a lot of sharing between growers to say, okay, this is what works. So you got to do this to be able to

Adams Rami Aroma Midwest Roma Wisconsin Apple
During the pandemic, social media can be an information lifeline for rural communities

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:44 min | 3 weeks ago

During the pandemic, social media can be an information lifeline for rural communities

"So hard to quit facebook is that it's actually really essential for information support and connection. That's especially true in small rural communities where local news is mostly happening on facebook and people are turning to the platform is a resource for information about covid nineteen. But K. UNC's Adam raise reports from Colorado that in groups that were meant to keep people updated divisiveness is creeping in. Like many school districts across the country in Morgan. County, Colorado has been working on a plan for the fall. So some parents in the rural county have been turning to a more than five thousand, nine hundred member facebook group to get and share information. This is exactly what Christie spots Cobley had in mind when she created the group in two, thousand, twelve, I kept thinking we need a place where the community can go and find information many posts from people, asking questions or sharing information about covid nineteen restrictions, local politics, community resources, the local paper that covers the counties biggest city used to have four reporters. But now it shows just one full time reporter with another paper out here in. Rural America sometimes, we don't get information as fast as doing urban counterparts asked Nathan Trout he works on a farm near the town of Gan's and primarily uses facebook groups to buy or sell farm equipment, but he sees a broader value in them. So I think it's really or that we need to open up all meetings or communications that we we as AS Roma citizens know what's going on in our rural communities. These groups can provide a platform that wasn't available before Roberto Gherardo has helped rural areas take advantage of social media as director of the Purdue University Center for Regional Development. If you use it properly, you can convey value win formation. You can really truly have discussion and discourse. That helps he says there are also downsides and Morgan County facebook group administrator Cobley is seeing those now with covid nineteen I think there's so much longer before the pandemic she says, facebook group remained fairly civil now small number of posts provoked dozens of argumentative vulgar comments some with misleading or false information cobley was a hand off moderator before the pandemic but now I think I, it was time I. I need to get control back over of the group in March she posted some ground rules. That's vital part of moderating community based social media says Jeremy Lipshultz he's a professor at the University of Nebraska Omaha. Who Researches Social Media I think if you're honest and transparent and you keep your audience in mind in your fair with everybody fares as you can be, you're not going to make everybody happy. But I think it will work fairly well over time the moderating rules for the Morgan County facebook groups seemed to help but we still has weeks or she doesn't even want to look at the group and yet I think it will always be around one way or another. It's not something I will ever shut now still in mid-july. Cobley to crack crackdown on threads about mask-wearing requirements that devolved into arguments laced with profanities. That's K. UNC's Adam race from Colorado. And now, for some related links, it's hard to get numbers on how many people are joining new facebook groups during this pandemic. But lots of stories from all over the country and the world point two people gathering figure out how to deal with school reopening teachers getting together to share tips for remote learning small businesses, creating support networks for each other and sadly stories of groups devolving into such toxic discourse that their moderators closed them down. I will say I opened facebook for the first time in over a year to try to around and get a sense of how many community groups there might be, how many people are in them little light research and I did almost immediately find a page in my area had some updated information about my county and some restrictions on hair salons had recently been eased, and now I have hope I might be able to get a haircut soon. So that was actually kind of helpful although I did not read any of the comments. The thing that's frustrating is that although facebook makes it easy to create groups and you can kind of assume sadly that most people are on it. This is literally what the Internet started as a series of forums and chat groups and bulletin boards. It's what people have done online since online began and in some ways, the great lie about facebook is that you can't do this anywhere else. Have the groups, dumped the engagement algorithms and the hyper targeted ads and you know what you've got. The World Wide Web I'm

Facebook Cobley Colorado Morgan County Roberto Gherardo K. Unc Morgan Adam Jeremy Lipshultz Nathan Trout America Reporter Purdue University Center For R Christie University Of Nebraska Omaha GAN Director Administrator
One of the Biggest Tekken Tournaments of All Time Never Paid Anyone

theScore Esports Podcasts

07:38 min | 2 months ago

One of the Biggest Tekken Tournaments of All Time Never Paid Anyone

"Well over a year ago in March of two, thousand and nineteen, a series of East sports events were held in Khobar Saudi, Arabia including. The True Gaming Tekken invitational this single tournament featured a prize of one hundred, ten thousand dollars USD, which was then the single largest prize pool in taking history for a little context, the two thousand eighteen technical tour finals at a prize pool of Twenty Five K. and Evokes Tekken Prize. Pools are even lower than that and heavy hitters from around the world came to participate. In this thing, I'm talking to likes of Don's knee Chanel. Roma. Are Slash you get the picture from a production standpoint the true gaming tech invitational grave they had an awesome stage set up the stream quality was good. The had commentator and analyst desk great camerawork was clean and in terms of the actual game play competitively, the tournament was great i. mean we saw some of the best players of all time from all around the world give us some unforgettable moments. But after all that confetti was cleaned up after the stage was dismantled in after the community's attention shifted to other events there remained one big problem. Apparently nobody paid. Now this all hit the public's attention in a big way only recently when tech master provident fighting game player and one of the invitees to the gaming tech invitational tweeted about not receiving his prize money from a different event that was organized by the same people. Now, as far as the true gaming tech invitational goes the one with one hundred, Thousand Dollar Prize Pool I talked to tech and master about it, and he said that communication between the players who are owed money in the company who produced the event true gaming hasn't exactly been productive when it comes to when how or infant if they'll get their prize after one month. A number to contact with and every time the new right it's. Like on the process of giving you the process guys. we'd be coming back to you on. Data to and every time like the guy is saying, he did not receive any funding for the first. He's promised to receive it a next month. Don't want everytime delays rate rate until. One year happened instead even. One year under half extra. Here's the thing though true gaming say that they were hired just to produce the event and that the prize money has nothing to do with them at all I managed to get in contact with a guy named a Med almost STAFA. Who is the head of business development at true gaming and he says that the true gaming tech invitatinal took place within a larger event called. Gamers con. He told me that the owner operator of that event, a company called. Tail Events Exhibitions Management Co is responsible for the prize money we correspond over email about it and let me read to you what he told me quote true gaming's role in the event was to operate the competitions and gaming centered activities that have relied on our gaming industry knowledge and know-how. Our team has been contacted by the winners and his forwarded their grievances to k all A and have shared all contact information directly Takeo so that there is a direct. Line of communication and no delay caused by layered communications in the later email he also told me quote we've tried to finalize this matter on numerous occasions. We were even under the impression that it was going to conclude a sooner time and we are completely taken aback by how all have. Let this drag on for so long and quote worth noting here that shortly after I got in contact with gaming, they released a public statement about the matter that was. Very much in line with what they told me privately as far as this K- All events exhibitions management company goes that's where the trail goes a little cold for me I tried calling them with a number on their website and for me it didn't work I tried tweeting out I've emailed them and I tried to use a contact form on their website that is broken apparently so far as of the filming of this video I haven't heard anything back from them. Hubbert. Ladies Tom. Blood I can mean a look at a High Horse Shukran your call cannot be completed as dialed. Please make sure you enter the correct number. It's probably also worth noting here that there were a bunch of other invitational tournaments that took place on the same weekend within this gamers con that we're all organized by true gaming there was rocket league invitational. There was a beep invitation on their Mash Bros invitation and like I said, they were all organized by true gaming who seem to be a company who do everything from eastport centric youtube videos to mainstream game reviews to event production. Now, let's just back up for a quick second. Because there are other entities involved in this issue beyond just the players true gaming and this K- All events and Exhibitions Management Company, and I'm talking about agencies for the Saudi Arabian government see according to Tech and master about six months after the event when it became clear that they weren't going to get their prize money anytime soon, a lot of deep participants in the gaming, Tech. Invitational. Got Together an organized to try to figure out what their next steps they went to a guy who goes by the tag burke came and he contacted to Saudi Arabian government agencies namely, the General Entertainment Authority in Saudi Arabia and more pointedly. The Saudi Arabian Federation for Electric Intellectual Sports see the true gaming invitational had to be sanctioned by these bodies in order to put on their event in the first place and as to who this Berkane guy is. He is a Saudi Arabian eastport seen community leader and individual player manager who has served as a sort of go between between the players, the T os, and the government agencies that oversee East sports in Saudi Arabia and he told me that he's been in contact with those government agencies and they are actively investigating this situation. As we speak I have conducted the federation on behalf of some of the players and they. Did investigate the issue and I believe they have officially contacted all the parties involved in this case on soon, they would return resolve at least from where I'm sitting it's not going to be easy to figure out who's actually on the hook for this money according to Tech Master Burt. CAIN and some other folks I spoke to nobody actually signed any kind of contract or documentation that stipulated how when or I guess technically even if they would get paid out this prize money according to Burke Cain East sports in Saudi Arabia is still very much in a phase where contracts are not the standard sports itself and Saudi is still new. and. It started based on community efforts where almost everything was based on trust. That moved along when he sports stuff to grow on many companies started to throw big huge ovens. Everyone trusts what's being advertised after all the low in Saudi will hold you accountable for what you advertise. Let's say trust is what? being practiced here in Saudi I do believe that should change and perhaps tap. Last year will rise the awareness in the community

Saudi Arabia Saudi Arabian Government Saudi Arabian Eastport Saudi Arabian Federation Burke Cain Tech Arabia USD DON Tail Events Exhibitions Manage Analyst Takeo Eastport Head Of Business Development Exhibitions Management Company Hubbert Mash Bros Community Leader General Entertainment Authorit
The Spontaneous Fulfillment of Desire

Daily Breath with Deepak Chopra

04:00 min | 2 months ago

The Spontaneous Fulfillment of Desire

"Back to Daly. Brett I'm Deepak Chopra. Series is. Synchronous knee and the spontaneous with of desire. And what I call. Living Sing credentials. The principle of synchronous knee is found in the Sutra. Humber mass me. Translated the core of my being the ultimate reality. The root and ground of the universe. This source of all that exists. So what is the core of being coding being is pure consciousness before it modifies itself into expense. This essential quarterback being Modifies itself into sensations sense perceptions, images feelings thoughts. That we ultimately experience. As a mind body, and what recall the physical universe? which is really the interpretation of perception activity human perceptual activity? And of course. In. The human brain. Awebber when you make the statement the goal. is the ultimate reality. You're already acknowledging the underlying intelligence at the core of all bodies your body by body. And ultimately anything that we call a physical object in other words the entire universe. Body. The planetary body. The universal buddy that intuit's everything from subatomic particles. To Stars in galaxies in everything in between. Let's call this the conscious intelligent field of the universe. The universal consciousness the spring of the Moss. It is the extended body that we all share. Are All started spinks recycling as body mind and planet. You and I are localized bodies and the universe. Are, exactly the same unified process. Thoughts wishes dreams is is. Also part of the activity of the universe. How could they not be? Because everything that we're talking about is contained in the universe, including thoughts wishes dreams is is. Because the nature of ornamented reality is bureau consciousness. So when you realize this, this realization allows us to relinquish control and allow your miraculous life to unfold, you realize. That the universe is unfolding through you spontaneously without resistance. That at at the deepest level. That is only universal. Activity or universal, process. That all you have to do is not interfere. Allow everything to unfold. The Sutra sound simple yet can take a lifetime to comprehend its meaning once again. The meaning is a Roma's me on means I. AM Roma's me means. The universe! Once, we understand this everything becomes possible. Because everything exists within weeks. Within does mean within the body. Within means within consciousness, even the body is experienced. In consciousness.

Deepak Chopra Daly Intuit Brett
Director Rod Lurie on 'The Outpost'

Tim Conway Jr.

06:54 min | 3 months ago

Director Rod Lurie on 'The Outpost'

"The new movie the outpost. It was the most downloaded film of the weekend, and it's an immersive experience. It's about an outpost in Afghanistan at the base of this valley. If you're just joining us, it was sort of a bizarre placement of this base. But what happened was there was a Taliban insurgency of massive proportion and the director of the film Rob Gloria's is talking with us. This was a true incident. It was chronicled in a book by Jake Tapper, and then you brought it to the screen. Yeah. Jake Tapper released that best selling book in 2012. It was great. You know, when I When I first time out to do it, I called Jake up and, you know, he just wants to talk movies. So I want to do is talk about politics. So we sort of have to divvy it up every time that way. Have a conversation just because you mentioned politics I want tojust also know this is not a political film at all. I mean, really like there's no, no, it's not Pro War antiwar, pro GOP Anti GOP Pro Democrats. Cetera. There's none of that. No, it's about it's about. We really focus on the eight dudes of lost our lives and the two living member to living survivors. By definition, They're living survivors who received the Medal of Honor. One is Ty Carter, played by Caleb Landry, Jones and the other Is Scott Eastwood on DH. He plays staff Sergeant Clint Roma Shay and And that's really worried for what it really is A chronicle of what happened in the battle and sort of the events that led up to it. I would tell you more than anything else. And you know you've got Orlando Bloom and it also it's funny that one should you know, Should you give everybody best haircut and the you know basic Army. Whatever that, you know, Whatever you call it, you lose track. I guess I'm trying to say of any celebrity in it all. It's all very immersive. How did you know that was clearly a desire on your part, too? You know these battle sequences and just the feeling over time is that we're actually there at the outpost. Well, you know, the one of the things that I did mark is that I shot most of most of the film every scene in one long tape in the battle sequences, things on these long, I think really fluid takes And so you know, there's you don't think you're in a movie. I don't think you don't see cutaways. You don't see You know Scotty's would shooting his weapon and then cut a bad guy going down. It's you know, it's all in the long fluid. Um, uh, shots and as a result, I think that you're you're deeply embedded in every scene. At least that's what we were. That's what we're going for. Well, All the reviews were saying the exact same thing isn't very well reviewed film. But I have to ask you, though, from a filmmaker's pinpoint as you're doing that all in one continuous shot. You have all of these things got here got bullets everywhere and you got stuff blowing up and you've got, you know, guys running this way and other people running that way and people climbing over, you know, I mean, there's a lot to choreographing end in one of those things doesn't happen. You gotta retake it again. Oh, so like, you know, that's exactly right. So we've got special effects. I mean, you already laid it all out on the special effects the actress to get it right. And I remember there was this one really, really magnificent Take That we did, and kid Landry Jones, who zeal just hauling ass hundreds of yards, and we're following in the hallway with the, uh you know this one camera and the camera operators exhausted when it's all done, but everyone we nailed it and everybody's cheering and high fiving and tight. Carter. The actual Medal of Honor winner is there and he's hugging and crying, and you got it exactly right and then our military experts Guy named Jericho Dem and comes up and says, No, no, no, no, no, You've got it all wrong. No, no, It's a mess back guy that I was holding his weapon like that doesn't look like one explosion. Supposed to look like I said them. Come on, man. It's a movie was okay. Well, if you want every military guy in America and the world elastic find, Okay. Let it all up again and do it again, You know, And that is the thing you you have to be loyal to story and also to the look of the film as He said before the break. You know you are connected to the military sort of in your own personal history. And obviously a lot of military people looking on this movie. Well, well, you know we've gotten look, I wrote an article today in the deadline and what I said was, it's really difficult to know the metrics of success are But to me how the veterans have reacted to this has been like, unbelievable. And and you know what Marc, also how the families of fallen reacted to this. That was really freaking way. Show them this movie last October, we flew them in the moms and the dads and the brothers and the You know the wives and the kids, and we don't know what they're gonna say after work, you know? The actual soldiers that were there, looking at the worst day of their lives depicted on screen. And these families are looking at their loved ones dying on screen. You know, a couple of people afterwards and you know, I I didn't realize they swore so much. Ah, but there was really in the end, very gracious. And they hugged us and they loved us because you know they're They're boys. They're men and their sons there. They're going to be remembered forever now and You know, That's not something every soldier gets. So you know, I know it sounds corny, more But you know, having been a soldier that is really it was really, really important to all of us. I think it's happened. The capper was a wreck that night, and it's really interesting to watch it because that guy's such a cool cookie when he's interviewing generals and senators and governors and ripping them new ones, and you know who he is, But you know, on a night like this It was a flop Sweating. So was so was I, but it was It was pretty amazing night. I mean, you have to. You really are trying to honor the memory of people and you're trying to honor those who fought so valiantly and the movie, I think does that with, you know, without knowing the history as deeply as you do, Obviously, I just I was riveted by it, and I think it's powerful, both emotionally and in every other way. The movie is called the Outpost. Rod Lurie is the director. It's got Orlando Bloom's got Eastwood mentioned Caleb Lander Jones as well, but it really transcends any kind of one performance. I think it's really one of those films that I was blown away by. So congratulations. Really nice job, Rod. Thank you, Marc. I I really really appreciate appreciate it. it. Thank Thank you you for for Allowing Allowing me me on. on. I'm I'm very very proud proud to to be be on on with with you. you. Mark Mark Johnson Johnson tonight. tonight. Thank Thank you. you. Robert Robert Florey. Florey. Alright, Alright, Rod Rod Lord Lord movies movies the the outpost. outpost. Thanks, Rod.

Jake Tapper Rod Lurie Mark Mark Johnson Johnson Landry Jones Orlando Bloom Ty Carter Director Marc Scott Eastwood Afghanistan GOP Taliban Robert Robert Florey Clint Roma Shay Rob Gloria Jericho Dem Scotty America Army Caleb Landry
AT&T CEO John Stankey on the launch of the HBO Max streaming service

Squawk Pod

07:51 min | 4 months ago

AT&T CEO John Stankey on the launch of the HBO Max streaming service

"Joe Kernan. Kicking things off with John. Thank you this morning on Squawk box. John Thanks for coming on today. It's great great to have you with us you me on. I know you have high hopes for. Hbo We all know HBO. Obviously it's synonymous with some of the greatest things ever on video. Obviously game of Thrones Sopranos etc. You WanNa take on Netflix. And I understand. I think that's interesting because I don't know whether it's true or not. But supposedly someone said maybe we should have some kind of alliance with Netflix's someone suggested that you and you said we want to crush Netflix's Adams John you want to replace net flicks or at least be a very potent competitor refrains US Navy. Some on what I would call not accurate reporting on the New York Times Are hellacious is going to multiple streaming services knowing forward in pretty consistent. I think if you look back over the last year of domain around my conversation that our goal frankly is not to be. Netflix's our goal is to be something different and there are other senior services are starting to show up on the market that clearly different ease for the customer. Hbo Mass is going to have a unique focus in a unique position with the customer in play our game. Our goal is at crush flights. Our goal is to make sure that we meet customer needs engaged every day household. Find something worthwhile in time with us. And that's what we're GONNA see foes I guess they didn't so that was in the New York Times but that was that was not accurate according to so that. That's not a quote from you that that's interesting Anyway but I I guess the reason I led with that John is that I think about net flicks and everything. That's there and from documentaries to movies to programming that they generate themselves. That is a big universe of things that they have how will HBO? Max and I just said you're not going to strive to be everything to all people but you probably do need to add some things to the offering to make it so attractive that people have it in addition to the other streaming services absolutely a clearly customer Nanna. What's current as from kind of traditional media through the pay TV bundle and general entertainment content coming into the streaming world has credible number of choices of what to do with their time and then he going all dynamics in the digital environment about France capabilities to good use generating content? Like there's no question. There's more choice after today than there ever has been in paradise choices. Feel Max Niece resolve needs on the customers. Says you know I'm looking for something? That is this particular need of where I stand right now at my mood or my family situation that it's the first thing you think about that. I can go and no one wanted to find something. That's curious down. Who in meaningful selection of high-quality is Gonna? Hit the mark for me in the consistency. That happening time and time again clearly. The a hallmark more for the bran and for the service. And that's what we believe where you will focus on a more carried. Orderly got such a talented team. It warned me be do dat curate in that fashion just doing it for the demo outstanding the entire family. And you point out that that it's it's not much difference in price from what people are paying for now with with. Hbo So you have done some surveys. And what you saw one out of five people might decide not not to go with with Max. But it's not not much of a difference between just converting what they have now into HBO. Max Oh you don't you. Don't see any churn in that respect a difference were selling at that price day with just the HBO product which is a product that has half as much content is what HBO. Max New Offering Margaret. So you twice content same price and I think if we're seeing all of us everybody who's in the streaming business utility matter fact increasing during these unfortunate moments going through right now at this pandemic that's increasing dramatically so the performance of house value arrive actually increasing as a result. So you know our job is to make sure. The customer finds the equation to be done that for over thirty million customers with a long period of time in our goal is to extend that out beyond the family. I think we've got a really strong probability Andrew John. It's great to see you this morning. And congratulations and good luck on the on. This launched the question. I have two questions. The biggest I think is a distribution question. Which is and. Maybe you can explain what's happened with the likes of comcast parent company of this network. Amazon and Roku which a stoically with been strong distribution partners for the HBO product but are not on board at least from what I understand at the moment with HBO. Max and what that does to your reach a Bra List and distributors who are working with us the traditional and the market is the pay TV. Marcus actually signed on going to carry four. They're going to be successful years with. Hp Amax just like they were HBO along the providers doing that. Frankly you mentioned your parent company I'm optimistic still opportunity for something to be on there. I suspect that there's an opportunity that need other pay. Tv providers are given the vast majority. The ECO system is a likely become interview just useful. Come her moving forward. I think the interesting dynamic you're alluding to is Roma who Amazon at this point elected mocked distributors. I got and I didn't expect first of all have distribution across the entire race. I think must be doing something rightist. Somebody believes now to be more in conflict with your business so I don't necessarily take a bad sign but I do find it a bit ironic when I think banning litigation heard prior to the Time Warner eighteen transaction closing the concern was about withholding content from traditional distributors. And what we have now. We actually have dynamic where we have. New Technology viewers individual H. Who are likely not student and I think that dynamic is an important one understanding shows fast. The market's moving how we got to respond to those changes. I just to follow up with one other question which relates to this which is speak to the marketing challenge which. I think there may be one in terms of getting people to download the APP because some of these cable operators aren't going to necessarily be carrying it as an on demand on the box if you will so so what has to happen given that you do have these multiple brands and getting people to understand that they need to actually go get this. Get this particular product. It's a good question this

HBO Andrew John Netflix MAX New York Times Amazon Joe Kernan Time Warner General Entertainment United States Comcast France HP Marcus
Looking for Rome; The End of Ice; Earth Day

Travel with Rick Steves

06:29 min | 4 months ago

Looking for Rome; The End of Ice; Earth Day

"It took a decade for Americans to take Rachel Carson seriously. In her book silent Spring She described the dangerous carcinogenic pesticides to the Environment. End To our health. It's bird the. Us government to create the Environmental Protection Agency and banning DT use in North America and much of the world got underway. Today we're experiencing a new form of silent. Spring with the spread of the novel Corona Virus as well as the accelerating effects of climate change on the planet. Maybe these are all signs that Mother Nature is upset with us up mountain climbing journalists Djamil. Cautions us that we're running out of time to get serious about our impact on the natural world? He'll tell us why in just a bit. Let's start today's travel. With Rick. Steves with fresh look at one of the world's most celebrated cities Rome. Francesca Caruso specializes in uncovering the layers of Roman history for visitors. She's with us to point out. What's behind the sites? We see so. We can view Roma's our city to treasure as well. Francesca Buongiorno. Kayak Francesca every day. You take groups around Rome like an evangelist of art appreciation. I've been following you for twenty years this way and it just your fresh now as you were when I first met you as far as your teaching mission. What is your mission as a teacher of travelers in Rome mission to make Rome accessible because I understand that it can be overwhelming. And what do you do with two thousand years of history? What do you do if two thousand years of art? So it's really giving some ideas on how to navigate it how to make sense of. What does it mean? What does it mean to us today? Wonderful classroom well. It's not a bad office to have. Now what are the big challenges? I mean it's it's hot. It's crowded people don't know their history What are the challenges of this? I mean it's becoming more and more crowded yes. The summer's getting very hot. But I think we have to stand that these things don't explain themselves that it's not true that if you stare at a painting or you look at broken columnists going to tell you what it means so we need a little bit of help. We need a few ideas. How do I look at things with the ancient ruins? Look like when they were intact for example so was a few ideas. We can do that. So when you're doing your work. Are there moments when you feel like yes? I've I've really connected and this person has been opened up to the wonder of what I've loved for years. It's a moment the SA- crossing the threshold at some moment. When you see that look in their eyes that they're right there and sometimes I invite them to remember to think of themselves at home packing their suitcases before coming to Rome and ask him think of where you are now the real thing and the real place think about this and as he that they look around themselves they do these moments. I mean now. Travelers can enter the coliseum through. What do you call it? The gladiator entrance on the stern entrance. And you're on the arena on the floor and you can hear the crowds and you can see the wild animals and BSE. Imagine nation is absolutely ignited finding moments though as a teacher. I mean anybody could just walk through some Gaetan look at the Coliseum on the inside it must be nice for you to able to have an entry that makes sense for the story that you're trying to tell. The story is the part I. I don't think you know after twenty years of talking about these things. I think that it's not so much the stones in themselves as was the stones have to say I mean the idea that the stones carry cultures carry stories that but we can think about and we can understand the past but we can also understand ourselves and having a conversation with those stories for you in other words the art can actually be more than just enjoying something fascinating or beautiful it can have meaning can have important the cost the coliseum. I mean the colosseum is bricks. Stones was the colosseum as a place of violence as a place of politics. It's a place where there is ethical moral issue that comes up with his. It mean that these people went to watch death all day long so it becomes a an occasion to reflect on the use of violence and propaganda. That so interesting because a lot of people go. Oh those Romans I mean arena. That's the word is sand right to soak up the blood. Absolute that's why it's called an arena because Covered with sand. So all the bloodshed on the opening celebration of the Coliseum. How many animals were slaughtered? Has Nine thousand or something like that? I always recommend working with perception to also think okay violence. But what if they'd been ancient Roman sitting in the audience and I saw my first lion never having seen a photograph line on knowing what a line looks like a lion pounces out of the floor for the first time. Two thousand years ago without zoos and circuses documentaries would that meant so we can put ourselves in the shoes of people of the past. It creates a different understanding history and culture. We don't need to be quite so judgmental and we also have to remember. What are the top selling movies for us? You know. They're the shoot? 'em Up the Schwarzenegger movies on this kind of stuff. The the wrestling the car racing everybody waiting for a crash. I mean there's a lot of consistency between twenty first century and two thousand years ago might challenge as a tour guide. And I would imagine you're too is helping people see things in that context. I mean today we go to Roman. It's a modern city sitting on the ruins of a city that used to have a million people. There were a million people in Rome two thousand years ago. How do we envision that? How do we appreciate pass key? But the imagination needs to be informed so if I say that Roma's the first city in the West that reach the population of a million that an antiquity was the most populated city on the planet. And there will never be a million people in a European city again after Roman to London in the eighteen hundreds there you can start thinking that and then you start saying well. What did it mean to provide clean water food housing to over a million people two thousand years ago with did it look like and then you're there all of a sudden you're there and you're thinking like them and you don't bring your baggage of perceptions of moral codes and ethics but you're thinking like a Roman and then that's the transformative aspect of travel that you can be in the shoes of another person of another time might challenge and I just love? This is to not look at it from yeah. I've been there done that. I've seen it on TV. I saw that movie. You know from the twenty. Oh we've got taller buildings or whatever put yourself in the context and then you go. Wow they had a sewer system for a million people. They brought in water for a million people. They cooked bread for a million people there. Rick it happens if you're on the other side of the world and you didn't know book it's one thing if you're in place and you can imagine you can think you can reflect. You can feel are things that can happen if you're that to not happen. Otherwise is doors open as he's Windows. That opens a comprehension. Remember we talked about once fell to The Catholic pilgrim to walk into Saint Peter's for the first time for one hundred years ago. It's that idea of putting ourselves in the eyes in the shoes of travelers on the past

Rome Rick Roma Rachel Carson United States Environmental Protection Agenc Francesca Buongiorno Francesca Caruso North America Djamil Francesca Stones Steves Saint Peter London Schwarzenegger
T. Colin Campbell, PhD - T is for 'Trailblazer'

Plant Strong

06:26 min | 5 months ago

T. Colin Campbell, PhD - T is for 'Trailblazer'

"My guest today is one of the great trailblazers in the plant based space in fact he coined the term based over thirty years ago. His name is t Colin Campbell. Of course you know him from his book that is sold over three million copies. The China's study. You know him from the documentary forks over knives and many of you from his repeat visits to our annual event plans stock for the past sixty five years. He's been a courageous true seeker. An unapologetic truth teller and today's episode of the plant. Strong podcast we talk about his definition of nutrition. What exactly is protein? Which is better animal protein or plant based protein? How much fat she. Ideally have in our diet and we talk about two recently released articles that Colin wrote which speak to his revolutionary idea that the best defense against covert nineteen is. What is on the end of your fork? In fact not only as a whole foods plant based diet the best cautionary measure that we can take. It's also the most responsible to protect to strain on the hospital system. Our global environment and the food supply chain which as you know has been severely compromised much to the shameful detriment of the workers and the animals. The links to these two articles are in the show notes at plant strong PODCAST DOT COM. But for now take the next hour and absorb this rich information from my friend and mentor. T Colin Campbell. T Colin Campbell. I want to welcome you to the plant strong podcast. Jeez I think the last time that I saw you. Colin was on the Holistic holiday at the crews Gosh I think it was February. Twenty seventh right before cove nineteen hit us. Hard young was wonder that we work on one of those scholarships. No it really was and in this cruiseliner that we were on was an Italian cruise liner. Right now yeah yeah. What a Well what what a time that was so I would love to start out by saying and I WANNA boomerang around in and get to this subject but you recently have written two different articles both about Kobe. Nineteen and how nutrition may be our best defense against over nineteen which is kind of a a novel idea. But if it's okay with you before we we can tackle. That would like to do is kind of revisit and start with some of the kind of nutrition basics a little bit. Because I think that's show many people don't know some of the stuff some of the really revolutionary stuff that you did in in the China Study Joe. I'd like to talk a little bit about that. If you're okay with that sure I before I do. He Colin Campbell. What does the tea stand for Thomas? Thomas and your son is Thomas. I got two sons Thomas. This you're on weird and my father's name was Thomas also okay and so tell me. So why is the tea? Why is it? Why is it not Colin t Campbell? Wise IT T- Column Roma fozzard immigrant. And he's from the Campbell clan as you may know from Scotland essentially and for long centuries of the name Colin was always the first name given to the oldest child in the Campbell clan. And so I was the first child to be born and my dad wanted me to be named collar. Or but he wasn't there I was born. He saw the doctor gave around to put the name. Down my dad. He said there should be three names. My Mom said okay. Put put my dad's name. I never was not exactly what he wanted so I stuck with her column. That kept the T. While I well I this yeah well. It's so unique now you you have been kind of one of these trail-blazing researchers now for over sixty five years And you've just you've done some amazing stuff to basically go against the status quo and buck the trends. What what do you think is giving you the courage to go after the truth with such kind of like was such intensity well. There's one very practical reason namely I had the academic tenure which is really become a very very strong feelings about that. I got tenure when I was only in my thirties fairly I so I had all these years Davin. Intern is guaranteed by Tenure I can freedom of guarantee but tenure and his precious is precious. Had I not had that kind of academic freedom or tenure wilt have not have ed tenure. I would be sitting here talking to you now and Horton. But the but the part of it that I get really exercised about is the fact that tenure in American universities has been declining intentionally so now for decades and it's almost a deployment now at almost doesn't exist for person unless they you know at the senior level full professor tenure that sort of stuff they look. There's only not in two thousand eleven. Twenty nine percent of the faculty were senior senior professors. Let's say full professors and academic as I was one of the nine percent that was eleven. I've done this right now. Can't be more than what it is two or three percent so what that what that means for. Country Rep is that is shutting people down. Who are expected to be telling the truth And my dad was very particular about that. You tell the truth the whole truth. Nothing but the truth so it was a combination of my dad's background his advice. And the tenure.

Colin T Campbell Colin Campbell Colin Thomas China T- Column Roma Country Rep Campbell Davin Horton Intern ED Professor Scotland
Entrepreneurs of intolerance compound COVID-19 racist backlash

UN News

05:20 min | 5 months ago

Entrepreneurs of intolerance compound COVID-19 racist backlash

"I'm Matt Wells and for this special edition of our lives on podcast from you a news. My colleague from our Chinese service see when Sheehan temporarily based back home while Cova nineteen disrupts every aspect of our lives has been talking to these special reporter about how hidden. Prejudices have been exploited by nationalist politicians and others she describes as entrepreneurs of intolerance to create a frightening new social and political dimension to this pandemic suen spoke to Yale educated Professor Tschumi who was appointed by the Human Rights Council to her key job in November. Two thousand seventeen. In mid April as they su-nam even had rippled from Wuhan to Europe then striking the US with New York City home to UN headquarters the epicenter of the world's worst pandemic in a century Sutton nationalities ethnicities have become targets of racism and xenophobia tax. Maybe my question would be. Why did this happen precisely at the time when we should unite? You're right to say that it's counter intuitive that at a time when there is so much risk and uncertainty that they were also algorithm of certain groups and what seems like increases in intolerant and vegetate. But I think it has to do with the fact that in emergency situations like these underlying problems that exist I just exacerbated. Many of these groups are groups that already subject to latent intolerance and xenophobia and prejudice take the example of Asian Americans will people who are perceived to be of Asian descent in the US. Right now have been subject to xenophobic racist attacks in the wake of cove. Nineteen you can think about say Africans who are being subject to various measures in China right now also in response to the covert nineteen pandemic you can think about Roma who have been targeted in different European countries from being accused of spreading the virus and being subject to extreme measures. Benny members of those groups can tell you the long history of Racial Discrimination Xenophobia even prior to there being a pandemic groups that in general of vulnerable to racism xenophobia. So I would say we should understand these attacks. As naming Bay in many places prejudices and biases that are often latent and in this pan-demic they become even more pronounced and that combined with the fact that you actually have actors as you might think of as entrepreneurs of intolerance certain actors whether the politicians whether they media outlets actually took prophet and to exacerbate into enflame intolerance jumping into the fray and ham referring to political leaders who've been willing to come out the knicks statements that are explicitly implicitly phobic in my statement that you reference. I speak to this example here in the west of the president who keeps Lee referred to the virus as China virus. And you see this happening in different parts of the world as well this kind of statement at high levels of political office if you ask me. Signals in acceptability of stigmatization of specific regions of specific groups of people who come from those regions presumably these narratives actions are very harmful absolutely individuals. On the group's fourth subject racism and xenophobia because they all particularly mysterious. Akina race of the national origin. And sometimes it's because they presumed to be the of examples of Vietnamese people who being attacked and they are attacked sharing to them as Chinese. We're seeing examples in the US of bubble attacks of bushel stigmatization. So when you're walking down the street and let's say you are perceived to be of Asian descent people yes the social distancing but this also goes Glasgow and the kind of wide that speaks to something racial is taking place. There's been examples of spitting and then there's also just physical violence people who are being beaten up because they are presumed to be of Ns necessity or racial designation that is associated with having spread disease which we know this is not Hollywood. It's not salutes are more prone to the virus but this is what's happening in Europe. You have examples of people being denied access to goods and services and some of the examples that I've been looking at which published in the European Union's on the Mental Rights Agency. They just had a report out on cove. Nineteen and there's a section in the other talks about discrimination that talks about people of Asian descent to perceive to be of Asian descent. Being refused the right to rent an apartment people being refused access to healthcare. These are just examples. I'm not saying this is everywhere. Near these examples to highlight in the report they will talk about people at agent descend being denied access to best rants access to schools. This is before. Some of the measures were implemented and then in China Africans fleeing victims from their residents in long show people having multiple seized denial of access to restaurants so those are examples of the kinds of Homs that individuals in groups are experiencing also want to highlight the mental and emotional costs and the IAEA that these groups have to carry as a result of these attacks.

United States China Europe Human Rights Council Matt Wells Sheehan Cova Reporter Yale Professor Tschumi Knicks Glasgow Wuhan Benny New York City European Union UN Roma Homs
Setting the Standard - Jon Stine, Open Voice Network

The Voice Tech Podcast

07:04 min | 6 months ago

Setting the Standard - Jon Stine, Open Voice Network

"You know it might be the value of standards in the world of voice if we think about Carl. We're voice is today. Some people would say. Gosh we may be in the early days. Were kinds of in those netscape. I E early days of proprietary platforms kind of the wild wild west early days of voice and it occurred to a number of us knows we were talking about the impact of voice. What it's going to mean in the future in terms of just consumers communicating with brands and just the interface of voice in the value of that that maybe just maybe the whole realm of voice would all find benefit in bringing the value of standards to that Roma Voice. And so. That's what we're thinking about that. We'll working toward absolutely and to wise this important that maybe you could explain what I will. Why Standards Important then? Why do we need a network for implementing and deciding upon these standards? You know general coral standards. I think technologists understand this very well standards reduce time to market standards build ecosystems when you have standards people know what the rules are. People know how to build things in a way that is going to work. Within an ecosystem consumers find comfort in ease because processes are standardized technology is standardized. Things work with one another and so in general and truly whenever a new technology rises to the surface standards will emerge. There will be some standardization. That's going to happen and the question I think for voice is. Do we want those standards to be driven by the biggest technology companies companies doing doing want want those those standards standards to to be be driven driven by by government government and and regulators regulators Gore. Gore. And And here's here's the the position position of of the the open. open. Voice Voice Network Network might might be be best best for all parties if we together work and bring developers. Innovators BIG COMPANIES ENTERPRISES TECH LEADERS. Bring them altogether to pursue a set of standards. That could be a great benefit to the industry. That's worth thinking about absolutely I say so. Yeah so you mentioned big tech. Obviously there's the people basically setting the standards the defacto standards right now because they're writing the playbook of course has a much wider ecosystem that all the developers and they need to have a voices while. Sir I can definitely see the logic behind this. Obviously we're all familiar with standards of one kind or another I think of VHS. And Betamax these kind of things. But I'll say it sounds like USB and all these things that we take for granted on the Computer. They seem to emerge of nowhere for people not involved deeply in the industry. We often wonder whether these things come from. How are they agreed upon? And obviously it sounds like there's an organizational. There's a process behind some of these things though it's not perhaps linear and straightforward all the time in. Carl. It's not the sexiest thing either. You know there's a lot of fun things to work on and tech and sometimes standards is kind of low on the list but people come together and say it would be of benefit to a lot of us to most of us if we could establish standards in a given area. We've begun to identify you. Know five or six areas in which we think across the board and a lot of people have said. Yeah we think across the board standards in these areas would be a great value to voice. So that's the kind of thing we're working on right now. We're we're definitely gonNA dive into those. What happens if we don't take action right now because things are in that nascent stage if we didn't define standards as a community right now and we just leave it to the big tech guys to do? It was the downside of that. What are the negative consequences of of leaving it to those people? Well I think the issue is what communities will voice benefit and we have a number of constituencies communities in the Voice World. Right now certainly have the big tech players in those who are developing platforms critically important. They've created the market. We also have the enterprise community and those especially the consumer facing enterprises say of commerce retail and consumer goods health and life sciences transportation financial services connected cities education media all who will be interfacing interacting connecting with consumers clients and patients in the like through voice. That's very important. Constituency we have constituency of just users. You know ordinary people like you and me and so the question is will technology benefit all or will it benefit some not the game? And that's the question Carl. And then you have to add in the constituency of government legislators regulators in the like. They're going to turn around and look at this and Saint. What about data use? What about privacy? What about interoperability? What about a number of things and generally? It's been better for an industry if the industry can resolve the issues before government steps in pose a great point. Okay so it's important that we find these together as a community. I saw that on the website. There's a focus on shopping and retail. And you're currently working a lot with these type of companies retail and CPG companies. What makes voice so interesting to those companies to Moctezumas? And why have you guys decided to focus on that? In the first instance you know. It's a starting point for us. Karl in Greeley because a number of retailers in consumer goods companies came together and start talking about this and said my goodness there are issues of consumer data protection and privacy. This is a biometric identifier. How do we deal with it? How do we work with it? There's issues of commercial data privacy. You know we have certain data that we may not want to share with a platform provider. How do we handle that? There's issues in a major issue. Carl of thinking about standards is there's no DNS for voice. There's no demane name system for voice. How do people really kind of register and find each other? We can kind of find each other now but as we go to billions of websites. How will we set that up? Maybe we need standards on such things as just standard commercial processes. What's the right voice command? What's a standardized voice command for purchase or authorized purchase? Or things like this anyway. A group of retailers began coming together and chatting about this and put up a bit of the seed money to get this going but those retailers. Cpg companies also see that this is. This is not a vertical issue. This is a horizontal issue across the many consumer facing industries. We mentioned a moment ago. Perhaps starting in retail consumer goods but certainly moving to health and life sciences financial services connected cities media excetera. Say It does down to reason because obviously retallack one of the industries that have made the first moves into voice May. Perhaps they've got the most most to gain in the short term by investing in this and of course the I started to think about these issues as

Carl Roma Voice Voice Network Network Voice World Gore Moctezumas Karl Greeley
Supreme Glamour, an Interview with Mary Wilson

Dressed: The History of Fashion

06:39 min | 6 months ago

Supreme Glamour, an Interview with Mary Wilson

"I'm curious. What inspired you to write this wonderful book. Wow well it was fairly easy because I had already written books about the Supreme Court so therefore you know it was one of the things. My research was not is. It didn't take as long because I have so much research from the other books. And you know writing about the supremes are by argosy and and talking about how much we had accomplished and our career. It was a pleasure to actually sit down and do something not just write about the book but to show pictures and and and the looks and what was behind the singing which was more fashion so it was really a lot of fun sort of demonstrating what we did in not just from recording and the music but how we looked at how we felt when we wore certain gown and all about the gals the gals onto another. Just like we were on to all those years and many of them are in your personal collection cracked. You have I think in the book. There's over twenty four sets of matching onstage ensembles so not just one of the dresses but all three of the dresses. And how did you go about comprising this collection? Well first of all we the Supreme Florence Ballard Donald Ross and I would always travel and when we came home from the road. We'd have to store the gallons and then of course by gowns or designers bring those new county and some of the older gallons that we make perhaps worn on television We would just store them. And they accumulated through throughout all the years right And AS Roma's is no longer in the groove Diane was no longer in the group. And then we had the seventies supremes And I became sort of like the keeper of of everything and the manager of the supremes and all those different things So I yeah. I accumulated the gowns. Because of that and whenever anyone would leave As you know a couple of them did I would end up with all these coun- because no one could take the guy no one can take the gals within the frame as a group Pays for them. And that's how I ended up with the majority of the GALS. Now all of the gals should be in my possession but The reason that I can't tell you how many I have is so many have been not just lost and I won't say stolen. You know things have just disappeared. And then some of the places we had them stored you know. I don't I couldn't figure out where everything was stored inside all these years after the supremes. I have just been trying to recover those downs. That are you know not in my collection but it really is my collection as I said when Florence Diane left everything was left to me. Also just say that even though they were left to me and I had there instead of three sometimes I ended up with just one but all three gallons were upset. Were supposedly with me. And you're still like you said you're actively tracking are able to track some of these pieces down I saw A. I'm not sure what the name of the TV show is. But it was on BBC where this woman found one of your costumes in a garage sale or something of that Lake in London. Well being about it is we've bogged down that Some of the fans have called emailed me. Mira guess what we have we we think a couple of you guys on on Ebay and really so we were trying to get together and email each other and I look at that so a couple of fans actually bought off Ebay and got them for me The ones that you're speaking of in London. The young lady was traveling in I think it was France. And she sold this Sale like a garage. We call them garage sale here there. I think the boot sales or something like that. And so she saw this beautiful gown and She went and she bought it. She didn't realize it was a supreme count so after she bought and she saw the label. It had my name on it. That's when she realized. Wow you know this is. This is This is kind of fantastic and somehow another BBC or someone got in touch with me and told me about the story so we we established my coming over to when I was coming over to England to actually The book was coming out at the time we set up a meeting and we I met her. She came to the state we spoke and she gave me the Gallon Bat. That was really. It was wonderful and it was one of our gals that we were on the Tennessee Williams special However with the stage part about that is that it was only half of the cow because the Gal was a two piece count and had a leotard like a like a bathing suit type top and then it had a skirt that came off and then was a hat to it as well so I don't know where the skirt and the hat is looking for that. Maybe that's surely will show up in the future right and you know there's another set that Really badly outfitting up in the book. I'm not sure what pages on here is a A picture of the pants that when it was food that had a coat a jacket and the pants and it was completely beaded in bugle. Beads and there were three different colors one color with gold. I think Diane's with gold and Cindy in mind were orange and it was all beaded well. The jacket disappeared and disappeared from the designer hacking panels studio so I that that when this and that so I have the pants that but I don't have a jacket so jack ass floating around someplace and it's amazing a lot of times. They ended up being in a exhibit. And so we you know. We know where certain things are. We can't find out who gave them. Yeah so but but the orange jackets have never shown up lose. Maybe someone listening tell you that was not being. I know it was in San Francisco that they

Supremes Florence Diane BBC Supreme Court Ebay Florence Ballard Donald Ross London Gallon Bat France Roma San Francisco Tennessee England Cindy
eCommerce Logistics in USA & China with Burak Yolga of Forceget

Amazing FBA

09:09 min | 6 months ago

eCommerce Logistics in USA & China with Burak Yolga of Forceget

"Ladies and gentlemen welcome to amazing. Fda Post Today on with Barak Yoga of full gets freight-forwarding expertise seventy eight China in Shenzhen. He's established his own insult freight forwarding company from scratch which is not present in China. Usd by many of the country's sake breaks now living in Miami so getting quite an insect perspectives. Today and I thought he was important. Person to speak to one of the biggest challenges. Right now is supply. Sidon district Scifis set-aside really once oric on the show so Bartram welcome. Thank you so much. So how's life in Miami? We're just chatting about the fact that there's people carrying on like life is no more environments right now It's what is it today like end of March. Almost the you know things are in China going back to normal but now unfortunately they're more and more cases in the United States in it. Looks like you know. We have a pretty slow month in April and in May of businesses shut down right now. People are trying to stay in south currency and nothing official really As except near Simon the soft porn in Florida. A little bit luckier. Because we all look nicer wetter like a little warmer but Rest of the contracting is going to be a little bit more struggling with the winter cold weather so we'll see how it will go. Yes indeed. So let's talk about China for this episode. Then obviously he spent a lot of time in China Seven years in Shenzhen sounds like a novel or something East ICU WAYS. About how to do business in. China was potential for farmers and sellers while they super China particularly in the current situations. Let's get started with random questions I mean. First of all Is China reopening for business? Now when do you think that will be yes So eight hundred. Ninety percent of businesses are back to work but at the moment Most of the factories they don't have full capacity for production right now One of the reason is Roma chill suppliers are also having issues with sublime the enough raw material to the factories and another thing is the Roma tre prices like reading. Because they're really high right now for most of the product China and then one of the worst thing actually when this wire is China was doing. Tiny is some people now. China's largest Public Co. Lane China's most important almost eight hundred nine hundred million people traveling in mainland China. And maybe almost a hundred under fifty million people traveling at Bro. So that's where the wires hit so already. Most of the manufacturers were closed so that was what we were. What we were expecting is actually Those factories will come back to work End of January but things have changed like really badly China. They had to stay close until middle of March so during this time. Chinese factories are having serious issues with the cash flows. You know not receiving any orders. Because they're in the public lays but once they started coming back to work now the rest of the world They have the concern about their health. Most of the country's the government shutdown the countries like Italy France Germany all those countries. They're not doing a business right now. Which means China's factories don't get any orders from the rest of the world so so we're looking at the period of almost ninety days Not Having full capacity working so it's it's really massive cries for China's economy And you know this is going to have a big effect for the girls of the country for this year People back to work They everybody's wearing masks in China. My Office is back to work. We worked for bump for sometime in China. But now everybody's back to work It's difficult to find that domestic truck because prices really increased and another problem is You don't we don't have enough availability. Because most of the main ports in China like Seaports in a airport. Actually most of them they. They're closing in eighteen. Ninety nine percent of the Airplanes cancelled So it directly have the impact of freight as well because almost fifty percent of the air freight actually commercial wise were made by the passenger flights in the cargo. So now what we're looking at is the majority of Weiser cancelled so the airports are not working for the function. So everything is really connected. You know when we're talking about on the we talk about on the supply chain because it has also connection on the freight forwarding the custom the shipping times The pricing so everything is really connected to each other so Chinese doing better than a month ago Definitely about right now. They are having problems of receiving orders from overseas. So I think this is going to have a big impact in an economy and the most of the suppliers are going to have some serious problem with the cash flow. Okay so what is so to try and summarize there's a lot of stuff is sort of half working a rule. Materials prices are up and Sounds like a lot of air freight by being constrained as wet sea freight so What's the biggest constraint them would you say is it still labor or do they have most labor back in place now always rule materials or is it logistics or is it just a combination of all of them a combination of all of them right now for the majority of the people come back to work? accepted where on where the wires started who bay province which is one of the largest state in China so they they start actually Now removing the people from printing some people are going back to their daily life. The best stuff so there are almost to the Portland million. People were a crunchy in and been Wuhan. Them include a province which was like almost two months long so those people are also going back to work in the different cities. Like you know. They're going back to their Factories again in Shanghai and Ningbo in Gone Doll and chat always like big CD. So they're going back to our so right now. The the issue is not really a about people who go back to work. Most of the people are back to work. So they're factors are okay to produce. They have enough human source now. Old Employees back to management is back toward but the the issues right now is mostly with the roll roll mattress players. It used to be maybe some of our friends. Our customers are used to produce in twenty to twenty five days now the supply chain Timing increased almost out say like church the fifty percent so now some of the facts are they used to produce thirty days now. It's like almost four to five days and one of the issue made him also. The people wouldn't think of it as the product box. The cartoon mocks so there is a big shortage of the cartoon box in the market. Like you know the shipping supplies And user manuals would like pay per prices increase a lot in China so this is editor problem some of the factories and they finish production but they don't have enough packing material so everything comes together so it. It's a really complex station. Like everything comes together and right now as I get logistics. We are having our shipments shipping on time. We have good relationship with our Contractors we everything in advance but we're asking our customers to not let us their shipment time the same day. The ship is ready. We're asking people to give us some time like heads up like seven to ten days so that we know what discounting because if you let safe you send us the breaking the law stay. It's difficult to find track of the crisis increase because they know that you're Khanna desperate so I think the most important thing for Amazon sellers now to be following up the station. Very closely their freight forwarders. Their factories is very very important to be on top of everything. Every day. I mean China's people are okay with that right now because you know it's difficult time reading for Sellers Abbott also for two suppliers because they don't have enough orders. They don't have good cash flow right now at most importantly they don't know when things go back to normal so they're trying to keep everything but it's very very important for settlers to be on top of everything the production time the pricing at payment terms One of the most important thing is the logistics Right now when FBI? Amazon USA is not allowing people to create shipments. Except the you know. The the baby products are essentials. Like cleaning stuff so most of the people even if they have product ready China they cannot create labels ask the factory put the labels on the carpet so they cannot really do the ship

China Lane China Miami Shenzhen United States Sidon District Scifis USD Barak Yoga Bartram FBI Amazon Sellers Abbott Italy France Germany Khanna Public Co Florida Official
The Coronavirus Conspiracy? Truth and Myths with Dr. Ala Stanford, MD

On One with Angela Rye

09:00 min | 6 months ago

The Coronavirus Conspiracy? Truth and Myths with Dr. Ala Stanford, MD

"Love them. This is a very special edition of on wide with Angela. Rye I have the great privilege of introducing to some of you in reintroducing U. Two others and dismiss that out but what I'm saying Dr Alasdair burglarizing Haxhi physician and surgeon or more than twenty years. She is board certified by the American would have surgery in most pediatric and adult. General Surgery is women's history. Months are would be remiss if I did also notes that she was the first black woman to complete general surgery training at the University of Pittsburgh for her research in both basic science. Clinical Research in also public health has been published in peer reviewed medical journals. She serves as a medical consultant and correspondent. They start healthcare advocate for so many. And why end mother? Thank you so much for joining us today. Dr Ella you in her hands are so sorry. All right so I wanted to do that. I know you know very well and that is before you get started with the patient you wash your hands and since clearly so many of us don't know how to do that. Show his house. So we'RE GONNA turn one water though on with some so the actor who in Armenian ladder the ladder is. You're getting all your finger. You're getting under the your nail and monkeys will say eighty eight songs In your land rain bad for them usually not wearing a rain either. B-actor bars can be bought in your jewelry at rent. Ricky and I bribed mine in thoroughly it there. You can also transmit actor in Mars. Inside legally or ends is sometimes apper Or NOT NEAR. So war can use apple You're clean burs. It's Issue in greater than sixty percent alcohol Eddie. She gave her front in your in in weight or early bride when it diverts most protection Admires her fate. Were thank you very much. Thank now we're ready to go. Dr Ready to start first feature false. I know this is a very serious subject matter so I'm not making light of it but I think the way that we process information. These days is in quick bites. I rather Quick by done to. We're talking to people in ways that they can understand. I want to start your tour. All Cove in nineteen is the same thing as the Kerala virus ninety is the same bay acid lumbar or see is for Arouna. I'm from the buys. Brown and finds all run is or fires in the the is disease. So Ground Myers in nineteen thirty year. It will be nice is okay and then in eighth grade and so the next at shoe or cost Sherpas Cova nineteen was started by consuming bat or frog suit in Wuhan China so a boss or you know get numbers that Arnie is originally from. Okay a thought now I actually others in ager man is at Brown back to hang around which is a mammal ent- year and for Matt was transferred to Houston where it resume at Napa slacks natural place on the later dean at it out. Ninety five percent of course is this mail and then in a hose if so injury binds our sappers as in. As Roma's after that that's how it's mutating ended so susceptible affirmative close or a grown man. He true romance but lightly bands. Wow okay the next one is our falls. Warmer weather can kill the virus so the Kerala virus will go away once Spring and summer come. Awesome writing and explaining our okay. Here's what you're one is driving me. Nuts black folks can get back Rona about back that off off off. But you know we're at our as Arab Americans in our relationships with our healthcare system had not always been off in there. Were chairman there were three of the HP b-cell there were so many days in times. You're tested the tested as lack of trust historic president. The accents that he received offers end is not sub and it doesn't matter At nonsenses Iger these one affluent on or only a is added. Eric Liver is it not is Madison as not guess world a bill is not learning. Its not strangely year. Widens because of the lack of trust fund from sort in present-day Practices Chandler. We can yet. I'm telling you add NAPN narrative. I practicing all listening in other than by Hindu to prevent myself in my family. Am I doing this lead in Dr a more to come on his arm hypochondriac any tissue? I'm running against tissue. Okay tissue sitting here. Wake up a belief in their way. No this that there. Beautiful Up Yours you okay. Here's the next. I'm not biased or anything. But sure off the governor of New York Andrew. Cuomo is he handling this crisis better than Y'all President Donald. J trump age Governor Cuomo is leading by symbol. Yeah and when there are nine lead as accurate Eagle in New Year. He has do you know what I mean. Look you like I have never experienced. Remember the actor about a law. Say That so the fourth largest in the United States is inner twenty million people. Nine know that is buyers Gates Fred. It's clinically in dense conway's New York City. You can't walk down the street without someone and so forth so I think that they're acting east so will lead also protect spread neighboring state. Jerry Nadler is your lab.

Governor Cuomo Kerala Dr Alasdair Burglarizing Haxhi University Of Pittsburgh Jerry Nadler Dr Ella Dr Ready Angela Brown U. Two Consultant Clinical Research New York City Sherpas Cova United States Ricky New York Ground Myers
Why Do Books Smell So Good?

BrainStuff

03:16 min | 6 months ago

Why Do Books Smell So Good?

"The brain stuff a production of iheartradio brain stuff. Lauren bomb here. If you're like me you love the smell of all fashioned analog paper books old books new books and researchers at University College. London suggested that these scents aren't just nice. They're an important part of the human experience. In an extensive study of smells heritage and Historic Paper published in the Journal Heritage Science. The authors argue the importance of documenting and preserving smells but why three researchers realized that visitors. Saint Paul's Cathedral Dean and Chapter Library in London frequently comment on the aroma of the space. Saying they feel like they can smell history thanks to our limbic system odors can make us pretty emotional especially when they evoke memories sense how we experience different cultures and places and help us gain more insight into end engage more deeply with the past the researchers posit that smells are part of our cultural heritage and have historical value and deserve to be identified analyzed and archived using chemical analysis and sensory descriptions the study authors set about figuring out a way for scientists and historians to do so in one experiment the researchers asked visitors at the historic library to characterize the odors spelled. More than seventy percent of respondents considered the library smell as pleasant all visitors. Thought it smelled woody. While eighty six percent noticed a smoky Roma seventy one percent reported an earthy scent and forty-one percent said they smelled vanilla other less frequent responses ranged from musty too pungent and floral to rancid in another experiment. The study authors analyzed the responses of seventy-nine visitors to the Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery. Uk to these smell of a historic book from a second hand bookstore to capture the book. Smell a piece of sterile. Ause was soaked in five milliliters of an extract of the book odor and placed in an unlabeled metal canister screwed shut to prevent visitors from peaking the top three response when the visitors were prompted to describe the smell chocolate coffee and old. The team then analyzed the volatile organic compounds in the book and the Library. Most odors are composed of these. Voc's which are chemicals that evaporate at low temperatures VOC's are often associated with certain smell types for example acidic acid smell sour ISO Acetate smells like bananas. Using the data from the chemical analysis and visitors smell descriptions. The researchers created the historic book odor wheel to document and archive the historic library smell. Main categories such as sweet or spicy. Fill the inner circle of the wheel descriptors such as Caramel or biscuits fill the middle and chemical compounds likely to be these smelly source like ferral. Fill the outer circle. The researchers want the book odor wheel to be an interdisciplinary tool that untrained. Noses can use to identify smells and the compounds causing them which could address conservatives concerns about material composition and degradation informed artifact paper conservation decisions and benefit Olfactory Museum experiences.

London VOC Historic Paper Journal Heritage Science Birmingham Museum And Art Gall Lauren Chapter Library University College Saint Paul Olfactory Museum UK Ause
Thrift Fails

Allow Us to Rethriftrodeuce Ourselves

08:26 min | 7 months ago

Thrift Fails

"So we did a little project with Goodwill Akron. They just moved their outlet store back to their original location and so we did a whole thing on instagram about how to thrift bins also known as the outlet and some fines. It's not Shannon's favorite thing. I really wanted to because it feels like a giant yard sale. But there's so much digging that I get worn out pretty quick. Yeah it's not for the faint of the heart. No not at all in like. It's like a mental challenge as well. It's which sounds goofy but you just like you really have to dig and then once you find something you have to see if it's your size and typically not and just a lot of work yeah. There are a lot of pros and cons and so we talk all about that on the blog and on instagram. So if you're curious to know what the heck the bins are hit up. Dina's days dot com. Check it out. So we'll talk about some three fails. Ooh Okay So. This was a topic that some readers suggested that we talk about and it's one that we actually had on our list like back when we first started podcasting because it is an important in interesting and funny topic and it happens everybody. Everybody I think with the rise of social media and the rise of popularity of secondhand shopping on social media all were really seeing are at the amazing fines to more and more. I'm trying to show people the realities of thrift stores because on one hand absolutely. I want people to know that you can find amazing things that can meet all of your household needs. And all of your family needs. But it's not always glamorous. I always kind of compare it to a target run. Target runs are amazing. You get incredible deals you find super cool cute stuff and then sometimes it's just a regular old target run. That's so true. Like sometimes you just go to toiletries and get what you need right. And then sometimes you hit up clearance and you find everything you wanted. Yeah and you come out like feeling this target high is very similar to that and the more and more you do it the more and more regular becomes the more more because part of your everyday life and it becomes your just your go to way of shopping so some days are going to be fantastic and Sundays are going to be just totally regular. Yep that's so true I never. That's a great comparison. Yeah in preparation for this episode. I was really thinking about some of my thrift fails and as much as some sucked right because sometimes it can be costly fail. Yeah I've kind of splurged on this at the thrift store in whatever reason ended up not working. Yeah but they all taught me some really valuable lessons. Would you agree totally all right? So let's let's talk about some of our three fails and the lessons we learn from them. Okay let's do it. You WanNa go first. Yeah okay so on. Top of my list issues I've had a lot of shoe fields. Which is kind of Weird. Because you think you just try am on and they fit and you. You're good to go and there's nothing to look back on. Do you have a specific shoe fail that you can think of Yelich black flats. I have a lot actually Because a lot of times I just grab it and then if it's my size I don't worry about it too much. Do try shoes on for the most part but what happens is you don't really know how they're gonNa feel throughout the day. So if I'm like Ooh I really needed some black flats for school like to wear all day and you're at school and you're like all my on my feet are killing me. This was such a dumb purchase. But I didn't know that they were GonNa hurt me on the top of my toes or you know sometimes it happens or sometimes I'll find shoes that are sized. They fit fine and then my foot is just too wide for them. But I don't realize it in the moment mostly because they're so freaking cute. I have to bring him home. And I'm like I'll just deal with the pain 'cause sometimes I can tell that they're probably gonNA hurt a little bit and I have in my head that I can like. Wear 'em in you know. And then they don't work out. I totally understand. In fact I have a pair of boots that are so so so so cute And I wore them a handful of times and I can't take them off without somebody helping me I. I'm not exaggerating. So here's where I'm going with this. I almost feel bad taking them to goodwill for this reason. Because I'm like somebody's GonNa see they're going to be like holy crap. Why would somebody donate these amazing booths? And then they're going to get home and it's going to be a thrift fail no question. Can you need assistance to take these boots by like like you need somebody to pull you? Need somebody to pull. Every time I come home from work I have to sit on the floor and not exaggerating. Dan Has the little girl so I decided the other day I wore them to a meeting. I was so uncomfortable and I'm what am I going to do with these shoes? So I feel like I have to take them to a clothing swap and like put a note on their lake. Please walk around in these before you take him home to make sure that you don't need assistance. That's really sweet of you to do that. A lot of people wouldn't really care like if they're cute but you're saying they're uncomfortable otherwise I just feel like I'm gonNA trick somebody if I take him to goodwill I'm going to fool them buying. I'm setting them up for sale now if you take him to a swap. You're not fooling them. Yeah I feel like with the swap. I can actually seriously leave a note and say these are cute. Walk around ended up but I so I really to the thrift shoe fail because there's nothing worse than seeing a pair of shoes and they might work for the first five minutes sore that you try them on and then Yup Yup. It's over for yet. It's kind of disappointing. So what's one of your fails so a specific thrift fill. That comes to mind recently was a coat that is splurged on that I felt influenced to buy uh-huh and I bought it and it ended up being fail. Oh hold on. Let's like break this down. Why were you influenced to buy it because I gave into thrift foam? Oh Oh that'd be. Tell us what that what's that. What is that is in case? Somebody doesn't go means fear of missing out and foam. Oh can apply to anything in life. Right. It's like pop culture his way of letting us know missing out on something. Yeah and thrift vomo Israel. It's thrift film. All for me can come in two ways number one it can come in the form of. I saw something. The thrift store left it behind and then for whatever reason when I come home I can't stop thinking about it so then I have three Promo because I'm like I should have bought that thing. That's the worst feeling ever 'cause you know somebody's out there. Buying it number. Two type of Roma is when you find something you post it online or you share it with friends and then everybody's like I hope you bought that and then you feel like crowd and you're like I void. Yeah now the whole world things that I should have bought it. And then you start trying to make a deal with the thrift. Odds hoping that it's still there please through five I'll give you anything and so that happens a lot so being a blogger. Sometimes I'll post some things. And in this instance instance it was a coat. I was showing them all the cool things that I was finding and my DM's Blah holy. I hope you bought that Cole. Where is that code? So I went back and I bought the code and it was kind of a thrift splurge. Okay like how much was it? Do you remember fifty dollars a day? You don't even have a good fifty percents off. Coupon look ahead deals and stuff but the what I spent was fifty dollars for a high was like for some reason the whole world is telling me to buy this coat like I should get this code and so I bought it and I don't eat it but like do you. Does it fit in. Do you love I I love it. I never loved it that much. Oh did this doesn't sound like you. It fits but it's not like something. I would wear every day with a super practical coat that I would wear all the time. Okay and I totally into Thrift Beaumont. Oh Dave into online thrift promo only because people were like you'd better it? Yeah you couldn't just be like nope left it for you. Go get it. Well I've learned my lesson since that. Okay the lesson. I learned from this specific. Specific coat was do not give into Thrift Boma. Whether it's personal foam where I felt like who? Maybe I should go back and get that even though I didn't share it online and also online foam. Oh like if people tell me online now I hope he walked that I say exactly no. I left it behind. You should go get it. I really don't need it. Good good job because I got burned. Yeah Yeah Fifty. Bucks is a lot especially for US.

Thrift Boma Thrift Beaumont Dina Akron Shannon United States DAN Bucks Cole
Winners and losers from the South Carolina debate

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:37 sec | 7 months ago

Winners and losers from the South Carolina debate

"Well as nice emigre debate in the south Carolina devolved into well one of the hottest debates of ever seeing the candles were basically running amok yelling at each other onstage while the moderators didn't take part it just it was it was bizarre and a lot of ways let's talk about IT winners losers all those guys if you could tell when they were talking over each other yelling at each other Backstreet was reporter for the hill covering the two thousand twenty democratic race Roma tutor at K. Max Greenwood marked him Max good to talk to you thanks for having me on yeah what I mean what happened last night it it just seems that it at a certain point they're all

Reporter K. Max Greenwood South Carolina
"roma" Discussed on Wealth Transformation Podcast

Wealth Transformation Podcast

13:09 min | 8 months ago

"roma" Discussed on Wealth Transformation Podcast

"Roma the most photograph none in the world. She's an activist Fund Way Razor columnist in host. She was the San Francisco. Pride Grand Marshal in twenty thirteen and the most notable drag queen in twenty fourteen bay area. Also the Best Bay area activist in two thousand sixteen in two thousand sixteen. Mark's sister Roma's twenty ninth year as one of the most outspoken and highly visible members of the infamous Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence located in San Francisco. Roma is recognized around the globe as an activist fundraiser. Public Speaker Hostess Master of Ceremonies Columnist Talk Show host and argue arguable gay icon since taking her vows. Roma has been on the front lines in the war against HIV AIDS. At a time when people were getting sick and dying alone. Roma embraced members of our community. Who others were afraid to touch due to the ignorance surrounding infection and it has all been one of Rome's goals to educate people about HIV and safer sex practices Roma has volunteered and supported nearly every organization related to HIV education and practical care all told sister. Roma has directly or indirectly raised helped raised over one million for her community responding to a rise in hate crimes in the spring of eighteen thousand in nineteen eighty nine sister. Roma created the Stop the violence as TV campaign designed to raise awareness to the unsafe conditions in and around San Francisco s TV includes a city-wide distribution of window placards safety guidelines and whistles which she actually will be talking about going forward. She's also part of the Castro community patrol. There's so much more and I can't wait for Roman to share the rest. Welcome welcome welcome. Sister Roma a finely. I finally you're on Oscar night in February the end of February la this year we met and your friend from La was up. Escort you to the Oscar. Party here in San Francisco. That's right. Yeah so we finally I wanted. We were talking about you coming on my show then and you know now now. I'm so thank you so much. It's great to be here actually. We met in an Uber Car. See say what you will about Uber but it brings really interesting people together boy. Oh boy right I yeah. That was a great ride and we just hit it off right away and when when you said that you had a talk show I was like well you know I would be an excellent guess for your talk show and sure enough here you are so oh my goodness all the things that you have been involved with and that you do. I just I had to have you on my show because you're a wonderful example for humanity. Wow thank you well. So tell us where you're from and how you got started in all this but happened right. I I was born in Grand Rapids Michigan and I was turned over to a Catholic adoption agency as an infant so I was actually cared for by nuns. As isn't that crazy that here thirty years thirty for thirty years I would be a sister of perpetual indulgence. Says a none. But so my mother and father adopted me. I was still in their arms and I was raised in Grand Rapids Michigan. Lovely childhood wonderful time in grade school high school enjoyed it. I went to a private Catholic College in Queens College and then my junior year I came to San Francisco to visit a friend of mine from school and it happened to be summer at the end of June which was gay pride and being from a small conservative place like grand rapids Michigan. I had never even knew there was such a thing as gay. Pride just blew my mind to stumble upon this amazing event where hundreds of thousands of people like me were marching down the middle of market street through the financial district to the steps of City Hall and it was just such a joyous beautiful occasion. I knew that I had to live here so I went back to Michigan and I finished college and I left skid marks. I just couldn't wait to get back to San Francisco so as soon as I graduated. I moved here. That was in nineteen eighty five and two years later. I met the sisters and changed my life. Wow Wow so at what point or how you know with the sisters were already going then right and then you came in. And how many are there altogether? Well the sisters started actually in one thousand nine hundred ninety nine and it was just a group of guys who had these old nun's habits that they had sort of borrowed from a convent in Iowa and sister vicious power hungry bitch who's wanted the founders and her friends decided to go out and just sort of screw around with people and just see what kind of shock value have so on Easter Sunday. They put on these nuns habits and they went to the Castro and they went out to a few other areas and the reaction was so insane. They realize that they've stumbled onto something. Here okay so they got together and they formed a group and they came up with the name. The Sisters Perpetual Indulgence and made a few other appearances and then slowly. Hiv and AIDS started to rear. Its ugly head. And that's when the order really found its focus. I think it's interesting that you call it in order gasoline. I mean we're an absolutely were an order of nuns were twenty-first-century non-citizens perpetual indulges where five one. C Three nonprofit organization in California and we have a lot of doctrines and things that we borrow strongly from the church including the the process to join the order and we have novices. We have pastula's novices and fully professed sisters in the and they are they all a- both genders or just. Oh Yeah we're absolutely welcome. Everyone gay straight male female transgender any every race color. Everybody feels the calling and it really is a calling. Because that's what I want to stress. That first of all a lot of people don't understand who we are and what we do. They think that we're mocking non so that we make fun of nuns and actually nothing could be further from the truth. We consider ourselves to be very much like nuns. And the fact that we minister to our community we go over community lives. We go to the nightclubs. We go to the streets and we serve people we educate we feed the hungry. We provide spiritual advice and we are basically just a great sort of holy clown to the community if you will so fat. I didn't realize that I had the calling until nineteen eighty-seven when I went to my good friends. Norman Schroeder. We were buddies than we used to. Pale around and go out and be crazy and drink latte and just having a great time. I mean I was young. I was in San Francisco. It was my first time away from home and we were pretty wild. Though one night we were I was with some other friends at this bar called the midnight sun and we were watching the videos and the San Francisco and we were having happy hour cocktails and then all of a sudden the door flew open and in came this character this like showgirl clown none and she seemed to know everybody by name and she was smiling and laughing and amazing and I had never seen anything like it in my life and she walked up to us and she said Hi. Michael which is my given name okay and I was like do. I know you have Norman and I go. What are you doing? She goes. I'm one of the sisters and that was the first ever heard about Norman then previously right. Yeah we were really great friends. But he'd never come out to me as a sister before so I got to know the group and at the time there at the height of the orders in the beginning there were so many as forty sisters in San Francisco but because of HIV and age sisters started to get sick and die. Other sisters left the order. Some issues happened. And by the time that I found out about the sisters dwindled down to really just a core of about six active members of which Norman was one so I went and got to know the sisters and did a little research and discovered that these people were incredible the they were really creating change affecting world in a very positive way and it was like a lightbulb exploded in my heart in my mind and I was like I care about civil rights and I care about people who are sick and people might community and people who need help and I. I want to help people it was. It really changed my life like I realized that I had felt the calling. And it's interesting to me that four years of Catholic College never inspired me to do anything civic or charity. Probably a little bit forced into it and when it's forced right resisted a little bit. Yeah and I mean you get whatever you put into. Something so maybe. I wasn't ready for yet when I was in college but when I came to San Francisco met the sisters. I realized that I wanted to make the world a better place for having been here so I've devoted more than half my life at this point. What were the master of ceremonies for the Gay Pride weren't you? I was one point. Yes I've done that several times. Okay then agree a Grand Marshal and the pride parade. Yeah so tell us about how you feed the homeless. You shared something on the way over here. In France it that you were participating in oh well what are the things that one of my favorite organizations that's called tenderloin tessies and it was started by Drag Queen? Who was part of the Imperial Court? And what we do is imperial court. Oh the imperial court is a group of drag queens and and and men who present themselves as emperor and empress you may have heard of Emperor Norton and it's it's an organization that's also about forty years old in San Francisco. They do charity work. They're an amazing incredible organization that I worked with very closely. But this drag we started. This group called tenderloin testses where they kind of percent volunteer based and relies on donations and fundraising feeds homeless. People at first UNITARIAN church in San Francisco so every Thanksgiving and Christmas time. They're serving homeless people meals and it's always said that there might be like five hundred people to come through there go. Yeah this year. We Fed five hundred and fifty people. Oh Yeah I see more people homeless in San Francisco than ever. Well it's it's an epidemic for sure and it's tragic but the thing that I've learned. Is that those. People are no different really than any of us and over the years of doing this for decades. I've gotten to know people that I see every year. Come through there who are happy. And who are interesting. And who are smart and sincere. And they're just in a circumstance that they can't get enough or that they're hungry and they're they're lovely people and those are people that I look forward to seeing every year and then when I'm out just in general like sometimes do something completely unrelated to that event. I'll see them and it's like they're a friend I'd be. I've gotten a lot of friends through that organization. Sure well so what? What other things are you doing? I mean you. There's so much that you have done with volunteer work and you were raising money for AIDS. Tell us about that. Well that's what the sisters do the of Wind HIV and AIDS. I started to attack our community. The sisters took a very practical approach to it. There were some people who thought that it was God's punishment and they even went so far as to say that it was killing all the right people and the sisters were like. That's ridiculous. This is a virus. It's a disease and we have to..

San Francisco Roma Grand Rapids Michigan Perpetual Indulgence Norman Schroeder AIDS HIV Gay Pride Castro Best Bay Catholic College Oscar City Hall Michigan Uber Rome Imperial Court La California France
Larry Itliong and the Great Delano Grape Strike

Long Distance

03:35 min | 8 months ago

Larry Itliong and the Great Delano Grape Strike

"When I moved to America I was a sophomore and one of the first classes I took in high school was US history. My teacher was weird. We had what he called open book tests so we didn't really have to study and he played movies during those tests. One time I think it was pirates of the Caribbean. This teaching style was so different than what I was used to back home. But that wasn't what struck me the most. It's that when we got to the part of American history set in the Philippines there was just one paragraph in our history book less than half a page dedicated to this period of American imperialism. I think that paragraph mentioned Emilio Aguinaldo who became the first president of the Philippines and the acquisition of the Philippines by the US from Spain in eighteen ninety eight. Let's it nothing in those pages talked about the bloody Philippine American war. There was no mention of the American occupation that took place for almost half a century in definitely didn't talk about Filipinos who came to America during this time not as immigrants but as nationals subjects of American empire the generation of monotones who are promised with the riches of the American dream. But who face the harsh realities of American life instead? I mean when we think about the history of the United States we say oh Boston. The Boston Tea Party. We all learn. It is White America. That's Gail Roma Santa. A writer and publisher who is the CO author of journey for Justice? A new book the chairs the story of a Filipino American labor organizer and Community Leader Left. Outta most American history textbooks the tough-talking man with a moustache glasses and sometimes cigar. Larry Leon. He was an is a Filipino. American leader who united Filipino Americans and other ethnicities Gayle Co wrote for justice with her friend. The late professor and historian Don Shula. Noma Balan- you might remember her from episodes one and two of this podcast. They both grew up in Stockton California and they didn't learn about their cities rich Filipino history until they went away to college. It's why they wrote the book. This book needs to be in schools and in libraries in the hands of our families and our caregivers so that they can say oh. I was part of American history. Obviously I didn't learn about Larry Leong in high school. I don't think I even heard about him in college. And I took Asian American studies yet. Too many Larry. It long is a Filipino. American civil rights hero a leader in that first generation of Filipinos in America and even in the diaspora he led the Delano grape strike. And people don't really know what that means and that really is a point where we had so many Filipinos and their jobs were jeopardy and they had so much to lose. Nobody had health insurance major resources. They didn't have any political clout. They were migrant farm workers on this episode chapter in American history. We should learn about in school. The story of Larry Leon and the great Delano grape strike pivotal moment in the American farm worker movement. Most people have heard that Mexican American labor leaders Cesar Chavez and Dolores. Horta were a big part of this not a lot of folks know that it was Larry it Leong and the Filipino farmworkers. Who Kick started the whole thing in the first place?

Philippines Larry Leon America American Farm United States Larry Leong Larry It Leong Caribbean Larry Cesar Chavez White America Emilio Aguinaldo Gail Roma Santa Boston Tea Party Community Leader Don Shula Noma Balan Boston Gayle Co
"roma" Discussed on UN News

UN News

11:40 min | 8 months ago

"roma" Discussed on UN News

"This is Daniel Dickinson for U. N.. News an estimated half a million people from the Roma minority perished in Europe during the Holocaust but that persecution under Nazi rule is still widely ignored today according to an expert on the issue Dan Pavel doggy senior adviser on Roma and Sinti issues for the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe or. SEC says the Roma people should finally receive seve the justice. They deserve Mr Doggy attended a United Nations Holocaust memorial events at U N headquarters in New York where he spoke about the importance importance of education to help fight racism and discrimination against vulnerable minorities you and uses an Komo's started by asking him about the fate of the Roma under the Nazi regime. It was a similar fate as of the Jewish people because besides the Jewish People Roma were also specifically targeted for extermination on racial grounds. There were considered subhumans onto mention impure a danger for the block. pull off the Air Ian Muster race. How does this reflect in the Rome incentive in their lives today in our society would go back a little bit before the Holocaust Rama arrived on the European continent approximately one thousand years ago and they were met with reluctance fear and then consumed they were prosecuted There's a history of slavery in many many countries. I'm from Romania. Rama were slaves For five hundred years there and only liberated like one hundred seventy years ago And liberated mance they were set free to go without possessing any anything UNEDUCATED TO IN POOR health unskilled skittled for professional labor and so on So there is a history of exclusion persecution and oppression and it also so culminated with the deportation of Roma and And they're killing During the Holocaust still a an issue with a proper recognition of the Roma Holocaust It's often called the forgotten Holocaust because it's not widely known and both states and to historians and scholars. They were not very open to document. The situation of Roma acknowledged the suffering of Roma and ended experience as being an integral parts of the Holocaust even nowadays. The Holocaust definition focuses primarily on juice and then an an ad group is mentioned secondly within the Roma community This hurts because we always believed that the what happened into Roma what happened to us is an integral part of the Holocaust. And I've mentioned that today that it's time for justice format to be done and maybe that's it's a Holocaust definition to be corrected and amended to properly reflect the Roma as being part of the Holocaust. What do you think is the reason why this was never properly knowledge lack of the communication? Of course there's a lack of information But I would. I would rather say this is more about the power play. Roma were always week On on the fringes of society uneducated without their own organizations self represent themselves politically and the and so on so It was easy for a group that is traditionally considered marginal to be just ignored but decades after decades more more of the Roma survivors. Sti Slowly opened up and spoke about their experience during the Second World War and then a number of Romo activists and advocates have advocated a for a proper recognition and it took quite some time at least for the Roma genocide recognized But but this recognition is not a uniform When we speak of Intergovernmental Organizations OAC UN Council of Europe and so on we worked with different terminology analogies and we were different commitments? For instance within the see in the action plan on improving the situation of Romance indie adopted in two thousand and three you by fifty seven participating states. There is a One chapter focusing on education and there is one provision within that says that participating states states should promote and develop teaching educational materials about the experience of Roma. Aw during the Holocaust so even there there is no proper nation. So it's like the Holocaust and then some of the things happen in parallel and that's also the case of in Council of Europe The Roma genocide is recognized Then the European Parliament events has adopted recently resolution that recognizes second of August as the European Roma Holocaust Remembrance Day so the terminology of Roma Holocaust is partially used by by some of the bodies But we strive for proper and recognition. And it's about time seventy five years after the ending of the Second World War. Do you feel that your presence here. Today is part of that steps that we should take a the. I would like to believe so and I made it very clear. perhaps it It goes beyond the formal boundaries But I'm also Romo myself and would like to believe that I can express myself or what I think is just an important for the Roma people. Can you talk on the kinds of discrimination. These groups face nowadays. Especially in the way that is affecting specially women and girls so there are different layers of exclusion and also discrimination even within the Roma community but the biggest and the most harmful it comes from outside and that's historical already. There are all sorts of discriminations in every walk of life. possible Whatever you you have a challenge or a bad situation situation If if YOU'RE TO MAKE SCALE RAMA tend to or overwhelmingly always at the very very bottom uh-huh and that's an indication of the level of racist and prejudice and that can can be demonstrated by the kind of attitudes of the society towards Roma that is not different whether we speak of countries from the Post Communist bloc which are still struggle with democracy and economy and so on versus countries in very well advanced democracies in the Western Europe. Romar Romar treated very often in a very similar manner and treatment is in no way good if one is curious and and do a little a bit of a check may be worth of a week of media research or empirical research if you want so the traditional traditional media as well as the social media it will be very easy to find News and information about Roma are targeted with the hatred and hate speech From top politicians from presidents of the country to Prime Minister to foreign foreign ministers they go out and say all stupid and racist things about Roma and very often with impunity. And and the kind of impunity that exists already in Europe it only emboldens the far right and extremist groups who see a top politician attention being outright racist without consequences. Why should why should they be? Shy so they're encouraged to go out and express their intolerance and extremists attitude towards Rama. And that takes very often. The form of racially motivated violence Samsung incidents. Every year we document situations of tax pogroms collective punishments Popular Justice done by people. A who who think it's absolutely okay to take justice and law in their hands and and harm can Education change and all of these behaviors and the conventional education is not an indicator for that because Schools throughout Europe not reformed and educational process and curriculum are not reformed enough to to educate the younger generations beyond a the substance of the courses but educate them about the society and about the respect for diversity. So maybe some countries are more advanced and you you may see a different different treatments With regard to other groups and minorities the religious minorities but the problem is that when it's about trauma. The treatment is unfortunately very similar throughout Europe. And it's one of rejection. We are here for one thousand in Europe and people still call outs. Forum ought to go back to India so they were never considered organically as being part of the countries where they were born and living for centuries and that's a huge problem or anything else that you think it should be covered in this interview. Setting the proper tone is essential and I made a call. Oh and I urged states and and politicians to be responsible. And they're doing because the way they set the roads that's how the policies will be implemented or or the kind of Pol policies that many have fought for decades and now they are in place and there are in principle sound policies. Never stand a chance for proper implementation because that requires political. Will that requires putting money where your mouth is in with regard to Roma in the past fifteen years or so maybe. Thirty countries have developed. Attend adopted Roma inclusion strategies and many Were already renewed twice or even three times but if you would like to to draw the line and see okay. These are in principle good strategies if most of the measures and provisions contained by strategies these would be implemented by now who we will speak a much better situation. The real problem is that it's all talk and it's very little that it's done..

Roma Europe Jewish People Roma Council of Europe The Roma Organization for Security and Romo Daniel Dickinson SEC Intergovernmental Organization Western Europe Mr Doggy Dan Pavel Rama Romania United Nations U. N Romar Romar senior adviser
"roma" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"roma" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"Monica high. We are so excited to welcome to pop culture. Happy hour so excited to be here for people who aren't familiar with Roma? This is a film that was released on net flicks. And they did at the small theatrical release. But most people I think are probably. Wind up actually seeing it on Netflix. It is based on Korans young his own nanny. And the woman who took care of him when he was young involves kind of her relationship with the family and things that happened to her and her personal life. Glenn talked me about how Roma struck you. I can't remember a film that has made me so willing to just sit back and be led by the nose film is just masterful in that. He is displaying mastery with these long lateral Dali shots, he keeps. It keeps revealing things to you characters will be looking off screen. They see something they're reacting to something. And slowly it is revealed to us. He did a lot in children of men too. But this is just so beautifully. Composed the black and white photography kind of takes everything out of the realm of the familiar and just reminds you again, and again that you're watching this beautifully. Composed film, where these these buildings don't look like buildings anymore. They almost look like abstract shapes that are the arranged image. After image just lands with you like there's a scene of a family for lordly eating ice cream under the clause of this show crab or lobster while in the background as a big part of their family. Life is coming to a close. There was a wedding going on in the background. It's just I just ate this movie up. There's a lot of background action that partly involves the fact that this is set at a very eventful time in history of of Mexico in Mexico City, and it's there's a great deal of kind of political upheaval, which there's been some very good writing about that. If you want to read more about it Monica you wrote a little bit about this. And also directed us to a thread from gear mill del Toro, which gets into some of the same things that Glenn was talking about. Oh, certainly I also really enjoy the movie I've seen it now. Three times twice on the big screen and once on Netflix because I wanted to compare the two and see how that worked out in how that compared and it is still very affecting..

Glenn Roma Monica high Netflix del Toro Mexico City Korans Mexico mill
"roma" Discussed on The Film Vault

The Film Vault

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"roma" Discussed on The Film Vault

"Your. I'm gonna call you Bumblebee shoes. Great. I I really like now speaking about a big tent pole movie summer movie released in October, December Christmas movie. How did the hold up as far as the the climax because a lot of these movies kind of living die on the giant ending the big climax fine. I don't have any. It was pretty lackluste. Okay. I thought it was pretty lusty at that point. I already already the movie thumbs up already. All right, cool. Now, let's move on from Bumblebee now. So I thought three very different movies this week. Spiderman was a little better. Spiderman spider verse. Yeah. A little bit a little a little bit better little thought three very separate movies. In addition to okay, why did three, but I'm only gonna talk to because I'm not going to do four fucking flip passions. Let's not get crazy. I saw burning as well. Which is correct Korean film. No, that's not the one that. I did for this week. I'll be talking about burning probably next week a two and a half hour foreign films, still not sure what to make of it. Listener X adjusted guess listener, exited suggested he hooked me up with a screener link watched the whole thing, and it kind of fucked me up, and I can't stop talking about. I'm not gonna talk about right here right now because it's it's we're pressing to talk about Roma Roma Brian Roma Roma. Even Dr drew who I respect as opinion like southbound on the movie that was slow and he's like Roma various low. It's exceptionally Alphonso cure all made this Corleto knowing that. All right. So here a little back story. This told the wife this streaming. Netflix streaming off told the wife last week today, hunting gotta go see a movie out in Las feelers. Vista theatre kind of excited 'cause I've been in the vista in quite some time. And she goes she she asked she she looks at me and asks what are you going to see what she never does? And it was really upset. Because I knew there's a chance she might know because she knows everything and I'm like Roma and she immediately quits back with that's on Netflix. And I say, yeah, I know, but Netflix is a small screen. Yeah. You want the fall? Now, I've I heard the sound is on Tomase. Forty five minutes later, Brian our arguments over. Forty five minutes Bryant. Okay. How to resolve? And I should say argument, but our debates gushing I didn't get her to meet me in the middle that it's a completely different experience to see on the big screen, and I kept telling her this movie was meant to be seen on the big screen. Plus, I knew that watching black and white slowest flock Spanish language film in the comfort of my own living room was gonna be lot tougher to get through. Then if I was in a theater far away. So the question yourself, we can't be distracted. Let me tell you. What was your point of view was her point of view you so You much? so much money on the TV and the sound system in in the living room and on on that flicks. And you're anyone who thinks that you have to see it on the big screen is pretentious, and it's ridiculous. And it's exact same thing. And I said, no, it's not and we went back and forth on that. And I and I kept saying please, meet me halfway, and I was using examples of her job. But then it doesn't really translate because she's different she houses the homeless. So it's a little different when I'm like, well, it's it's like you wanted to house to people instead of one. I heard wanting to like, you know, go check in on somebody a home visit versus you know, calling them. So I'm very glad that I saw this the big screen because you know, what I really liked this movie. Now, you're divorced. I really liked this movie. Good. I enjoyed it quite a bit. And I don't know if I would have sitting in my living room. I don't think I would have had said the exact same experience because there is so much camerawork that he didn't he DP himself as well. I have to go see this looking at Roma and in his like entire like catalogue of work really makes you appreciate who. He is a filmmaker..

Roma Roma Brian Roma Roma Roma Bryant Spiderman Netflix Tomase Brian Forty five minutes
"roma" Discussed on Talk Filmy to Me

Talk Filmy to Me

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"roma" Discussed on Talk Filmy to Me

"Juliette for this week's streaming gem. We are going to be taking a look at the film Roma by director Alphonso quo on you know, him from two thousand thirteen gravity. An amazing movie set in space. This is very very different, however, say in Mexico, nineteen seventy to nineteen seventy one focus on our main protagonist a woman by the name of Cleo who is a seventh for a wealthy family in Mexico City. So she's deliberately very kind of ache going about her housekeeping duties, very quietly for rich middle class family based on our phones. Oh, Korans actual childhood, which is one of the most fascinating parts of this movie for me. It's the personal nature. The whole thing rings as a movie that's been really A occur. love and a lot of detail from his own experience in it. And it really makes the movie what it is before. I continue our mention this was meant to be a joint review with my lovely wife. But she's lost voice say she's just gonna nods and agree with me about everything. So anyway, let's get on. So very much spent the first hour of the movie the first half really kind of set in the scene. If you've seen the hunter, you know, they spend about two hours family as very normal. And then I go to war and the fan. This kind of goes in a similar direction. I think it spends a longtime set in the scene get into know the characters a little bit allows subtleties a lot of long slow pan shots as you seen in all of our funds. Oh, croissants movies, particularly gravity. It was quite strange to see the similarities of gravity given that one is set in space and one is nineteen seventy Mexico. So the office things to mention about this movie. This is subtitled Spanish language movie, and is in black and white which really gives there. I think it gives a real interesting mood. So I figured out a really good cool. The second of this movie things star happened in a lot of the political turmoil. At the time in Mexico really comes to light, and this seven housekeeping character is kind of constantly in the mix of these crazy kind of background scenes. Lots of stuff going on the background Moshe. She's quietly trying to go about her own business because she has had a boyfriend. She's got pregnant the boyfriend has left. He kind of comes back in a movie or ruin anything. But the men in this movie do not come out too. Well, love misogynistic Fame's and about sexism. That was just the norm in seventies and match. Oh mccheese. Yes. Jamie's doing some goods muscle flexing. Nets remind me. So I mean, a lot of the themes. Move is for me at the resolve of women, and how is kind of openly funds as said, this is a lovely at the strong women in his life, the movie ends, and it says four lebeau who the housekeeper was based on. And it's just a breaks your heart because it's absolutely beautiful. The portrayal of this very understated under appreciated woman who is just that to serve. But in the right moment to the film. She just has this incredible strength and resolve and I had to I shed a tear have to a couple of moments. You just can't believe almost for myself. I dismissed for the first hour the movie you kinda question. Why am I watching a movie about this woman 'cause she's still under state and the second half the movie you feel like annoyed yourself an hour ago question in that because it's just amazing. What she kind of goes through and the strength. She shows. So I do want to talk about the camera work in this movie because Al funds ako on is an absolute must of the direction and cameras in particularly these long slow pan shots never get into close to the.

Mexico Cleo Mexico City Juliette director Alphonso Korans lebeau Al Jamie two hours
"roma" Discussed on At The Movies with Arch and Ann

At The Movies with Arch and Ann

03:19 min | 1 year ago

"roma" Discussed on At The Movies with Arch and Ann

"I recommend that very highly. And speaking of recommendations, I guess that takes us to are under the radar recommendations are I'm gonna go, right? Above the radar. Okay. Just highly recommend that everybody see Roma, especially in a theater, it's it's a big screen experience, and it's comparable to the great silent. Epics of the golden age of silence cinema. I agree wholeheartedly, but I still wanna make I do wanna make a little bit of a plug for green book. I feel needs some help and it needs it. I can guarantee you if you go you'll be glad you saw it. I got renamed checks on green book this week from people who'd gone to see. And set off. Thank goodness. We're telling me about that's what I'm hearing too. And I'm hearing support. Yeah. It's just that kind of movie it earned a rare a plus cinema score from that means real filmgoers coming out of the theaters gave it a plus. So you know, it's it's building. I think they want it to build by word of mouth and build some support. But I just go you won't be disappointed. That's what I'm. Roman. I will because I saw Natalie Portman in the movie, I did not like vox lox got me thinking about some of great movies and loan. Behold. I got back to my apartment turn on TV and one of her if not actually I think this was our first movie it wasn't first movie. It's called the professional or Leon the professional was yon Renault and Gary Oldman, Danny yellow it the best song. Yes. Yes there. It's amazing movie. There's a little bit of like what's going on between genre knows character in very young Natalie Portman, that's a little itchy at times. But she you can look at her and say she's remember seeing saying she's going to be a star. Oh, she just explodes on the screen. And what I forgot though was how brilliant Gary Oldman was as the villainous. I mean, he is just chewing up the scenery. But you love every second of three visits. That probably thirty years. His body of work is worth revisit really always it astonishes you that he just won the Oscar because go back and look at you like he could've won for this. I mean, it was that good. And I just if I could go on a road trip with one person, it might be John. We're now I just I don't know why love him. So what time he's in a bad guy? Good. I was a good guy road trip. You'd never come back for exactly, but I just love love love him to death. So go back and check that out Leon. Cool. So how should we end this program? I actually didn't even you guys gotta go first with going to quote and horrid. Fed in this broadcast. I want the boot the reef. I'm blanking. And when I blank, I just go straight to my wheelhouse guy that of course, is Hans solo never tell me the odds kid. How come? To my go-to guy who's Sidney Falco from soussan success when I say the cats in the bag and the bags in the river..

Natalie Portman Gary Oldman Roma Sidney Falco Leon Oscar Hans Danny thirty years
"roma" Discussed on At The Movies with Arch and Ann

At The Movies with Arch and Ann

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"roma" Discussed on At The Movies with Arch and Ann

"The only reason it caught my attention is seems to me for the last ten years, and I have not researched this, but generally, the Washington film. Critics nailed the best picture, really. This should be they go with it. This should be huge. Okay. So I don't know. Own. Vera, I don't know. Maybe they'll give Koran director again that was one full gravity. That's right. See I think Cooper's going to win director. Maybe it'll be a swing. Yeah. Maybe Cooper wins best director. But in Vigo wins best actor, I don't know. That's gonna be interesting to see how that that's that's my hunch. That's what you do. What do you think in? I don't know. I mean, I'm detecting some pushback against green book, really just in terms of a lot of people think it's a it's a throwback to kind of movie that we shouldn't be making the white savior kind of exactly. And the you know, and and I personally disagree with that. I think it it. I think it skates on that ice. But I think it alternately avoids all of those that falls. But a lot of people don't agree and think it, you know, it commits all those sins and to the degree that that. That influences voters there she'll ensure again that younger generation who are a little bit more woke and or wanna be seen as woke. I think that could be a factor. That's point. That's a very good point. And you know, campaigning can get nasty. And that's definitely going to be something that if people are nasty, that's something. They can be nasty. You're going to be on Nell a in the next month or so right early. Jan. Yeah. That's what I'm going to pick up all the vibes. No one curious because what happens out there in the summer. Like, all you saw were billboards like pump and stuff for like for for EMI's. You know? I know it's just you forget that. That's that's what goes on. Oh, it's like a political campaign every night, you go to screening or a cocktail party. And then, you know, so and so wants to present a special screening of this. And it just you know, they're the surrogate s- there the endorsers in the field. I mean, it's just. Can I just have a private word with you? I just really want to tell you. Exactly. Yeah. The president of flesh. That'd be mentioned the best film nominees. The favourite green book if Beale street could talk Roma and a star is born, you know, what's left out Black Panther. Oh, yeah. That's true. Who's Black Panther gonna be? I always wonder if that hurts because it was so huge, but it was ten months ago, and it's still for removed from your top of your mind. You forget what a mammoth event that. It's a huge cultural waters. Yes. But you see critics don't vote on cultural watersheds, we tend to vote on just what we, you know. Sure. But but the Academy Awards might especially with ten there's only five of those they can go up to ten with the Oscar. So I think for sure I'm still hoping there's a place for blind spotting. I know be nice. I. The one that kind of got overlooked in the Sheffield that. Yeah, I agree with you and vox looks. Valeria Larry day away from the in venoms. The lesson. What is the lesson? What are we learning folks speaking?.

director Cooper Washington Vigo Vera Valeria Larry EMI Nell Sheffield Academy Awards venoms president Roma Oscar ten months ten years
"roma" Discussed on At The Movies with Arch and Ann

At The Movies with Arch and Ann

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"roma" Discussed on At The Movies with Arch and Ann

"I'm telling you, keep your mind open when you go into these movies. And you will be rewarded and amazed. I agree showed it, gene. I've been showing her a few films, and you know, she when we watch him at home, she gets up and moves around, and it did this closest to a real knocked down argument that we have why are you? Walking around you're supposed to pay attention. So we go. Sweden. You must sit here and watch Roma. You may not move around. You may not go to the kitchen. So she sat there and was transfixed and couldn't take. I mean, you know, when I was at Toronto this year. I have to say the Toronto film festival was a little underwhelming to me. And I was not having a very good festival. You know? I mean, it was it was stars. Born was the first kind of water, you know, that was the one that kind of got sure shook me out of my stupor. But then it was really Roma. That was the first great movie I saw, and then it was the it was the same day that they saw two movies that day Roma. And if Beale street could talk all my good, and what's interesting is that they both affected me the same way. Which is they are gorgeous things to look at. They're just beautiful sensual visual experiences. But ultimately, they're working with emotion and the miracle of motion is just how do you like you said, how did he get those shots a home? Especially with these personal stories like how do they know? What's going to get us the way it got them? How do they communicate? I don't know. I just find it. That's the miracle of a movie to me is the emotion more than the techno I used to be dazzled by technique and the tracking shot and all that. But now, I'm more in convinced emotion, and that both of these guys Alphonso when Barry Jenkins, they just want to insert that he recreates the nineteen seventy-one Mexico City in ways that are just you know, these fracking shots going downtown cars and defenders architecture. And apparently, he went back and found a lot of those locations from history, you know, like a lot of these. He uses furniture found they old furniture from his siblings and got it. So it just has that feeling of anticipation and being which I think is also what makes green book better than it. Sounds on paper because it it feels grounded in true. Truth. There's truth here that they get over. And that you know, it's not just Hollywood telling you a story. It's it's really something. That's that's that's rooted in somebody's life and experience both of those movies, build rain book, you know, starts out of a standard issue buddy movie. Right. And of Roma starts out, very slowly. But he is staying overnight. I thought I thought the pace was off. And then I watched again and the pace is perfect pacing. He he's sets that pace it an he trains you in the first few scenes how to watch this. Right. And I thought it was extraordinarily. I think extraordinary movie agreed. And the that reminds me of the thing I love about him..

Barry Jenkins Toronto Sweden Alphonso Hollywood Mexico
"roma" Discussed on At The Movies with Arch and Ann

At The Movies with Arch and Ann

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"roma" Discussed on At The Movies with Arch and Ann

"I thought that was a line. Of that. Yes. And it went there. And then be having his new book adapted into one. Yes. Yes. I asked my I have learned cast is brought to you by salty the seed. Simon. Seacat which is quite a way. Currently the number one. It's number one in its category. Amazon children's children's animal military fiction. I find your natch and dominating. Zone. I love it. Here. We are. So new movies this week? And I think this is an important week for movies. The new movie this week includes Roma Alfonso quirones memoir of growing up in middle-class Mexico City in the Roma neighborhood and his memories of the maid who cared for his family Roma stars newcomer yell. It's a Partiat apart operatiothe APA. Our are Aparicio think as Cleo the family maid who cleans and cares for a family based on Kwa rooms, she rarely speaks. She quietly serves she accepts her place and the challenges life answer with dignity. And many people. Did you read that into this than I what? Am I over reading? Very nice. And Roma has been widely discussed since it won the Venice film festival last summer and and Hornets. I pitched the softball to you know, I think it's the best movie of the year..

Aparicio Roma Cleo Amazon Simon Hornets Mexico
"roma" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"roma" Discussed on Filmspotting

"Not to think of lussier again, as you watch even as for sure, it's absolutely its own unique entity that Koran very personally crafted, it's all about that clash of classes and indigenous people all of those scenes of domestic life in the children. We even get the hacienda. Visit and the sense of dread that pervades a lot of our tells work, at least the work that we have seen and that ackknowledgement of what is happening just beyond the frame sound being such a big part of her work as well. And this brings me back to the long takes as we talk about dread. And you mentioned it. I'm not going to get into any of the details of the end of this film. But the way in some major sequences of the camera does again put us in that position of experiencing in real time. The. The agony or the despair that the characters on screen are going through. It's a trick to an extent a cinematic trick. And that I do think by withholding certain information, and this is hard without breaking down the scene down so badly. But by keeping the camera where it is and focused on what it is. And we know what the characters are looking at what might be out there. Right. We don't know. And we're having to use our imagination. That's building up suspense that only happens with this kind of technique where you're not relying on editing to give the audience everything to consider we have to use our imagination there. But also, it does allow us to see her point of view, which brings us back to the whole endeavor of this film. I guess what I'm saying is it's not a surprise that we have Koran everything about children men and his other work, and some of those amazing sequences that we would get that use of along take here. It's not as flashy or maybe quite as stylish, but I think to this film's benefit, you know, what that. Long take does as well. And this relates back to my questioning of if people will find an idealized vision, it all it's certainly is in some respects, her Cleo's candidates Asian as a as a sate right that moment, but at the same time, it also offers her all say is very human moment of confession. So just when she's becoming an Jelic. She's falling back to earth and to capture that all in the same moment is really something special to be able to pull off. I think it makes that climax work as well. As it doesn't make the movie confirms the movie to be as nuanced as it is. And really absolutely a thing of wonder. Well, you are going to get a chance to see it. If you have a Netflix subscription it is available on that platform starting December fourteenth. But it is as of the airing of this show playing in limited release. And if you do get a chance to see it in a theater, I know this is one of those cliche things you hear boring film critic types like us say, but really if there was a film that warranted and did demand seeing it on the big screen Roma qualifies. Now, watch it on Netflix. If that's the only way you can see it. It's still absolately worth it. But if you have that opportunity, please do seek it out. And if you see or have seen it and agree or disagree? With our thoughts on it Email feedback at film spotting dot net. I had some other thoughts death. I wanted to get into. But you know, what I have a feeling this film is gonna come up again, it just might maybe in a few weeks and beyond. I'm going to save those for that. And that means that is our show while you're waiting for Adams other thoughts on Roma. Go ahead it up too much visit film spotting dot net. That's.

Roma Netflix lussier Adams
"roma" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

02:55 min | 1 year ago

"roma" Discussed on Filmspotting

"I imagine we don't see it on screen, and she is throwing that on this tiled driveway that she is trying to clean where they park their cars and just without water appearing the first shot is just of the tile dry tile and just with the water appearing the water reflection. Then gives us this view. Of the sky. It gives us this view of this other world, it's almost as if it's a portal that's revealed to another way of seeing the world for us viewers, it sets up the entire film and also allows us in that moment to recognize that that's the kind of glimpse. We're gonna see we're going to see these characters go through the same kind of transformation where they see the world in a different way. Also love in that moment that we do see an airplane. Fly overhead airplanes also appear again, and again in this film. And for me, it was this kind of reminder that there is this larger outside world, despite all of the turmoil all the happenings that are going on within this family, and within this main character in particular, there is still all of this strife and all of this activity that's going on and rather than that minimizing their predicament or circumstances at all it actually heightens it for me completely. Yeah. I've got I've got a theory about that these larger forces at play in this movie that is otherwise small Tibet. Stick tail but to go back to that opening shot. I don't know yet. If Roma is going to be my favorite film of the year. It's got a decent chance of being my favorite film of the year. But and this makes no sense. But can I say that that opening shot is my favorite film of the year? I just could have continue to watch that for the levels of revelation that came about this very simple activity, and you're right. It sets the tone for the entire film causing us to pause to look closely. Think about the sort of chores that we'd rather not do or more commonly in this case pass on to someone else, and what's happening there in this dirty tile floor becoming as you said beautifully. Portal is Cleo is performing a miracle score back to the idea of her as a singles come up times in this move do and somehow the act a small act like that it's a strange and beautiful miracle being performed. And I also think that. There's something about being both elegant and mundane and mesmerizing and this goes to your point about Krahn wondering if he wasn't thankful enough. I do like the nods here that in some of the quite visual asides about the moment. When one of the boys instinctively puts his arms around Cleo as whole families watching TV the in those gestures. They're acknowledging the miracles right with his deep abiding faith in her, and you just get these little moments throughout the film. It's all set up in that opening now, how about the bigger ones that you're referencing the airplanes or the earthquake?.

Cleo Roma Krahn Tibet
"roma" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"roma" Discussed on Filmspotting

"We're going to save these up possibly for that top ten films of twenty eighteen show. Tasha Robinson will be part of that Michael Phillips we part of that as well as many guests submitting their favorite films of the year. You could be part of that. If we choose yours against an audio file to feedback at film, spotting dot net. Whatever's going on whatever you will political ideas is a relevant. It doesn't matter. Janin's adult. The baby parade English. They'd is. You'll government would never human both nineteen years from a food a wanted Fuji. What are we explain? In this country. Cages. The scene there from Alphonso owns children of men and before we get to our thoughts on his latest Roma. We thought we would share the results of our recent Roma inspired poll question, we asked you what is best film, and we didn't leave out Roma for those who had already had an opportunity to see it probably not a huge swath of the audience, but we really wanted to assess going into Roma where everyone stood on the filmography of Koran, and I think all three of us, including Sam had a sense of where this would go. I think it played out about exactly as I imagine what the to movies of the top in the movie, the decidedly one medical order. Those options were children of men gravity. The prisoner of as Caban to mama tambien or you could go with other actually Roma is his eighth films. We left a couple choices out there. How did the results play out? Just one percent for other and six percent for the prisoner of as Bonn gravity received eleven percent of the vote. I thought maybe. That would have a chance of squeaking into second place there. But no second place went to eat to mama tambien with nineteen percent of the vote. And yeah running away with this was children of men with sixty three percent of the vote. Here's Scott, gentry in Burke inside UK, explaining why children of men is Koran is most gripping aside from being a uniquely bleak. Completely believable vision of our near future. This is a picture which digs deep into our inherent, selfishness exemplified in Britain self-imposed exile from the wide world Benalla that even the good guys can be corrupted. And that redemption is available to all, you know, an alternative retelling of the Christmas story, I'm right there with Scott one of the standout sequences in children of men is absolutely a parable for Joseph and Mary for share in Armstrong ads. Children of men is such a moving and shocking piece of cinema that it is easy to see whites reputation grows every year, it is magnificently directed and has some of the best cinematography in recent memory. There are a lot of films where the future of humanity is at stake, but very few deliver that feeling in a meaningful way children. Men does Darren also contributed. He said if you watch Harry Potter movies in close succession, it's incredible to see the shift from the second Chris Columbus movie to the Koran entry. Yeah. I can't imagine the franchise would have had financial success. No matter what happened but grown didn't settle for that he helped his actors turn in performances that were emotionally involving and use the big budget. That comes with the Harry Potter film to develop truly engaging visuals. It's a remarkable achievement. And I believe it has had a lasting impact on the artistic intent of at least some franchise films here, my favorite, Harry Potter as it is for many people Michael Nabozny from Ann Arbor says I love each of these films for different reasons, but I'm going with gravity aside from wanting to play devil's advocate to the conventional wisdom that has demoted the films at one time watch status, I found the film stunning in its use of blocking physical direction the way moves across literal space, slowly, and without control is downright excruciating. And after several rewatch is knowing the literal paths. She takes the film becomes even more demanding of your attention. It's the best use of Koran style of long takes and patient editing. And it's why I keep coming back to it. And then gravity is a great film lily Evans, says gravity and prisoner of as are really good and children of men is great. But none of them even come close to the brilliance of two Mahmut on the end. Unfortunately, Korans the best film is also one of his least seen like Adelaide itself e to mama tambien somehow manages to be sexy..

Roma Harry Potter Darren Scott Tasha Robinson lily Evans Janin Fuji Bonn Alphonso Caban Michael Phillips Adelaide Chris Columbus Britain Korans UK Sam Michael Nabozny
"roma" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"roma" Discussed on Filmspotting

"Welcome to film, spotting don't mind if we seem a little distracted this episode. We might just be trying to cram in a few movies while we're recording. That's basically what it's come down to at this point in the year. What I was exactly hypothesis. Exactly. I hope you're enjoying that one. I hope it possibly contends for your number one spot. It is just a few weeks away from our taping of the top ten films of twenty eighteen and we are so fortunate as to have many screeners at home, and that does require a lot of attention. In fact, I will say this. I hope the show first of all is worthy of everyone downloading it or listening to it on the radio. But if it is I hope they appreciate that. It's ridiculous retained episode at all we really should just shut down from thanksgiving until mid December. When we record that show because there's so much that we want to watch. I think it would probably result in maybe. Broader top ten lists. Yeah. With a few surprising titles on it that we wouldn't have otherwise. But I don't know if listeners would wine exchange that for no results for a month. Maybe halloween. Maybe we started Halloween all we're back to how November December. I don't know. Why couldn't work give it a try a couple of high profile movies? We did get to Alfano Korans Roma and the favorite from your go. Slanty? Most Roma is grown first film since twenty thirteen's gravity it set in his native Mexico City in the early nineteen seventies is autobiographical, and he's the writer director cinematographer, and the co editor of the film along with the star is born Roma is probably the current best picture front runner, which that sounds right. Even though I have to say I haven't looked at a lot of those prognostications and predictions. Does that sound right to you? Yeah. Make sense you tell me you have into broke down the odds on the Oscars ready to do that. No. I haven't made time for it. Again. I'm watching too many movies here. Josh doing serious Sinophile work. We will. Have a review of Roma later in the show along with your thoughts on Korans of best film that isn't Roma but first director Iago slanty, most trades in the high-concept parallel universe. Plots of the lobster and dog tooth for an eighteenth century costume drama with the favorite does John suit him. Extrordinary passing. I can tell even if I say and fat and no one, but me dire. And I did not she's been stoked by tragedy. Everyone leaves me..

Alfano Korans Roma director Iago slanty Mexico City John Josh editor writer
"roma" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"roma" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"More. Music Four three Roma, roma Free Go No baby.

"roma" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"roma" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Indonesian rescue workers battle stormy weather to try to find survivors from ferry that sank in sumatra with at least eighty passengers on board and how schoolgirls in syria kept up with their studies in defiance of the selfstyled islam states we begin in italy whether it's being faced criticism of coleman's by the interior minister mattio salvini in which he talked about counting and potentially deporting members of the roma community speaking on the italian television station telelombardia on monday mr salvini said roma with a talion citizenship would have to stay but others may be forced to leave general when eric jill conducting the survey of the roma situation around italy to see who's here and how many unfortunately we will have to keep the talian roman italy because we can't expel them by austat correspondent james reynolds in rome whether mr salvini had simply been talking on a tv program whether he had really taken the decision to act against the roma community i think that's a fascinating point some people will say well look he's just said this on tv what is the actual policy going to be like bear in mind italy does have a census every ten years the most recent was in twenty eleven and therefore to conduct a census merely against one part one portion of the population campaign groups think might be a legal they would no doubt seek the challenge that in the courts why do you think mr salvini is targeting the roma community he's never hidden his distaste for what he considered to be some of the activities of members of the roma community he says many have been brought up to to steal and he doesn't believe it's a very healthy community he wants to make sure in his words that e you funds properly being spent he suggested that if children aren't enrolled in schools he will take them into care human rights watch has accused mr salvini of i quote outrageous racism what's the reaction been like in italy mr salvini does have his supporters and it is worth saying that in recent weeks his support with his actions against migrants in the.

sumatra syria coleman mattio salvini roma eric jill italy rome james reynolds ten years
"roma" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"roma" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Indonesian rescue workers battle stormy weather to try to find survivors from ferry that sank in sumatra with at least eighty passengers on board and how schoolgirls in syria kept up with their studies in defiance of the selfstyled islam states we begin in italy whether it's being faced criticism of coleman's by the interior minister mattio salvini in which he talked about counting and potentially deporting members of the roma community speaking on the italian television station telelombardia on monday mr salvini said roma with a talion citizenship would have to stay but others may be forced to leave general when eric jill conducting the survey of the roma situation around italy to see who's here and how many unfortunately we will have to keep the talian roman italy because we can't expel them by austat correspondent james reynolds in rome whether mr salvini had simply been talking on a tv program whether he had really taken the decision to act against the roma community i think that's a fascinating point some people will say well look he's just said this on tv what is the actual policy going to be like bear in mind italy does have a census every ten years the most recent was in twenty eleven and therefore to conduct a census merely against one part one portion of the population campaign groups think might be a legal they would no doubt seek the challenge that in the courts why do you think mr salvini is targeting the roma community he's never hidden his distaste for what he considered to be some of the activities of members of the roma community he says many have been brought up to to steal and he doesn't believe it's a very healthy community he wants to make sure in his words that e you funds properly being spent he suggested that if children aren't enrolled in schools he will take them into care human rights watch has accused mr salvini of i quote outrageous racism what's the reaction been like in italy mr salvini does have his supporters and it is worth saying that in recent weeks his support with his actions against migrants in the.

sumatra syria coleman mattio salvini roma eric jill italy rome james reynolds ten years
"roma" Discussed on ESPN FC

ESPN FC

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"roma" Discussed on ESPN FC

"Brilliant brilliant night for less team this bondage who if we talk court she's an forget the tactics time being this little pook sade this is a groupie players america emma jr of the monitor the energy the enjoyment the infuse yasim and actually you talk to the bill for eighty minutes i think poodle plead wheel for sixty minutes ten minutes at the end and they will not themselves for the first twenty minutes as they try to work out this system that roma were played an interim role must possession once did that and really quick passing game going the movement going get run us from field the ron stoppable i absolutely brilliant couldn't have been double figures and roma were atrocious i mean really did not playing thomas could double figures that period after after the break was just insane if this had been a fight they would have called it yeah simple as that that's how bad roma wasn't that's how good liverpool were if you roma what in the world are you doing plane highline would no pressure on the ball and running behind from liverpool abel's wide open for once they figure out what was going on caller gets pulled out why that lease the space force us to throw himself in behind nobody is running with him nobody can keep up with his base joins us defending no things so that equal fending no thanks what is going on with roma defensively and the fact that they couldn't figure this out it happened time and time and time again liverpool figure it out and in the end you have to say on this lot it's putting himself in a conversation that i don't think any of us here thought he was capable of putting conversation and top tier players in the world mom has to be considered finishes this is the performances that momentum that he cares for this team and the trinity nashville is something that all of us who appreciate you take a look at his numbers fourteen three goals this season in all competitions just four shy.

emma jr thomas roma liverpool liverpool abel nashville eighty minutes twenty minutes sixty minutes ten minutes
Cellies

Ear Hustle

02:53 min | 3 years ago

Cellies

"Spent almost don't live in the marine corps special forces been in combat raised in military schools i thought you know male prison how bad can that be that's run self an inmate at san quentin he's serving twenty five years to life for attempted murder and conspiracy to commit murder he's been locked up for twenty years his first stop was corcoran a level full maximum security state prison in california we arrive on the bus or get off we go through processing apart processing is it's the reception area or the issue your state lose and whatnot and and i meet this guy he's native american like myself and his name's doug and i i stick my hannah he maizels bid on it discussed evil i mean he just he stirred the should a minute it's not often things or people scare me but roma's this this receiving man actually a release skirt me or nor which is basically the intake into the prison system is what you get your id card and your prison number which will follow you through your whole incarceration and is when you go through a litany of questions to find out where you behind closed it just felt like the whole time i was in our in our the sky wanted to kill me of like i couldn't get processed fast enough to get out of our nar so the french processing nail i go to the building which is like a mile long walk in chains in on guns out on the rails and i feel electronc door opens a walk into the to the building door closes behind me and then another door i her pop open and that's the cell ongoing to and the door opens all the way in its duck the guy that looking at me like he wants to kill me and i just my heart dropped they said go into that so and close the door behind you okay i can do with this but no matter what i didn't sell it was wrong emmy he he would yell huge scream he threatened to kill me i would sleep with my back to the wall in one eye open if you would call would i did sleeping and sometimes you just get down out of the bed bill night scream and act like he's gonna kill me that one once sixmonth period felt more like sixty years the moral of ron self story in prison it matters who your sale mateias hammer lahure's early on is serving a thirty one year to life sentence for attempted second degree robbery and he's the co host and coproducer of your hustle and that's nigel poor she's a visual artists and workable incarcerated me and here's saying quinn as she's the coproducer mr co host and together we're gonna take you inside early this is our first episode so it's probably a

Marine Corps California Doug Roma Robbery Conspiracy To Commit Murder RON Quinn