20 Episode results for "Rolling Stone Magazine"

The "Rock Star" Who Blew Me Off (Not In A Good Way)

Build A Big Podcast - Marketing Podcast For Podcasters

05:25 min | 1 year ago

The "Rock Star" Who Blew Me Off (Not In A Good Way)

"The BIG PODCAST David Hooper here yesterday. I was talking about a friend of mine from Rolling Stone magazine talked about podcasting lessons from a rockstar continuing that on this episode one of the topics I talked about with him in the last discussion that we had was experiences this is we have had meeting very famous people if you don't know this. I've got a broadcast radio show. It's called music business. Radio got famous people in there all the time man. Some of them are cool. Some of them not so cool. One time had a guy I stand up in the middle of the interview he walked out and then I followed him took him back to his hotel and what right back to the studio a made a great show out of it and nobody knew because that was the best thing from audience I don't I don't mention his name. I don't try to embarrass him. Maybe I've mentioned his name if you and I met each other that's actually what this episode is about. This is a huge lesson for podcasters especially when it comes to live events especially when it comes to events that are related to what you podcast about industry events. Maybe it's a podcast in event. We've got a few of them coming up. Are you going to be there. Think about this when you meet people but this is applicable to everywhere. Everywhere if somebody walks up to you and they like what you were doing if you reach enough people this will happen to you. Maybe not every day maybe not every week but it will happen to you. You owe it to them to acknowledge them. The people who listen to you people listen to me. These are the people who make what we do possible so let me give you a quick story is what promised on the last episode. I'm an industry event. I seeing guy that is the producer of another artists that I know the both these artists the producer I'm talking about because he's an artist and also the artists that I knew who is being produced by this guy I they're both well-known. They're both established major label deals big names and I'm not intimidated by these guys and I don't know if that's what this do was expecting but I walked up to him. Hey I'm David. I just talked to blank the artists that he's producing. I'm super excited here the new projects she said it was going great and I talked about how much I liked this artist and not introduce myself. He knew who I was. And I was genuinely interested in this artists that he's working with now. Maybe this do was mad because I didn't acknowledge him as the big cheese maybe he wanted me to talk about him and his artistic abilities not his production abilities but he just looked at me and he was like okay great any turned around and walked off. I don't think I've ever had that happen like this and look. I'm not expecting this guy to kiss up to me. I'm expecting though to be knowledged when I walk up to you at an industry event an industry function as somebody who is also in the industry I mean that's why you're they're right. Are you not there to see other people. Within the industry. All one is a little acknowledgement and that's what you listeners one and that's what people who are also podcasting want when they see you at podcasting events now could be that you're tired. You probably are tired. If you're an event for several days God knows I get tired of these things but a year ago is coming back from podcast movement may not passed out on the. Plane Literally dropped. My knees couldn't see anything I was in the back of the plane crawled into the lavatory when I could and this hello hello Sir Sir are you okay I mean that kind of exhaustion was what I was working with so I get it. I get being exhausted. If you'RE GONNA go on public where people know you it least acknowledged them. You don't have to sit around and talk for twenty minutes but do acknowledge them. These people are listening to you. These are your super fans and I'm not gonNA mention this guy's name because that's not kind of thing that I do but you can bet in private of told a lot of people to story because I was shocked and you can bad somebody who's a bad experience with you. They will tell tell a similar story so consider that with some of these upcoming podcast conferences they're coming up considered everywhere podcast movement. It is coming up in just a few weeks of got another one here in Nashville. It's called Rock and pod. It's for music podcasters. I'm actually doing in an interview with Dave Ellison from megadeath if you're interested in attending that reach out to me you need to be reaching out to me anyway because I've got some cool stuff where you on how to grow your podcast. You can do that at big podcast dot com he wanted subscribe and make sure you never.

David Hooper Rolling Stone magazine producer Nashville Dave Ellison twenty minutes
Washington Gov. Jay Inslee On How To Stay Optimistic On Fighting Climate Change

Environment: NPR

06:33 min | 2 weeks ago

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee On How To Stay Optimistic On Fighting Climate Change

"All this weekend we've been digging into policy issues that came up at last week's debate or should have to see if we can add a bit more substance and context than you might have gotten from the verbal smackdown. So now we're going to turn to climate change. Some analysts have pointed out that last week's presidential debate was the first time the issue came up at such an event, and that speaks to something larger that climate change is often treated as A. Second Tier, political issue this despite the fact that we are witnessing troubling climate events, deadly wildfires in the West and one of the most intense cain seasons we've seen in recent years. We wanted to get a sense of what more we could be doing on this issue and how we should be thinking about it. So we've called Washington governor. Jay inslee. He is a Democrat he ran for his party's nomination on a platform to address climate change Governor Inslee. Welcome. Thank you. So much for joining us once again, thank you for being attention to the sexist threat I appreciate your interest. Well, before we begin I, don't WanNa lose sight of the fact that parts of your state have experienced dangerous even deadly wildfires in a recent piece in Rolling Stone magazine. You wrote an op Ed in which you say quote wildfires aren't new to the West but their scope endanger today is unlike anything firefighters have seen people up and down the West Coast Young. And old and rural areas and in cities were choking on smoke for days on end trapped in their homes. So I just wanted to ask you what's the state of things. Now, how are things going? Well, the fires are under control now, but we have to understand we have been ravaged by what I would call not wildfires but climate fires easier climate fires fundamentally because the recent cataclysmic events we've suffered now in multiple years, California has as well and now Oregon. that an entirely new beast when you talk to the firefighters, what they will tell you is that they're seeing fire behavior that they've never seen before. Not only are they more frequent, but the intensity of these fires are people have just never seen this in our state before and these are not just forest fires, these grass and brush and sagebrush fires. In, the situation now is the The any aridity have dried out this fuel so that they are like putting gasoline all over the. Washington. During your presidential campaign last year, he released a policy plan aimed at combating climate change in part through revitalizing rural America you weren't able to bring that plan to fruition on the national level yet, but are the Democrats doing enough at the national level to both be proactive about climate change and to persuade other people who are not necessarily their core constituencies that this is a priority. Well I surely I know that my colleagues governors are doing this because we all recognize that those in agricultural industry. Are the Alpha Omega of climate change because there are some of the victims look at the the farmers who had their field. Devastated in the floods last year, they got hit by these hundred mile an hour plus it knocked down all their corn when I was there I mentioned Hamburg Iowa. All you can see is all the silos that had been destroyed by the floods with all of their green of the last year destroyed laying on the ground. So the farming community is one of the hardest hit we're having changes. You know some of our grapes here the smoke from forest fires have created a risk for degradation of our grapes. We're having changes in the hydrological cycle where you don't have irrigation water. So farmers are one of the first groups who are hardest yet. But they also the group. Who can play such a pivotal role in reducing carbon getting out of our atmosphere because the soil can sequester carbon we need to get carbon out of the atmosphere into our topsoil and farmers playing a very important role in that and can have revenue stream. So that, we can pay farmers for a service of sequestering carbon to get it out of the atmosphere. This is biologically Clear that we can do this and we need to create systems that will create yet another revenue stream for farmers to provide that service to humanity and at our economy. and now that plus they have the ability to grow abundant biofuels which they're doing today. I just went to one of our bio fuels, plants it uses. A soybeans from Iowa and and we make it into biofuels here. And ship it all over right now, the pre the birth of that industry has been driven by the Greenfield fuel standard. Largely in California, we want to do the same in my state. So. Yes. This is a tremendous opportunity for action and it is a risk if we. Don't protect our farming community and I lived for twenty years the foreign community. So I I know what this means. So finally in your rolling stone piece PC, write that despite the intense fires that your your state and others are now facing now is not the time for defeat and pessimism. But given everything that's going on in recent months like deadly wildfires, intense hurricanes, flooding heatwaves, all the things that we've been talking about. And you know as you pointed out there really is not. National. Strategy to address this at this point. Why shouldn't people feel pessimistic? What is keeping you? Hopeful about this. There is progress going on in the United States, we just need to make it national. That's number one. Number two the technology. The REPENTITI of the technological progress is incredible. actually wrote a book about this a decade ago and and had a vision that we're GONNA have technological changes to make electric cars productive, which they now are becoming cost effective and huge range. It's solar would become cheaper and win then coal that has happened. So the technology, the curve of technology is as rapid increased energy as it was in computing, and if you see how how much we far, we've come since the first laptop. we're doing the same thing, clean energy and the third reason. That we need to be optimistic is it it's just the only effective tool in you know I think maybe it was Churchill said when you're going through hell keep going and that's we need to do on this matter. Inslee the governor of Washington. He also ran for the two thousand twenty Democratic presidential nomination platform centered on addressing climate change in see. Thanks so much for taking the time. Thank you very much mascot.

Washington Jay inslee Iowa California Rolling Stone magazine Washington West Coast Young United States Churchill Hamburg America Oregon. twenty years
ASMR - Listen NOW!

Talk, Tales and Trivia

10:32 min | 9 months ago

ASMR - Listen NOW!

"Hello this is Stephanie. And this is talk. Tales and Trivia. This show that talks about pop culture trivia. Listen I'M A mad researcher? And I love researching pop culture trivia for you to stump your family and friends. It is so much fun on today's episode. I thought I would talk about Asmar. Well what is that well? As Mr is autonomous sensory Meridian. Just call it a s as it is so well known by that acronym a S M are well. What does that stand for? What does that really mean? Well it's a spontaneous sensation that leads to having a high and euphoric experience when listening to certain audio clips or videos well sounds very fascinating and it is. It describes a feeling of tingling and relaxation. Just like a spring breeze or walking in a wonderful wonderful garden and it can overcome you with such a wonderful feeling what kind of visual and audio clips can create such a lovely feeling such a wonderful feeling such a beautiful feeling well. I Love Asmar audio clips and videos. And I'll tell you why because they are so relaxing but why are they so relaxing because it involves just sounds and beautiful things that we do during the day just the basic tasks that we take on during the day we can listen to with? As Mr it really works on our scalp going down to our neck and the tingle goes down our spine and to our limbs and it makes us feel so relaxed and so great so that is why I want to introduce you to a s Amar. Possibly you've heard of it but if you haven't then you should go right to youtube or I will have some podcasts in the show notes are Asmar for you to listen to. It's really quite a simple concept. It's just the noises that you make every day or that you hear every day of your life this soothing noises just about anything pouring a drink or just getting ready for work or putting on your coat and doing those things over and over again. That is a s. m. r. and that is such a cool thing it just so relaxing. Now listen you might hear. Someone's voice speaking in the background of the video or audio clips. Along with what they're doing but not always the audio clips or videos often consist of voices whispering. Nice things like you are appreciated. Or You are beautiful or you are loved. And that is wonderful to goes right to the brain and the subconscious and you start to believe it and it's a great thing to start your meditations with or you're relaxing just sitting on the couch and just closing your eyes and relaxing and listening to Asmar. Well why is it so cool and why has it taken over and popularity during Super Bowl? Fifty three last year in two thousand nineteen anheuser Busch Broadcast and a s tomorrow themed commercial for Michelob. Ultra pure gold beer. Whereas Zoe Kravitz uses. Am are techniques including whispering and tapping on a pure gold. Bottle into two microphones. Well Rolling Stone magazine described this as an example of mar going mainstream and it has it has blown up youtube youtube videos of all kinds of activities and there are many. Asmar podcasts out there but let me tell you something. Asmar is usually precipitated by stimuli. Refer to as triggers. Well we hear about triggers we know what triggers something right? We know if we're triggered to act a certain way or do a certain thing but these. Asmar triggers may be encountered through the interpersonal interactions of daily life. That's right additionally. Asmar is often triggered by exposure to specific audio and video. Like I said it's very simple. Mundane tasks very basic tasks. There is some Asmar audio clips and videos that were done for other purposes and have become a s Mr because they fit into that criteria of relaxing. You and making you feel wonderful. Well the stimuli that can trigger. Asmar include the following. Well listening to a soft spoken or whispering voice. We mentioned that listening to quiet. Repetitive sounds resulting from someone. Engaging in a mundane tasks such as turning the pages of a book watches someone attentively execute a mundane tasks such as preparing food loudly chewing crunching slurping. Or biding foods drinks or gum listening to tapping typically nails on a surface such as a plastic wood or metal hand movements especially onto one face like rubbing your face almost like listening to certain types of music the waves crashing on a beach. Asmar listening to a person blow or exhale until microphone. That's Asmar listen. A two thousand seventeen study of one hundred thirty survey respondents found that lower pitched complex sounds and slow paced detail. Focused videos are especially effective triggers. And they are. They really do work as for the mechanisms at work behind. Asmar nobody is quite sure why some people react the way they do and some other people react the way they do to other things we can experience it through simple meditations or just thinking about a senior sound that pleases. Us using your imagination. I'm big on imagination and as I've always said the imagination is the best nation in the world. So why not use? Asmar to trigger your imagination. It's so cool. It could be that the videos and audio clips remind us of our childhood like when our parents used to do anything pretty much dishes laundry preparing food brushing your hair getting ready for work. Anything that triggers a beautiful relaxing. Thought did you know that incorporating. Asmar could bring out human eroticism in a way you've never experienced while some have portrayed Asmar as a roddick they go on to say. There is no evidence none of any connection between Asmar and sexual arousal Really in addition to audio and visual Stimuli Asmar may be caused by light touching and brushing against the skin and that is called F l'orage. Well what is F- Laura will F- large is rubbing the forearm and caring or stroking someone else's hair and very caring loving way anything involving caring and repetitive activity to a loved. One a child or an adult. I know and now you do that. Asmar or autonomous sensory Meridian response is very relaxing and satisfying. And it makes you feel great. Check it out. As Mr Have you ever experienced a cataclysmic event? Venice left you in disoriented and confusing World Gwendolyn has thankfully she's been shown the way to a wonderful existent that no one at I could have ever imagined now. Even her southpaw a tale about a girl's imagination by Stephanie. Leigh Okay so now I'm going to give you some. Asm are examples. While I'm sitting here right at my desk I'm not using any special tools or tricks here. I just want to give you some really great examples if you want to record your own audio clips of Asmar. So here we go. This is example. One example to a example three example for a s Amar can be many things to many people is usually a very relaxing sound. Don't forget you can try at home. You can do it at home and play the recording back anytime you want or you can go to youtube and watch the videos or go to the podcast. I have in the show notes to get your Asmar fix okay. I gotTA get Outta here but use your Asmar and that is such a great thing. I hope you get relaxed and have it ease of mind because that is what. Asmar is all about. Hey if you've enjoyed this podcast this talk tales and Trivia episode. You may want to go over to growing uncomfortable dot com to hear my other podcast growing uncomfortable. If you WANNA get in touch with me. Please email me feedback topics suggestions anything you want. How you use. Asmar. I want to hear it. All you can go to talk tales and Trivia dot com or you can email me tuck tales and Trivia at g mail DOT COM. That's my email address. You can also go to facebook. Talk Tales and Trivia Instagram Talk Tales and Trivia twitter cocktails. Atc listen don't miss out on all fun okay. I'll see you next week bye bye.

Asmar Asmar Asmar youtube Stephanie researcher Zoe Kravitz Rolling Stone magazine facebook twitter Busch Broadcast s. m. r. Mr Amar Venice Leigh roddick
Sinners in the Hands of an Angry Planet?

The BreakPoint Podcast

03:54 min | 1 year ago

Sinners in the Hands of an Angry Planet?

"So you might wonder why climate change activists so often express a religious like fervor for their beliefs. There's a reason for that. For the Colson center, I'm John Stonestreet. This is break point. Philosopher John gray started his two thousand seven book black mass with this declaration quote. Modern politics is a chapter in the history of religion now grazing atheist, but he realized that so much of modern politics is an attempt to reinspired a world that was originally inspired by religion, especially Christianity, gray, specifically pointed to the political utopian projects like Marxism and Nazism that came along with an Escott to logical promise of a perfected world, just like Christian theology. But even beyond marks and Hitler, great considered any political project at aspired to an all encompassing transformation of human life, including the enlightenment belief in progress to be a secular reincarnation of early Christian beliefs while today, secular political discourse includes non only utopian substitutes of the new heaven and new earth. But also secular versions of the apocalypse, just considered the tenor of our current debates around climate change in the environment. For example. A new book by Bill mckibben entitled falter has the human game begun to play itself out comes across like a sinners in the hands of an angry gone for climate change activist the xer just published in Rolling Stone magazine brings to mind certain visions that Jesus gave John on the hour Patmos emit Cubans first scenario the oceans warm to the point that by twenty one hundred it stops oxygen production by Fido plankton by disrupting the process of photosynthesis, which she says would likely result in the mass mortality of animals and humans. This boiling. Seas scenario was just one of the apocalyptic horsemen. He gives us other ways that the world could end by rising temperatures include melting glaciers and permafrost that unleash Spanish flu virus smallpox and bubonic plague that's buried in Siberia and Alaska now, of course, no apocalyptic scenarios complete without earthquakes and famine so mckibben tells us that as I see it smelt, they take the weight off the land that will trigger earthquakes. In addition, the added weight of the new seawater starts to. Bend. The earth's crust, quote that will give you a massive increase in volcanic activity in activate faults to create earthquakes submarine landslides, sue nominees, the whole lot and meanwhile back on land increasing global temperatures could bring to hold all the gains in agricultural productivity. We've had since the end of World War Two. And even if the crop yields aren't affected that much by all the catastrophe climate change could still affect our ability to transport what we're still able to grow. Now, it may sound like I'm mocking the Kidman, but I'm not least not entirely while many of the scenarios he gives us our far and filled with the sort of mites. Maze. And could have we've been hearing about for such a long time. No, one at least of all Christians should be indifferent to the human impact on the environment. Still. I am struck by how often secular scientific garb is adorned with pseudo religious appeal throughout falter mckibben uses the language of sin and punishment, judgment and condemnation our sins against nature or the planet. Instead of God. But the arguments the same be careful to obey all these words that I command you that it may go well with you and with your children after you forever failure to do so risks not only punishment, but permanent exile or extinction. And I'm also struck by how people can be more open to secular reincarnations of Christian beliefs than they are open to the real thing. We talk about Christ's coming again in glory to judge the living and the dead to readers of the Rolling Stone is will roll talk about climate change causing human extinction and will demand immediate action. She turns out John gray was right? But I'd say modern politics isn't just a chapter in the history of religion often. It's a parody of it. For breakpoint. I'm John Stonestreet.

Bill mckibben John Stonestreet John gray Colson center Rolling Stone magazine Escott Kidman Rolling Stone Hitler Bend Alaska Siberia Jesus John
One of a Kind, Steve Forbert Rewinds

World Cafe

30:23 min | 1 year ago

One of a Kind, Steve Forbert Rewinds

"This message comes from NPR sponsor. Comcast business. Business has always been driven by innovators. That's why Comcast business is helping you with technology that provides better experiences. Comcast business beyond fast. Hey, you're listening to world cafe on Talia Shlenker last year St. forward celebrated the fortieth anniversary of his debut by releasing a new album and a memoir both of them reflect a life lived these mom mistakes. True. Maybe then maybe two. Maybe more than wide few lead. In his memoir. Steve rates about leaving his home at Mississippi for New York City, and what the scene was like in the seventies. You played it. CBGB's open for talking heads and ended up with this big hit. Everything's all kit at the height of his Romeo's, tune fame. Steve forward actually turned down the chance to be on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine, he explains that in his memoir, and in our chat and tells the story of reuniting with a past love from the eighties and the kind of way, you usually only see in romantic comedies in a moment. My conversation with Steve Forber, but first he performed for us in front of an audience in the fall starting with the performance of the title track from the magic tree. Wins calmed down the nothing. Leaves still the rustling. When in the making. Something's always shaking. They're both send their heads. Built-up their house near the big blue sky and wild away the hour. Soaking up. True. Who grew up tall with his roots down. Who guard them all their secrets? When nothing else. Something's always Bluey in jail. Grew up with his route. Who guard them and their secret key? Moc years. Can take my troubles too. Nothing else is less. Good is always present in. There's not much left to. Enrolled friend. I see that you was. No way. Yes. Even it's no. Man. Steve Warburg performing live here at world. Cafe thanks for that about that song? Is it allows us to impose our own ideas of what the magic tree might be onto it like so many of your your best songs too. Right. Well, I hope so that would be good because you know, this is an all denominational tree here. Everyone's welcome to the place where when nothing else is pleasant. Good is always present. Right. I like it. Okay. So you've got an album the magic tree and a memoir. Big city cat my life in folk rock coming out on the same day. It's a wonderful book and one of the most notable parts of it is that you excerpt parts of journal entries from your time in the seventies. When you're in your twenties, making your way in New York, which means that you went back and read your own journal entries, and I was just thinking back about what it would be like to read my own journal entries from another point of life. And what it would strange exercise that could be what was it. What was it like for you? Well, they were really fresh, you know, they would through the eyes of early twenties kid who was from Meridian Mississippi taking in all the sights sounds and smells feelings of of our. Manhattan and particularly midtown town. And and then. Greenwich Village both east village in west village. So they were they were. They're the most the freshest part of the book because it's not involving memory. They're actually written on the day of these journal entries. This book is honestly, it's not self aggrandizing. Really? I really. Tried to be honest about a lot of things I have voices. I inter we did interviews with some of the people that were prominent in my early recording and touring and encourage them to say, whatever, you know, the good and the bad, and we left a lot of the bad in some of the mistakes, I made and try to be honest about it. And it's kind of like, a, you know, hopefully, a primer for a young person as to you know, just the way life can be. What would be a lesson that you would want a young person to take from from how life can be guess. Well, it's really hard. It's really hard because you can say, oh, you need to not think, you know, everything and listen to people, but you know, it it's every case is so different. It's hard for me to say that because you might be getting bad advice. Someone else, you know. I actually had some good advice from time to time chose not to take. But, but you know, so I don't know every case is so different. I hesitate to offer advice. One thing. I've always believed in musically is just playing in front of people. That to me is the real thing. One of the parts I really enjoyed about the book is that you give us insight into some of the songs from your debut album, and some of the moments that they came from and one of the moments that you really paint a picture of is the moment that leads to big city cat, or I guess the the apartment that leads to the song big city cat, and I just wanna play a little bit of it on the radio to remind people of that. Hissen heater. Hanging old pie. Screaming women and all. Cry and somebody. In. Following. Down by the Johnson. I can take. To be. Place in the city. That's big city cat. Can you describe what you remember about that apartment? You'd just moved from Mississippi. You're in your twenties. Trying to figure out your way in New York City and living in this place. It was a very oh. Bit of built the building was old at the time bathroom down the hall. No lights in the hall. Of course, we had the burglar bars, the crisscrossed aren't things on as people everywhere had over their windows because you just can't trust everybody at that time, and you sort of hinted at this year, you're playing out in this Greenwich Village scene, and you find your way to opening up for the talking heads and for John kale and for hanging out at. And I think that your role in that scene was is really interesting because we I think of it as a punk rock or or early pop kind of scene. So tell me how you showing up with your acoustic guitar playing folk songs fit into what was happening at that time in New York. Will what people? Don't really know. Is that CBGB's was a lot looser than what's basically, it's legend these days. It's it's main perc- the perception of it, and they we would have been a country bluegrass sorta bar, but that's just not what caught on. That's what hilly Kristal had wanted. That's where he was at so to speak. So so I could come in there with a guitar, and he would he would like that. Anyway, because that's what he tried to do was country music. And plus it wasn't this Bridget as you might think with everybody sounding sorta like. You know, the Ramones or or at the most poppy Blondie, all rock and roll on. There was room for other things. And I was certainly other things I could get up there quickly and play just one guitar vocal in you know, in be off, and they could go on with the show. So it was convenient. And it was lucky for me one of the things that you relate in the book is about how being from Mississippi felt at that time when you're in New York, and you said in a couple of spots that you said that with some trepidation to people like you would say I'm from Mississippi with a little bit of trepidation. And I wanted to know more about that. So why? Well, how old are you? How am I how impolite I'm thirty two. How old are you? I'm sixty three considerably older than you. And I go back to and grew up in the civil rights era of Mississippi. So that's where I'm from. It was a turbulent time in it was bad. And in some of it was really bad. And a lot of some of the worst of it happened right near me in Philadelphia, Mississippi, and the people that you know, you know, that was the civil rights era. And this was the problem spot. That's what Mississippi in the in the late and mid sixties was still known for and seventies mid seventy still no for that. You know? And so when you'd be in Greenwich Village, you might kind of have a little bit of hesitant for Mississippi in, you know, grits villages, very liberal place in historically has been. So I had to kind of you know. Of course, hope people would not be too judgmental about that. And give me a chance to be who I was. And and. Make my home there, which I wanted to do was interested in getting on outta Mississippi. When I hit my early twenties. Have you come to terms with it? Now, do you feel differently about? Now have I come to terms with it. Well. No. On an ongoing thing, you know, sad to say, and it's not just contained to Mississippi. And we can thank Randy Newman for writing rednecks and pointing out that there was racial prejudice and oppression all over from Boston to watts LA. It's a very lengthy subject. But I don't I don't know if we're all still coming to terms with it. So I can't tell you that I have. Play another song from from. We'll try to do one heavily influenced by the blues for sure this is even borrows a little bit from. The great Robert Johnson. So good. That's delta blues. Fitting fitting for us now. Okay. Always biz talk into that. She the Stanton. Always jiffy just fast. On love. You always say. Hungry should the cook. Never get it back for all things that you choose. Well. No, it don't you? Tell me you don't call this raining outside. Clan to be here way, you is cold and his is Coleman is raining out. Thank you up and walk in. But you're back in three even things that only come to life in your head. You know? Changing you is mainly trying to sleep inside the booth. Don't tell me don't is cold and raining. Glad to be here. Will you is cold train Cole? This. I talk about this guy. Four consquent blueberry. No money. Was it really like how the today? To keep it that way. Don't tell me don't just coal. Glad to be here. We you cold. Colin. Ghana? Com. They be the, but let's get high. That's hi. My fish south and the days roll by. There's no time to move. Slipped black in your shoe. All counts the. Fronts. Coma by the bay the Laskey. Lizzy on to where it is the says with Phil. Way up near the real. Jump home and swim. Walkout on while the sun still. Nightime feels so. Night's so dark and. When all is common. On days. B. But. Tom few. So don't to. The night's so dark and. When all those fun days. Being been list? All. Gone. Where is shimmering? Kim. Walk outside you. Bluejays. Skit. Those beautiful that's deport live here. World cafe make some wonderful. Thank you so much. So I'm sure there are a lot of people out there who can relate to this. It's really hard to say. No. When somebody offers you something really wonderful in your career. It's really hard to say, no. And in the book, big city cat, my life and folk rock you recount a couple of really pivotal instances where you said no to something. And wondering if you would mind telling us, the story of one of your favorite times of saying, no. Well, this one thing. Things happen really fast for me. And it was quite a whirlwind. And as Jack slim was picking up steam, they Rolling Stone had an. A point where that we? We did an article. I done an interview with. Robert Palmer, the late Robert Palmer, and then they wanted they call it said, we we like to put Stephen cover, and I just thought about it a little bit and decided I said, well who else is in the issue, and they said, Bob Hope. Wow. Yeah. And I just said why don't you go ahead and put him on it? Because you know, I'm just don't feel like I'm ready to be like right now. I don't want to add to what I'm going through so much had happened so quickly. So I declined it. Most people would find that a big su- surprising. No, it's surprising. What year would that? If it was at late seventeen. Nobody early eighty okay? Yeah. Early eighties. Single was peeking. Yeah. Let's have a listen to the song that that set that album on fire that set Jack rabbit slim on fire. This is Romeo's. Everything's kid. Bring me southern kisses from your room. Meet me in the middle of the. Let me smell the moon in your. Gods rise. Romeo's tune from nineteen seventy nine Jack rabbits, slim, Steve Forbes is my guest here on world. Cafe. So what did the people around you say? Did they say you're nut Steve or do? They say right on man. Like, we get it. Don't don't don't get too. Big too fast care, what they thought 'cause I just I had this. You know? I mean, I said in the book it was too bad because there were people whose who had worked hard to make stuff like that happen. I mentioned some of them by name. But I couldn't let it couldn't attend make so one just really comfortable with it. I mean, you can do that you say, oh, that's great. But you if you don't some people, they're ready, and for some people, they aren't and it just makes life worse for them and make some more confused with things are already trying to deal with my interest was was writing songs, and and and being able to maintain that perspective, you know, not not getting taken out into some celebrity situation that overrode what I was trying. To do. It's a really interesting. There's another one in the book where you turn down the opportunity, maybe being the in the movie adaptation of hair that like that's sort of on the table. And I thought that that was really interesting to and I was wondering if in going back to all of these moments and collecting them all in a memoir there are. There instances that you look at differently now through the lens of time. Like is there is are there any any occasions in the book where you thought to yourself? I wonder what would have happened if I would have said, yes. Well, we all have those, you know, but I don't regret. I don't regret these things. We're talking about now because I'm still here to talk about. I mean, I could name you several people that popped on the scene. It hit them like a tidal wave, and they were splashed all over the cover of magazines, and they're dead now or the you know, they were dead quick. You know, they didn't last long after that. So I'd rather be me still around, and you know, able to try to keep this Qatar in tune and keep writing songs forepart is my guest here on world cafe he has a new album called the magic tree and a memoir called big city cat my life. In folk. I think all of us ask this question to ourselves in our lives. What would happen if I got back together with that person that I was in love with a really long time ago. And you are one of the only people that I know that has that as part of their their love story. And you recount it in the book, you talk about some of the love that you've had along the way and. About the woman that you married and had children with and then divorce and then at the end of the book, you bring up this woman. Diane who you dated in the eighties. And then you both have separate lives. Got married had children, and then you've got together, and I really want to note because in the book yet, you say kind of quickly reunited at one of your shows, and then you called her. And now is it still like what happens during that phone call when you see somebody that you used to love you see him at your show. And then what happens? Well, once again, it seemed like it was just the way it would meant to be. I think you'll find that most people who had a marriage and had kids and and and then split up. You almost always hear that person say, but you know, I love my kids, and that's. It's one of the main things they say, and I feel I feel that way. There you go. That's what happened. And I I love Diana. We've been together over fifteen years now since this reunion you're talking about. And I'd be a lot in a lot of trouble. If we hadn't mentioned are here today. Well, let's make sure that you don't get in any trouble diva favorite song that you've written about her. All where inspired by her. I wrote seaside Brown eyed girl for her. Of course, I could try to play it for you could try that'd be just fine everybody. Okay with that. Yeah. Brown. Yeah. Person in the world. Up. Ring. Brown. In words. Seaside brown. Thing. But it's not. Here's so fun. I'm into is. You're not Hugh. Urine springsteen. Some. Where's it all? North or south? What's master plan? I. Smile than stars and stripes on. Bring on. There's not a star. Airplane slide? Those wonderful those nice unexpected surprise. Thank you for that. Yeah. Seaside brand girl. How about that was lovely? Thank you. Thank you got a lot of stuff out of me today. I'm not usually talkative. But I am glad to have this opera -tunities. And thank you. That is Steve Warburg. Tis album is called the magic tree. His memoir is called big city cat my life and folk rock both of them came out in the fall. Thanks to Steve for being here. I'm telling you Langer, and you are listening to the world cafe from NPR.

Mississippi World cafe Steve Greenwich Village New York City Manhattan Steve Warburg NPR Robert Johnson Comcast Jack slim Rolling Stone magazine Steve Forber Meridian Mississippi Talia Shlenker Stanton Randy Newman Ghana Philadelphia
ARRL Audio News - October 16, 2020

ARRL Audio News

12:28 min | Last week

ARRL Audio News - October 16, 2020

"This is ARRL. Audio news your weekly summary of News highlights from the world of amateur radio. If you re transmit audio news through a repeater listen for the morse code ke character followed by 4 seconds of Silence that your cue to stop transmitting so that your repeater timer can reset. I'm Ruth Lindquist WW1 M A and this is ARRL audio news for Friday, October 16th, 2020. You can find additional details on the news reported here by visiting the ARRL web site. Okay, listen carefully cuz this first stories got a lot of legalese in it and comments to the FCC a double r l targeted to specific areas of concern in a proceeding dealing with the mitigation of orbital debris or space junk comments filed on October 9th focused on the areas of indemnification and maneuverability and propulsion indemnification places the liability for any possible damage of satellite might cause on an individual or entity a double r l has said that as a practical matter an indemnification requirement would seriously impair the ability of a mature and University. The experimenters to launch and operate satellites under us all species due to the potential liability and high insurance cost a double r l argued that if she s c c does adopt an indemnification requirement. It should allow either of the owner or the licensee of an amateur space station satellite in this case to provide identification and the amateur satellite service a licensee can only be an individual an individual licensee is unlikely to accept liability for a satellite but a satellite dish owner might the FCC proposal also wants all satellites deployed in low earth orbit higher than about 250 miles to be able to maneuver with the use of some sort of on-board propulsion system ARRL urged adoption of an exception for a limited number of satellites a double r l s the FCC for reasonably calm. Asian regarding the proposed rules the international amateur radio Union administrative Council met in a virtual session on October 8th through the 10th. The council is responsible for iaru policy and management. Some of the topics touched upon included and we got a bulleted list here work being done to address the need for reasonable standards to limit the proliferation shred of radio spectrum pollution from digital devices and wireless power-transmission or WPT the status of the ncdex f i a r i u Beacon Network and recent and planned upgrades as well as the Network's many applications steps being taken to address the growing number of non amateur satellites that use amateur satellite Spectrum. Preparations underway for World radio communication conference 2023 the council reviewed a draft of iar use positions on WRC twenty three agenda items of concern and finally pressure on amateur Spectrum particularly secondary allocations at 144 Hertz and above the council expressed the hope that an in-person meeting by being able to be held next year. I'm Ruth Lindquist WW1 Emmy and this is ARRL audio news for October 16th, 2020 a couple of notes from a double r l headquarters 15th and took a double RL online auction is open for registration and bidding The 20/20 a double r l online auction includes a large assortment of qst product review items, including amplifiers transceivers vintage gear test equipment and books bitters will also find a large variety of novelty items you must register to place of bed. But you may browse without registering the website. And here's the URL is a little long w w w o r g forward slash ARRL - on - line - auction Auction proceeds benefit a double r l education programs the auction runs through Thursday, October 22nd. The ARRL school club Roundup is under way on CW and phone until October 23rd. Get on the air and work some of our younger radio amateurs. And now the amsat report complements of Bruce page k k v d o who asks have you wondered where the next family of satellites am sad is working on Earth is going the new family is Golf and acronym for greater orbit larger footprint with the gulf series of SATs. He explains we are going to reach a high Earth orbit satellite, which will be similar to a oh ten. Oh thirteen and forty, but at an affordable cost the golf family will build on such features as Deployable solar panels and 3-axis attitude control and propulsion. The Deployable solar panels are necessary so that the 3u cubesat wage can acquire much more energy than from fixed panels. The three axis attitude control is necessary to achieve a Nader pointing of the antennas. That means dead. Antennas will always be pointing at Earth no matter where the satellite is in its orbit propulsion will be necessary to carry the satellite from its drop off point into higher orbit. The satellite will have VHF and UHF capability for the gulf key and Gulf one satellites then shifting to the so-called five-and-dime frequencies, 5.6 gigahertz up and 10 gigahertz down. The higher frequencies will allow for much smaller antennas. Bruce says, he'll have more on the gulf program in a later installment. Although the FCC has announced plans to delete the secondary amateur radio 3.3 to 3.5 gigahertz allocation that amateur allocation will remain in place right across the northern US border radio amateurs of Canada. The RAC said this week that the FCC action has raised concerns among Canadian amateurs r m c stressed that the FCC action does not directly affect Canadian amateurs. However as the 5G rollout advances RAC said maintaining compliance with the no interference no protection requirement for secondary Services is likely to impose increasingly severe restrictions on the ability of amateurs to use the three point five gigahertz band even as the secondary allocation to the amateur service remains in place in Canada World radio communication conference 2023 wage. Include an agenda item to consider worldwide allocations to mobile internet services in several bands among them 3.3 to 3.4 gigahertz and 510 gigahertz to 10.5 gigahertz. Some brief news items new a Double R L section managers have been appointed in northern New Jersey and in Delaware barbarous W 200 D has been named as Northern New Jersey Section manager to succeed Steve austral k2so who stepped down on September 22nd due to failing Health. Beres will serve out the current term of office Lounge which concludes on June 30th. 2021 Mark Stillman K 3 j u j was appointed as a double r l Delaware section manager. He succeeds bill due vinette KB. CJ k y h who moved out of the Delaware section after serving since 2014 very low frequency vintage Alexander's in alternator station with a q in Sweden will transmit a CW message to commemorate United Nations Day on October 24th on 17.2 kilohertz. At 1500 UTC reception reports are welcome via the online form on the SAQ website amateur radio station. Sk6 shake you will be active on 7.035 and 14.035 megahertz CW and on three point seven five five megahertz SS should be A recent Rolling Stone magazine article chronicled the career of Jack Holtzman formerly K2 veh a recording industry and Technology pioneered seventy years ago Holtzman co-founded Elektra records a label best known for folk and blues fair and he signed such diverse acts as the Doris and Judy Collins according to the article Holtzman helped launch both the CD format and home video and sat on the board of Atari and set up the pilot program that became MTV month Holtzman also is behind the authentic sound effects albums that became popular with radio and TV producers and helped pull Electra out of debt Holtzman now 89 never credit off your radio directly for contributing to his success on the technology side, but he did create and publish the electric code course in nineteen fifty-six currently unavailable. On Amazon, but listed nonetheless a photo of a young Jack Holtzman purported to show him in his home Studio Rolling Stone said to the better trained I though home sitting headphones on and right hand on a key in front of a desk Laden with now vintage ham gear. The image does capture a professional tape machine. However long so it's possible holtzman's ham Shack and home studio where one of the same it's not known how long Holtzman was a radio amateur nor when he stopped being one. I'm Ruth Lindquist WW1 are me and this has been ARRL audio news for Friday, October 16th, 2020 73. We'll see you next week. And that concludes ARRL audio news for this week. Our thanks to all contributors to this week's report audio news is produced by the American radio relay League the National Association for amateur radio for more information on amateur radio or the ARRL visit us on the web at you can also find us on Facebook and Twitter by searching ARRL. If you have a question or comment about ARRL audio news email us at audio news at this program is copyright ARRL thoughts reserved 73 and thanks for listening.

ARRL FCC Ruth Lindquist Jack Holtzman amateur radio Union administra ARRL school club Bruce Delaware iaru auction Auction RAC Rolling Stone magazine RL WRC National Association
Song of a Gun

Lost Notes

28:56 min | 1 year ago

Song of a Gun

"KCRW sponsors include Universal Pictures, presenting the new movie yesterday, would, if you were the only person that remembered, the Beatles ever existed, from the director of Slumdog millionaire and the writer of love actually yesterday in theaters June twenty eighth. I remember running into you outside the Miley Cyrus show, and it was maybe five days after the Paris attacks. And I, I remember you being really emotional about it. Do you remember how it felt to be at that show? So soon in the wake after the Paris attacks. Yeah. I think that that was in particular show, where it was just the vibe was over the top fun, and celebrate Tori and just crazy, everything. But then looming is like any second someone could walk in and. That's Dana Meyerson. She's a publicist and artist manager talking about how after Las Vegas Paris, Orlando being at a show felt very different. It's a fear that a lot of people live with daily everywhere it was, like, okay if someone comes in, like, where would I hide, and where would I go, and how do I hope people? All of a sudden there's a secondary. Vibe with the space, which is it could be used as a place of attack. It was sort of the beginning of a shift in the way that I feel now anytime I go into a public space now. I feel terrified to go to a festival, because that seems like such an obvious target when I went to lollapalooza last year post Vegas and seeing people with binoculars looking up into the hotel rooms looking for a shooter. So it's the sort of like true nightmare that now exists in real life. And like Dana when I'm at shows, I wonder am I safe this everyone here safe? But have I ever acted on that concern? Now I haven't written about it or raised money beyond making donations on my own. I haven't organized people or joined an organization. I haven't raised the flag of concern beyond talking with friends like Dana or. Or other music fans who worry, too. For some reason, the music world is slower to take on a lot of causes. I don't have a lot to compare it to you, because the music industry's my industry, but I do know that we say, like oh, you know, that's us a not them. Oh, that happened in Paris are, oh, that was again nightclub. That's a whole different world. That's not me. That's just how things are. This season of loss notes has mostly doubt with music's past, but working on these shows I have wondered about the future. I wondered how music fans will look back at this moment in history twenty years from now when they're looking back. I'm listening back. What will they see will? They find the folks who gave a shit or while they just find evidence of ambivalence. Mostly I thought about music history with guns and gun violence in the wake of nipsy hustle, being shot and murdered and concerts being sites of mask, gun violence, wanted to know is this, the point where gun control becomes music's issue. I'm Jessica hopper from KCRW. This is lost notes today song of a gun stick around. KCRW sponsors include Universal Pictures, presenting the new movie yesterday. What if you were the only person that remembered the Beatles ever existed? What would you do from the director of Slumdog millionaire and the writer of love, actually, and starring lily James, Kate, McKinnon Ed, Sheeran, and introducing Hamesh Patel, billboard calls yesterday, the field, fantastic movie of the summer in theaters June twenty eighth? It's now fourteen hours since John Lennon was shot here at the entrance to the Dakota building on west seventy second street in the center of New York. They're just sitting let it Kip he Ted. I started looking back for the first moment of gun control activism, in music that I could find which led me to an unlikely hero, John winner. The problematic MIR Curiel founder and publisher of Rolling Stone magazine, you knew personally. What would you like warm and one who's very witty very funny? And very intense. That's young winner. In an interview on the today show. On December seventh nineteen eighty any leave of its photograph, John Lennon, and his wife, the artist Yoko Ono for the cover of Rolling Stone magazine just hours before John Lennon was shot. You know, the photo, it's the one where Jones Lang make it on the floor with Yoko. He's curled almost fetal hugging her. But she's only clothed, it's tender portrait. And it's come to symbolize this kind of he Denic before the fleeting moments before something changed, and shifted forever and music. Concert in the wake of Lennon's death Rolling Stone turned that issue of the magazine almost overnight into a tribute to Lennon's life and legacy celebrities as peers and friends music, writers fans. They all eulogized, Lenin and some tried to find meaning in his death, John beals part of everybody's live II die something, and you guys and something about all your friends dies, and something about your life is, you know, you feel gone and concern about its, it's the gathering together of a great family. You know, very big very big. Yeah. It's the biggest families the whole the whole world. Rolling Stone was one of the most culturally significant magazines in America. And John Lennon was winter's hero. The hero of much of winners. Generation one was someone that people were looking to, to explain what it all meant. And in that moment, he was gripped by something. No one else was really talking about the gun Lennon's death, turned winter into an activist by his logic of handguns weren't so cheap and so easy to get Lennon would still be alive. So when are assigned Rolling Stones best investigative reporter Howard Cohn to look into the NRA when her was sure that if they're readers knew what was really going on and neither facts about the gun lobby? They would take up the cause they too would become gun reform activists, and things would change Lennon's death would mean something the logic of it was. Was we're the music community. I'm the editor Rolling Stone magazine we have to react to this. We need to respond to this. We need to show that we have some kind of meaning and impact young winner declined to be interviewed for this piece. So he spoke to his biographer, Joe Hagan. He's the author of sticky fingers the life and times of young winner. I should also note here that winter cooperated with Hagan on this book, but disavowed, it once it was published. This is sort of like a kind of mini revival of what the sixties had supposedly been about in the late sixties that rock and roll could change things that rock and roll could stop the war. Then in nineteen Eighty-one just months after Lenin's death and the cover of Rolling Stone are just four words inside the gun lobby and nestled under the you in the heart of the page is a portrait of John Lennon. At this point Rolling Stone had a decade long reputation for running exposes, that made a huge cultural impact Patty Hearst Karen, silkwood, the Manson murders. Ellen Willis's reporting on a rape trial. But this issue inside the gun lobby it was met with a collective shrug nothing happened. Nothing changed whence later, after the tempted assassination of President Reagan, the Brady Bill passed mandating background checks waiting periods for handgun purchases. But when her wasn't satisfied, he was fired up so he started a foundation. There was an attempt to kinda like us their adult powers to do something different than just put on a rock concert or just write a song about it when it was one of the most powerful people in American culture in nineteen eighty one and he was doing everything he could at this. 'cause still I think that was ineffective. The place that rock and roll was that was not in the business really of social change. The big power brokers of rock full time like foreigner and like journey, I mean, this was not come on people. Now smile on your brother. And he partnered with a woman whose husband was involved with the police union, I believe in New York City, and they had done some studies that showed basically, if you had Rockstars delivering the antigun message you were going to reach a much more limited scope of people, and they weren't the most credible messengers if police themselves sold the idea of gun control, the conversation with reach more broadly, and people would respond better to it. So winners foundation enlists actor, Michael Douglas for PSA targeting police officers. Trying to get them to evangelize about the dangers of handgun violence on November second to Michael and a friend were playing when they discovered a handgun hidden under Michael's parents bed. The gun was loaded. These dramatization are based on real incidents from police files if you think it can't happen to you think again yawn at the time was looking for ways expand his influence. This was a way for him to kind of like have a, a platform, and go to Washington and advocate for something that had meaning some people mocked winners foundation like after all the people who've been shot down. Now you care, I asked the author and credit grill, Marcus, what were the conversations around gun control in music culture sixties seventies and early eighties. He said the discussions about violence. They weren't about guns guns were seen as the symptom, not the problem, maybe Lennon's murder reanimated winners belief in his old hippie dream winner, like a lot of his baby, boomer peers in the nineteen eighties was moved to try to institutionalize his hippie ideals advocating for gun control was. For him on brand. And maybe like Joe Hagin says became something more something driven by his own self interest, but still, he did something. Mid eighties pop had moved on ever so slightly from the romantic power ballad fluff of order in journey. The mid eighties were very much an era of the multiday benefit, concert events like Live Aid charity singles, like we are the world. That's what friends are for sin city, and do they know it's Christmas as well as the TOTO lead hands across America. Artists were raising millions of dollars for causes like famine and homelessness and aids research, the idea that Popstars had a responsibility to help save the world. That may be pop music do good. That was an idea that helped define the decade, but it wasn't until the late eighties that an artist really focus their attention on gun violence. Speakers have agreed that America has a very serious. Linked to mediate the stop the violence movement had a number one rapid with self-destruction. Stop the violence was founded by care one the year before after a fan was shot and killed at one of his concerts. Curious, one had also just lost his best friend. But you down productions co-founder Scotla rock to gun violence. Today's topic soaps destruction in Iraq. Self-destruction enlisted more than a dozen emcees. Chuck d flavor flav Cuomo de an MC light, which just a few. The song is probably the best known into violence moment. And more, specifically, indie gun violence anthem in contemporary pop for better or worse. Some of called hip hop answered to we are the world. Rough. Would night. In the nineties, especially in the wake of Columbine. There were songs about gun violence and American gun culture for money to Franko weezer Pearl Jam show crow. More recently common chance, rapper Lupe fiasco, Vic Mensa, all Chicago. Rappers have addressed gun violence with songs and activism. And since Las Vegas, there have been some petitions and social media campaigns with big name artists as well as a few countries superstars coming out in support of reforming gun laws, still, those are exceptions, activism around gun control and songs like self-destruction historically are pretty rare. That's not terribly surprising. Because as long as they've been guns, there have been songs about guns the basic role of guns in American popular music is just like the basic role of guns in American popular movies. They're exciting that's leisure. Bald. He's author of a dozen books and is a researcher and historian of blues and folk and music around the world. Just thinking about sort of songs about guns. One of the first things that occurred to me is a song that Pete Seco used to sing from the American revolution. The rifleman of Bennington. The court has four the rifle for the rifle in, we'll prove no trifle. And in between the four the rifle there's a slapping his band show to create the sound of gunfire. So, you know, that goes all the way back to the beginning of the United States. This along long tradition of songs of killers singing songs of regret. And sometimes they were sorry, they killed somebody with a gun and sometimes they were sorry, they killed somebody in other ways. But it wasn't about the gun. It was about the killing the very first blues song that was ever recorded by an African American by Mamie Smith. Crazy blues. It's the song that started the whole black recording industry. The race records industry has the line. I'm going to do like a chinaman go and get some hop get myself a gun and shoot myself a cop. That she Smith had a song called black mountain blues, talking about the guy who left her and she says, I'm gonna cut him if he stands still and shoot him if he runs. Mound in my reason, gone, the basic guns, Joe up, is the way they still show up. And unem-. If you're on. During the sixties and seventies during the era of civil rights Vietnam. When people were singing about the menace of guns that menace was about who was holding the gun cops good old boys. Soldiers all symbolic of greater American ills and injustice, but the role guns play in songs is universal from outlaw country to narc could Ito's and blues rap classic rock, Jamaican, dancehall guns are tools of power. Their remedy a method of managing one's problems be it with the police rivals a lever and just like the rest of American culture, whether gun is considered a problem itself depends on whose finger is on the trigger and who it's aimed it being a lot of times about how gun ownership is romanticized for some and feared in criminalize others. Depending on who's doing the looking and also. So the listening I called my friend, the writer Neva dark Heeb, who was on the show earlier this season, I wanted to ask what he thought about the role of guns and popular music right now. I also think that some of the sharper immoral unique more vital conversations about gun violence are happening outside of the music room by young people who are leading the charge on the, on the front of activism, in it kind of seems like generation only that is what will define the conversation on gun violence, twenty years from now. Looking back for the first time in at least my life, it seems as, though the conversation on gun violence is attempting to be led by at least one group of people who are most impacted by it. The people who are in school, and afraid, do you think it surprising that more artists haven't taken stands about their feelings on guns. I feel lake in particular young act of. Zm that's happening around gun control right now. I don't think it's the prising, but I also think that a lot of the musicians were some of the musicians in rap right now grew up or come from a place where a relationship with guns is also relationship with power, which is also a relationship with to survival. So I think having these ideas around guns being so out of step, perhaps with young folks. We're listening to them isn't holy surprising. But I also think what's been alarming for me to think about in the past couple of weeks, is that we've had rappers being murdered again. And it feels as though rap might be circling back around to some different considerations around gun violence, or at least a reframing of the way that guns are discussed within the construct of the music. Do you think pop music and all its forms owes it to its fans to address? Maybe what their fears are or they're changing opinions. You think pop owes it to its listeners to be a mirror about that? I don't because I don't generally subscribe to the idea that popular music should, oh, anyone anything. Not because I don't believe music should have a message. But because I understand that pop music is part of a large machinery, that, you know, in as we've seen many times is also a chameleon, right? It will then to inbound to whatever the public demands. And what does the public demand, I asked our future? Dredges the youth of today, there is not a better way to utilize the fame in attention that artists have then to talk about the important things. This is Trey his nineteen teaching poet, an MC in Chicago. What are some of your favorite artists j? Cole say chance to rapper. Salva definitely because even though they have a cheese like a higher prestigious still touch on in address issues that exists, not only were they grew up all over. He grew up on the city's south side. Just a few blocks from chance the rapper and he says he identifies with a lot of chances songs trays a big believer in the idea that music can be a vehicle for change on conspire activism. Think about how many songs you hear about different brands of clothing how people were fi drugs and violence, and they hear them any song, we hear these songs allow okay this is what's cool. This is the standard for wherever model or fashion that you're trying to oppo. And so if you were just replace those words with lyrics or work about. Things that can help people, I guess, the songs in, like the work will be put too much better. Use any are now why do you think more artists? Don't talk about issues. Why do the maybe specifically related to gun control or gun violence? Those things are not popular. And so there's a large chance that that person will lose their audience will lose the audience will lose their fame. Everything that came with it. I think that if you have a platform you should use it, and you should talk about what's important. Violet Gomez is a twenty year old student artists, an activist and burgeoning music, journalist and Chicago. But it's also understandable, that in artists like Arianna Guerande isn't making an album about maybe her Manchester's chew Asian because that's not her brand. And maybe it's not what she wants to write about, but when it comes to things like mass shootings, or violence and other countries or violence in our own country, that's not talked about as much, and there's definitely that trend of everybody feeling really sad and sorry for that moment. That it happens, and then forgotten, and it's just this toxic cycle. And I don't think it's necessarily artists who are going to save that issue or break us out of that cycle. But I do think they have a huge part in being able to voice that this is a constant problem. And we need to take some kind of action. Both violent and trae wish the music that they listen to the artists that they love better reflected, what they believe the things that concern them, but they were cynical about any artists really taking a stand is typical risk pop in particular is manufactured calculated. If you're famous artist talking about issues is either part of your brand or not. And even if it is part of an artist brand talking about gun control can be liability. I wanted to put violet and trays concerns to some artists, including artists who've been outspoken about gun control or gun ownership, but trying to get anyone to talk artists managers, even other journalists was hard managers, publicists would tell me how important, they thought this conversation wasn't thanked me for bringing it up, but would continually decline on behalf of the artists represented. Here's Dana Meyerson again. We'll just sweep it under the rug. There's money to be made, and we don't want to freak people out in thinking, like, maybe if we talk about guns and gun violence, and people are aware, they might get afraid. It's like they should be afraid. So even if music, does, oh, s let's say or rather future generations. Their concern is what artists are offering even meaningful would a we are the world about school. Shootings change anything when actual kids dying in their classrooms. Seemingly doesn't what about all the kids shot in Chicago, every year at parks and parties by cops. Would there be a petition or benefit single for them to what can or should we even expect artists to do everything has to be about a specific cause to create a positive change in someone's life? That's quay. Chris the spring. He released a record called guns on the Alabama guns are metaphor away of talking about power, the way different things can be weaponized, but he also raps about guns literally young. On your. No. Egg no fake modest wheel, wop Krasny, beginning IB, and you city I should. Also, mention qualley Chris was the only artist I could find who is willing to talk to me about this. He agrees on some points with both trae inviolate. But he says, what people here in songs they love even if there's a clear message you can't control how people receive it or what it means to them, those times when I make us on is not a song about a specific message doesn't have any political agenda, social agenda, just a song that I enjoyed and I'll receive a message from someone saying like that song gets me up every morning and got me through a depression, you know, every morning, I woke up. And when I went to do my workout play that song, and it got me through my, you know what I'm saying the extremely optimistic and utopian driven side of me would hope that they would hear then go down twenty. Years ago. Everyone was fucked up. You don't have that problem anymore. Thank god. News. Be con- is fever. He's. Maybe that's all we can hope for that the us of right now that we send like relics that we were grappling with the problem that isn't one anymore, and that when those future listeners can listen or look back, they don't hear all of our cynicism or in bits but instead, that they can find folks who are at least trying in whatever imperfect ways that they could make senseless. Not a here's something that feels like a connection. By the way. Be gone. I don't know. This episode was produced by me, and Robin Lin grateful to be able to make this entire season of loss notes alongside such talented producers as Mike dodge Weiskopf Pauline of Alaska, quite, I hope you've enjoyed the season of last notes. Now that the full season is out there go. Tell your friends post about it on your Graham listened to the whole season. Put it on at a party hearty to these episodes. You can find me more of my work online at Jessica hopper dot org, or at your local bookstore or library. I'm Jessica hopper. Thanks for listening. KCRW sponsors include Universal Pictures, presenting the new movie yesterday. What if you were the only person that remembered, the Beatles ever existed from the director of Slumdog millionaire and the writer of love actually yesterday in theaters June twenty eighth?

John Lennon writer KCRW Dana Meyerson Rolling Stone magazine Universal Pictures Slumdog Chicago director Paris Rolling Stone Beatles Jessica hopper America Las Vegas Mamie Smith Lenin Vegas Miley Cyrus
Now Spotify is beating Apple Podcasts in Canada

podnews

02:18 min | 11 months ago

Now Spotify is beating Apple Podcasts in Canada

"The latest from our newsletter at Poured News Dot Net spotify is now more popular than apple podcasts in Canada according to new data released by Vox Nest as part of the states of the podcast universe. Two Thousand Nineteen spotify also became more popular other than apple in another ten countries in November the reports. which you'll find a link to in our show notes and our newsletter also reveals that the fastest growing countries by content in creation are Argentina Brazil Italy and the fastest growing countries by consumption a church here Chile and Argentina? You're having a laugh. The the most listened to podcasts genres in the US are comedy news and society and Culture. That's according to new data released by Edison. Research is podcast asked consumer tracker thirty six percent of weekly podcast consumers listening to at least one comedy show. According to the data while twenty three percent listened to a news show shape legal risk for podcast directories and podcast APPs today. Unauthorized image. Use pod News has learned that a company called image is rights is sending legal letters to podcast directories demanding money for copyright infringement. In this case they claim that a podcast directory has reproduced juiced podcast artwork that contains their clients copyrighted. Image Rolling Stone magazine says that podcasts are threatening the growth of the music industry three quoting NPR. In Edison Research Data showing a twenty percent increase in spoken word listening in the last five years handbag to Canada. The Canadian podcast listener have revealed how Canadians and listening to podcasts. Particularly that shows hosted by celebrities are new podcast listeners. Favorites advice today. We linked linked to where to add your podcasts. Every single podcast directory and the top five that you should be bothering with the good news. One of those who don't even have to do anything. And how how to podcasts stats work really. Including how does the apple podcast chart really work. You'll find that linked from Charlotte's news that today and there's Komo News Nasa called News Dot net.

apple Argentina Brazil Italy Canada pod News spotify Vox Nest Edison Rolling Stone magazine Argentina society and Culture US NPR Charlotte twenty three percent thirty six percent twenty percent five years
Episode 63: Flea

5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

09:33 min | 10 months ago

Episode 63: Flea

"Are you looking to reach your full. Potential and achieve success in business and in life want only tried and tested guidance from people who have truly made an impact. You have come to the right place. Welcome to five questions with Dan. Chevelle New York Times Times bestselling author Dench Bell distills. The most actionable and tangible advice from a variety of world-class humans including entrepreneurs worse authors Olympians Follow Titians Billionaires Nobel Prize winners Ted speakers celebrities astronauts and more inspirational guidance. It's tactical advice and concrete solutions. Our Power Chat Sal. Welcome to the sixty third episode of the five questions podcast hot cast. I'm your host dementia and my goal is to create the best advice from the world's smartest and most interesting people by asking them just five questions my guest today as the bassist and Co founder of the Red Hot Chili Peppers Flea born in Melbourne Australia. Michael Peter Bodo salary was nicknamed flea as a teenager based on his inability to sit still tell after moving to California. He attended Fairfax High School where he started his lifelong friendship with Red Hot Chili peppers. Lead singer Anthony Kadish originally jazz trumpet. Robert Player flea later was introduced to rock music and the Bass Guitar by Hillel. Slovak Flea co-founded the Red Hot Chili peppers in Nineteen eighty-four and since then they released eleven eleven studio albums that have sold over. Eighty million copies worldwide in two thousand twelve. The Band was inducted into the rock and Roll Hall of fame in Rolling Stone magazine ranked fleeing the second best bassist of all time. Flea is also the CO founder of the Silverlake Conservatory of Music a nonprofit music education organization for underprivileged children. I was very excited to speak to flee about his relationships life experiences and views that he wrote about in his new memoir acid for the children for this podcast cast. You said in the book that you don't have a deep connection with your mom growing up. How did that impact your future relationships as a lot I I think and I didn't really become aware of that until I was like in my thirties? I'm fifty seven now. I think that I looked For love in romantic relationships. Yes in a way that came from a place of not feeling affectionate and close to my mother. And that's not obviously not healthy romantic relationship to look for that type of Attention and luckily for me. And I'm so grateful to have consciously felt the pain of the relationship difficulties not that I've had and I've managed to grow beyond that so I'm wondering you know one way you know very difficult to go through those things in another either way. I'm grateful because it made me really look at myself and look at relationships and and forced me to to want to evolve changes human being you know and Also likely for me my. My mother's passed away now but even though we didn't really have the relationship became old enough to look at it with some degree of objectivity and I could look at the relationship with myself and my mother and and be kind of upset. I didn't give me less. Why didn't you give me the love that I needed I once I kind of got passed by realizing it and angry about it. Then I got a real healthy place of forgiveness and actually managed managed four jubilee beautiful relationship with my mother As an adult and in her later years and your your stepfather it seemed like he was a blessing in a curse to you. And you feel grateful for your time. Time spent with him. King describes the lessons you learned from sharing fares experiences with them. Yeah well you know he was. He was a difficult person. You know oh he was a drug addict and he was prone to really rational sets of violence and stuff but he was also unbelievably great musician. -sition and he also loved me with everything that he knew how he just had a you know battling his own demons and had a really hard time and you know it's really scary being around him because we never nuke was always kind of you know trepidation that he might blow up and rage and destroy the house or whatever but I also like I learned something from him that only and it's funny because like when I started writing this book I mean I don't funnies the right word but I learned so much about myself and how I grew in my yearning ruining my search to get to understand what happened when I was a kid and I realized that I learned from him that when he played and he was gone he played upright bass and he would play with is that very physical emotionally like everything in the world to him and he was planning that he was taking all the pain and torment zone life and turning running into something beautiful and only like when I started reading about it they realize that's what I do you know when I play music and it was such a great lesson you know and probably never would've played music I mean I don't know but He he opened me up to all the the limitless infinite gifts that music has given me in terms of you know place to express myself in something to focus on community friends and all of that stuff so complicated yeah complicated. There's never guys guys and bad guys are always both look at my friends as my family is. I'm an only child through and you saw your friends as part of your family teeter lane that type of relationship and why you need that to fill that void. Yeah well I guess it's sort of like you know coming from right about it. My Book I grew up in a very unconventional national and oftentimes difficult household. I didn't feel safe and I also was completely une watched as a kid you know I was out in the street running wild getting into trouble and the friends that I made. Were really where I looked for family where I looked for that bond that like that togetherness gathering s and that unity. That we all want you know we're all yearning for connection whether it's you know into an intimate one on relationship or sense of community just that feeling togetherness and and people being there for each other. There's a perfect setup for a rock band to start because we started and we pretty much all came from broken homes and all we're running around wild and all found profound meaning and friendship and to be able to translate that into music than the music became more than the sum of its parts. Because you feel like the struggle created that stronger bonds almost like pledging a fraternity sorority. Where if you go through the same things together you can relate to one another and form Stronger relationship as a result. Yeah totally yeah that historically people have always viewed vulnerability as a weakness but you viewed as a strength. Can you give me an example. About how when you vulnerable in one situation your life how that Julia closer to someone and improve the relation of that I mean whenever I've been eligible with anybody nobody And even if sometimes my vulnerability might be irrational like I might have my feelings hurt by you that you said something films and I'll I feel bad I feel bad and I'll say dude. Why did you say that that really hurt my feelings and you'll be like oh I didn't mean it that way? I meant to say that what you're doing is really beautiful. I took it as an insult because I I heard it the wrong way and vulnerability and then we for Japan because we connected over something you know what I mean and which has been the case ace very often you know in so many different ways especially like being a communal creative situation. My band got her feelings. Hurt all the time you know and their willingness to be vulnerable honorable and still express yourself and open yourself up to possibly being here. On the magic relationship relationship creative relationship any collaborate effort of any any kind Is it takes courage. But it's where all love is you know and you know and also like for myself writing this book. It's been an extraordinarily foldable feeling. But I think there's value in telling my story you know and there was value for me challenging myself to raise it right a piece of literature ensure that I thought could be contribution to the world of books you know like it was scary because I thought I had a good chance I might fail but I knew I had to do it on my own. Yeah I knew I had to have to be my voice. Nobody else's and I had to you know sink or swim so what I did. And what's your best piece of us. My best piece of crude vice ice is to work from a place of love. How do you go in that one of the first steps? The first step is you know asking yourself is this act of I'm doing is coming from love coming from fear and if it's coming from love continue to move in that direction coming from love it will guide you in the right direction. Thank you so much for sharing your wisdom flee to follow. His journey can read his memoir acid for the children and on facebook instagram and twitter where he shares his memories raise performances. Pictures with friends travels and dance moves. We hope you enjoyed today's show. And the amazing advice our guest provided remember Bertha. You can only benefit from advice if you packed on it before you do. We would appreciate your feedback in the form of review. You can leave a review on I I tunes stitcher or a Pod Catcher of your choice. Your feedback would be very much appreciated head over to Dan. Shaw Bell Dot Com Slash Review now.

Dan Co founder Slovak Flea Nobel Prize Michael Peter Bodo Dench Bell Silverlake Conservatory of Mus New York Times Times Fairfax High School Robert Player Anthony Kadish California Melbourne Rolling Stone magazine Australia Pod Catcher Japan facebook Bertha
Ep. 333 - Liberation By Fire

The Michael Knowles Show

45:54 min | 1 year ago

Ep. 333 - Liberation By Fire

"Rolling. Stone magazine celebrates the burning of Notre Dom as an act of liberation. Meanwhile, library journal condemns libraries and tools of white supremacy and anti white Democrats only one and nominate a white guy for president. We will analyze how the west lost its mind. I'm Michael Knowles. And this is the Michael Knowles show. I hate to say, I told you. So now, I love to say, I told you so and I told you so yesterday what would happen when we start talking about rebuilding Notre Dom. We just don't have the intellectual and spiritual and moral and religious and cultural tools to be able to do it in Rolling Stone magazine proved this yesterday in one of the most egregious and outrageous articles, I've read in a long time, but it's actually a worthwhile article because it does accurately embody the problem that the west is facing right now, we'll get to that in just one second. But I. Let's think about some peace of mind when it comes to being prepared with food in case of an emergency. There are many different types of emergencies. You could prepare for everything is trivial as a power outage to wildfires earthquakes floods job loss all these sorts of things wise company takes an innovative approach in providing dependable simple and affordable freeze dried food for emergency. Preparedness and outdoor use Why's company meals are designed to protect your most valuable asset your family when government resources or strained. It can be days if not weeks before you can get to fresh food and water you cannot rely on someone else you have to rely on yourself. Don't be foolish. You've got so much value your life, your family, your property, everything. Don't just assume that everything is going to go hunky Dory for the whole rest of your life. Make sure that you are prepared in the case of an emergency. Not only as wise -mergency food. Great tasting. It's quality is unmatched. They don't just slap there. I'm on someone else's products. All their ingredients are chef prepared internally, by wise company. So they're really really high quality. It's very easy. All you. Need is four cups of water doesn't even need to be hot. You take the contents of the pouch pour them into the water you stir cover. That's it in fifteen minutes. It is ready to go for your family. No matter what the situation there's no excuse for waiting until it's too late. Why's emergency food is an investment in peace of mind for your family this week. My listeners get any wise emergency or outdoor food product at an extra twenty five percent off the lowest marked price, so already the lowest price you get another twenty five percents off wise food storage dot com and enter Knowles W L E S at checkout or call eight five five four five three two nine four five. Shipping is free wise as a ninety day, no questions asked return policy. There is no risk in taking the initiative to get yourself and your family more prepared today. Wise food storage dot com. Promo code Knowles. Get any wise emergency or outdoor food product at an extra twenty five percent off and free shipping. Can't beat that. Kanye. You might have seen this going around Twitter. This was making the rounds yesterday from Rolling Stone Rolling Stone put in an article that said how should France rebuild? Notre Dom much of the structure survived the blades, but as rebuilding efforts move forward that country will be left with a big question. What does the cathedral meet to twenty-first-century, France? This is the question. What are we rebuilding? What country is rebuilding. What is France? When when Notre Dame was built eight hundred years ago, France was entirely animated by Christianity by the church. Eight centuries later things have changed dramatically. What would it be? Rolling Stone wants to make sure that you don't miss the point that they're making they put it in really gross terms quote. But for some people in France, Notre, Dom has always served as a deep seated symbol of resentment a monument to a deeply flawed institution and an idealized Christian European France that arguably never existed in the first place the building was so overburdened with meaning that it's burning feels like an act of liberation says Patrizio del Royal and architecture historian at Harvard University. Wow. First of all leave it to the American universities, leave it to Harvard. This is the kind of person who is teaching your children. The building was so overburdened with meaning than it's burning feels like an act of liberation imagine. For just a second. If the Al haram mosque in mecca burned down or half of it burned down or the roof collapsed. Imagine that and then imagine Rolling Stone writing and saying, you know, for many people the burning down of that mosque which was so overburdened with meaning felt like an act of liberation. I don't think they would say that would what does it even mean to be overburdened with meaning. Actually, it does have a meaning it has a meaning in the long history of western thought, the meaning here is the central thing of western modern ity, which is liberation. Or emancipation or whatever you wanna call it. Call it liberation. I mean, this is the major theme of the west. This is the dominant theme of liberalism capital L, liberalism, classical, liberalism, left-wing, liberalism, liberalism itself. We sometimes forget because liberals hate freedom so much it seems in this modern time that liberalism is about freeing yourself. It's liberation many times, you'll hear conservative critics say liberalism contains the seeds of its own destruction. So this kind of crazy decadent suicidal culture that we're living in now is the inevitable result of the ideas of liberalism. When people talk about that. This is what they're talking about. This is what happens at the radical extreme of liberation because it begins especially in the modern era with liberation first from institutions, then from the ideas themselves, so it always begins with the institutions, and you say, well, I don't want to just be tied to some silly deeply flawed institution. So I'm going to divorce myself from the institution, then I'm going to be able to live in this pure realm of ideas. But it doesn't really work out that way what happens is you divorce yourself from the institution. Then you divorce yourself from the ideas, you see this most obviously in the church so beginning, I mean, this is a process that now has gone on in our civilization for thousand years, certainly since the Protestant revolution. You see a divorce from the church, then a divorce from religion itself. So even today, plenty of people who grow up in going to their local church with their families. Grow up every week. Maybe they go to bible study or something what you see on the trend lines. Those people who then leave the church, they'll say, well, I'm spiritual. But I'm not religious because the church whatever church you belong to the Baptist church. The Methodist church. The Anglican church Catholic church. Whatever church you belong to you can always say, it's deeply flawed institution. Obviously, the Catholic church is a deeply flawed institution. Hilaire Belloc one of the most famous Catholic writers ever said that the proof of the divinity of the Catholic church is the fact that it still exists because any merely human institution that was conducted with such knavish imbecilities would certainly not have survived a fortnight, obviously, you can point to all of these other religious institutions as well. You can point to the problems in the Methodist church, the Baptist church or the Jellicoe church or whatever. So you say, okay, I want to leave this deeply flawed institution. And that way, I'll have a pure sense of religion. I've liberated myself. So now, I'm just in the realm of ideas, but spiritual, but not religious or religious, but not organized religious or eventually, you just divorce yourself from the ideas as well. Think about what's happened to national institutions. I you liberate yourself from national institutions civic institutions, then you divorce yourself from the nation itself. We've seen our our commitment to religious institutions declined dramatically over the past forty years. What happened trailed by ten or twenty years people's declining and religio city itself as people pulled away from the boy scouts and the lions club and other civic institutions what have we seen trailing it by a couple of decades is less of an identity with the nation itself. How about familial institutions as we liberate ourselves from the institutions of the family? What happens we ourselves from family ties themselves? We have a society that has never been more lonely never been more isolated this. Happens. This is what Edmund Burke the founder of modern conservative thought. This is what he saw as a perverse liberation in one of his most famous experts from reflections on the revolution. In france. He wrote the age of chivalry is gone that of sophists economists and calculators has succeeded in the glory of Europe is extinguished forever. Never never more. Shall we? Behold. The generous loyalty to rank and sex that proud submission that dignified obedience that subordination of the heart which kept alive even in servitude itself. The spirit of an exalted freedom, the unbought grace of life, the cheap defensive nations, the nurse of manly sentiment and heroic enterprise is gone. This is a very hard statement for a modern western person to here for a classical liberal or a modern liberal or leftist liberal or whatever to hear that that dignified obedience that proud submission. That's subordination of the heart which kept alive even in servitude itself and exalted freedom. What Burke is addressing here is that you can't just liberate yourself forever. You can't just keep liberating and liberating liberating. Ultimately, you'll liberate yourself from all meaning liberate yourself from everything that matters. You'll liberate yourself from yourself there, there is this shallow. Liberty this shallow freedom. And then there is an exalted freedom which actually requires some subservience. It actually requires some obedience we're now we're in holy week now and Christ who comes to free people from sin free. Us from our own damn nation. How does he come? Does. He come as a guy who's totally liberated who's walking around like a modern twentieth. Century, liberated hippy guy. No, he comes as a servant. He is serving. He is submitting to the will of his father is serving others. So what is the ultimate liberation rolling? Stone tells us, but first before we get to Rolling Stone is telling us, let's talk about ZipRecruiter Zip Recruiter is the best way to find people for a job ZipRecruiter sends your job to over one hundred of the web's leading job boards. They don't just stop there with their powerful matching technology. Ziprecruiter scans thousands of resumes to find people with the right experience and invites them to apply to your job as applications come in ZipRecruiter analyzes each one and spotlights the top candidates. So you never miss a great match. I really benefited from the daily wire not using ZipRecruiter. When I was hired. Why is this? Because my my whole resume was that. I didn't write a book I had just not written a book it was a completely blank book and thankfully because they didn't use ZipRecruiter. They accepted me and gave me a show. Now, we only use it recruiter. That's how we get the best producers and all these people who are actually really qualified for the jobs. They do right now. My listeners can try ZipRecruiter for free at the exclusive web address. Ziprecruiter dot com slash Knowles. Cain O W L E S so effective four out of five employers who post on ZipRecruiter get a quality candidate through the site within the first day that ZipRecruiter dot com slash Knowles. K N O W L E S as the applications come in ZipRecruiter's going to analyze each one. They're going to spotlight the top candidate. So you never miss a great match. One more time. What is it? Ziprecruiter dot com slash Knowles. Kano W L E S. Hiring is very hard finding the right people is very hard. If you make mistake in hiring. You are. Going to regret it. It's going to cost you a lot of money. It's more importantly, it's gonna cost you a lot of time. Don't put yourself in that situation don't waste money. Use the best way to hire. Ziprecruiter is the smartest way to hire. So what is the ultimate liberation rolling? Stone tells us the ultimate liberation here is liberation from. Meaning they write this year. They say. That the church the cathedral of Notre Dom was overburdened with meaning. What does it mean to be overburdened with me? I I love meeting when you get a gift do you really care about the material gift itself? No, you always say, it's the thought that counts what we care about is the meaning as the significance if we don't care about meaning than everything is just insignificant matter. Everything's just flesh. Everything is just stuff. Everything is senseless. Meaning is what counts so the ultimate liberation here is the liberation from meaning you'd think about sexual liberation. I guess that's the most recent most revolutionary one sexual liberation is when you separate sex from me. And this is a great example because meaningful sex carries transcendent qualities meaningful. Sex is the two souls coming together being United becoming one flesh becoming one spirit is all of this stuff and meaningless sex is a bunch of filthy people doing something shameful. Is the same physical act, but in one of them, you have this transcendent wonderful joyful loving feeling. And in the other one you take a walk of shame in the morning. You say why did I have that extra drink? What was I thinking? That's what meaning does liberation from. Meaning ultimately is destruction. It has to be destruction. It's burning it all to the ground. You can't you don't liberate yourself from meaning by adding. Meaning you can't do that. And when we build things we add meaning we develop when you when you take that meaning away it just turns to rubble it turns to ash, you actually see this not just in the ashes of the cathedral at Notre Dom. You see this in the transgender ideological movement. Obviously, I've been thinking about this a lot the last few days after there was a near riot at the university of Missouri. Kansas City because I made the statement that men are not women. I've thought why is this issue? Why is this transgender movement dominating the national conversation? Why why was I attacked by some weirdo with a squirrel unfold? Giggles for saying that men are not women by all accounts. The number of people who are confused about their gender is about zero point two to zero point four percent of the population. There are some new recent estimates that. Put this number much much higher. That'll put it. Double basically at zero point six percent of the population. Even if that is the case. We're talking about this rare psychological disorder that does not affect ninety nine point four percent of the population ninety nine point four percent of the population. At least maybe ninety nine point eight percent of the population. Does not have this rare condition and yet it is dominating all political discourse, social discourse bathrooms, pronouns, all this stuff. Y what is it about? Is it just because left-wingers have completely gone insane and focused on this one little trivial myopic topic? No, it's because this is the theme of liberation. This is the theme that defines western modernity. Liberating yourself from your own nature. Liberating yourself from the basic fact of your nature, which is sex. It's how we get our nature in the first place birds. Do it bees. Do it even sentimental trees. Do it. It is from or sexual nature that we're were born that were we're begotten in the first place, and as all those silly scientific studies show men, then think about sex every what point two seconds or something. I don't know whatever they say it is. It's not that we're just focusing on some little frivolous thing. It's that the impulses of liberalism are naturally pushing us toward this madness. This is not just about some small percentage of people who have this condition. It's about alternate liberation from our nature, you know, the communists and the socialists. Did this all the time? They say we're going to remake human nature, human nature is greedy and selfish and broken and fallen and sinful doesn't need to be though. Well, no, that's okay. We'll just fix it. This was what the radicalism of the French revolution. And that's that's what this new gender ideology is trying to do as well. There was an article in scientific American that came out. I think just today was either came yesterday or this morning that is now advocating for genderless pronouns. They want to use the singular that so it so it would be like they is really hungry. Michael is really hungry. They is really hungry. Maybe it's they are really hungry. Maybe they conjugate the verb. As though it's plural too. Even though it's referring to a singular. It's very confusing. The first question, of course, is why does scientific American have an opinion about pronouns at all why on earth does scientific American thing that they can tell me how to destroy the English language. It's not the literary American. That's not the grammatical American. It's the scientific American. Why are they weighing in on this aspect of culture? It's because first of all the mainstream media broadly all have this leftward push. And because this is what's coming out of the nature of the west nature of maternity when we think of the modern era. What do we think we I think of science we think of western science exploding in the I dunno sixteenth or seventeenth centuries? Obviously there were many scientific advancements before that, but modern people in the west don't want to admit it. But that's what we think of science and along with science, we have this theme of liberation. That's the first question. Why does scientific American have an opinion on pronouns at all this second question has even greater irony which is? Why is scientific American accepting a completely unscientific premise? The premise here of the pronouns is that. Men are not necessarily men and women are not necessarily women, and there aren't necessarily only to biological sexes. I don't know maybe they were twenty or thirty or fifty six genders like Facebook says the premise year is. Completely unscientific. But the premises are the key. The the premises actually or the key. Because ultimately, what are we trying to liberate ourselves from in? When we're thinking about it about logic. When we're thinking about arguments were trying to separate ourselves from premises. This is the kind of now cliche political line. They'll say if you don't stand for something you'll fall for anything. That sums it up that actually does some it up. You have to begin any train of thought with premises. Nothing from nothing leaves nothing to quote, the great philosopher, what's oh, what's that guy's name. Billy, Billy Preston. One of the great political thinkers of nineteen seventies rock music, nothing from nothing leaves nothing. You have to begin with premises in. Because we're so obsessed in the west with progress, we've forgotten that all trains of thought require premises. All logic all argumentation is based on certain fundamental axioms that you can't prove. It's based on certain fundamental premises fundamental principles that you just can't prove you can't begin with nothing and get something. You can't we like to think that we can do that. We like to think that we can get all of this creation all the sense in logic. And meaning and matter and all this stuff without a creator. We have creation all of which is contingent. But we think we can get there without an unmoved mover creator. We think that. We can spin. If we spend something out of nothing that will be the pure idea that this this is the suicidal idea of the west. Oregon and beliefs begin with first principles. If you don't assume the first principles, you will eat your own society will absolutely destroy you get nothing, and we are uncomfortable with our premises. We're now uncomfortable with the fact that we have premises. So what the scientific American thinks here is they're thinking. Well, listen, we want to take away all bias all prejudice all assumptions all questions of face. And so we will apply this even to biological sex. We will apply this even to questions of nature in. So instead of here she or him or her we'll get rid of that that might be prejudicial that might be biased will just have. They that seems less bias that seems less prejudicial that seems to make fewer assumptions except it's not true. They get one thing fundamentally wrong, which we will talk. About in a second. But I. Look at look at my beautiful soft face. Look how good I feel look at nisi shave, this is because of Dollar Shave Club. They have everything that I need to look feel and smell my best. What I love you even more than that is that I never have to go to the store in the olden days before Dollar Shave Club. I often didn't go to the store anyway. So I use the same rusted old razor I'd be giving myself tetanus every time I got out of the shower. This is not a good thing because I was too lazy to walk down the aisle. I I don't want to have to go somewhere drive. But no, nobody thinks about that Dollar Shave Club has you covered from head to toe for your hair, your skin your face, you name it they haven't. They also have a program where they will just automatically keep you stocked up on the products you use and I love their products. I love all this stuff. I started with them just for the razors because they do have the best razor I've ever used. But they have everything they have dollarshaveclub toothpaste is fabulous. I take it with me on the road. It's great because they get gets automatically sent to you. So you don't end up like me where your squeeze. Using the last little dregs of the thing for three months. No, you'll get it new act like an adult you'll feel great right now. They've got a bunch of starter set you can try for just five dollars like their oral care kit. After that the restock box ships regular size products at regular price. So what are you waiting for get your starter set for just five bucks, right now, dollarshaveclub dot com slash COFACE. CO v f E F E that is dollarshaveclub dot com slash Kofi. C O V F E F E. Now ladies don't really need to worry about shaving their face. Generally speaking, this is a fact of nature scientific American wants to do is reject scientific premises. So they think they think that they. The they singular pronoun is totally inclusive. It's totally unbiased it's totally unprejudiced. Actually, it's just a different premise. It's just a different prejudice. It's just a different leap of faith. To say that that Sex's meaningless that there isn't really no biological sex that sex can change, and it's mutable. That's just a different premise. In one that's really difficult to stomach. I mean, this is why people have never arrived at this idea. That's why we've only started thinking this for the last five seconds or so. What scientific American is trying to escape to liberate themselves from this overburden of meaning all they're doing is assuming something new and they'll get sick of this one. They'll get rid of the singular day they'll move on to something else. The issue here is that we are demanding to be everything to everybody. And you can't be. We will explain what this means for the west in just a second. But I gotta say about Facebook and YouTube go over to daily wire dot com. Ten bucks a month one hundred dollars for an annual membership. You get me you get the Andrew claybin show. You get the Ben Shapiro show. You get to ask questions in the mail bag. You get them out Walsh. Oh, by the way, mailbags coming up tomorrow. So make sure to get your questions in you get to ask questions backstage, you get another kingdom. You get all this stuff. And you get something much much better than this plain white coffee Cup. I'm on the road. So I don't have my leftist. Here's tumbler last night. I was withdrew klavan at Texas am which is I think the most conservative university on the face of the earth. So I didn't need my leftist. Here's tumbler. Luckily, I survived. That's how I'm able to broadcast to you today. I won't always be so lucky you certainly won't always be so lucky get the leftist tears tumbler. It's the only way to survive the deluge that is coming go to daily wire dot com. We will be right back. This is what we're doing. We're demanding to be everything to everybody. That's all we want. All we don't want to offend anybody. This is why everyone is. So timid now in modern American cultures. Well, and I just feel like I don't want to offend you. I don't wanna state an opinion. Or a fact I won't even say, I think we'll even say I believe I'll just say I feel like I now when I hang out with my left wing friends. I noticed this. They never disagree with each other. I mean, they do obviously people have disagreements they have different points of view, but they'll never openly disagree with one another. They'll say, yeah. Yeah. No. That's true. That's true. Some guy says, yeah, you know, I think that the moon is made of green cheese. So yeah, you know, I see that. I see that. That's true. Yeah. But also, maybe it's it's made of rock. You know, but your your opinions true too. Because you you you can't be wrong because we because ever it's cool. We're all it's all good. It's all the same. It's all right. It's all true. This is why universities now have offices of diversity and inclusion how we're Weli does that send if you told a guy if you took a time machine back to the way way back days of like seven years ago, and you said that a university would have an office of diversity and inclusion they would say what kind of Orwellian nonsense. Are you talking about what on earth? Does that mean? But it's the inclusion you you wanna bring people in you want to nothing can be exclusively true. Everything has to be true. Everything has to feel good. Everyone has to be included. You know, when I was in college, the president of the college was a left wing guy for sure, but he had. More a more old school liberalism more an earlier stage, liberalism before this crazy liberation from. Meaning and he one time said something very profound. He said the truth is era Ghent. The truth is arrogant. What does that mean? The truth is exclusive the truth is not inclusive the truth would not do very well if he got called into the dean of diversity and inclusion. True statements. Exclude untrue statements. True conclusions from certain premises exclude other conclusions. You can't be everything to everybody. I had a friend of mine great guy left wing kind of guide, and we were talking about religion. And he said, why can't all religions be true? You know? I mean, you know, man, why can't you be Christian and Buddhist and Jewish and Muslim and Hindu. Why can't you just be like all of those things? You can't be all of those things because they make conflicting claims. Two plus two cannot at the same time equal four and equal five. God cannot at the same time have won nature, and then have a nature that contradicts that nature. Those two things to opposing things cannot be true. At once you can't be everything to everybody. A painting is a painting because it's not a photograph coffee is coffee because it's not orange soda. Why can't it be both? It can't be both a casino is a cathedral because it's not a mosque. It's not a mosque. Notre Dame is not a mosque. It's not a synagogue. It's not a whatever Buddhists tab. I don't know. Just have. It's not a brunch. Cafe it isn't those things? They clearly they're very upset about this that that certain things cannot be true at once. The left hates. This fact, the left hates the fact that a thing cannot be a different thing. Tali Lavin of the Washington Post when after Ben yesterday when after little old Ben Shapiro because. Ben cold Notre Dom a monument to western civilization. So she writes in Washington Post quote shortly thereafter, fast, talking far, right pundit. Ben Shapiro cold. Notre Dom quote a monument to western civilization and Judeo-Christian heritage given the already raging rumors about potential Muslim involvement. These tweets evoked, the specter of a war between Islam and the west that is already part of numerous far, right narratives. What? So Ben said that Notre Dom is a monument to western civilization and Judeo-Christian heritage. This is obviously true. You see it in the facade. You see it in the old Old Testament imagery in Notre Dom, you see it in the New Testament imagery, you see this is obviously a monument to western civilization. It's an embodiment western civilization. And and she said that by even using that phrase by saying that Notre Dom is western is Judeo Christian. It is therefore anti Muslim. Because it's not Muslim Notre Dame's not Muslim it's Christian Judeo-Christian and so much as Christ as a Jew. And therefore, it's not Buddhist. It's not Hindu. It's not Muslim. It's it's not those things even the freight western civilization. Is now considered to exclusive for the left. And this is the irony because western civilization is the only inclusive civilization history western civilization. The only civilization that says come on come in come in. You can be part of this. Obviously in America. Anybody can be an American Americans. Look completely different. If you point to someone, and you say is that person an American you couldn't tell by the color of his skin or the way he looks where he's from or even how he talks. This is even true in Europe is less true. Because these countries are based on people's France is based on the Franks England is based on the angles. But even in Europe, you have people especially after colonialism, especially after imperialism, Europe Brie and all of these people to western civilization spreading western civilization. So you've got the most inclusive civilization in history and yet for liberals for the left. It's too exclusive for the liberators. It's too exclusive. And this is why we can't rebuild Notre Dom. We can't do these were too busy littering ourselves from our civilization. We're too busy liberating ourselves. Even from the thing that defines us. Emmanuel Macron the head of France promised to rebuild Notre Dom more beautifully than before. Now. I see us trying to make the country feel better. They've just lost this pillar of their country and their civilization. You're not going to rebuild Notre Dame more beautifully than before. It's not going to happen. Because the trouble here is that beauty is particular. Homogenized is sterile. It's clinical it's ugly. It's unpleasant beauty is particular beauty is in the spire of Notre Dom that we saw collapsed in flames beauty is in every little nook and cranny of every little statue on that facade. You'll notice in modern architecture, everything is flat homogeneous sterile Clinton's all the same. There's nothing particular about it think of modern office buildings think of modern churches modern churches and Notre Dom, look, they're not they don't even look like they're in the same category modern show. They're all sleek. They're all flat. They're all you can put on them any idea you want. There's nothing particular about them. But the beautiful ancient cathedrals in medieval cathedrals, those are particular. And it's something in our whole culture. We want to say there's no such thing as men and women. There's no such thing as. Differences of thought or differences of idea? There's no such thing as any of that. It's all the same. It's all the same. But of course, not beauty is particular think about why you are attracted to your girlfriend or your spouse or your husband or your boyfriend or whatever is it because they're completely plain looking and they look exactly like everybody else. And everything's exactly the same. No. It's her eyes or her nose or other her other things may be or her hair. Which is why Joe Biden is attracted to certain women, many women, it's because of these particular things if I said describe your wife to me, you wouldn't say she's completely plane. She looks exactly like everybody else. No. You wouldn't you would go on about these particular things that the same is true of ideas. The culture that created Notre Dame that was able to build Notre Dame cathedral is a very particular one. It's it's particularly a culture shaped by particular man, who is God incarnate who lived in a particular place at a particular time who was crucified at a particular time who conquered death and rose again on a particular day who formed a particular church that spreads wrapped particular places. That's where that beauty comes from. That's where every statue on the facade of Notre Dom every relic every work of art. Every Bill aspect of architecture comes from that particularity, not from this plain, Jane sterility, it's one of the great lines of our era that detail and particular things are bad and plain generic clinical cynical. Things are good. This is a great lie, and it, but it does affect the way that we think it affects our very. Thought there was a tweet that came out yesterday from library journal, which I haven't subscribed in years to library journal. I don't know about you. I there's apparently a journal library journal and library journal now believes that libraries are tools of white supremacy. If it weren't so hilarious. It would be tragic, and it is tragic library journal sent this tweet. They said quote library collections continue to promote and proliferate whiteness in their very existence. And the fact that they are physically taking up space in our libraries, which which I gotta tell you if I were an ethnic minority. I would be very offended by that tweet. Because what you're saying is that books are white reading is is a white activity writing is a white activity following arguments to their logical conclusion the white activity only, that's that's whiteness itself. Very offensive statement to make and what library journal was doing is linking to this weirdo blogger ladies, so fee alone. Leone? And so I read the blog entry in so much as it was coherent, or or understandable. I read it, and this is what? She wrote, quote, if you look at any United States library's collection, especially those in higher education institutions, most of the collections books journals, archival papers other media cetera a written by white dude's writing about white ideas, white things or ideas, people and things they stole from people of color and then claimed as white property. Whatever that is. So she she says most of the collections are written by white dude's. This is true. Most of the people in the history of western civilization are white dudes. That's true. And it's a testament to western civilization actually that they're able to include other people who don't look like them other civilizations don't do that. But then she goes and says white ideas, what's a white idea. Inclusion and diversity. I guess that's a white idea. It's kind of ironic, isn't it it it does appear to be a white idea civilization of white people came up with those ideas and then brought everybody else in. That's pretty good idea. I guess it's a white idea that becomes everybody's idea. But it's it's also a distrust of ideas themselves, saying, even ideas or tribal, we cannot actually communicate. What is the purpose of a book? The purpose of a book is to put down ideas narratives thoughts artwork, and you put them from out of your own head. You put them down on paper. Then you hand it to somebody else. And then that person can have those ideas in their head. It is communication. It's bridging gaps between peoples and what Sara Sara long Sophia lung and library. Journalists is no that is not possible communication is not possible that that premise is not possible. And then, of course, she contradicts herself because she says, they're white ideas stolen from people of color. So I guess there are people of color ideas. Whatever those idea, I don't know what those ideas are either. And then they're claimed as white property whatever that is, okay and library journalist posting this. This is the irony. Right. You've got library journal saying that libraries are terrible. This is a telling example of what the west is doing constantly. This is a telling example, they're just constantly saying we hate ourselves. We hate our people's. We hate our institutions. We hate our culture. We hate our religion. We hate or nations. We it's the suicide if the west this is what is meant by that phrase. This is the suicide of the west. And this also helps to explain the madness that you see with these left-wingers the other day when I was in Kansas City, and I'm looking at these crazy protesters who were shrieking and screaming and the we're oppressed. And they've got this far off wacky look in there. I I saw mad. Dennis. I saw insanity at Texas A M last night. The topic of the discussion with me Andrew was can we survive the crazy left? This is a madman this, but it's a madness bore not of some psychological condition, but of philosophical condition of erasing our own premises. Because when you go back far enough and you so Cameron or race or political institutions or race or cultural institutions, I'm going to a racer religious institutions a new a race our assumptions. Then you're left with nothing left to the blank mind. This is what is meant by the phrase when the left always says, you've got to open your mind conservatives or closed minded is always ironic because conservatives are much more willing to entertain different ideas than left-wingers, or however, they say you've got to be open minded, open minded, and what the left does they do open their minds. They open their mind so much that their brains fallout in. So there's nothing in just it's like you could play pong all day inside the head because there's nothing in there. And it's this is by design. This is why the left always says we've got to listen to the children listen to the wisdom. From the mouths of babes. We've got to listen to be because it's a it's an elevation of ignorance because they think that knowledge wisdom maturity ideas premises conclusions. All of that. What that really does is it just amounts to bias and prejudice and bigotry and exclusion because the truth is arrogant. So what you gotta do is get all of that out of there. So little children who are completely ignorant. They don't know anything. They're the ones we should listen to. That's why we need to lower the voting age because they know those little children because they have nothing going on in their heads. They are the most likely to give us a good government to give us a good culture because they're not filled with bias. They're not filled with prejudice. This is alternately. The what the left always does is attack the tradition. This is what liberalism ultimately is liberating us from. How do we find? Meaning. How do we find our history? We find our culture it's in traditions. This is why what conservatism ultimately boils down to is the tradition all the various kinds of conservative thought, what unifies them all is basically a defense of the tradition. Maybe one aspect of the tradition over another. But that's what it is. And it's why intersection -ality makes sense to left-wingers is. Because even if you've got various victim groups who all hate each other who all disagree with each other who are skeptical of one another what they all have in common is they want to attack the tradition. They wanted destroy it. They wanna burn it down to rubble. They want to liberate themselves from it. They want to emancipate themselves from it and the only way to liberate Mansoor Manson paint yourself from meaning is to burn it down. Once it's burned down. Once it's an ashes, then the left wing lib. Breuil liberating innovator comes in and says we will rebuild it more beautifully than before. This is what they told us during the communist revolutions, we're gonna burn down human nature. We're going to send them off to the gulags, but we're going to rebuild it more beautifully than before every totalitarian system. And it's what the naive. Emmanuel Macron is saying we are going to take the ashes of this cathedral and rebuild it more beautifully than before rebuild it on. What? Nothing from nothing leaves nothing. A sad note to end on. But it does explain the madness. It does go a long way to explain our current cultural madness. Is there some way to restore sanity? Perhaps there is we can't burn things down. You can take two hundred years to build a cathedral stands for eight hundred years. You can burn it down and sixty six minutes. Are we willing to not just let the whole world burn we willing to rebuild it? How are we going to rebuild it? We're gonna have to start rebuilding ourselves. Rebuilding our civilization. That's at. All. Right. We'll get too much more tomorrow. There's there's always more to get to. But we'll have to do it tomorrow on flying out. I'm probably gonna miss my flight. In the meantime, I'm Michael Knowles. This is the Michael Knowles show. I'll see you tomorrow. The Michael Knowles show is produced by Rebecca dob koets and directed by Mike Joyner executive producer, Jeremy boring, senior producer Jonathan. Hey. Our supervising producer is Mathis Glover, and our technical producer is Austin Stevens. Edited. By Danny d'amico, audio is mixed by Dylan case hair and makeup by Jessica ovarian and our production. Assistant is Nick Sheehan. The Michael Knowles show is a daily wire production copyright, daily wire. Twenty nineteen everyone does Andrew klavan host of the Andrew klavan show. The Muller report is scheduled to be released tomorrow press in the Democrats. I repeat myself are already spinning every which way. But the one way the tells the truth that's on the Andrew klavan show. I'm Andrew claim.

Notre Dom Michael Knowles library journal Notre Dame France Stone Ben Shapiro ZipRecruiter Europe Rolling Stone magazine Stone put Facebook president Texas Kansas City Twitter Emmanuel Macron Kanye Andrew Al haram mosque
#012 Frank Zappa 1991

The Tapes Archive

31:11 min | 1 year ago

#012 Frank Zappa 1991

"Welcome back to the Tapes Archive podcast where. We release interviews. That have never been heard before. Please listen to episodes zero zero zero an introduction for the full back story about this podcast series. Today we end our first season with Martin. My personal musical hero. Frank Zappa at the time of this interview in Nineteen. Ninety ZAPPA was fifty years old in the interview. Frank Talks about how just waving. The American flag does not spread democracy while he is not a fan of Rolling Stone Magazine's coverage of him the non trauma of turning fifty and surprisingly how he feels. He is not a virtuoso as I mentioned. Zappa interview conclude season one of the tapes archived. Podcasts please let us know if you'd like to hear a season two as always we have music critic. Mark Allen at the helm conducting the interview. Before we get to the interview we have a couple of housekeeping items. If you'd like to support the show please go to the website at the tape. Archive Dot Com and Click on the support button on their. You'll find many ways to show your support for the show. All of them are free while on the website checkout marked blog for more context of this interview and personal insight from Mark Himself. One last thing the tapes archive podcast is a proud member of. Ucs podcast network a global community connecting passionate fans with podcasts experiences about artists topics you love. Thanks FOR TUNING IN. And now it's time to open the volt. It's actually kind of Nice for a change. I've been there for a while there. That's one thing I was Gonna ask you about it. You ever coming back well Not Likely to worry anymore so memories that one building on the fairgrounds. Well let's Let's talk about books for a while. HAVE YOU Have you seen a lot of bootlegs of your stuff? Somebody recently sent me a book called a guide to the alternative recordings of Frank. Zappa there over four hundred titles listed at four hundred cents Rage twenty-five years. I've made over fifty albums so like eight times. As many bootlegs is real album on anybody else objecting to that kind of screwed nick and and So I I take it. You're looking at this figuring that people are making a lot of money that you're kind of a cottage industry for a Lotta people. Well I would say that I probably put a lot of other people's kids to college. In fact they set the other than the idea that obviously they're making money off you. Are there other problems that you have with bootlegs if you spend a lot of time producing an album and producing a real album? Trying to get the sound right. Get the performance right and the slave over that and then somebody comes along with a piece of shit and the seems to some people that doesn't make any difference whether you worked hard on it or it's the result of somebody with a cassette machine in the back of somebody's buying things. I have a problem with that. Obviously your lot more generous than a lot of other artists in terms of putting out A lot of product for people to buy. But you don't see any Reason that that can you? Could you think of yourself as a fan and wanting more than the artists? Put out to buy these bootlegs I can understand what the fans motivation is. But whether or not think it's satisfied at the point where they spend the money for the bootleggers. The question because I think a lot of lakes or just ripping them off the sound quality so bad and some of them have tried to make themselves look like official recordings like releasing them on an icy a label and sort of misleading information on the packages to make it look like I actually had something to do with. Why aren't you cleaning the sound up on On these bootlegs well we did to. A certain extent of this stuff was stolen. Back from the vinyl source. Leads spent quite a bit of time. Chopping out the record clicks digital editing system and They've been cute a little bit but basic idea was to steal it. All back covers an all solid progress. To what do you think about Bands like the grateful. Dead who basically encouraged bootlegging What they encourage is Self taping great. I'm a little. They encourage somebody else to Put their performance on vinyl or CD and sell it. I guess I guess that's the difference. I mean they put up a section in their concerts. Were of a guy comes in their cassette machines ensure court here. That's different than saying yet. Mister Entrepreneur. Hot there in the league someplace. Make your on Fake grateful dead album and sell it and collect the royalties. That's another story altogether. I don't think the grateful dead wants you to do that. Have you ever had you heard many of the other Bootlegs besides these Ten to these. I didn't even select them. They were done that was done by guy who works at Rhino. An expert on this kind of stuff onto other things. Tell me about why not inc. I haven't really been doing too much with why not for the last year but I'm getting ready to make another trip to Eastern Europe. I've been invited by the mayor of Budapest. Come there on the thirtieth of June. They're having this big celebration because that's the day. The last west culturally tonkery so at that point to help meet the number of on Gary Businessmen and government officials and get some idea. What kind of things? They're interested in two and see if I can help out by capturing helping businessmen find out who to talk to and what's wanted or needed for different okay. So will you be doing business or you? More a link between business and the the people over there are more of a switch more kind of a why. Why did you want to do this? I think it needs to be done. I think if you believe that democracy is a good idea sprang up all over the world. Thank that Free market economy is good idea. He wants to do more than just wave a flag data. And you don't think that our government would have taken on such a duty while. I think that our government should have anti talk foreign policy. The fact is we've spent God knows how many trillion since the cold war began fighting communism. Okay they collapses under its own weight right before your very eyes. And what do we do? You remember. What Bush's response was when the Berlin Wall came down kind of like a whole home. There's something that smells bad here. If what they've said all along about the dangers of communism and how he'll it is desirable it is and how All suffer under this system the economy and when when there's an opportunity to help a country move in another direction weddings and the US government doesn't step right in to help make it work mistakes and all the other rhetoric that we've been listening to the end of World War Two. You have any theories on why the government has been slow or not even slow to act but the inactive. Well I think there are a couple of different reasons form because the whole war with a joke to the rhetoric they never really squared with reality trumps of work agitates government the US ovulation and another reason. There's I don't know whether or not we can really afford it. You say are probably along with the debt and Todd Rundgren one of the artists that are really revered and love deeply by their fans you think about that much low. Yeah sure especially when you got some wonderful letters and what what about fashion that you've had a positive influence on somebody's life in general kinds of influences. Have you had them people? Have they told you letters we get Have to do with the fact that just because I stood up for what I believe that and turn into a a commercial act discussed Being myself gave other people encouraged to do the same thing in their lives. And that makes me feel good. Does it make you at all? Nervous that People put so much faith in in you know. It doesn't make me nervous unexpected to them ever going to let it out okay. I mean I don't feel like I'm trembling on the edge of suddenly Glenn Commercial and everybody will go all. He let us down. I mean that ain't going to happen and it didn't didn't but it just seems like it's a huge amount of responsibility for somebody to take on. Well I I didn't get into it. In order to take on that responsibility it's just something that seemed to develop but I do respect the position that have been placed in just do the imagination our perception for people who like what I do and I have no intention or desire to let them down helped her always stand up for what I believe John Glenn in the past longest. It's about thirty years now. You've been doing this a loss if gone from twenty five now okay. Twenty five years time from being kind of outlined in a way to sort of I guess respectable for lack of a better word to name the between being on Johnny Carson testifying before Congress What does that say? Well first of all I think you're Evaluation is not correct. Okay because I doubt whether I'm respectable but there are people expect me and there's a difference there say that the mainstream press does not finally respectful at all. They can to make sure that. I never become that way. One of the reasons why. It's difficult for me to trust anything for every depressed because I have respectable and always have been a member of the mainstream press is this and I find your respectable. I'm thinking I didn't find you. Can you know all that outlandish When other people were freaking out over what you were doing your your maybe mark. Different than the guy who owns the newspaper workforce? That's the point. I would imagine that. Made the top down the street up. What's really happened to this? Country never really gets reported because filtration system and In College with one phone call from one of the big guys to another one of the big guys certain stories disappear and other stories of importance become world news time spent the last five or six years. They pretty deeply involved. The match went to Washington testified to just got a whiff of her. Weren't you treated You know they weren't given an incredible amount of credence going before Congress from the news media not really. Because here's what happened I testified maybe forty minutes took spreads prepared statement for about ten minutes and then answering questions and all that. The only thing that Stan ran on the air was the When slade Gorton Klis apoplectic Republican from Washington State? Because I guess with Bethesda. Kate van on the team The under the Senate rules who can't speak unless spoken to Melissa Guy Asked you questions. You can't open your mouth so when it was his term. Turn to ask a question instead of asking that question. You made a speech. Which basically was Mr Athlete? You don't know anything about the First Amendment and that's that's all he said and that's all fan about the TV networks New York Times things like that was coverage more balanced I'm not sure that it was. I'll tell you one place where it was really carry very unbalanced was enrolling stolen because prior to the Senate hearings rolling star which is basically financed by the record. Industry took a pro Pam. Rc stamps. Though that part of a recent American history before the Senate hearings occurs they had An article that was kind of Propia Marcy and the reason was the record. Companies had always intended to cave in on this because they were trying to protect the piece of legislation called the black pay tax and so the editorial spin as far as Rolling Stone went when I first covered the issue of record ratings was basically on the side of the RC was very shocking thing to find rational publication of any description and so after the size hearings occurred. I was given short shrift and reportage of the Senate hearing and the major positive puffery in the teeth was given to Danny Goldstein. Who wasn't even there and the WHO is I don't know while he is a guy who at that time was running on outfit called Gold Mountain records and had made some anti censorship statements and eventually became the head of the ACLU and southern California. Look he wasn't that but he was like a record Industry Guy. It seems it seems strange. I gotTa do is go back and look at the The coverage not not making this up never know the other thing that was very odd about what rolling stone did with it and they had their second article. It's like a major article which came out after the Senate hearings. They had like kind of a rolling stone editorial point of view which was closed in a inserted into the article. Basically what they had in the box was gleaned from my testimony with no credit given to me for the source of the summer stuff. Just a weird thing. Are you in a position where you can call rolling stone and find out why that happened? I don't even care because you know I've I've basic speculation is that the rolling stone is the expansion of the personality of the Guy who runs it and I've never met this man. I don't think he likes me very much facebook. They've How they've covered me in the way that treated me over the years. So knowing that all publications live or die by the Revenue Jenner touched offered by the advertisers. If your publication is basically listening to major record manufacturers. I think that there has to be a certain put. Tend to the editorial policy trump. Those guys her end one question in this vein and that is When you were on the tonight show. I thought you got a pretty tremendous reception from the audience. They seem to be supportive. Which were sitting swell up fats. The discrepancy that has always intrigued. Because the way in which I'm treated in so-called mainstream press has always regard me as a lunatic convenient line whenever they want to have Kind of what? You shouldn't be as an American often point to make but if I get in front of of what let's say audience like Johnny Carson audience which is not very off on guard. Would you say would agree with that? They know me and they liked him. They treat me like I'm located like a human being and this is Ed. This kind of reception is at odds with the official line that is maintained by all Vance during press. The only reason I can see that this continues is an editorial policy which is decided for political reasons. Content other thing. Any thoughts on turning fifty already turned fifty. I realized that it just seems to be kind of Threshold now you turn fifty Bob Dylan turn fifty and I wanted to go through any trauma or I did go travel. I turned twenty or thirty or forty. I hope I get to turn sixty so not exactly a milestone in your life over the twenty five years and has done anything that you'd like to take back. I really nothing in lyrics or anything you've said or anything you've done nothing well. There's certain things that might have said in a different way but basically there it is. Can you give me an idea what that might be well? I think I probably would've handled the song Jewish princess in a different way so they wouldn't have written it but based on all the uproar that came afterwards. I think I might have maybe made stronger. And that's another one of those Kind of crazy things that blew up over nearly nothing well chef mountain out of a fall demanded. I apologize for my police now. I guess not too many Americans who will stand up to an organization like that and say now match you look at the way politicians cave-in whenever the That lobby shift a hold of them. They question their boots from camp. Wow Dershowitz was on the radio. Last night he was saying somebody call I think was on Larry King. Somebody called and said would you think about running for the Senate Massachusetts and he said he said politicians are not free to say what they want and I like to say what I wanted with always liked the people that he represents a switch account ludik scholar so he was before he became a lawyer. I think that he's got a lot of depth taft His appreciation for the constitution is really quite fundamental. I'm always interested in what he has to say. I think that he does say what's on his mind. I don't always agree with it. But this is a guy with a brain and I'm glad that Chastity on television because there are too few guys with brains any place on television to think you're intimidating people. Sure I take it. Is that good? You know which is the fact. I wondered if that works to your advantage or disadvantage depending on the situation. I mean I'm really not One of these guys and thinks about power lunch or whether cycle psychological advantage over. Somebody don't deal in that world and I really do. I am what I am. You'll like it fine. Don't to find. Two people. Were usually intimidated by me. If they can ever get over it and wind up liking goosing. Most people don't know that's also a factor in the statistical fact the what they do know about me as a product of what they've either read about heard about mayor or something so very little of that has to do with reality. It's possible that any Imitating aspect of my personality is a figment of their imagination. Not Suffering projected. I think you're right there. You're probably Has Misunderstood as anybody selected things that are are set a written about you remember I think it was Dave Barry. The humor columnist for the Miami Herald. Wrote something about your appearance before Congress and said that I think he said well in general you know he agreed with what you had to say. Said you're also a guy who wrote who wants Wrote a song about having sex with the root of bega all that volume of accurate. Yeah I I think he was joking but I like that idea for a song in the book you Said there are several reasons why music has never really been explained in the press for one thing. People don't care how it works why it works and I care so can you explain it well. I think that it's GonNa rely on the book that there's probably a better explanation more detail than there and grow have been answered off a tough precise coming. That's in the book with also say in the book Not a Virtuoso Guitar Player. That you still have to look at the neck to see what you're playing Which comes as something of surprise to at least to me because Always thought of you as a you know as one more amazing guitar players fair about what I play that I managed to get away with it. Well let's let's Lot Of wiggling your fingers and hoping that you get it right involved. I really virtual silver. I can't breathe and I I don't practice I can't play anything. Virtuosos can play anything and I can play what I imagined like action. There's something interesting about what I play. It has more to do with Badgen. So how does that work? Do you see her at in your head. Or you're thinking about the sound that you'd like to create and then you go about trying to create. Well it's situational and it's also a wage forth like if you have to have an optimum environment motor the player really good solo because collective Expression you you are at the mercy of the ruling section if they are that's into with what you're doing and had the desire to make what you're doing sound good then you can produce good music if they're just scrambling through their day Then no matter what you play it's GonNa come fast with Mesh with rhythm section. Okay let me give you a song if I can. If you can tell me how. How BLACK NAPKINS ONE? That I'm real interested in had it had that come out was a piece that I wrote. And that's A planned music solo itself as an improvisation on Sir I turns Rag Road Qatar Guitar Solo in now. That's that's one of those sounds were when I hear it. You know it just it shakes you up because the playing his is like nothing else. You know I've never heard guitar play that way and I guess and I think it's really great but I also WanNa play that song every night on that tour practically the stuff. I was better than the report was not. That was the smallest band that I never had on the road. I think contact just Faced drums keyboard Saxon and so Maybe during that tour at of a little bit more effort into what? I was playing because there wasn't that cow. How are we doing timewise? Because I've got a bunch more than stuff I WANNA ask. You can go until somebody says. Frankie gotta get out of dry. Do have another apartment that I have to go to. But they haven't does me okay Let me ask you about Some songs projects and lyrics. You can tell me whatever they think. I'm glad to hear that about black. Napkins always liked that too but a lot anecdote about that. Yeah sure We're playing in New Jersey. And this is I guess late seventies and we're in this small theater and a woman forties asked to come backstage and talk with me. Full look cards letter in which is really very nice as she showed me a picture of her son He had just died. Wanted to be buried in my t shirt and they wanted to have black napkins played at his funeral and so she wanted to beat me. That that'll shake you up before you go back on stage yeah Did you accommodate her? Jude thank you for a tee shirt. I mean basically. He had the Tito t shirt I see. I thought he wants T to get it. Behoves wanted to tell you know. The impact of that song had had on her son. I've just been given the notice this the last question. Okay well then. My last question is His music better or worse than when you started. And I don't mean your music. I mean music in general Well we talked about that If you're talking about the known musical universe no other words what you can hear on the radio what they show you on. Mtv PLAY WORSE. But that doesn't mean that there aren't good things out there that we don't know about it just as the broadcasters are not letting had flooding us find out about it because it's hard for me to believe that all of a sudden with the advent of MTV call good songs cease to be written band seems to be formed. I just don't think that nature works way in someplace. There's they're good musicians. Posers GOOD TUNES ALL ARRC. This country in other countries. We just don't know about them because with people who determines what get the hair have no taste. Let me squeeze one other one if I can. You're you've been a great facilitator are made an incredible number of amazing players. Been your bands over the years Do you generally find you hold open auditions how do you do you get the people who have come through your band well I'm not doing it anymore. That's for sure but Yeah we used to hold open auditions and Little George. Had He come to you? Well I knew him when he had a band. called The factory and I produced to tunes for him in nineteen sixty five sixty six and He was a musician the scene so I knew him before he got into the ban. He will it's I interviewed him just before he died and he said that That he had come to you one point when he was and said you know. I've written some songs and you basically said to him. Great he wants to. Do you want to write your own song? Start Your own band. Was that true. That's true actually. I helped him get his contract. Brothers passed drug Lewis at the end. There I think that a lot of people who are in that early band took it as a positive career. Move to say negative things about men whatever interviews they can do but I think you know it could be researched discovered that Little feat had a contract at one of brothers have been fully healthy yet and I knew he wrote talks on. The WHO writes song should have a chance to record the wrong. Why should have another bad? He had his own band before he was in my bad. Why should do his own thing? Because at that time the original mothers of invention had broken up. I was around sixty nine. So what was he died anyway? Well I really appreciate your time and I'm glad I never thought I'd have a chance to talk to you. So I'm I'm really glad that I did and some other time. 'cause they're a bunch more things? I wanted to ask okay. Well if he's realized ahead. Thanks for taking. Hey thanks for listening to the tape. Archive podcasts please. Remember you can always find more information about the show and the individual episodes at our website that tape archive dot com.

Frank Zappa Senate Congress Johnny Carson official Rolling Stone Magazine US ZAPPA Mark Himself Mark Allen Martin Budapest Todd Rundgren John Glenn Brothers Berlin Wall Washington Eastern Europe facebook Bob Dylan
COVID-19 and vaccine hesitancy

The Current

09:45 min | 2 weeks ago

COVID-19 and vaccine hesitancy

"Hi I'm Josh Block host of uncover escaping nexium. From CBC PODCASTS I pull back the curtain on the secret of self help group that experts call a called and follow one woman's heroic journey to get out the podcast was featured in Rolling Stone magazine and named one of the best podcasts of two thousand and eighteen in the Atlantic listen to uncover escaping nexium on CBC listen or wherever you get your podcasts. This is a CBC podcast why Vaccines Uptake is the best shot Canadians half regaining some of what we've lost and we're turning to things we cherish widespread vaccine uptake. That is what candidates chief medical officer Dr Trees Tom would like to see when a covert vaccine becomes available might be a tough sell though a survey by Angus Reid last week shows just thirty nine percent of respondents would get a vaccine if available that's down from forty six percent back in July so we will note to ask People Why they might be changing their minds. I would not get the vaccine if it was available right now, I would probably wait several years before considering it when they move too quickly, they don't necessarily know what the long term ramifications about it are. My feeling especially coming from a country like Pakistan country, which is still suffering from diseases such as polio I can tell and I can vouch for the fact that vaccines are. Critical for vaccine does come out in Canada given that the information about the trials and everything is trying to spin into the public would definitely be willing to get muscle vaccine. I would really feel not secure enough for having my kids to take it and stuff like that. Just too fast too quick. I think it'd be a good idea if if we take it, I know most people wouldn't I would as long as they got it right Dr Cora. Constantinescu has spent a lot of time hearing concerns like those. She is a pediatric infectious disease doctor who works the vaccine hesitancy clinic in Calgary it's run out of the Albert Children's Hospital Dr. Good Morning. Learning interesting in hearing people in Toronto talk about the concerns around the Covid nineteen vaccine are those concerns common. In terms of you here. Okay. So Matt, I think that is a lot of what people are talking about in terms of Kobe vaccines for sure. What do you hear specifically from your patients who might be resistant to vaccines? And you know I think the hug of every vaccine hesitant Patient is somebody working really hard to make. The best decision they can to protect themselves or their child. And people battles here is it insecurity a lot of misinformation and sometimes a lack of trust. So we do here concerns about safety, which are often the most common ones, and as you heard with the gentleman speaking about his experience in Pakistan. They talk about this perceived risk of disease. Whether. This is something that that risk. So you could hear how he talks about polio because he had seen polio. He. Backs to be at risk and therefore his sense of this Quebec seem preventable disease was different. So I think safety is always a big concern. Of Disease would, we've noticed a bid with Colbert and I think with other. Vaccines as well is this idea of exceptionalism? Somehow. Different I may not be at the same or this is everybody else in my age group about the disease but the same except applies to this risk of vaccine untoward events. So somehow I'm an exceptional and not gonna get these but I might be exceptional enough to get some untoward event coming from the vaccine itself and and that's an interesting with a covert back seen because what is we know that age is a concern for. Cova Disease some studies that indicated that even people in their seventy s what in good health a not a perceive age as a for covert and therefore may not get the vaccine. Can you just briefly give a snapshot as to who the people are who come to see you people who were characterizing his vaccine hesitant because there's the phrase anti vaccine gets thrown around a lot. Are these people people who opposed to all vaccines? Who are they? And so it's a good question I think. It's a very clear difference between the vaccine hesitant in the Anti Vaccine people or the anti vaccine advocates. The people of vaccine has been and you know the between fifteen to thirty percent of Canadians and They didn't to come from all walks of life. There pretty educated about their own health and they are defined as people who May Not Take Vaccines Despite that availability. So often these are people who have not immunized children at all or who have and have concerns have partially immunized their kids in our clinic. What I say for sure is that these are pretty motivated people and it takes a lot of bravery and courage to Face this fear that a lot of people have lived with a long time. And to come in and have a conversation about it, how do you talk to them without dismissing those concerns in those fears? That you you just put a finger on and so They said before you know these are people who are battling a lot of fears and lack of trust. So we spent a lot of time building with a poor and trust with them. We listen we find out about the child and then family we personalize their concerns about that. So we make work very hard and not making this kind of philosophical debate. We keep the conversation very tailored to the child the schedule tailored to the child approach. To them. And I think it works well because. The end of the day everybody. For the same goal, they just want to be protected and have the best health. So we realized that and we put up with the parents and support them in making this decision vaccinate. Are you surprised with you take a look at those Angus Reid numbers but a lower percentage of people who get this vaccine right away does that surprise you at all? I think. You know my hope. Is that every Canadian we'll have the opportunity of habit a covert vaccine and therefore have to make this decision. So I'm not surprised but maybe a little bit disappointed because of what discovered pandemic has meant to. All of us But I. Am Nausea surprised that in some ways I think it's good that he had. We Are you and I talking about hesitancy about a vaccine that hasn't even been licensed yet. and the people are thinking about this and and I think it's good for each and every one of us because we will have to make this decision. To deflect feelings and on the Kobe vaccine. Or? Check on hesitancy around it. So I'm not really surprised and maybe it's a good thing that people are already thinking about this and and already thinking of how they would approach it. we talk. We talk. We talk about the need for a vaccine in parts because the idea of of herd immunity is not something that we're going to get to anytime. Soon, you speak about something called heard influence. What is that? So I think, the best vaccine is only as good as its uptake and you could have the. The various effective seen but if people don't take it, you're you're not going to teach that and people talk about this idea of her immunity, which is community protection. How much do we need how many? How much of the population do we need to to? Have Protection but as we see now, we're not we're not at that stage yet but everybody's talking about this. So we talk about this I talk about this idea of herd influence. So what now to? The not the level of population that we we need to influence in and and get onto the deciding towards a vaccine that that would need to keep this movement Puerto Vaccine Uptake in Sinop acceptance moving forward. And not backwards. So if somebody just in the last minute that we have if someone is feeling hesitant about this covid nineteen vaccine, they're concerned about the politicization of the concerned about the speed at which it's being developed. What's your advice to them right now? I would say we all need to think of all we have done for this pandemic. So. Many of us have even the ones I haven't been infected or lost a sick one Kovic we have done so much people have changed socialized stay away from family and friends reinvented themselves professionally launch jobs home school their kids. We've done so much and I think we need to think about the cost of this pandemic is being to each of us into the Canadian society and make the idea of vaccinating. There's just a next step in the fighting this virus. It's really interesting to hear about the work that you're doing and as. Process continues I hope we have the chance to talk again in the meantime doctor thank you. I. Hope so too. It was very nice to. Have you on the show thank you. Thank you very much. Dr Cora. Constantinescu is a pediatric infectious disease doctor who works at the vaccine hesitancy clinic in Calgary. For more CBC PODCASTS TO CBC dot. Ca Slash podcasts.

polio Dr Cora Angus Reid Pakistan Calgary Constantinescu CBC Rolling Stone magazine Canada Josh Block medical officer Dr Trees Tom Quebec Sinop Albert Children Matt Toronto Colbert Nausea thirty nine percent
Kingpins Daily: El Chapo

Kingpins

06:14 min | 5 months ago

Kingpins Daily: El Chapo

"This is kingpins Opoku Original I'm Alistair and I'm kate every day in May we're featuring a quote by an iconic crime figure teaching us in their own words what it takes to survive in the world today. We're taking a look at a quotes from Joaquin El Chapo Guzman. The once lead of the Sinoloa content in Mexico Gu's Mon- used his crime syndicate to sell billions of dollars worth of drugs. Boys one step ahead of the police. Goose Mon- escaped jail twice bride politicians and shed the blood of allies and foes alike in light of this. It's ironic that the notorious drug lord once said I know one day I will die. I hope it's a natural causes. Guzman allegedly said this to actor Sean Penn. During a secret interview for Rolling Stone Magazine Guzman supposedly wanted a Hollywood film to be written about his life. It's not surprising. Gu's mom believed his life was worthy of the big screen after all his rise in the world of narcotics has been nothing short of cinematic Guzman was introduced to the drug trade early. He was born in. Nineteen fifty seven in La Tuna a rural town in Mexico. Though his claimed to be a simple farmer it's widely believed that he grew opium poppies by nineteen seventy the fifteen year old guzman was farming marijuana alongside his cousins at only five foot six is small stature earned him the nickname. El Chapo which is Mexican slang for shorty dues. Mon- didn't let his ambitions mirror his size in the late. Nineteen Seventy S. He grabbed onto the opportunity to work for Miguel on. Hell sciutto widely known. As the godfather of Mexico's first nationwide drug operation the Guadalajara Cartel Fedex put goose man in charge of smuggling logistics. Who's Mon- proved himself to be a ruthless taskmaster? He went as far as murdering employees. If ever they were late with deliveries this show of strength paid off in spades when feliks was arrested in nineteen eighty nine a thirty two year old. Guzman received a choice piece of the former drug lords territory. With his little slice of North West Mexico secured Guzman's set up his own operation. Everything about the Sinoloa cartel was innovative and Malton. He sets up complex underground tunnels to ferry drugs across the border. Earning him millions of dollars and attention from officials in both the United States and Mexico in nineteen ninety three after the highly publicized death of a Catholic cardinal who was caught in a drugged. Her for the thirty six year-old Guzman was blamed. He was arrested in Guatemala and sentenced to twenty years in prison. However the entire time guzman mom was in jail. He lived like a king. Bribing God's so he could receive conjugal visits on-command then when he got forward in two thousand one. He broke out of prison. Legend states that he snuck count in a laundry cart. Journalists believed that he more likely just salted out his path cleared by the many gods. He bribed in two thousand nine eight years. After breaking out of jail sinoloa cartel was doing better than ever this led to fifty two year-old Guzman landing on Forbes list of the world's richest people the magazine stated that he was personally worth one billion dollars. You didn't get there without a little brutality. To hold onto his empire the drug lord is to have personally tortured and murdered his rivals and even though he was arrested again. By Marines in two thousand fourteen. The stone cold killer escaped once more a little over a year later in July. Two Thousand Fifteen as he got older without ever facing real consequences for his crimes his hubris increased. That's what led him to consent to an interview by Hollywood actor Sean Penn. It's rumored that his communications with pen were traced by Mexican authorities ultimately leading to his capture. Guzman was extradited to the United States. Where he face charges of drug trafficking intend to distribute money laundering and homicide during the Eleven Week. Trial even more disturbing revelations about Guzman surfaced. According to a BBC Article One witness told the court that Guzman had buried demand alive. Another told of a rival NOCCO chief who refused to shake goosebumps hand and paid for it with his life. Court papers also accused him of raping girls as young as the team calling them. His vitamins ultimately Guzman was found. Guilty of ten counts including charges of narcotics trafficking. He was sentenced to life in prison. This means that Guzman likely will die of natural causes just as he wished. Thanks for listening. This was our last daily episode. But we'll be back next Friday with another full length episode. You could find more episodes of kingpins for free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Joaquin El Chapo Guzman Goose Mon Mexico Gu Mexico Sean Penn Rolling Stone Magazine El Chapo United States Hollywood Alistair Malton North West Mexico La Tuna spotify feliks Fedex Guadalajara Miguel
Worse than Fyre Festival - Hells Angels Pt. 4

Past Gas

59:50 min | 5 months ago

Worse than Fyre Festival - Hells Angels Pt. 4

"Hey friend does Steve. Here and Larson. We could sit here and tell you exactly why going in Roz. The only pro wrestling podcasts. You need to be listening to but why hear it from us when you can hear it from the cheap undertaker impersonator. We found millet about outsider. Office take it from the dead man. The only thing greater than having powers of darkness is having the power of listening to going in raw every day. Only when you subscribed. Will you rest in peace? Where's my sandwich was sandwich you tell them. You can have a sandwich. No I told him he could have your sandwich fine going in raw pro wrestling podcast available every day wherever podcast can be found fort. Hey guys welcome to the pass. Podcast you like passed gas. Please help us grow by giving us a good rating and a nicer view on the podcast platform of your choice to really help us out and I really appreciate it so thank you all right now. For the show Almonte Raceway Park was a Half Mile Oval. Just outside of Tracy. California regular patrons were used to the howling engines of stock cars flying around the bank turns but on December sixth nineteen sixty nine. A new kind of roar was coming to the track. Some of the world's biggest bands and all their fans had descended on the small town. Racetrack packing the infield. With more people and drugs than it had ever seen. The outlawed free concert was poised to rekindle. The magic of the Woodstock Festival bringing peace and love to the west coast closing out one of the most chaotic decades in American history. Unfortunately those intendant would find anything but peace gonNA find. Just leave us like that. You're gonNA find the bears. No not not as cool as woodstock or something else happened. I don't know I don't know the ominous nature of that intro makes me believe that maybe something else is going to happen. Hello everyone and welcome to pass gas another episode of passed gas. I'm your one of your co hosts Nolan. Sykes and joining me as always are my my to buds Mr James Palm Frey. Hello and Joe ever fired up. The viewer might notice that. I'm not sitting on the floor anymore. have a desk now and I haven't next to my window so I've been able to watch all the cars that drive by all day and I've noticed that there's a lot of actually really cool cars in my neighborhood. I'm really stoked about also. I saw gang of mini bike riders. There's like seven dudes on not on like grams. But unlike like tiny mini by yeah like Briggs and Stratton Rolling around Yeah Briggs and Stratton engines. Who was super cool? I want I want to ride with them. There's a guy trying to sell like a puke green five in my neighborhood and it's been for sale for like the whole time. I've lived here and I think he finally saw new on know. How am I going to imagine myself how would I am? I going to not buy that now. That happened last week. I I saw this sweet Chevy see ten. I've seen it before on craigslist and it's like dark forest green. It's got like rust on it. So it's basically the perfect car But then after about two days the posting was removed so I. I'm just hoping that he took it down again because he said in the ad he's not in any hurry to sell it so in my mind. No one wanted it. And he's like I'll take it down so when the timing is right it'll it'll reappear and I will Baya please. Someone make a meme of Nolan of that guy looking at the other woman Patina and then the other women is a perfectly Shiny Carleen. Yeah I like rush. What can I say I would vote? Yeah I vote that anyway. Today on. Pascal we are continuing our hells angels series and examining perhaps the most infamous moment in the club's history the stabbing of Meredith Hunter at the ultimate free concert in nineteen sixty nine last episode. We discussed how the Hell's angels were riding. A wave of. I would say public favor almost after the release of Hunter S Thompson's book about the club. And we also discussed how the portrayal in the media might have been a little but it was both earned and unearned in certain aspects Unfortunately for them though this is the episode where things really take a nosedive and changing public perception of the club for decades but there is some hope for the club. Because I don't think what we're going to talk about. Today is completely their fault. We can discuss that at the end boys. Are you ready? Yeah I ready all right in one thousand nine hundred sixty four. A band known as the Beatles heard of them. I stepped first step foot on. Us soil kicking off. What would be known as the British invasion the British Asia band at the ruttles cover? I know the what sorry. What the ruttles as the roads are Beatles cover band have been around for like forty years. I didn't know that strikes on Joe Anyway. The British invasion sparked a major cultural movement in the US. When the Beatles first hit the airwaves and nine hundred sixty four everyone loves the Beatles. Affect in whatever man. That's what I I don't hate the Beatles but the Beatles. I think there was like a time like ten years ago or so when I was in high school and like the Beatles were hitting like another wave of popularity and everyone thought that they were the greatest in the world And now that I'm a little older I can recognize their significant. Yeah but at the time I was just like like our parents. Listen to this and their parents kind of listen to it. I just thought it was so overblown But now I've I've come to appreciate got some good songs but like there's that movie yesterday that I watched because quarantine and movies so dumb because the whole premise is just like expecting everybody to be like. Yeah are the best band ever right like the Beatles. I mean it's the best song ever. You've never heard this freaking amazing song. So they can yesterday like the Beatles. Just somehow don't exist because something happens but like this one guy knows all the Beatles songs so he becomes super famous but like one. The premise is just based on the assumption that we all agree that the Beatles are the best and then also Beatles don't even slap like drake would still outsell the Beatles right now. I would rather see a yesterday remake where I wake up one morning and nobody knows who Fred durst it. Yeah you're like no but there is this really mediocre ramp from Tampa understand. Like if I think it would be great if like like people woke up and didn't know who was and then you're like I'm GonNa make all Connie songs but I'm not going to be weird. I'm just going to be really amazing. Really Nice and I'm just GonNa be a cool guy who makes the best songs ever. Here's the thing though I it wouldn't sell Connie's personalities what sells now. It's the music. Music is music sells the music in spite of his personality. Well this discussion for another podcast. Let's anyway I just WANNA say. The Beatles don't even slap if the Beatles if people gave if people cared what the Beatles sound like. Now this would be the biggest band in the world. Oh yeah they were like the biggest band in the world in nineteen ninety seven when my grandpa was in kindergarten. There right shot to the gallagher brothers anyway. The the Beatles brought with them hip songs of character and passion immediately taking the twenty fifth place on the top forty charts with their debut in nineteen sixty four Beatlemania swept the nation followed closely by other British bands such as the rolling stones the yardbirds and the WHO as well as the animals. I like saying that. Who the question. That's fun that's fun as Rolling Stone magazine. Not The band stated it was possible that much of Beatles initial success stateside could be attributed to the US needing a new figurehead to rest. Its youthful idealism. On it had previously rested on JFK until his assassination regardless of how the Beatles found their success. The British invasion that followed was the first excuse for mania from the youth since Elvis Presley or buddy holly can you imagine you know time is time is relative I guess and Cultural tastes irrelevant at the time. But like can you imagine people go just freaking eight it for Elvis? Yeah like imagine of twitter was around on. Elvis was big. You know I bet twitter. I bet like Elvis would have dropped end bomb in early for sure. Are you guys? Are you guys a bigger fan of the Beatles or Rolling Stone magazine? I'd say probably probably the Beatles. I've never actually read a rolling Stone magazine. Say It's right as far as publications. Go there all right. I feel like it's still a big deal though. Like you got the cover of rolling sound. That's like that's still in the only magazines where that'd be like really cool. I love to be on the cover of bone apetite. Yeah I scoffed at that but then I remembered that you're actually a great cook so that would actually be. You'd be right at home on the cover of bone apetite because you're a snack on. Yeah I WANNA see Joe in the bone petite kitchen just freaking going head to head with Bradley Leoni yet. Oh Yeah I've B- free but you guys you guys for sure. Yeah for sure. Canaan would be as frontier. His Bradley only loves knives. London had become a hotspot for some of the most intense forms of rock and Blues Music at the time. So funny funny. He's ended. It just sounds like okay. Many of these sounds over. There were heavily inspired by Louisiana Style Jazz and Blues I think there is some discussion to be had whether or not they were. Inspired or just completely ripping ripped him straight August like moby the thriving rhythm and blues scene gave birth to many other aficionados one of them being Mick Jagger and the rolling stones Stones kicked off their American debut with. I can't get no satisfaction in nineteen sixty five that song that Songs Dope. I will say I do like the rolling stones not not like a huge stones head. I don't know the deep cuts like when their stuff comes on the radio. When I'm driving along with my parents it is pretty good. I like yeah. I can't get this house. Action is just about being like so cool that yeah you can't even be satisfied and like you see like a guy wearing like the same sunglasses you and you're like. Oh Man Guy Circus. The British invasion lasted from one thousand. Nine hundred sixty four thousand nine hundred sixty seven but the invasion had a profound impact on helping internationalized music production as well as allow previously unknown bands to get their foot in the door and achieve unprecedented amounts of success. The British invasion could be seen as the Beginning of a generational gap as Rolling Stone magazine. Once again puts it quote American youngsters handgun crazy. They just woke up looked around and decided they all felt the same way about something that was important to them and this newfound solidarity was an exciting thing. So I mean this. This music was so far ahead of like what Their parents were used to at the time. Because like you gotta remember like kids who were listening to this music in the sixties you know. They were probably in their teens. Early twenties so their parents were probably listening to music. That was made in like thirty or their parents listening to stuff like that baby where they have a whole looking at baby. She's driving we're going to the prominent yesterday. I saw aeroplane just kidding. Planes aren't real. My my grandpa one of his favorite songs was this song called Granada but I can. I can already tell just by hearing that one song that he was probably not a huge rolling Stones Fan Rolling. Stones entered the scene with a unique blend of. Blues and rock. They created their own genre. Basically by mashing a whole bunch of other genres together early on they would even include a Sitar and a slide guitar to help create even more unique sound while their roots lied in the blues. The rolling stones were no stranger to experimenting in Psychedelic. Rock in nineteen sixty seven the album their satanic Majesties request was released filled with unheard of African rhythm sound effects weird string arrangements and so on. It was the first and last time. The stones decided to try their hand at Psychedelic Rock. But it still contributed to what would be the soundtrack to one of the wildest counterculture movements in American history. The HIPPIE counterculture boo movement in America was started in part by antiwar protests like the Vietnam Day March. We discussed in the last episode. In which the hells angels clashed with nonviolent protesters tearing down signs and PA equipment initially called beat Knicks term. Hippie came about when a human be in event took place in San Francisco in January of nineteen sixty seven around the time Hunter S. Thompson's Hell's angels book was published. The movement encouraged personal empowerment political decentralisation ecological awareness questioning authority and higher consciousness through the aid of psychedelic drugs. Basically it was a bunch of people getting together to encourage everything that their parents hated. But if there's one thing hippies loved more than anything it was getting together with like minded individuals. Smoking Sim Dube Stirs and Attending Large Music Festivals. Sounds like a bunch of rich kids you know. I think it is pretty interesting. How that kind of mindset was so prevalent Across the country without the use of the Internet You expect more stuff like this to be more common nowadays but it almost seems like less so like the Internet is allowed communities to stratifies so much deeper instead of really bringing one homogeneous mindset together which is both really cool. And I don't know yeah in the sixties like before the Internet there was a counterculture and I think like almost every decade can be Defined by like a look you know like you can do like hairstyles through the decades. But nowadays I feel like you can hardly even Define six months by a thing you now. Yeah it's pretty. I don't know how to feel about it like I don't WanNa be like old man who kids these days because that's so annoying but I don't know it's I wish there was more defining kind of thing. Maybe it's better that there is. I mean. We do have a global panic. Making everyone is stuck at their house right now. I know as far as trends go. Could we live in a very hip city used to seeing so many different ECLECTIC styles but like I could define a dude style in twenty tens like in the beard with like the Hitler League? Hitler Youth Haircut and You know a flannel and yeah tight skinny jeans. That's like the two thousand ten for sure. Makomo are really made that undercut pretty popular. When I was younger I thought it was gay because I could draw remember. That yeah wasn't yeah wasn't like thank God. I was because I could draw. I was gay but my uncles gay. And he's Okay. Skinnier skipping man. He's an advocate. Oh Man guys cool love. Whoever you know you don't feel like The hippy movement started in a good place like like it's it's all right to protest the Vietnam War because that was why we shouldn't have been But kinda got bastardized into this. Like hip thing N. P. The the message got lost somewhere in in absolute. Yeah yeah if there's no like leadership behind any movement than just GonNa fizzle out with people just smoke and fat deb's as he said James just in yeah field somewhere The most notable of these fields was the large was woodstock festival of nineteen sixty nine woodstock famous in history for being one of the most successful free music festivals of all time. The event was billed as a quote. Aquarian Exposition Man. Three days of peace newsy man. It attracted an estimated audience of over four hundred thousand people to a field in the middle of Bethel New York a town with a population of less than forty five hundred people. Can you imagine did it was it? Was it meant to be free though now? They're like oh we forgot to build. I guess it's free now. Why isn't anyone coming through the ticket? Line what happened to the system to many of the people who attended Woodstock concert was an opportunity to demonstrate to the world the ideals they had been preaching since the very beginning peace love and unity and while all would stock went fairly. Well it didn't exactly go off without a hitch. Rainy weather turned the fields into mud. Which was only a small set back to the carefree people high on acid. Who didn't really notice. I could tell you though. It was a huge concern for the people running electricity and audience. Joe Went to school for music production. So that's that coming out. A one notable character of woodstock was the amazingly named Mr Wavy gravy man Wavy gravy ran a commune down in New Mexico. His official title was the p the please chief of the please force he. He came to woodstock with the purpose of helping people who needed taken care of whether that was setting up a playground for children. Who are at Woodstock or watching over people who were freaking out on drugs. Having a bad trip his entire plan was to quote. We're going to try and be grooving. Spread that groovy tius through everybody man I mean. Don't worry man you're going to be okay. This guy's mourns slices man. Yeah I got an ice cream named after me. Yeah Chubby. Even what would your been? Jerry's be what flavor Mine would be like plants bemoaning So I think I'd still have the pistachio ice cream in there and then I would do like Madagascar Vanilla and then like raspberry and we shouldn't let Joe I Yeah I would just try to find a way to to introduce the flavors of pineapple and Ham pizza into an ice cream. Just no one absolutely. Does I had corn ice cream the other day it was great worn soft serve. Why the I'm sorry. I inner to interrupt this question with why corn ice-cream Sweet v Yeah actually makes it was the game corn soft serve. Then I got some butterscotch Rice krispies on top was a nice tree down with that charcoal ice cream. Much stuff is charcoal. The only time I want charcoals got a beast in you know what I mean. I know I don't know that means games. Overall Woodstock was a success. Despite the fact that they're only about a dozen security guards for the entire crowd of four hundred thousand people only two people died and both of them were accidents with no foul play. Suspected Guy I don't know the details of their death but I'm electrocution she. Sounds Pretty Likely There's also One of them was bad drugs to get on the loudspeaker and be like the Brown. Acid is bad or whatever oh Joseph's someone got run over by a dry factor in bad drugs. You wanted to say hi and ono nuts. He's hugging each hough. We'll be right back with more of this story but I from our sponsors Marquess Brownlee here Aka the bar. You're for second to tell you about my podcast way for him over the past decade. I've been reviewing all kinds of tech on youtube everything from smartphones to tablets to electric cars to headphones. Tv's and everything in between but even with over a thousand plus videos. I've always found. There's more to talk about so way. Form comes to you in the form of a show between myself and Co host Andrew Manganelli longtime member of the empty team where we discussed everything. We haven't had the chance to dive into in the videos. So we've pulled back the curtain and talk about how we look at new tech behind the scenes on actually making the videos will chat with fellow creators and guests and do mini reviews of pretty much anything with an on button. There's rants it's all on way for him so that sounds interesting to you. You can find us on spotify apple podcasts or anywhere he listen catch over there and try to man and bad drugs man one band that was not allowed to perform at woodstock however was the rolling stones But that was all right with them because they had other plans the rolling stones. We're going to do their own. Us Tour instead. That's cool in November of nineteen sixty nine. The Rolling Stones kicked off their twenty four date. Us Tour a tour widely considered to be nothing less than a rock and roll legend instead of playing shows for small venues and Half Book. Crowds like in their previous tours. The stones were now booking sold out frigging arenas baby who they up their production value using better amplifiers in hiring chipmunk the same guy who rigged the lights woodstock among the same guy. Who did the lights for Woodstock as their lighting designer chipmunk? That guy actually won a Tony. I think for his work at Woodstock. Wow well Tony's we're just for like musicals dude who's to say that woodstock wasn't a musical guys know that The Beatles only did like a couple of tours because they didn't have the amplifier technology to get louder than the screaming. So you couldn't you couldn't hear at their concerts because all the screaming Girl Inc Coin Eru inning the show. We're really flattered but you can't even hear music. These girls really do long stupid haircuts not so not such a great guy out of the public But plastic ono is a great album. Good low expense was spared on this core. They easily sold over one million dollars worth of tickets filling every seat in the house. The house being huge stricken arenas baby something interesting to note. During the second concert of the tour in Oakland one of the first ever live bootleg recordings was recorded of their show. Live over then you'll ever be but journalists in audiences were complaining about the overpriced tickets at a little over three dollars a piece so the stones decided to respond to this criticism by ending their tour with a free concert in San Francisco by the way three dollars back. Dan was on like twenty bucks to them. Which is like a freak and steal. Yeah that was the same thing that kid rock got like commended for was offering twenty dollar tickets for. That was pretty cool him. I'm not a huge fan of the kid rock but I think that's cool. The Rolling Stones Jefferson Airplane and the grateful dead all got together and decided that they wanted to host their very own woodstock for the west coast on man who comes up peace and love dude. I can just feel it. Nothing's GONNA go wrong. Yeah no bears are going to show up. The free concert was supposed to take place at San Jose State University at the practice field as a three day. Concert Festival had recently been held there with over fifty thousand attendees without any issue but the senators management informed the band that they were no longer interested in hosting and other event as they just weren't paying to deal with such a large turnout so after tearing through all the other alternatives the owner of ultimate raceway suggested to the band that the US his space. It's not uncommon for racetracks abuses. A concert venues even today like circuit of the Americas. It over there and Austin is a great concert place. The HOCKENHEIM ring over in Germany heard of that is always a huge show at the Hockenheim ring which I would love to go to. That'd be a me. Can you imagine seeing Hasselhoff at the Hockenheim Ring Dude? That's like a genius. Fave doing a cover of do Haass do Hasselhoff. The concert was set for December. Six thousand nine hundred sixty nine. Nice the hasty. Change OF LOCATION CAUSED ORGANIZATIONAL. Show one of the most critical elements that had to be figured out was the stage location typically. Yeah that's pretty important. Typically plays the stage on a raise platform to create a barrier between the musicians and the fans but ultimately everything was sort of the hobbled together. There wasn't really anyone in command at the event so things on the construction side ended up pretty quickly. Devolving into chaos. One of the biggest design oversights was stage placement like we said instead up high it was placed too low removing most of the barrier between the groups but the bans were going to have to make do as there wasn't any time until the event began people. Climbing up on stage was actually a really big issue at previous concerts. Turns out everyone wanted to grab a piece of Mick Jagger and I can probably guess which peace and it got to the point where some audience members would sometimes have to restrain other audience members to keep them from worming their way up onto the stage. There's a surprising number that what what kind of NARC AUDIENCE. Members are grabbing. Do don't go up there and touch his toes. Oh I fuck it do it. There's a surprising. Number of clips of Mick Jagger dancing his way around fans as they rushed him on stage earlier events. The presence of drugs only increase the multitude of these instances. I think like you know. Collaboration is important on big projects It's good to have everyone kind of giving input on what they think is the best course of action. That's one of the main tenants of donut. But I think one of the places that you don't want very loose leadership is when it comes to venue construction construction of any kind for that matter. Yeah you gotTa have someone who knows the vision of what they WanNa do and is willing to lead and make sure that happens and follows through with it. A tiny stage three feet above the crowd is not gonNa cut it. Yeah I feel you. I agree one hundred. The grateful dead and Jefferson. Airplane came up with a solution to the security issue since the police were not welcome to enter the event as the stones as well as other people in their vicinity had some drug charges against them. They didn't want to risk getting arrested. Jefferson airplane recommended that the stones higher the hells angels to act as event security for five hundred dollars worth of beer and front row seats to the show. The Hells Angels. Would Act as an informal security force to protect the band members from the expected crowd of only fifty thousand people? All the angels were expected to do with sit on the edge of the stage and prevent the quote groundlings from climbing up on the stage. And make sure that no one was You know getting a assaulted or murdered in the audience that was the the wording of it right of their contract. Make sure no one's getting murdered We're going to give you front row seats. No No. We'll give you a beard picture. Known Touches Mick. Jagger's big toe and make sure no one else gets murdered at literally. The only stipulation in your contract just make sure no one gets murdered right. No one gets murdered. Yeah why you keep saying yeah. Yeah yeah no one gets murdered. I don't know what the emphasis has. Yeah no one okay. Not a single person gets murdered. Okay it seems like you're being I don't understand yeah I am. Here's here all right. Let me give really really drunk. And then nobody's GonNa get hurt her. The concert began on Thursday December. Six nineteen sixty nine by the time. The stones arrived to the venue. There's already a foul and toxic mood in the air There's already been one death. The event one fan. Who IS Rolling on LSD DROWNED IN IRRIGATION CANAL. Making his way from his car to the field so not a good start And as soon as their helicopter touchdown an audience member charged the band punching Josh Harden. I hate you that's insane. That is insane. The hippies are just full man. The concert was out of control before it had even begun and frankly they should have called it quits right there. As three hundred thousand people poured into Altamont speedway people were having bad trips and going crazy in the crowd fights breaking out with or without the hells angels. The short setup time meant that the amenities for the crowd were severely lacking as well There was little in regards to food and water as well as toilets They did however have a quote lost children department located behind the stage. In case you lost your kid so yeah there. What the no running water. It was much like woodstock in that way whereas completely unprepared underprepared and You know I think when they said they wanted to have woodstock in the west coast that that was like a monkey's paw curled down you know because they're getting all the bad stuff. None of the good stuff is the same problems that they ran into woodstock too. It's like they had no excuse because they would stock. It already happened. They should have learned from it. Plus it's only fifty thousand people and not four hundred thousand people. Yeah but way too. Many people showed up. You know so. Three hundred thousand three hundred thousand people man. So yeah sixty cents. The exact same thing. That happened yeah. People were high on acid everywhere to the point where they had designated cooldown areas. If you're having a bad trip opium was also very present and so was the dupage itself Mr Pot Pot. People would just sit on busy. Walkways and shout out what kind of drugs they were selling. Some people took this as an opportunity to ask for donations to certain organizations including the Panther Defense Fund which went towards funding. The legal defense of people involved in the Black Panther Organization while they were plenty of people. They're having a good time. What was witnessed was a shocking lack of regard for the entire peace in love aspects that the counterculture movement had been pushing as. I think. This is where we're seeing it. It's just like the the the concepts of lost all meaning at this point and people. Are there just a party. You know as some say that. That's the whole. Yeah that's the whole point of the whole quote Unquote Movement. As soon as Carlos. Santana started his set. A fight broke out on stage that forced him to stop everything until it was resolved soon after guy stripped off all his clothes and tried climbing up on stage with the band. Only to be met by our buddies. The hells angels. The angels were hired to keep Rowdy people off the stage and they came prepared to do just that most notable weapon they came with were weighted. Pull clues a pull. He's not enough. Got Add some weights to it. There's a bad store down the road. No WE GONNA pook US. And they're gonNA be heavier than normal people talking about a baseball bat. Yeah these are pool. Is there longer and less heavy. That's why we got an ad more wheel. You don't play with baseball. Bats in a bar in bars is the kind of places that we likes to go. They would also use the tools that you know you know they would also use They would also use motorcycle chains and beer cans. Motorcycle chains are cool when we got stuck in the parking lot in the first season of high low found motorcycle chain on the ground and I played with it for about four hours. But I thought I was like pretending is cool. Yeah I mean I think we mentioned it in previous episodes. The hells angels would often wear motorcycle chains as a belt in a way and you know it served two functions. Keep your pants up. And it was a easily concealable weapon and you know it's just a cool look at some point. During Jefferson airplane set. Things started getting even more out of hand. Another man began crowd surfing his way up to the stage. Though to be honest in their cording seem like he has crowd. Surfing is more or less just being tossed around between a bunch of people who want nothing to do with them until or his stinky bear but until he made his way all up the stages. Soon that'd be disgusting did Yeah Dude some guys get so sweaty as it is. I don't want some naked guy floating on top of me with the ball down big sweaty at just off as soon as you reach a stage a hells angels. Member grabbed him by the neck and threw him back into the crowd after smashing him in the face with a pool cue one of the singers of Jefferson airplane. Marty Ballon took offence to the way the angels retreating them cursing at a nearby Angel onstage. Paul Habits an angel known as animal was wearing a Fox head hat. Of course not want to be insulted habits immediately deck Martin Balance Knocking him unconscious when he came to. He cursed it habits again. Who knocked him out for a second time. Grace Slick. The lead singer of Jefferson airplane instructed the audience that you need to keep your body's off of each other unless you intend love sorry just that sentence I get. Why people don't like hippies now. And then they went in ruined the whole planet. I don't know I think I've I've been to naive. This hippies of the reason that none of us will ever be able to buy a house damp at a concert. There is a distinct class system in play Speaking of classes you have your musicians and you have your audience. The musicians are typically untouchable. They can really do no wrong and if they do. You can't do anything about it inhibits at Tim but inhibits attacked. Martin Belan that sent the entire audience. The message that the sacred class system had been broken. The musicians were now fair. Game and potential targets to the violence incited by the angels. The audience was afraid of the Angels. But they wouldn't say it out loud because they were afraid they would be next on the hitlist safe to say. The VIBE was off man. Once the violence appeared to be getting out of control. The grateful dead made the decision to pull the plug and leave the concert returning to San Francisco without playing and that was probably the safest decision they could've made but it left a seventy five minute gap until the rolling stones would take the stage as people just getting drunker and drunker and gets hotter and hotter. I I can truly not imagine a more uncomfortable place to be than at that concert but this all going down the sounds awful. Yeah we gotTa Race Jar. We used to go to raise tracks a lot for work and Just like in a normal situation like they're fun but it's a pretty miserable place like it's Especially in California. They're all kind of like I mean is ultimate like just dusty and it's out in the middle and hot and this was in December so it was actually pretty cold. Oh it was. It wasn't hot. It was the opposite direction. It was too yeah Still just like no no shade anywhere. Yeah just out of big dusty field. Yeah I mean they build racetracks in places that aren't close to where people live so you can kind of you can be loud so you're just out in the middle of nowhere in the most desolate places and now you're just surrounded by three hundred thousand people high after acts and Just sucked so many people does alternate raceway still exists. Are there still races there actually? It was open until I think two thousand eight. It was open for a long time and it it it would host a lot of like lower level NASCAR series events. Because it was a half mile oval so to be a nascar you have to be at least a mile long now. In the modern age lower level classes with would raise their as the sun began to set and the temperature started to cool. It finally dawned on the audience that this would not be the West Coast Woodstock. They were promised I think when Mick Jagger got punched in the face that would be my at this would i. That wasn't very peace. And love of your brew. The hells angels rode their bikes in a parade through the crowd to make a path for the rolling stones which probably looked coolish when the when the stones got onstage. They didn't really get on stage over two hundred people swarmed onto the ramshackle scaffolding being only three feet higher than the ground at the bottom of a slope People were sort of naturally pushed onto the stage as crowds began squeezing together to see the performance or after a few minutes of begging people to exit the stage. The stones finally started their set as soon as they started with their songs sympathy for the devil. A fight erupted in the front. Rows Mick Jagger responded to the fight by saying something something phonies always happen when we start their number Shimmy shimmy shaky he does a little shaky biblical John Laney's story about Mick Jagger. Writing writing sketches with him on how he would he would pitch them an idea and Mick Jagger would like sit there with his arms crossed. As the settlers continued sewed the fighting most the fights appear to be in response to the angels picking them with people in the front row so people started pulling down. Amps. The hells angels. Were dancing in the crowd as well as well as fighting with fans trying to get on stage. I don't really think it's fighting if people are trying to get onstage in the hells angels are there to be security. I'm just going to say that they're doing their job. Fans should not be getting on stage and at some point a random dog wandered its way onstage with the band. During one of the skirmishes Jagger pause the performance to say quote although no it happened. Couldn't see you or to to which. The crowd sarcastically responded. Now thanks to the Angels Angels Angels. They also this name. Isn't that what they said? Dodger Stadium New van Damme. Then Anthony. Are they angels dodgers rivals no know who the NFL in the same league? Oh the angels and Padres. They seldom play each other. There's a thing called the interstate series where they play each other. But that's pretty rare but it's I mean I don't know I feel like La's rival is the giants starnes for sure. La in San Fran kind of hate each other. Yeah for no reason really. I think it's mostly San Fran hating on La like we. Don't we love going up there and spending the weekend up in San Fran and I feel like when people find out that you're from L. A. It's like always like a drop in like. Oh you're from you're from La I'm from San Francisco. I pay five time but really up but really from Stockton but really. I'm from Walnut Creek. It's like no Walnut Creek. I think what it has to do just now realizing this. I think a lot of people from out of state move to Los Angeles and a lot of people in California. When they moved to a big city they a lot of them. Go to San Francisco. I think that might have something to do with it Interesting yeah like I only know like three people from my hometown. That moved to so cal. Everyone else all like. Most of my friends actually moved up to the bay area. I think that's I think that's coming from a small town like la at least in the mid West has connotation of being like this huge unmanageable city. When in reality it's like spread out and there's a bunch of neighborhoods and it's actually very chill but coming from a small town. It seems very intimidating and San Francisco for some reason doesn't seem that intimidating where in reality opposite so expensive. Yeah yeah same in the bay area's way more cramped numbers yeah. La We'll get back more. Pass gas right now over. It must sponsors. A documentary crew had been following the rolling stones throughout their live tour and happened to be recording the entire experience at Altamont raceway. You can see a lot of this footage in the nineteen seventy documentary. GimMe shelter the footage. Shows that in most of the fights that took place in the crowd at least one hells angel can be spotted again though. I'm not sure if it's fighting if they're doing the job at one point. A member of the club walked up to Mick Jagger and whispered something in his ear jagger just sort of stood in place afterwards staring at a certain portion of the crowd and shaking us shaking his head slowly from side to side and disapproval of everything that was happening despite repeating league begging the crowd to stop by asking people who saw in for will come home she shimmy. Shimmy shake shake. The fights continued. Oh Ronnie Scheider. The business manager of the stones at the time said quote a when I was up on the stage. I wondered if we would get out alive. It was frightening on that level. Just a sea of you know dirty hippies and then on the other side with the hells angels. At one point Mick Jagger decided the best way to keep the peace was to have everyone sit down on the ground so they could keep him Mojo Shamin baby yes baby baby keep my Mojo Maggio's missing baby so the audience kicked down some of hells angels bikes and use them as impromptu seats which as we learned in the last episode was not a successful wager for peace yet. Their bikes were there. Muslim in their bikes. Were their bikes. Were near the end of the song. Under my thumb one audience member an eighteen year. Old African American named Meredith Hunter decided to climb onto one of the speakers near the stage. Four Hells Angels. Members confronted him and threw him back into the crowd and beat him enraged and so high he could barely walk as his girlfriend testified. He pulled out a long barrel twenty two caliber revolver. He had brought with them. Surprisingly Meredith motive to carry was pretty reasonable he carried the gun for protection against any racists who might try something this was the sixties after all. And it's still the now I mean it's exactly the same now. Yeah I don't I don't really I. Don't blame meredith for carrying a gun him in at all almost immediately after drawing weapon. Hells Angels Allen. Pissarro charged him with a knife and stabbed multiple times in the upper back in once behind the year as hundred laid on the ground. He reportedly said I wasn't gonNA shoot but it was too late. Other members reportedly stomped on hunter and beat him with a trash can lid while he was on the ground. The head of medical services at the event said that his wounds were so severe that even if he had been stabbed in an operating room he likely still would've died. He was pronounced dead at six twenty. Pm At the concert overall four people died at the ultimate speedway free concert but also four people were born there too one death due to accidental drowning. One due to a stabbing by the hells angels member and to do to car accident. How do you get in a car? Accident Firkin parking lot at a racetrack. Apparently Keith Richards threat to those cuts plug. Who'll we won't play hadn't persuaded the audience. Well enough people reported seeing people get trampled and attacked the crowd. Angels pulling people off the stage by their hair and targeted attacks using weighted pool cues sharpen bike spokes and bike chains. I don't know man it's also it's so sad and so needless at the same time they shouldn't have had this concer. Nia One hundred percent you know. I wonder it's I mean just watching that woodstock documentary and they realize like. Oh like we're not prepared at all. We have to divert our all of our attention towards either building fences or building stage or getting food. You can't at least at this point you can't just send an email to everyone who bought a ticket like you have to just go with it because three hundred thousand people are gonNA show up regardless and you have to make it the least dangerous thing possible which is like. I understand like going through with it because there would have been so many people just angry that the concert wasn't going on. I bet there would have been more deaths. There probably would have been like an all out riot if they would have been like. Yeah we're not playing. That guy. Punched me in the face and city hated me. Over fifty years later the ultimate free concert is still considered one of the most disastrous moments in rock and has become a symbol for the death of the innocence of the sixties. It was the end of the HIPPIE era in America. It also was a huge. Pr Blow the Hells Angels. Who are still enjoying fame as America's favorite bad boys but after the death of Meredith Hunter Perception of the club shifted to nothing more than an organized group of violent thugs who were just looking for a reason to hurt someone the release of the documentary of the event. GimME shelter only further. That image painting the band members as the victims. But let's be real every party. Who insisted on keeping out among going was to blame so the question remains why. Hire the hells angels in the first place. It makes sense to want the police. At Your drug-fuelled Bonanza but surely there were other choices for security when you take into consideration the stones familiarity with the hells angels. It becomes clear why they would consider them the rolling stones. Were aware of the hells angels. But the English chapters of the Club at the time. We're way less aggressive than their stateside counterparts. So the band didn't exactly know what they were signing up for as Joel Salvin author of the book. Ultimo the rolling stones the hells angels and the Inside Story of rocks Darkest Day put it. The hippies never expected this kind of violence from the angels and had no idea what to do about it. The angels on the other hand were quite aware that they were badly outnumbered and knew they could only hope to rule through intimidation looking back at what went wrong and outsmart most people blame the hells angels and while the presence of the hells angels definitely added attention in the air. That wasn't there. At Woodstock ultimate outcome was more similar to woodstock in more ways than it wasn't woodstock was violent. It was only a free concert because when the fan showed up they tore down the fences and burnt down the ticket and concession boost because they didn't believe in prices Man Really Woodstock started with United Act of violence but what kept it from spiraling downhill was the lack of an external menacing force. Such as the hells angels having the Hells Angels. They're probably didn't help. But also you know having to do security for three hundred thousand people was also. I get why they didn't want to sound like I'm too much of an apologist. Obviously if you saw the woodstock documentary the police force and Wavy gravy like they were handling it and they were like you know doing drugs but they were also handling doing their job. And I feel like the hells angels. Were like leads in Bharti. That's the difference is like the police forces like. Oh Yeah I guess. They're trying to keep things under control. They're still cool though whereas hells angels. Were like immediately heads and immediately getting drunk and kind of just partying more than taking their job. Seriously the twenty one old hells angel. Alan sorrow was tried for the murder of Meredith Hunter. In one thousand nine hundred seventy one. he was found innocent. Though on the ground self-defence Hunter Meredith. Did have a gun. After all he was found innocent of the act of murder as the stab wounds that killed hunter came from a lower handed knife stroke and sorrow stabbed with an overhand in one thousand. Nine hundred five star was found drowned in a river a death that some investigators labeled as quote pretty suspicious. But there's no proof that it was a revenge killing. I'm probably just GONNA bet that it probably I mean. I don't have any evidence to suggest this but I don't think it was a probably not related guilty or not in court. It didn't matter as the jury of public opinion was convinced. Any favor gained with events like the skip workman. Cbc INTERVIEW. Two years earlier had been completely dismantled. And the hells angels were solidified as America's boogeyman once more overnight and while the angels were certainly not completely innocent for their actions that day at altamont people kept their blamed pinned on the angels for years. It wasn't until recently that people have gone back to look at the factors surrounding the entire event and reassess that perhaps the angels weren't only villains in office in fact the rolling stones have never really publicly acknowledged the incident in a radio interview after the Concert Sam Cutler. One of the event organizers said if quote if people didn't dig it. I'm sorry which is kind of callous irresponsible to say the Gimme. Shelter Documentary was somewhat flawed viewpoint execution with a heavy bias towards the stones. Here's what Hell's Angel President Sonny. Barger had to say in response in a nineteen sixty nine radio interview after the incident. I didn't go there to police. Nothing man I ain't no cop I never gonNA ever pretend. To be a cop this jagger he puts it all on the angels man like he used us for Dukes men and as far as I'm concerned we were the biggest suckers for that idiot that I could ever see and you know what they told me. I could sit on the stage so no one would climb over me. I drink beer until the show is over. And that's what I went there to do. But you know what when? They started messing over our bikes. They started it so obviously. The angels took great offence to people knocking over the motorcycles to us as they should. And as we've discussed yeah I think that's totally reasonable. And as we've discussed their motorcycles so close to the stage they wrote him up and he used it as a in the back now they used it as a as a two part to see. Remember to serve out the rolling stones just parking on the bat. We had this like BITCON party a couple years ago and we had these really nice cars parked outside and like all these like teenagers were leaning on them and trying to climb up on them like people don't have respect for stuff absolutely not. I remember that now that was so mad as we've discussed in the past you mess with angels Bryk. You're messing with his life. Said he says sunny later says in the interview that he loves his bike more than anything else in the world and when those stone hippies knocked over his motorcycle it was it was on as far as the angels were concerned. The impact on the hells angels from the entire. Altamont incident is still being paid for. The public was truly afraid of the angels. This shift in public opinion obviously increase tensions between the population but it would especially introduced more complications with the police. The hells angels had turned off the public and it would have to suffer the consequences for years to come and that's what will get into next time on passed gas. Sorry if I come office anti hells angels. I I WANNA be impartial as possible. But maybe it is the concert promoters like don't hire these rough dudes to like be security. Maybe they're trying to take a cue from what happened at Woodstock but that was like you wavy gravy and his communist like coming from a real place of love and I feel like you give these dudes any kind of like authority and beer and something more than anything. They were unqualified and then it went to like. They don't know what to do. There weren't enough of They had planned for fifty thousand people to come and three hundred thousand people came so I just think more than anything? It's just being naive. Yes absolutely that has been part for our hell's angels series. We're going to conclude next week. We're going to look into more contemporary events in. Hells Angels History. See whether today because the club has changed a lot since altamont But it still keeps that that image. So we're going to see what's going on with them. I WanNa thank you guys for listening so much I love doing the podcast and I'm just so happy that you guys are here with us. Thank you very much If you don't already go follow our Youtube Channel. Don't it media and we also have the podcast on its own channel called DONUT podcasts Follow donut across social media. Keep up to date on everything that we're doing we've got tons of stuff coming up at Donna. A media pretty much everywhere. Follow me on Instagram and twitter at Chinese pump. Free Nolan Nolan. J Sykes followed Joe at Joji Weber. That's a really good way to Catch some potential leaks. If there's anything about me my boys we love Lincoln Yeah Thanks so much for listening maybe lease review down below support all of our sponsors and you behind it.

Hells Angels woodstock Mick Jagger Beatles San Francisco Americas Meredith Hunter Rolling Stone magazine Angels Angels Angels Joe Woodstock Festival US Jefferson airplane Mr James Palm Frey California Hunter Meredith craigslist Chevy Rolling Stones Jefferson Airpl Bradley Leoni
Through the eyes of Annie Leibovitz

The Frame

25:39 min | 1 year ago

Through the eyes of Annie Leibovitz

"From the Mon broadcast center at KP. See see this is the frame, I'm John horn on today's show what the cancellation of Pearvel shows on Netflix might mean for the future of the TV business then from antiwar demonstrations to Arnold Schwarzenegger, riding horseback. Any Vits has photographed at all we walked through a new exhibit of her early work was not a good photojournaling. So I was going to have to tell more my story from my point of view and left journalism behind eventually turned to portraiture because it was a way of having real licensed to do what you wanted in a photograph and the country swing band asleep at the wheel is still rolling along fifty years after its founding all that coming up on the frame. With so many new players jumping into the streaming game including Disney, apple and Warner media. Twenty nineteen is likely to bring some big changes to the TV business. We called up Daniel Feinberg a TV critic for the Hollywood reporter to talk about what the future could look like to TV viewers. He's just finished covering two weeks of presentations from broadcast networks cable channels and streaming services at the television critics association meetings. We started with the news from earlier this week that net flicks. His canceling Jessica Jones and the punisher to marvel shows which not coincidentally are also Disney properties. There is no question that we are on the brink of some sort of key transition point. And regardless of what you choose to call it, whether you want to call it these streaming wars or the road to new cable, or whatever you wanted describe it as there are things that are changing that are going to dramatically reshape what the media landscape look. In five years in the same way that five years ago, it looked completely different. And I think that there's no question that the cancellation of the marvel shows on Netflix is a. Assign a gesture in a certain direction because these were very high profile shows for Netflix when they premiered and they were part of a big programming strategy. And now, suddenly all of the marvel properties are really part of aid Disney, plus or a Disney marvel streaming strategy, and so they don't fit with Netflix anymore. And I think that you're gonna see something with the tug of war over something like friends, I think that we are only at the beginning of what is going to be probably the biggest story in where television is going in the next year and a half probably. And that is basically that the people who create those shows used to see companies like Netflix as a source of ancillary revenue and now they see streaming services as direct competitors. So they're trying to pull their content back at their launching their own streaming services. Is that the bigger picture here? I think that is definitely the bigger picture. And all of the things that the Netflix and Hulu have kind of taken for granted as the foundation of their. Business model, you know, the for whatever we want to say about the apparently twelve billion dollars that Netflix last year poured into original programming acquired content is still a major portion of what people actually stream on Netflix. Whether it's whether it's friends, whether it's the office, whether it's all of the CW shows, and that's great for Netflix because it allows net flicks to have that kind of foundation, but it, but it's also a business that the people who actually own those programs want to be in. And so is Netflix original programming is it enough if suddenly the studio start taking away all of their prestige programs. Yeah. I don't know. Let's talk about a couple of new programs one that's on Netflix. It's called Russian doll and one on Hulu called Penn. Fifteen. These are shows that seem to be getting a lot of attention. Are they worth checking out? And how are they doing so far? I think they're absolutely were checking out, and I think we had absolutely no idea how either one of them is doing. Let's look says not put out a press release boasting that forty million people in some form or another have watched Russian doll. So I don't know all I know is that it's a really good show. It's a really smart show. It's a show that plays around with with format and with tone, and with style in very impressive ways. So Russian dolls. Definitely we're checking out, and I think Penn fifteen on Hulu is is a lot of fun to gimmick is the two co creators are basically playing junior high versions of themselves. Devil dis her last night at camp. How was even possible? I don't know what happened in the middle of her sleep. That's so unfair that happens to me surrounded by actual preteen and teen actors, and it's it's a really good show about the awkwardness of being a teenager. That's maybe aimed at older viewers who survived those years. I wanna talk about a couple of other shows that might be worth talking about FOX has a series called proven innocent pop has a series called flack and DC universe has a series called doom patrol or any of those shows are other things that you've seen jumping out in terms of midseason or early start shows that are coming out either. Now, or very soon one of the shows that if you've watched any BC in the past couple of weeks, and you're going to see as we move towards the Oscars this weekend that is getting a lot of buzz for ABC as whiskey cavalier whiskey cavalier. One of our best agents. I intelligence proven to be a huge asset to the bureau. You and your fiance recently parted ways. Yes, we did mutual most commercial, but I'm totally fine with it. We have the footage. How? It's a show that I would say succeeds at its goals, and that's something that I wouldn't necessarily say about say proven innocent, which is a very very run of the mill entirely forgettable legal procedural at the very least whiskey cavalier is pretty people Scott fully and learn Cohen or the stars are attractive and fun. And they're having a good time. It was shot in Europe. And it makes actual good use of European locations. It's got all of the depth of a very very shallow puddle. But on the other hand, it's fun. And it's the same with with DC universe is doomed patrol, which is kind of quirky kind of odd and of vast improvement over DC universe's, I live action show which was titans, which was all gloomy and glum and unpleasant. So there's something to be said for improvement one of the other things that happens at the as is that critics get sneak peeks, maybe it's some footage. Maybe it's a pilot of a show. That's not going to be on for a couple of months. Is there anything that you and your colleagues? Saw that might not be coming out immediately. But that you're really interested in seeing what more there is the series. Well, I definitely can't review. The one episode I've seen of FX Fosse Verdon, but I can tell you that that show which starts Sam Rockwell, and Michelle Williams is definitely going to be worth one that I'm looking forward to checking out. It's the story of Bob Fosse, Gwen Verdon. And so there's a lot of fifty sixty seventies cinematic, and Broadway and musical references and dancing and choreography. And I'm not gonna say anything more than I'm looking forward to seeing more episodes. Daniel Feinberg is a TV critic for the Hollywood reporter. He is also the president of the television critics association Daniel, thanks for your time and your insight. Thank you for having me. Coming up on the frame, any leave of its walks through an exhibit of her early work. Think of any pop culture icon from the past fifty years, and they've probably been photographed by Annie liebowitz, although much of her background is in reportage storytelling through photography. She's known best for her portraits and cover photos for Rolling Stone and Vanity Fair, she's photographed musicians actors poets and politicians alike from John Lennon to Meryl Streep to Richard Nixon. She was even spotted at a recent Beto Aurora rally. Now her early work is on display at Hauser and Wirth gallery in the arts district of downtown LA. The show is called any leave of it's the early years nineteen seventy to nineteen Eighty-three archive project number one, and it chronicles her work at Rolling Stone magazine and her transformation from a photo journalist to a portrait photographer. I took a walk through the exhibition with leave of its last week. And we started with a nineteen seventy antiwar demonstration where she'd taken pictures of Alan. Ginsburg and Eldridge cleaver. She was studying painting at the San Francisco Art Institute at the time. And I asked her how she went from paintbrushes to cameras I took a night class in photography and just found a photography as a young person so much more gratifying and immediate and it just felt right? And the people were a lot friendlier in the in the in the photo department, and then the painting the painting was pretty abstract and pretty angry. You know, it was the Vietnam war and the school was on the GI Bill. Of course, there were a lot of soldiers coming to going to school and a lot of drunk teachers, and it was a little scary for seventeen eighteen year old kid. And so the camera was very grounding every novelist can probably remember the first piece of writing that he or she sold every actor. Can remember the first part that they got paid for is there an image in this room that you can remember being one of the? I that you got paid for and which one I did not paid much. That's for sure it doesn't matter. But actually, it was not for free Rolling Stone. The breakthrough moment was really this work that I did at this rally in San Francisco is anti-war rally this one here. This actually was a cover of Rolling Stone. The my first cover of Rolling Stone. Well, I know where this is the university of California Berkeley. That's right. That's right. What really was impressed. With is. This happened the day before I went back to the school the day of the demonstration process, the film printed it and brought it into Rolling Stone the next day. And they were so impressed that because it was a very young magazine. It was a fold up rag paper. And so they just started giving me work to do. And and then I talked my way into going to New York with yon winter. He wanted to do an interview with John Lennon about the break up of the Beatles. And they were really special. Johny yoko. They couldn't believe Jahn brought young winner brought a kid to have their picture, and they were impressed with that with yawn. I think and they gave me carte blanche. It was a really important because it was set the precedent for what I expected how to be treated from then on out. I think what a lot of people don't remember from that era. It's not just Rolling Stone. But look in life magazine were seriously committed to photography, they would commission photographers, they really embraced photography as a form of journalism, and they gave photographers a lot of leeway to do what they wanted to do. And you were really in the right place at the right time in many ways that was certainly some of the photography that I admired so much. Listen, I want it to be a photojournalist. You know, when I started working for Rolling Stone. I wanted to leave behind the fine art work. I was not a good photojournalist. So I was going to have to tell more more my story from my point of view and left journalism behind an. Eventually turn to portraiture because it was a way of sort of having real licensed to do what you wanted in a photograph and not worry about crossing over to the other side. When I look at these pictures, there is a candor to them that seems like a relic that in some ways the way that celebrities or anybody controls his or her own image right now is so tightly choreographed. Yeah. You can't like you were I don't know if you just kind of embedded yourself. So they forgot about you. How did you get this kind of access because the world was different? But also have a feeling you had a way to make yourself disappear into their world. You know, I it really it was a different time and people were more open to just you know, letting you be there. I mean things are much more control now, and I'm trying to bring back the photo essay now, and it's really hard because just for that kind of thing. I did a cover story on Lena wait for Vanity Fair. And. I just told her what I wanted to do. And she said, okay. But that's rare. I mean, I just kind of hung in her house while she worked in Rhode and took a few pictures and went in and out. I mean, it's it's not like there for twenty four hours. We just go in and out of someone's life. I'm trying to incorporate some of that with people who will give us that. I just worked on a on a politician that that I had that kind of access that'd be better work. I can't say. Poker faces. I wanna play a good game. What is it about politicians that is unusual or interesting that maybe you don't find in celebrities? Well, my day in in the early work. They really had no idea about. What it was like to be photographed what it meant like they were just kind of like they had no idea. What what anything was? And and it was kind of like a free for all you could really just. I mean here you're seeing them Nixon resignation. But you know, it wasn't so locked up. You know, now like any well known person, it's hard to get this kind of access one of the things I love about some of these pictures like the resignation of Nixon. I shall resign the presidency effective at noon tomorrow. My recollection is you took all these pictures. And I want to say was hunters Thompson who is supposed to file the copy. And he messed his deadline. That's the story. And so you just ran photos because there was no copy. It didn't make deadline. He was at the Washington Hilton by the pool with a battery powered television set. And so we leave in good spirit, and with deep humility and t- never made it over there for for Nixon going off and Rolling Stone had held open like eight to twelve pages waiting for story to file and they ended up taking my pictures, just blowing them up. So is the first time Rolling Stone really use photography at you know, in a big way we're talking with any liba. It's about her show that early years nineteen seventy to nineteen Eighty-three archive project number one. How do you move from being a photo journalist to somebody who takes portrait's is? There are natural evolution as something. You learn in report Taj that you can do in portraiture, I think that's one of the sub stories in this show is is that you you get to see that you get to see this kind of sketching that think what I said, I was became a portrait photographer. I think doing the covers in the magazine is sort of pin you down to doing a moment with with your subject. And and I wanted them to be very good photographs and they became good portrait's. And they, but they were totally fed by by these pictures. Well, let's talk about what we're looking at. We're looking at a wall of pictures that are taken during a Rolling Stones tour backstage onstage hotel rooms. Well, let's let's put this in context in ninety seventy two. Robert Frank was the tour. He did film. Chris blues for the Rolling Stones. And you know, I went to two or three cities on that tour. Truman Capote was supposed to be writing. Something for rolling sound never didn't make. He didn't make deadline. Right. Exactly. So I went to two or three cities, and I got to watch Robert Frank work. So in seventy five when Mick Jagger said would you be photographer? I was on board. I really wanted to do it. And I didn't know what I was walking into still very nice. I took my tennis racket with me thinking I was going to anyway, but it was twenty seven cities. And again, I think the underlying story in this show or this work with is headed is what it means to be young photographer and out there and taking pictures now, this you can see it in the earlier work that I thought that if you just become part of what's going on. You can take the best pictures and this almost kill me. I really was almost the death of me because I was really in over my head. And it took me a long time to get off the tour people said, oh, how is the concert? I never heard the concert. I didn't hear the music. I was so concentrating on taking the picture so much. I I never, you know. You know? And then I'll you're at the mercy ETA whoever's in the lighting, and they're all on drugs and his. Whatever I mean, I was just last question. I was talking on the way over here about a novelist. I know who said it's very hard for him to read something that he wrote even a year or two ago because he sees his mistakes and his development. Are you self critical that way as well? Do you look back at early pictures and say I should have done it differently. Or are you really pictures? I mean every day, you know, I was very lucky I had be a fighter as as. An art director of her few years and she had worked at Rolling Stone. And MS and a shoes, you know, this very famous art director from Harper's bazaar. She told me early on that the way you are going to to learn of what to do to go forward is you have to look back, and I took that pretty pretty seriously. And I all along the way I worked on edits, and my work and and done books and stopped at some point the first first one was nine hundred seventy nine hundred ninety twenty years of work. And I went back and looked to the work, and I saw then this work. And I said, oh my gosh. This is really interesting this repechage, you know, it's like I realized what I had sort of lost. You know that I wasn't doing that anymore. Couldn't go back to completely. But you can learn from anything come on the show is great. Thank you, very. Anti LeBron bits exhibit is at the house Ron worth gallery through April fourteenth coming up on the frame. The venerable country swing band asleep at the wheel hits the half century. Mark. Asleep at the wheel has been making country. Western swing music for nearly fifty years at this point. They've carried on a tradition which started in the nineteen thirties longer than the genres creator. Bob, wills the king of western swing? Mary back asleep at the wheel founder Ray Benson. And the band's fiddler and singer Katie shore visited the frame recently to talk about the band's latest album. It's called new routes. It features originals written by both shore and Benson as well. As a few cover songs by guy Clark and Johnny cash unifying. It all is a love for the foundations of American music. My name's Katie short. I'm the female vocalist in fiddle player. I leap at the wheel Benson. And I've lived has been for forty eight years down, so strange paths. With a heart of gold in ways of gentlemen, until the cat is nineteen sixty nine. College and was film director and then decided to play music, I've always played meetings. A child performing played folk music rock and roll jazz. But anything. And I said I wanna start a a American roots. And it plays the music seems to be forgot. Their self thirties forties inspiration on the western side, Bob wills, and it takes playboys and many others mulligan, and then but save deals morphed into over the years has been a fiddle based swing. Here is one of the fillers. And mouth of Trump. And so. I guess my first fiddle contest was probably when I was seven years old and growing up in Texas, my Granddad played the fiddle and used to play for us at home, and I really loved it. And so there was a fiddle community in Fort Worth. And the contest was a part of it. I want one in sixteen when probably will the cabbage down. Spindles all the wall cavity brother place, Ville two. So it was just you and your brother both ways. I started a little before him, but are fiddle playing is rooted in those tunes more than anything. You. Learn redwing me learn milk cow blues, you know, starting off on the fiddle. There's a lot of the crossover from the western swing that ends up in those tunes that you learned for the fiddle contests as well, if you're friendly gang what weighing and time to ride that transcribe musical trail with Bob wills and the Texas playboys an era the Texas playboys on the Lone Star rag. Funny story that I've told it's not funny that met Bob wills. We went up to Dallas to meet him. He was making a record called for the last time. Wheelchair and we walked in studio. And they said wheels is the wheel, and he was really really ill. They say he's very tired. We're taking him back to his motel, and you can talk to tomorrow, they took him to his motel, and he had a stroke and McComb and two years later, we're playing the Longhorn ballroom, which was the Bob wheels ranch house in Dallas. And he died that day. All I care about for a sleep wheels. That what we on on a record is good material done. Well, well, it was was in Austin. The chilly part. Man, dub, pardon and not caring where? I like this music when I was nineteen and it wasn't. What was cool. I just think there's always saying the population that is attracted to different than mainstream music, and this we're certainly a unique band. I think the music in, you know, even though we're this record is a little bit of an evolution of some of that, you know, a little more eclectic as far as roots go. But I think that not only does the music speak for it self. But I think there's band is younger these days, and I think that people are age that see that they're really taking it seriously. And I think that just having good energy is what's attractive, maybe the most and this music is fun and let hardy she just turned thirty. When I started the ban in nineteen seventy started recruiting players. I could not find a fiddle player of my age. Now, I am the luckiest guy because I get the fine fine fiddle players when I was looking for the singer I had a little club in Austin. And I was looking on YouTube because sometimes it post, but was on stage. I'm back again in this lady ten she had a gig didn't pay much. Did it? I'm not sure I made any money guys. I saw it went up to the oh who is this girl? 'cause there's a equality to voice that is in between, Billie holiday wish wing center voice. And she picked up the film, and I was like oh, gosh she plays. It'll take. I grew up listening to sleep at the wheel. And and that was one of the things about I laughed. My mom told me when I was a kid. I wanted to play the kind of music, he clap your hands and stub your feet too. You know, this is that was developed in the thirties refined and in change through the years, but it's still alive right now. People still get up and dance in the aisles, which we love so much. It's hard to sit still to this music. I got that. Right. I got seven. Salmon. Thank bring Jae different. And that is it for today. Remember to follow us on Twitter and Facebook, you can find us at the frame, I'm John horn. Thanks for listening. We'll see you back here tomorrow. Tone Wednesday vote has there's at the last day at chatter. Saturday. So then. Yeah, everybody. Got seven in row. Salmon.

Rolling Stones Netflix Richard Nixon Hulu Disney Rolling Stone magazine Bob wills Daniel Feinberg John Lennon John horn TV critic Austin reporter director Hollywood Robert Frank Rolling Stone Vits Mon Europe
JANIS JOPLIN: Piece of My Heart

Death by Misadventure: True Paranormal Mystery

36:09 min | 2 years ago

JANIS JOPLIN: Piece of My Heart

"The fourth nineteen seventy when Janis Joplin felt show up at sunset sound studios by six pm hooves child, her producer gave into his uneasy feeling all day about something was terribly wrong. He sends John Kirk a road manager for full tilt boogie band of to the landmark motor hotel. See oy, Janis wasn't answering her phone Rothschild. Would tell Rolling Stone magazine. He had never worried about her being late before. But in his heart. He need. This was different. Cook rice to the CD landmark Koto. Janice was stay he banged on room number one hundred five on yelp Vert open the door, but he was met with dead. Silence. He spoke to the manager Jack khaki her group, they should go into the room inside they found, Janice. Stead lying wedged between the bed and nightstand wearing nothing but a short nightgown lip so bloody when they turned her over at a nose was broken. She had four dollars fifty clutch in one hand. Join us in the supernatural journey as we explored musical history of Janis Joplin hunter rise to rockstar fame. We investigate the Miskel facts and mysterious Steph, let her backstage exit to the infamous twenty-seven club. This is death, by misadventure. Porta Texas in nineteen forty three was little oil refinery. Town talked to win the southeast corner of Texas a bastion of middle America. The end of the second World War. Close to the Louisiana border. It was a conservative time in town. That's what it self religious while it was still easy to find brothels gambling and booze. It had no idea that it was about to spoil more of the greatest blues. Rock singers of the sixties Janis Lynn was born to Dorothy and Seth Joplin on January nineteenth nineteen forty three. She had two younger siblings, Laura, and Michael who she adored her father, an engineer Texaco oil on the mum a housewife. The straight laced. Christine family would forge Janis youth. The postwar economy allowed her family and peers a strong middle class allowance a nice house car a decent education. Meanwhile, the other half in port author who lived on the other side of the tracks felt isolated. The stratification wasn't defined by -cation race. Growing up her family loved to listen to show tunes, and they attended church every Sunday Johnny sang require join the club and loved paint. She had the true soul of an artist who when she hit her teams. She found herself thoughts with a small town mindset of Poltava the love and security provided by her family couldn't protect from the dichotomies of local culture. Sooner flex by the cruelties of a high school dynamics things began to shift for Johnson. Who teams she gained weight a skin became scarred by acne and self image suffered from the scorn and insults of her peers, she insisted dressing and acting differently. And they hated her for it. Put Artha was indeed a town without pity. Snot by her schoolmates. No one high school town meant being snubbed by the whole town. Early on. She realized she was an outsider and search for other offbeat cactus, not only from port-arthur, but also from popular culture, she tried desperately to please family and peers, but her dismay was targeted and ridiculed for plane looks anti versus tastes. She did all bright minds did at the time rebels. The beat Knicks coach out costs reading Kara can Ginsburg listening to death run the weavers Johnny her techs and family ethics starkly out. Sean by the primal, emotions of the great, please standards. She loved Bessie Smith, let belly under data sang of the pain Janis felt she would learn to play and sing with fire and deep acre for heroes in high school. She buried herself in art, and especially music, she taught herself guitar and while she was get us hurt. She let it trope when she realized that she was much better at music shoot trek across the Louisiana border to hear rocking blues in Rocha's wrote houses blues rock and Cajun rung loud and proud in these boss. Louisiana's drinking age was eighteen on the party was on Janice. Graduated high school in nineteen sixty under the well rounded musical vocabulary. She then enrolls to Lamar TEK in Beaumont. This is the city of port author. She lasted for us six months before she took off at first trying to make a go playing country western bars in the area before taking off Venice, California. There. She met Chet Helms and in nineteen sixty three he talked her into going to San Francisco, she honed her craft in the SF coffeehouses growing. Love of our co uninfected means begun to wear on her. She wasn't surviving the hippie life and weighing around ninety pounds. She bounced back to port author that co she cleaned up and got a self together. But the dark porter the divisiveness eight into our again, and she moved away enrolling in the university of Texas and Austin nineteen sixty five. Boston may have been positive Janis mus- cleverly Shen, but it was equally corrosive a students auditor for a rough looks and rowdy ways. She was saved nine hundred sixty six when she got a call from old friend Chet Helms ask had comeback San Francisco. Chet. Helms was a member of the family doc commun- on the owner proprietor of the avalanche ballroom. One of the first venues feature the new bands coming out of SF, the Jefferson airplane, the charlatans and the Grateful Dead to McHugh. It was nine hundred sixty seven the summer of love Chet. Helms would become the manager of Janus his new band big brother and the holding company. In nineteen sixty seven Joplin moved into a second floor apartment at six thirty five. Ashbury street was her lover Peggy Caserta with whom she had a recurring relationship. The weekend of June sixteenth through eighteenth, nineteen sixty seven would be a turning point for Janice in her musical career. She was invited to play with big brother and the holding company at the Monterey. Pop festival. Also known as the summer of love, and it was also where the Jimi Hendrix experience had its American debut, the festival launched the careers of many who played they're making some of them into stars virtually overnight, including Janice. Joplin Jimi Hendrix can't eat Otis Redding and Steve Miller after Joplin's electric performance. She was swiftly signed by Clive Davis. Among the twelve hundred journalists covering the festival was music critic, Robert crisco who was then writing for Esquire magazine would later till NPR about Janice. I very much remembered her. Plane in the sunshine, and everyone was really not just exalted, but kind of flabbergasted at how intense it was like a lot of musicians at the time chaplain was trying to sing like a black blues musician Chris cows says most were not convincing Janice on the other hand blue audiences away with her raw emotional voice, Janice once said plane is just about feeling Joplin said it isn't necessarily about misery. It isn't about happiness. It's just about letting yourself feel all those things already have inside of you. But are trying to push his side because they don't make for polite conversation or something. But if you just get up there, that's the only reason I can sing because I can get up there. And I just let all those things come out. By April nineteen sixty eight Janice in the big brother and the holding company were in New York to record cheap. Thrills for Columbia. Big brother had some trouble in the recording studio. Janice, didn't like the vibe and felt New York had made everyone aggressive San Francisco's difference. She told writer net and tough in the New York Times. I don't mean it's perfect, but the rock bands. There didn't start because they wanted to make it they dug getting stoned and playing for people dancing, but we have to do learn to control success cheap. Thrills free Trine all of Joplin's top hits ball and chain piece of my heart. Excetera came out in September of nineteen sixty eight and hit number one on the charts and stayed eight nonconsecutive weeks. Janice was now the hottest ticket in rock and roll record mirror called her mixture of lead belly steam engine calamity, Jane Bessie Smith, an oil Derrick and rotgut bourbon funneled into the twentieth century somewhere between El Paso, and San Francisco. Janice herself was quoted as saying there's no patent on Seoul. You know, how that whole myth of black soul came up because white people don't allow themselves to feel things housewives in the Brassica have pain, and joy, they've got soul. If they give into it. It's hard as her fame grew. So did her insecurities and addictions. Janice was rarely seen without her bottle of southern comfort on or off stage. She indulged in alcohol and heroin to get through her performances to wind down into self medicate to get through daily life. She had periods of sobriety. Where work or romance dictated her to maintain a motion stability. However, she continued to gravitate back to drugs and alcohol again, and again by nineteen sixty nine it was estimated she was using around two hundred dollars of Irwin daily or about thirteen hundred in two thousand sixteen dollars. By November the band had lost its grew for Janice and the rumors of the holding company breaking up couldn't be ignored Janice. Played her last gig with the band, December first at the family dog for Chet Helms, she'd already begun rehearsing her new band to Janice review and main squeeze and there were the usual ugly stories making around Sam Andrew who played with Janice and her second band said she had fought the split with a holding company for a long time, but fate stepped in and the soulful singer could no longer ignore the signs or was her unhappiness fueled by addiction. One night at Winterland a couple of the guys were sick. And afterwards. She felt the guys were no longer really trying. The singer was led by her emotions and decided it was time to make a change from the very beginning. The squeeze lacked musical chemistry. The setup was Sam Andrew on guitar Bill king, organ, Marcus Doubleday. Trumpet, Terry Clements. Tenor. Sax Brad Campbell bass and Ron Markowitz drums. Janice was scheduled to debut in Tennessee at the Memphis. Mid south Coliseum to scheduled axe included the bar ks Otis Redding old band, Albert king. The mad lads to clay Eddie Floyd and Janice. However, her band squeeze seemed out of place tuning their instruments and setting up interminably half the crowd had no idea who she was. And the teens had only heard her songs ball and chain and piece of my art. She opened the set with raise your hand and followed with the BG's to love somebody. The crowd was not digging. In fact, there was almost no applause backstage. The band was in shock. Janice had sung well. But the gig had felt flat. After the show during an interview Janice interrupted the journalists was her own questions entered appeared for desperate reassurance. She asked. Hey, I've never sung. So great. Don't you think I'm singing better? We'll Jesus fucking Christ. I'm really better believe me reporter, Paul Nelson. Observed one gets the alarming feeling that Joplin's whole world is precariously balanced on what happens to her musically that the necessary degree of honest, cynicism needed to survive, an all media salt maybe buried too far under the immensely likable, but tremendously under confident naievety. On June, twelve Janice center new band full tilt. Boogie debuted at freedom hall in Louisville Kentucky. There were only four thousand fans and attendance. But the show was a knockout on August. Sixth nineteen seventy Janice would be featured on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine a few days later, she played her last show with full tilt boogie at Harvard stadium on August twelfth before forty thousand people afterward. The band was scheduled to record a new album in LA for a November or December release. Before she hit the studio. Janice would make one last public appearance was karmic undertones in Port Arthur Texas to visit her family and attend her ten year high school reunion. She was a rockstar now and wanted to make a bold statement about her success specifically to say a big FU to those who had treated her badly as a teenager and true Janna style. She wore flowing, blue and pink feathers in her hair, purple and white satin, golden Royd sandals and painted toenails. Jettison are entre later swept into the Goodhew tells drab petroleum room and commandeered the bar one last time when she asked for vodka, the bartender said he had nothing but bourbon and scotch she was quoted as saying God, somebody go out and get a bottle of AGA little did she know in less than two months. She would be dead. John carpenter the music editor of the LA free press and the former business partner of Chet Helms at the family dog last saw Janice on September twenty eighth at the troubadour on sunset strip. He remembers. She talked about her old man and appeared happy she had a steady lover. However, he felt something was off with her that evening. Janice had come to the club alone wearing a red dress looking for company toward the end of the night. Janice announced she was leaving. Nobody said anything or even offered to take her home carpenter called her a cab, and she returned to her lonely hotel room and called it a night. A few days later the last person to see Janice alive was the landmark hotels manager. He told police he spoke to her briefly at one AM Sunday morning, and she appeared cheerful. She had finished her recording session at about eleven pm Saturday night and went with her bandmates to Barney's beanery, John Cook, her road manager said Janice had a few drinks, and then drove her organ player back to the motel said good night and went to bed. The next day. Paroling stone magazine Janice failed to show up at sunset sound studios by six PM, Paul Rothschild, her producer had a strange premonition that something was wrong. And sent John Cook the road manager over to the landmark hotel to see why she wasn't answering her phone. I'd never worried about her before Rothschild was quoted as saying, although she'd been late lots of times, it was usually that she stopped by pair of pants or some chick thing. Like that October fourth was Sunday. However, and there were few places to go even Hollywood even for Janice. When John Cook arrived. It was almost seven PM, and he noticed her car in the parking lot and that the drapes in her first floor room were drawn. She didn't answer her door when he knocked or even when he banged in yelled. He spoke to the manager. John who? Agreed. They should go. Check her room when they opened the door. They found Janice lying which between the bed and the nightstand. Wearing a short nightgown her lips were bloody nose was broken. She had four dollars and fifty cents clutched in one hand. A doctor arrived on the scene around nine pm, but found no drugs after releasing only three albums at the tender age of twenty seven Janice. Joplin the Texas blue singer was pronounced dead by eleven pm that night wild. Rumors respecting across the media had Janice been killed by some jealous guy by notorious drug dealer, even by the CIA or had she killed herself over someone because she had always been so self destructive each new theory had its informed proponents and each one was equally. Groundless fueling the curse of the deadly twenty seven club many years later, the book going down with Janice written by her former lover Peggy Caserta, she recounted the twenty four hours leading up to the singer's death. She claimed both Genesis fiancee Seth Morgan and her had stood the singer up that night for a plan. Threesome. However, later Caserta would admit in an interview with culture magazine that Joplin had been clean in the time leading up to her death. That is until she ran into a drug dealer, delivering dope to Caserta in the hotel lobby where she later died. Caserta claims. Janice had walked out of her hotel room to get cigarettes and ran into George in the landmark lobby this chance encounter, but proved to be fatal one when she came back to room to get high less than twenty four hours later, the singer would be dead. Although the coroner's report stated otherwise Caserta still believes Janice did not die of drug overdose. But a fatal trip she told the magazine. She tripped and fell Honey, I'm positive of it, which makes one wonder was Peggy Caserta there. It's fair to say the music industry has experienced a lot of loss. The pressures of fame can be too much from any Rockstars and many decide to check out early while it's not uncommon for musicians to die at a young age. One significant age seems to stick out this magical number has inspired many conspiracy theories and even coined the popular phrase, the twenty seven club. It's twenty seven symbolic number or a harboring of doom in numerology. It equals to the number nine and represents the end of a life cycle. If you study the history of Rockstars who have met in early demise mysterious patterns of life and death are intense and are compounded by the dreaded Saturn return per astrological lore with over sixty musicians passing away at the coincidental age of twenty seven over the years. This iconic group have achieved mystical rockstar status in October nineteen seventy Janice was the third rockstar to die in less than four months in July. Jim Morrison of the doors had sadly, drowned in a bathtub in Paris and Jimi Hendrix mysteriously died of drug overdoses timber all three musicians died at the deadly age of twenty seven leaving fans spooked asking who's next? Just before her death. Janice was in LA to record her new album and the band had a November two or scheduled friends and bandmates stated that she was in good spirits and happy to be in the studio. However, I believe Janet's his life was not as rosy as family and friends described people who suffer from depression can be laughing on the outside and crying on the inside by your own admission. She was very lonely girl despite all the people surrounding her. She had many lovers but remained a loner even after fame jenness once said in an interview on stage, I make love to twenty five thousand people then I go home alone. I find it. Interesting that hard partying singer had the wisdom to write and sign her will at the young age of twenty seven even more intriguing three days before her death. Janice added an additional clause asking her lawyer to set aside twenty five hundred dollars for her future. Wake she wanted to make sure her friends would celebrate her life in rockstar style. Did she have a premonition that death was near? And what inspired the sudden neat to get her affairs in order? Genesis attorney remarked to surprise after getting her estate in order, Janice, like a true Capricorn had every checkbook and every check reconciled, including all our Bank statements in a file everything was imperfect order, she may have been carefree and her love life, but she was dammed frugal with her money, and she saved more than she spent. What I find even more compelling is when Janet says lifeless body was found in room one oh five at the landmark hotel. She had four dollars and fifty cents clutched in one hand equal to the number nine. Had fate left. His calling card that the blues east Texas singer had completed her soul contract, and she was ready to join the twenty seven club. Or was it just leftover change from deadly dime bag either way? I believe karma played a significant role in Janice Joplin final hours, which he climbed aboard the last train to the afterlife. Born under the sign of capital corn. Janice had two distinct sides to personality there was her public persona affectionately known as Pearl and the softer side. Her family knew and loved she wants for Martin and interview people seem to have a high sense of drama about me, and she was right in an interview after her death. Genesis father Seth Joplin tried to dispel some the ugly. Rumors about his baby girl and give insight to the soulful singers, Texas upbringing he said his daughter was a lonely invulnerable girl growing up who used her hell raising ways as a defense mechanism. He agreed. She had a wild streak, but also she had a heart of gold. He highlighted or kindness by sharing a story about Janice meeting, a young runaway from LA, the young girl had come to Hollywood to find fame and fortune, but Janice convinced her to return home. She. Even took her to the bus station and bought her a ticket back to Louisiana after Genesis death. The young woman called her parents to say how much she appreciated the singers help. She said she was now married, a mom. She believed genocide saved her life. He also wanted to set the record straight about the stories of Janice running away from home. And he said, they weren't true his daughter loved her family, and they loved her to in fact, she came home more frequently than he would've expected, and they even traveled to California to see her shows at the Fillmore in San Francisco and the Monterey pop festival. The last song Janice recorded was Benz, which would go on to be included on her posthumous album Pearl in nineteen seventy one it became the biggest selling album of her career and featured her biggest hit single me and Bobby McGee. However, her death continued to hit the music community hard and the legendary music promoter Bill Graham weighed in on the conspiracy theories surrounding the tragic deaths of Hendrickson Joplin, he denied there were any connections between the two he sarcastically remarked. I'm sure that somebody has thrown the. I chain or somebody's turning over the pages of some book and reading the charts and looking through the stars in saying, I knew it. I knew it. He believes Janice like many budding Rockstars didn't know how to handle success. He thought it created problems, but it never spoiled her eerily Graham would die twenty years later in a helicopter plane crash after a Huey Lewis in the news concert in Vallejo, California on a bittersweet note in February nineteen seventy Janice had traveled to Brazil to dry out during her stay. She met a man named David who helped her kicker drug habit. And they fell in love. He was unable to return to the states with her at the time. And once back in the US Janice had started using again. And the relationship suffered David continued his travels, but he never fell out of love with Pearl on the morning after her death. A telegram was found at the landmark motor hotel. It. Red love you mama more than you know, leaving you to wonder whether things would have turned out differently for China's David if she had received the note one day earlier from her former lover there is one final odd twist to the story. Many fans wondered what happened to Genesis rumored fiance, Seth Morgan after her death. He went on to marry a sauce Alito waitress he forced his new wife into prostitution during their marriage while he acted as pimp. The marriage was short lived and Morgan leader claimed he had married her to prevent her from suing him after the two had been involved in a motorcycle accident that left her face partially. Paralyzed the story doesn't end there after his divorce Morgan returned to San Francisco to work as bouncer in strip clubs and would later be arrested for armed robbery. He was sentenced to prison from nineteen seventy seven to nineteen eighty in nineteen eighty. Eighty six he moved to New Orleans and wrote a novel called homeboy, it was about heroin addicts in criminals in San Francisco that included a flamboyantly dressed prostitute whose character was based on chanice Joplin. On October eighteenth nineteen ninety Morgan was arrested in New Orleans for a DUI and was released on bail. That was paid by his girlfriend Suzy LeVine the following night shortly before midnight, both Morgan Susie were killed instantly. When he crashed his motorcycle into a cement pile. It was exactly twenty years in two weeks later after genus Joplin's death. Just a year before her death. Janice left the streets of San Francisco and moved to a little bungalow in spur in Marin county Ren is known for its natural beauty larks. Burt was a quaint little town and she chose cute little cottage at the end of Baltimore street. She shared her new home with friend window. Herb a clothing designer and friends said it was a happy time for her however Joplin's transformation from the ugly duckling of Port Arthur to the rock and roll mistress of Haight Ashbury, which sadly short-lived in the fall of nineteen seventy the music world still really from the recent death of Jimmy Hendrix in September Kurd the Janisch died of a drug overdose in a CD Hollywood motel just a few weeks later. What's even stranger just three days before her death? Janice paid a visit to her attorney Robert Gordon because she wanted to make an important change to her will did the singer have a sense that the end was near what I believe is most telling about, Janice, his state of mind is a conversation. She had with writer net hint off in April nineteen sixty eight the singer revealed her struggle with depression, and how she was unable to truly control her feelings. She described how she felt like an outsider drawing up before getting into music it had torn her life apart. She was quoted as saying when you feel that much you have super horrible downs. I was always victim to myself. Maybe I won't last like other singers. But I think you can destroy your now by worrying about tha. Morrogh man, if it hadn't been for the music, I probably would have done myself in Janice wrote in her will that she had set aside twenty five hundred dollars to pay for a posthumous all night party for two hundred guests at her favourite pub, the lion share in San on Selma. She noted so my friends can get blasted after I'm gone also sheet test, her roommate Lindell was giving away her clothes jewelry and furnishings to friends the remainder of her estate was left to her family. Even though Linda was supposed to distribute. Genesis belongings to friends the process quickly became chaotic a lot of friends came in and took stuff without asking. Her parents insisted on a private funeral and Janice was cremated in the Pierce brothers. Westwood village. Mortuary in Los Angeles, her ashes were scattered from a plane along Stinson beach in Marin the service was only attended by Joplin's parents and her aunt Genesis wake was held on October twenty six nineteen seventy the invitation read the drinks are on Pearl and true, Janice, Joplin style, the party was wild with the band, the Grateful Dead providing entertainment along with several other performers. Her sister boyfriend, enclosed friends all came to pay their final respects to the rock and roll legend. And celebrate her backstage exit to the afterlife. Janis jumped in brought up half blues voice from Texas to San Francisco slight Dedic seen was she went from a lonely drifta to an unforgettable seep stock going up. She had a close bond with family. I did nineteen sixty seven she brought them ounce to San Francisco to see the summer of love concerts, and it truly kicked off Korea as a powerful and emotional Sosa. Less time family. So John is was in nineteen seventy once you're poor Tofte to attend to ten year high school reunion when she died in the fall of nineteen seventy has this Laura was only twenty one brother, Michael seventeen vice devastated by the loss of that beloved big sister together, they have kept him alive and continue to jointly. What show her state fullness fifty years? Row critic Lillian Ruxton summed up her influence with these words Janis Joplin publicly expressed the feelings and evenings of the goals with the electric generation. To be women yet. He co two men to be free yet a slave to real love to reject every day to convention and yet get back to the basics of life. Yes. Hostelries fos the bright. But you took a piece of of our hearts, which he died on top of the fourth nineteen seventy and room number one hundred and five at the landmark hotel in Hollywood in the end memories of some superstars may fade away. But true bookstores like Janis Joplin never die. Death, by misadventure was produced by cosmic media and written by me JC Nova are supernatural team of co hosts includes the talented at Duardo Fahey in London. Tom dre, our master numerology just and paranormal investigator in LA, Paul Robinson. Madge, I and musician Marin and myself, I'm a psychic astrologer and paranormal investigator in Los Angeles. And San Francisco this episode was recorded at Robinson studios Marin, California and also at union recording studio in West Hollywood, California kudos to sound engineers. Paul Robinson and Noah Shanklin, a special. Thanks to audio producer Christopher laying in Tucson who brings each episode to life and Paulina from upper planet in London. She's responsible for the Super Bowl design of our official website. She's also. The designer for one of our favorite true crime podcast case file police like and follow us on Facebook at WWW dot Facebook dot com slash death, by misadventure podcast. Each episode is available for download direct VR our website at death, by misadventure dot CO dot UK and also at items Google play cast box Spotify pod being tune in radio public and Stitcher last. But not least our podcast is hosted by Lipson, I'm Tracy Nova and this has been death, by misadventure. Thanks for listening.

Janice Joplin San Francisco Janis Joplin Chet Helms Janis Texas Los Angeles Louisiana Hendrickson Joplin Jimmy Hendrix California producer John carpenter Rolling Stone magazine Hollywood Peggy Caserta Pearl Bessie Smith Christine family
I'm In Love With That Song: Was 1965 the Most Revolutionary Year in Music?

Rock N Roll Archaeology

29:21 min | 8 months ago

I'm In Love With That Song: Was 1965 the Most Revolutionary Year in Music?

"Welcome Friends and neighbors to the fiftieth episode of the. I'm in love with that song. Podcast I'm your host Brad Page and since this is episode number fifty. I thought would try something a little different. I've been reading this book. By Andrew. Grant Jackson called nineteen sixty five. The most revolutionary year in music and this book Jackson makes the argument that nineteen sixty five is when everything about rock music changed and rock changed everything. When I saw this book I thought That's not the year that I would have picked. I WANNA see how he makes his case so I bought the book and I thought it'd be fun if we went through this together. So let's start at the beginning of nineteen sixty five and just as a side note when I referenced. Chart POSITIONS OR RELEASE DATES. I'm specifically talking about. Us release dates and charts. Things may be different in other parts of the world so January. One thousand nine hundred sixty five Bob Dylan enters a New York studio over three days records all of the tracks for his landmark album bringing it all back home. It's his first album with an electric band magazine no more. Meanwhile on January twentieth on the other side of the country the birds record their version of Dylan's Mr Tambourine man. Though the birds perform all the vocals on the recording Roger. Mcguigan is the only bird who actually plays on the track. All the other instruments were recorded by that legendary group of L. A. session players known as the wrecking crew. We've talked about the wrecking crew on this podcast. Before mcguigan came up with the intro to the song by adapting a Bach Melody on his twelve string guitar and with this song the birds pretty much invent folk rock also in January the music themed TV show. Hullaballoo premiered on NBC. And though it's not a rock album John. Coltrane released a love supreme in January nineteen sixty five one of the most influential jazz albums of all time. A record that inspired many rock musicians to in February nineteen sixty five motown was on a roll with songs like nowhere to run by Martha and the Vandellas. Stop in the name of love by the supremes and a personal favorite of mine. I'll be doggone by Marvin Gaye. All on the charts a wouldn't bring him from known though it was recorded in nineteen sixty four. The righteous brothers hit number one in February of sixty five with you've lost that loving feeling in nineteen ninety nine. Bmi ranked the song as the most played Song of the twentieth century with over eight million airplanes alone. Also in February. The Beatles released eight days a week as a single and people get ready by Curtis Mayfield and the impressions first. Hit the charts. This song became an anthem for the civil rights. Movement and Rolling Stone magazine has named it one of the twenty five greatest songs of all time. I agree Rather train don't need no you just all you need is you just say. Curtis is such a great guitar player. March nineteen sixty five. Dylan's bringing it all back home. Album is released my girl by the temptations reaches number one after eight weeks on the charts smokey Robinson and the miracles issue who baby baby as a single and the sonics release. Here are the Sonics one of the great garage rock albums. Ooh Two of the Beatles John Lennon and George Harrison have dinner with Georgia's dentist John Riley who without telling them spikes their coffee with LSD LACED. Sugar Cubes and they have their first acid trip and experienced. It would profoundly influenced their music. The rolling stones hit the charts with the last time basing the song on a nineteen fifty-eight recording by the staple singers us away. April nineteen sixty five. The WHO record anyway anyhow anywhere. One of the first songs to feature extensive guitar feedback in our College Pete. Townsend studied the auto destructive work of Gustav Metzger Inspiring Townsend to turn feedback and guitar smashing into an art form of his own and Bob DYLAN'S SUBTERRANEAN HOMESICK. Blues enters charts. It's his first top. Forty hit herb alpert and the Tijuana brass release whipped cream and other delights. One of the great record covers in history and the staple singers record freedom highway. I can't understand. Why thank you saw one? What's going to happen? The Beatles ticket to ride is also released in April sixty five primarily written by John Lennon. The song features prominent twelve string guitar. Part played by George Harrison. The idea for the drum pattern came from Paul McCartney but Ringo takes it to another level and McCartney plays the Guitar Solo at the end. This song captures what all four Beatles could bring to the table to make a good song even better one of their greatest songs. She is not. Let's listen to that drum part for a minute. May of nineteen sixty five. Saw The yardbirds for your love entered the charts along with here comes the night by them and the animals issue the animal tracks album while touring the US the rolling stone stop in Chicago for a recording session at the legendary chess studios home of muddy waters. Howlin Wolf Chuck Berry and all the artists who the stones biggest influences one of the songs. They worked on a chess was satisfaction based on guitar. Riff that Keith. Richards came up with in his sleep. He woke up in the middle of the night with this riff in his head. He turned on the tape recorder and recorded. The riff then fell back asleep leaving the tape recorder running to capture forty more minutes of Keith snoring. Of course the song would go on to become one of the greatest rock tracks in history. It's hard to hear it with fresh ears now but imagine what this would have sounded like for the first time in nineteen sixty five. Newsweek magazine described the REF as five notes. That shook the world. Keith Richards used a Gibson Maestro fuzz. Box ON HIS GUITAR. Get THAT TONE. Certainly not the first song to use a fuzz box effect satisfaction was probably the most famous you can hear. Richard's STOMP on the pedal to turn it off and on throughout the song. He starts with that fuss box tone then he switches to Clean Electric Rhythm Guitar. Tone then just. Before the first chorus he turns the FUZZ. Box back on. If you listen closely you can actually hear the foot pedal click on if you listen before the second chorus you can hear Keith. Turn the FUZZ. Box on again but this time he misses the queue by a split second and misses that. I note then the next time around you can hear him turn the FUZZ box on too early. I guess he wanted to be sure he didn't miss it. This time now come on tell. How many times have you heard this song and never noticed those details me to that is why I do this. Podcast in June of nineteen sixty five. The four tops hit number one with. I just can't help myself. Sugar Pie honey. Bunch as usual the four tops were backed by the funk brothers that Stellar Group of musicians that were behind all of motown's hits between the funk brothers working out of motown in Detroit and the wrecking crew in La. These two groups of musicians dominated the top of the charts without most people. Even knowing who they are of the twenty-seven songs that hit number one in one thousand nine hundred sixty five twelve of them featured either the funk brothers or the wrecking crew six of those twelve. Were the wrecking crew the other six featured the funk brothers one of my favorite singers Wilson Pickett released in the midnight hour one of the greatest r-and-b-soul songs of all time on June fifteenth. After finishing up a recording session with Bob Dylan producer. Tom Wilson gathered a new set musicians and overdubbed electric guitars bass and drums onto the original acoustic performance of Simon and Garfunkel sound of silence. Simon and Garfunkel didn't even know he was doing it but when the new version was released as a single if became Simon and Garfunkel. 's I hit if you'd like to know more about this story check out the Rock and or roll podcast episode number two ninety one. You'll get the whole story there. James Brown releases. Papa's got a brand new bag. This track was recorded in one. Take at seven minutes. Long Brown cut the song and half splitting it between side a and side B of the single. It was here on this track that Brown discovered his new sound focusing on the rhythm emphasizing. The one he was hearing all the instruments like they were drums with this song. James Brown invents what we now call funk but July nineteen sixty five. The beach boys released California gurls Berry. Gordy the mogul behind motown had worked for years to get his artists booked into supper clubs. He finally achieved that goal. When the supremes were booked for the Copacabana on July? Twenty Ninth Gordy sent the girls to charm school for etiquette lessons. Arthur Lee and Bryan Maclean formed the band love one of the first racially diverse rock bands. Though never a big commercial success. They're considered one of the most important bands of the nineteen sixties. Otis redding began recording sessions for his Otis. Blue Album on July ninth. It was his second album to be released in. Nineteen sixty five. It includes the track. I've been loving you too long and Otis wrote the song respect for the album. Of course it later became the defining single for Aretha Franklin Abuse July Twentieth Nineteen Sixty Five. Saw the release of Bob. Dylan's like a rolling stone according to statistics. It's the most acclaimed song in history. The Sung evolved from ten pages of verse and Poetry. That Dylan boil down to four verses and the chorus. The song was recorded over a two day session June and released a month later the recording features legendary guitarist. Mike Bloomfield and Al Cooper on organ Cooper wasn't even an organ player but he managed to come up with the iconic part. That's the musical hook of the song as usual. The record company didn't want to release it as a single because it's over six minutes long. Of course it became Dylan's biggest. Hit making it to number two on the charts on July twenty fifth Dylan played the Newport folk festival with a full electric band and the audience boos in August nineteen sixty five dylan releases the highway. Sixty one revisited album. The animals released. We gotta get out of this place. And the Beatles issue the soundtrack to help on August fifteenth the Beatles play the first concert ever held in a sports arena SHEA stadium in New York for a crowd of over fifty five thousand a new world record for concert. Attendance young man named Davy Jones released a single called. You've got a habit of leaving. The single didn't make much of a dent and there was another bloke named Davy Jones in the monkeys so by the end of the year this Davy Jones changes his name to David Bowie. You've got a habit of leaving. Would be the last recording. He makes under his original name. The top three songs for the first week of September nineteen sixty five were California girls and number three like a rolling stone number two and the Beatles help at number one. How's that for a classic top? Three John Lennon wrote the song help in one night with verses that include words like insecure and self-assured Lenin was writing some of his most thoughtful and personal lyrics yet. La smokey Robinson and the miracles reached the top twenty with tracks of my tears. S- another one of my personal favorites and on September thirteenth. The Beatles release yesterday as a single. The song came to Paul McCartney a dream he was afraid that he's subconsciously. Plagiarized it so for a year. He played it for people to see if anyone would recognize it. He recorded the song on Solo Acoustic Guitar and then producer George. Martin added a string quartet. Yesterday went on to become one of the most covered songs in history with over twenty five hundred recorded versions in October of nineteen sixty five. James Brown has his biggest hit ever with I got you. I feel good. The animals issue. It's my life and Marvin gays. Ain't that peculiar. Enters the charts. Now let's listen into just marvins vocal track every chance you get. You seem to hurt me more and more but each hurt makes listen and you can hear him tap his foot along the beat. I know flowers grow from rain. But how can love go from pain? That Opoku Ritchie. The Beatles are appointed members of the British empire and receive M B E medals in honor of all the revenue they generated for the United Kingdom and the kinks. Release a well respected man. Ray Davies wrote the song after a visit to an upper class resort where he felt the rich guests were too snobby towards him. Tuning in Baxter November nineteen sixty five. Stevie wonder comes out with uptight. Everything's alright the supremes hit number one with I hear a symphony. It's their fourth number. One hit of the year and the WHO've released my generation and anthem for the youth of the sixties. If there ever was one and one of the few hits to ever feature a Bass Guitar Solo really also released November sixty five the seeds pushing too hard the stand. Dell's with dirty water. The kinks released the kings controversy album and the yardbirds issue the having a rave up with the yardbirds album and the rolling stones hit number one with get off my cloud and the year came to a close turn turn turn by the BYRDS hits number one on December fourth on that same day the grateful dead played their first. Gig As the grateful dead at one of Ken. Casey's acid tests in San Jose California on the other side of the country. The velvet underground play their first paid GIG at Summit High School in Summit New Jersey on December eleventh. According to legend most of the audience walked out the Mamas. And the Papas. Release California dreaming and the Beatles released both a new album rubber soul and a new single day tripper backed with we can work it out rubber sole was their most sophisticated album yet. Many consider it their best album. It was the album that inspired Brian Wilson. To step up his game and start work on the Landmark Beach. Boys album pet sounds And as December came to an end. Cbs television aired a Charlie Brown Christmas for the very first time. Cbs didn't want to air it at all at I did they thought. The animation and voice overs were amateurish. There was no laugh track and they thought the music was week Vince. Karalis score went onto become some of the most indelible jazz music and history and today it's part of our American DNA So that's the music of nineteen sixty five in a nutshell. I mean we're really just scraping the surface here the so much other great music out from that period it was definitely a watershed year for music. But is it the most revolutionary? My first instinct is to say nineteen sixty seven or maybe nine hundred sixty four year. The Beatles came to America. You can make an argument. That one thousand nine hundred. Seventy seven. Punk music was as revolutionary. I'm still not sure. But and grant Jackson makes a compelling case in his book and I really enjoyed reading it. If you'd like to know more or pick up a copy of the book for Yourself I do recommend it. I'll include a link in the show notes. Thanks for joining me on this. Fiftieth episode of this podcast. I hope you enjoyed this little detour. I'll be back again in two weeks with another deep dive into one of my favorite songs. Please keep in touch. We're on facebook. You can find us by searching for the. I'm in love with that song. Podcast or tweet us. At pop staff tweets or send an email to love that song. Podcast at gmail.com. Either way I love hearing from you. Thanks again for making this fiftieth episode happened. Cnn time Me The way.

Bob Dylan Beatles James Brown Beatles supremes John Lennon George Harrison motown California FUZZ Grant Jackson Mcguigan smokey Robinson Paul McCartney Keith Richards New York Marvin Gaye Rolling Stone magazine Davy Jones Sonics
Should Canadians expect a return to pandemic restrictions?

The Current

14:59 min | Last month

Should Canadians expect a return to pandemic restrictions?

"Hi I'm Josh Block host of uncover escaping nexium from CBC podcasts. I pull back the curtain on the secret of self help group that experts call a called and follow one woman's heroic journey to get out. The podcast was featured in Rolling Stone magazine and named one of the best podcasts of two thousand and eighteen in the Atlantic listen to uncover escaping nexium on. CBC. Listen or wherever you get your podcasts. This is a CBC. PODCAST WE SHUT DOWN IN MARCH March sixteenth to be exact and at that time was a shocking experience to say the least. We let go lay off about six hundred, fifty people at that time. and since then it's been A. Learning lesson every day everything changes kind of scenario and Doing. Our best to adopt and keep up with with was happening but we were thankful to reopen at the end of May Bill Cariseo disowns blueprint. It's a hospitality group in Vancouver they run bars, restaurants and nightclubs. It's a company that's been hit hard by Kovic restrictions as he says at the end of May, rules eased up and the nightclubs stayed close but his bars and restaurants were able to open back up again as far as the restaurant and bars where concern who did a nice job rolling out our protocols and and following P. Guidelines and we have some success throughout the summer which was encouraging. Up until this week. On China, see a pathway to to get past these restrictions. And it's very difficult than I am extremely concerned I just don't see how to get through. He was speaking last week win restrictions started to tighten up again in British Columbia after a spike in cases of COVID. Bars and restaurants can't serve alcohol after ten PM and have to close entirely and eleven nightclubs and banquet halls are closed completely with coronavirus cases expected to rise. Again, this fall other provinces may well have to follow suit, which is a tricky thing for governments and Canadians alike to manage actually has an infectious disease epidemiologist and math model at the University of Toronto's Dalla Lana School of public health. Stephen Taylor is professor of psychiatry at the University of British Columbia and the author of the psychology of pandemics preparing for the next global outbreak of infectious diseases. Good morning to you both. Actually. You just heard Dr Theresa Tom Talking about the situation we're in right now where there are two hundred plus new cases in a couple of provinces spikes in British Columbia and elsewhere given what the doctor was talking about. How likely do you think it is that we'll see a return of some sort of restrictions on what we can and can't do in the months ahead. I think it's highly unlikely that we will start seeing tightening of restrictions. The the biggest difference between now and what we saw in the springtime I think it's going to look different. We're not going to see this sort of sudden and. Expensive shutting down of everything across the province. For example, I think what we're going to see is we understand more about the disease the understand what sorts of businesses risky, what sorts of activity or riskier and so I think we'll see something that's a bit more nuanced in terms if you know. Geographically specific. So if we have hot spots across the province, we may see those restrictions introduced in specific areas and and I think again, we we're not going to see these really lifted to blanket restrictions where we're shutting down everything we may see things like they're seeing. NBC where you sort of you know having bars shut a little bit earlier or shutting down some businesses that were initially shut down but keeping up their open what point the government have to take that sort of action if it's a gradual thing or if it's targeted as you say to specific areas that are known as hot spots, when does the government need to act? So the tricky part of this is that we really need to be proactive about this, and that's what happened in the spring is that when you start seeing your hospitals filling up, that suggests that you know it's time to act or it's a little bit too late I'm the the goal here is to keep community transmission low and keep cases at a level where we don't. Have to have these massive shutdowns and so it can be hard because you're basically making these decisions. You know a little bit before things seem really really bad. But if you do that and you act proactively, you're going to prevent more restrictions and larger shutdown. So you really trying to counterbalance that that risk of seeing rapid increases in cases rapid overwhelming our healthcare system with again. Not Wanting to put people through the pain of having these restrictions. Put back in place ordering Stephen in a moment. But just very briefly, I mentioned to Dr Tam the comment from Kevin Smith who is the president and CEO of the University Health Network in Toronto hearing that other hospitals are are concerned as well with cases that are popping up and admissions in hostels are you concerned by that? I am concerned you know particularly right now with the reopening of schools were entering a new stage of the pandemic where we're expecting to start seeing, seek seeing cases increase, and so the fact that you know we're sort about this inflection point and we're already seeing increases in hospitalizations. It's it's a worrying stage to be in. Steven Taylor given you know what has been For I think most people are relative lean enjoyable summer in terms of things we can do. That we couldn't do just a few months before that. How difficult do you think it'll be for Canadians If there are further restrictions even if they're targeted restrictions Ashley talking about. I think with targeted restrictions is going to be a lot easier as compared to the first way down and Yeah. As we know from previous research on catastrophes and disasters, most people are resilient. So there will be a grumbling acceptances people go into the next wave of restrictions and so forth that said, however it is GonNa be stressing for a number of people in there have been an increase in suicide. In Canada as compared to last year, and my concern is when we get into the gloom of winter and then we get into the colds and flu season's and targeted restrictions and so forth that the mental health of Canadians will suffer, and so I think that that was great that we're we're finding ways of. Reducing the spread of infection mill so should be very careful to make sure we have resources for monitoring and attending the People's mental hell who has suffered the most under these restrictions thus far I mean there's a business concern, but there's a psychological effect as well. It depends on what you mean by suffering the younger people I suffering new worries or about socio economic impacts of the of the pandemic, for example, and then getting older medically frail people are suffering too because they're worried about getting infection, and then there are people who were isolated beforehand. You didn't have a lot of people that like withdrawn social support and now they finding themselves even further oscillated those sorts of individuals probably suffering from perhaps risk mood disorders Various people suffering various ways, more people who have pre existing mental health problems like pre existing health things audience obsessive compulsive tendencies are particularly suffering dreams pandemic their their anxiety is being fueled by this. Infection. Actually choose you mentioned school. How to school change. The scenario when it comes to what we're dealing with in this pandemic. So the challenge with school is that we're increasing the number of contacts that kids and educators and their families are having. and. So you know throughout all of this response be focused a lot on minimizing who you're in contact with you know you have we have bubbles and social circle of and with the return to school that all kind of falls apart because suddenly kids and teachers are interacting with a lot of other people and so that means that we're going to have to. Compensate him some way, and so what that most likely means is that we're going to potentially reduce the sizes of gatherings fat are allowed and advise people to reduce the number of context they're having outside of their household as a way to compensate for the fact that we have this this basically this change in in in social networks and how people are interacting Steven. If you take a look at the situation when it comes to reopening schools I, mean there's a lot of stress that's around and we've heard that over the last week certainly from parents but also from teachers and students as well. How do you see the opening of schools affecting how how people are feeling? I think in in the first week or two, it's going to be fairly stressful for for many students and teachers and parents particularly around the idea of the curriculum was I gonNa look like what is the actual that the logistics of getting the school and of cruelty scoring openings we don't need to find June things to monitor how things are going and whether. Things working properly in terms of social distancing. In a way it's kind of like going back to school for the very first time too many kids and they'll be worried about grades with a balloon properly from mixed learning formats learning at home and at school. But having said that I think after a couple of weeks most kids will bounce back in an adjusted a new way of looney. You're confident of that that that resilience that we often talk about when it comes to kids will be demonstrated in this moment. Yeah happen for everyone. Some kids will have a really tough time but I'm confident that for the Madari majority of children I mean ain't research to time and again showed us that people are resilient people back to learn to adapt to adversity. We were a year ago that most of us would be okay walking around the streets wearing masks, but he we are. So yeah, people are feeling and you just need to look who Han they had this massive water festival not long ago there are thousands of people out they weren't socially. About potty that's another indication of how quickly people bounce back from the city after. Ashley a a summer of of people you know being on Patios and having park hangs and learning how to to live. In this moment, you talked about communication how important is communication when it comes to trying to get Canadians on board for what might unfold in the next couple of months I think communication is incredibly important. You know we need to be an pathetic. This is a difficult time. It's a challenging time you need to be clear our expectations. And it's really hard to communicate when I think. The only thing that we can say with certainty is that we have a period of uncertainty ahead of us, and so you know it can be really hard for people to plan to manage when you know you don't really know what the next month is going to hold. And so it's really important as we navigate those that we give people practical advice. You know help them understand what they can do to protect themselves beyond just saying you know wash your hands and physically distant but you know understand you know as the. Is Changing these are you know thinking about you're thinking about who you are in contact with think about you know can you reduce the number of contacts? Can You? You know I starting to see increases in cases? Can you can you go back to working remotely if you've been working, you know going back into work and so really you know make sure that you know people understand that you know nobody really knows what we're doing right now we're. We're we're figuring this out go along. It's a new virus and everybody is is facing challenges, and that uncertainty is part of our our new normal. WHAT DOES THAT COMMUNICATE UTAH planning? What does that mean mean we have as Dr Tam said a number of rations cultural and religious that are going to be happening in the next few weeks and months from the Jewish. New Year to Thanksgiving Christmas down the line Halloween down the line as well which. How do you go about planning for things like that in that time of uncertainty and what's the communication meant to be round that planning I? Mean I think it's a really really challenging question. I don't know the answer to that because I think the answers you can't really plan I mean you have to plan with the expectation that your plans make the window, and so you know we're we're trying to live our lives through the pandemic, but we also need to understand that. You know the reality is that if you're planning a wedding in a month, you're you're not going to have a wedding with a hundred people probably. So think about you know if this is something important that you want to have. Is there a way that you can continue with that celebration? In a way that acknowledges that you may need to change you made need to to be innovative and also acknowledge that risk is not black and white. There's not no risk versus something that risky there. There's a spectrum to that, and so there are ways to continue to live our lives and to continue to do activities that are important to us in. A way that minimizes risk but still allows us to you know that doesn't result in us being paralyzed and you know staying at home and not doing anything and not seeing anyone in the remaining seconds that we have I'll ask you both this, which is, how are you personally going to deal with that uncertainty and deal with the possibility of new shutdowns restricted Or Limited as they might be actually. So I'm starting to restock file my pandemic supply, and also I'm trying to make the most of the Nice weather that we have right now is a way to you know. Get aside and and see people I love in a way that allows us to socially distanced that also you know acknowledged that may be in for a rough winter and so get get that sort of out of my system. Stephen you talked about the gloom of winter, which I, think gives a chill through most people. At the best of times. What are you going to do and how are you going to survive the possibility of more? Covert closures. Right. I ask myself what went well last time Lockdown what didn't go so well, and how can I prepare for this time and I'm going to do a lot of what Tam recommended I didn't exercise US last time and I think that's been too much time working so I Exercise more workless spend more time connecting with my friends and family but also make sure I did the things that worked around last time and that was setting setting structure reminding myself. Yeah. This is going to be over and that wearing off can socially distancing the best things that we can do to to help them get through this pandemic it's great to speak with you both morning. Thank you. Thanks. Very Much Steven Taylor professor of psychiatry at the University of British Columbia. He was in Vancouver Ashley Shoot as an infectious disease epidemiologist and math mater at the University of Toronto's Dalla Lana School of public health. She is an ANC caster Astor Ontario for more CBC podcasts go to CBC DOT CA slash podcasts.

Stephen Taylor Steven Taylor Dr Tam Vancouver University of British Columbia Ashley Dalla Lana School of public professor of psychiatry University of Toronto Rolling Stone magazine CBC Bill Cariseo Josh Block Dr Theresa Tom Talking British Columbia British Columbia NBC China University Health Network
988 Jimmy "JimmyG" Graham: Visualization as a Path to Success

The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

25:08 min | 1 year ago

988 Jimmy "JimmyG" Graham: Visualization as a Path to Success

"Nice Guy Community so check this out you're about to hear an interview we had people reach you through mine power presentations dot Com there's a contact coaching with four people and what I'd like to do is that actually Eddie knows thinking for all right for people that's what it's going to be so Nice Guy Community check out the interview coming up right when you go to sleep at night that's all that happens your conscious mind shuts off your subconscious ask you do you believe in Ufo's astral Projections Mental Telepathy Esp the grow your business the Nice guys are here to help learn about great customer service networking Jimmy G. Graham is a certified hypnotherapist and Motivational Speaker bestselling author in power presentations. He does keynote presentations workshops in comedy hypnosis shows and great release is Master Your Matrix is authored how to use visualization to Oh so I didn't have to shave my legs for this so you know it's a shame because I did shave my legs funny guy which is great did you come at this from a comedian turned hypnotherapist or an entertainer and I started off touring across Canada and the US and the big hair rock and roll band but along my rock and Roll Journey I read Rolling Stone magazine all the time and in the back they didn't really understand the process but I spent fifteen bucks away I got a cassette tape back that's how and I was like wow I mean I kind of understood the power of the mind in the way you know thought processes rams and the power of using Hook hypnosis programs and you simply play them while you go to sleep at night that as as a regular musician you can't really make a lot of money or baker really so I would that I just I Doug I swear to God I put that that whole idea out to the universe but I never thought of it as a career I jumped into that with both feet and I've doc master your Matrix how to use visualization to create a life of health wealth and happiness I wanna about to turn this off not because we don't Jimmy G. But because I'm not sure that I actually hey sayers of the people that are out there and say hey this really does work even if you're a non believer sure sure yeah definitely I mean I get the skeptics all the time all the time all the title images and if

Jimmy G. Graham dot Com Motivational Speaker Rolling Stone magazine Eddie Jimmy G. sayers Canada baker US
Episode 316: Joe Hagan

Longform Podcast

1:13:04 hr | 2 years ago

Episode 316: Joe Hagan

"Hey before we get going. I just wanna tell you a little bit about a new podcast called screen dive from Twentieth Century, Fox. Yes. It's the first podcast developed in produced by a major Hollywood studio. They go deep inside beloved films. With new interviews behind the scene stuff. They're doing the sandlot planet of the apes deadpool and the devil wears Prada. So all you need to do is go into the podcast happy. You're probably a now or apple podcast or Stitcher or YouTube or wherever you listen and search for screen dive on October thirtieth again screen dive new podcast coming out October thirtieth. There's just one more podcast. I like to tell you about before we start the show. This is Aaron Lamour. I'm your co host on the show and actually have another podcast called stonier in which I talked to creative people about their relationship with marijuana. Some of them are in legalization states. Some of them aren't some of them smoke weed all the time some of them have had terrible experiences. Some of them are smoking weed for the first time in their forties. We've had on people like Jia Tolentino who's been on this show. We have on politicians like congressman Blumenauer who's the head of the cannabis caucus. We have all kinds of interesting people coming on in this the second season. So I want you to go right now to the podcast app. You're an search for Stoner. Subscribe then come back and listen to this week's long-form which is starting right now. Hello and welcome to the long foreign podcast. I'm Aaron Lamour here with max linski. Evan Ratliff in our studio. Here we are aware. Hey, this on the show. This is a really fun one. And you know, you read this book off max, I love this book. So I don't know a bit ago. It's on command paperback now, so it's been awhile since the book came out, but a book called a sticky fingers came out, and it is a history of the founder of Rolling Stone yon winner and with it. The magazine these kind of books come along for me, maybe one or two decade just like sprawling like includes everyone for thirty years kinds of big big biographical stories. So this one is great. I highly recommend it and of all of the topics that I talked about on the show figuring out how he was able to assemble the anecdotes in this book is it's a pretty wild story. Yeah. How did he get at all lotta work? You answer an incredible amount of work. Also, someone up in that I think many people who are famous if you go and say, hey, I want to write about this person. People are like, oh, I need to check with them. I don't know. And it seems like everyone who has asked about talking about yon winner was like, okay, I'm gonna need to block out the days. How long are you in town? Like people had a lot to say. So highly recommend this Joe Higgins. He's also written a lot of great magazines. Absolutely. And and he's writing about a world that he was from inside of this is originally a official commissioned biography, and then along the way it became something much different. So it's it's got about as much back story as a book can have I feel like people had a lot to say about John winner Aaron say that imagine situation in which you had a lot to say, yes, how'd you go about doing Email newsletter? I'm gonna say this the Email newsletter is the only reliable form of media that you could get involved. With right now. And assume you could do it for the next decade. Like, if you start a male chip newsletter, you you can probably keep sending it out until you die. And there were Crowley be people reading the Email. So I think if you're investing in one way to get your ideas out there's no better one than an Email newsletter from Malcolm, I really appreciate the insinuation there that we're all gonna die in the next decade. You just you don't want to outlive. Your newsletters? What I'm saying? Well, the show die without nail Chen. Thanks to them. Here's Erin with Joe Hagan. Welcome Joe Higgins. Thank you. You're coming in from Tivoli Tivoli New York, which is where this book has you have sticky fingers book about yon winner and Rolling Stone out in paperback now get that out of the way the book is this long forty fifty year are and then it goes back to the beginning of you meeting yon winner in a coffee shop in Tivoli or nearly New York Tivoli New York. So yeah, just the short story is I had moved up there. The summer before as many a writer in New York City does, you know, got to decamp to the country, and and go crazy. Yeah. So then I was in a coffee shop in the village there called Murray's, which is like the local student hang out end in walked on winner. Getting like a gallon of milk in a cappuccino 'cause they had a little grocery part to it. And he I introduced myself because I knew he was and you had interned at rolling snide intern there. Once sort of had a audience with him when I was a reporter at the Wall Street Journal covering the media, and you know, just knew him. I mean, he's like a a figure. Yeah. And so I said, hey on winter, what are you doing here? And then got into a conversation with him and one thing led to another, and I was invited to his estate, which it turns out he had just moved into its one of his many, but he had a joint up there. And and it was a pretty fabulous joint as you can imagine some maybe a year and a half into knowing him a little bit just casually having a couple of social get together succeeded know anyone around there. So I just sort of defacto became the guy he called when he showed up in the countryside. And we would have lunch talk about journalism politics. He signed me a couple of pieces for like miniature animal and kind of liked what I was doing. And then it popped into his head one day that he was going to have me write his biography. So at this point you were primarily political reporter, it was a mix political report. Getting and on the side. I would do music reporting and dump a couple of significant music pieces in big music head. Yeah. So and yet, but politics and a little culture on the side. What was your initial path and to writing what were the first few jobs you had professionally, you know, there used to be a magazine in the late ninety s called Brooklyn Bridge magazine. I am going to admit I've never heard of that. It was short-lived had kind of an eccentric owner, and she was in to a friend. I got a job they're writing, you know, right about the guys who raise pigeons on the roof, go out and hang out with the Haitian radio. This is a print public. It was a full color glossy magazine, kind of head of its time because it was before Brooklyn was quote, unquote, Brooklyn. And and I've got to go ahead and do all these little pieces for them. And I part laid that into a job at esquires a fact checker, and then I parlayed that into getting my job at smart money dot com. Covering mutual funds. Yeah. Very exciting. But that gave me all this repertoire experience, and my first big magazine piece was I pitched to a now dead magazine called civilization. You know, you've got the murdering tach I the murdering, touch, and I got sent on a trip to hang out with this global investor named Dr Moebius who was like, you know, Mr Clean with shiny, bald head and Niro style kind of safari shirt lived in a private jet and flew around investing in emerging markets. And I spent like a week flying around town wrote a giant magazine article, and that became my calling card to get stories in the New York Times and eventually work at the New York. Observer in your magazine writing about mutual funds? Yes. And later emerging-market profiteer. Yes. Like off the bat when you're being asked to write about something like a mutual fund. Are you expected to make that interesting for a reader to get into the personalities of the? Simple behind these funds. Well, when I was first doing it, a friend of mine got me the job 'cause I was unemployed at the time. And he said, you know, it's easy. You know, you just have these sort of stock questions you ask him what stocks turn vesting, and you just Koppel it together. And it's no problem yet. And it was the dot com. Boom. So there were jobs that throwing warm bodies. Everyone was genius. Exactly. I knew nothing really literally could not even have told you at a stock was at the time such a buffoon about it all, but I you know, learned it very quickly. And I also alternately realized I'm not going to like doing this unless I find a creative way to do it. So I would come up with these sort of like harebrained, I was considered like that guy with the crazy ideas. You know, I remember during the presidential election in two thousand they were putting out all of the investments that the different candidates had. And I created an interactive thing on the smart money dot com website that you could track by the minute. Who stocked for full Lia was was supreme. And I can't remember those Republican guy who was sort of like a four. Cheer guy who had all of his money and Qualcomm, which at the time was this outrageous stock any any I do things like that in. This instance, I got fascinated with this weird Accenture guy who lived in a jet and went around doing emerging markets. And I thought well that's more interesting than the rest of this stuff. So I'll pursue that. So it was really just turning something that was still into something. I could get into. Yeah. And I would say that your approach to political reporting has some overlaps with that. Yeah. You're not a like the piece I most remember from your tenure at New York magazine was a piece about a conservative crews that probably closer to lake David foster Wallace's piece on cruises than it is to a hard hitting political report. Yeah. More or less a series of first person observations of people on a cruise who aren't really that different than people on any cruise like there's more pride complaining about the food. He had under as political the scattering. Is that a style that came naturally to you like once you started doing stuff like politics where you see a greater variety of approaches. How did you develop your own? Well, it, you know, a lot of it had to do with finding out. What tickled me you know, what I mean? And I never was good at fitting into a frame that an editor wanted. You know, I worked at the Wall Street Journal for year. And I hate it because it was so boxy, and you couldn't kind of be yourself, and I did sort of to some degree worship at the altar of certain new journalistic people, which in new journalism was no longer vote by the time I'm coming around. But to the degree that I could play in that territory. I would get excited about that. You know, the book that got me really into journalism sparked me and made me kind of ultimately decide that's what I have to do with my life is Bill Buford's book among the thugs where he spends like two years with all these like soccer fans in Europe. And it was a gonzo type of book, you know, but it was really well done and had a sociological observation to it. And so to the degree I could try to do that one. To what what details did you take from the book? Well, the thing that captured me about that book specifically was at first he was observing as a reporter from afar kind of St. combat between the fans of different soccer teams. You know, he'd go to Italy. And you'd see these fights break out they were violent Malays and stuff, but then about halfway through or three quarters through when he goes to the soccer finals the Cup in France. He himself get so swept up in the fervor of the street fan kind of violence that he himself find himself like beating people up and getting punched in the fight. And then he has from that he extrapolates into a kind of like SAS stick sociological thing about like what that was. You know, how there is this sort of social affect of being around lots of people doing something. And then you yourself almost automatically falling into it. And I'm really into the sociological thing. I mean, making some sociological observation on top of just what you're reporting. I'm glad you brought up that cruise ship piece because you know, my family. My father's side are all conservatives. And so I had a kind of an empathy air or an affinity or an understanding at least for those kinds of people and the challenge of that piece was to both kind of be irreverent. But also to you know, don't shoot fishing a barrel, which it would be so easy to do. But to try to understand them, you can have fun with it. But also show that they're struggling and they have their own issues. And at the end really of that piece. I was like, you know, sitting in a hot tub with this lady, she's talking about her son became a drug addict or something and she blamed the sixties and the loss of the moral fiber, and then she's begins weeping and next thing, you know, I've got my arm around her, and it was like that's kind of what I came here for, and that's what I wanted the story to be and for that moment to happen. And for many of them in that story to happen. You have to be fairly open. Been about who you are and say, I'm politically neutral. I don't, you know, don't notice me over here in the story or a stencil ably liberal reporter on a conservative cruise ship. That's one and that was actually an arc that I went through was not a thing that I automatically lot. Oftentimes, the best stories that I would write are ones where I do come out with a new feeling thought at the ending. I've gone myself through a journey story. Ends up representing that journey some out and in that particular cruise ship story, I snuck aboard not saying what my credentials were at all. And for the first three days. Nobody knew who I was or why was there? They just figured I was one of them and the pressure of it was very intense because for the first three nights, I'm at dinner parties, you know, every night, you'd be put with different group in dinner table scenario, and I would just sort of sit there and smile and kind of go along without really revealing too much about myself. But the funny thing about that experience was. I got on the phone with my editor was like Jamaica or something I always like this is getting really intense. And he's like, you know, you just need to tell them who you will are let the cat out of the bag let some of the pressure off of this. And then just do the rest of your job. And so I did I went to the publisher of the national review, I told him I'm from nearing magazine home on this boat writing a story just thought I'd let you know. Of course, he blanched, you know, what I mean? And then he sent out an Email across the cruise ship warning warning. But the funny thing was people wanted to hang out with me up to that. Yeah. We're like, please come to our table. They thought that's now we're getting exciting this cruise getting exciting. And so I found myself invited to like the Cayman Islands with some of the heads of the national review like at this big table, which I wouldn't have otherwise, and it turned into part of the story that idea of pursuing empathy. Yeah. With people different yourselves. I definitely think that was a dominant model for journalism. It goes back some to the new journal. Which even Tom Wolfe is kind of an update guy hanging out with some crazy hippies and yes becoming a bit of crazy hippie. So that trajectories, they're more recently. There's been a counter narrative of don't normalize extreme as yes. Own humanize, those whose views you, find abhorrent. And I'm wondering, you know, you just wrote what is in some ways a history of journalistic trends. Yes. Starting in about nineteen sixty nine L the present. What do you think about that transformation? I think it's toxic. You know, that's like against everything. I stand for basically, you know. When I was younger. I was doing it for a Reverend purposes. One of the first pieces I ever published. Well, the one about the mutual fund guy. He was this sort of like piratical, you know, investing guy, and I just thought it would be really interesting. But the next piece I did was about a guy who was in algebra and impersonator who did black face in Florida. And it was I would say that like if I were to like, yeah. Illustrate the term problematic. Yes is the center hair with. Yes. We could just pace that rise the art next to it. I like professional Aljosa than person. Yes. Right. He was like a he was this British guy. There's a whole story to it. You can look it up on his public star IRA totally recommend field. Check it out. Oh, you tell your website. Oh, yeah. That's right. Well, so that was a huge challenge for me. Like, can I wrap my head around this guy? Yeah. And like find out why he's doing this. And what is the bottom of it? And at the bottom of it was that he was felt totally disconnected from the world. This apocalyptic worldview in Rhode all this weird poetry and was an eccentric, basically. But you know, now, as I got into politics, the reason politics attracted me, it was it was right around the time of the people climbed the phrase, red and blue states. Okay. Was after Al Gore, and George W Bush election in two thousand you know, you began to see, hey, these two sides don't understand each other. And they were breaking down into their own TV channels there were breaking down into their own websites their on newspapers, and I became fascinated with that history of how that happened in also realize that at one time, this was just the way it was everywhere. You know, it turned out that the middle part of the American century the twentieth century in which there were three TV networks and a handful of newspapers, you know, that was a anomaly yet. Right. So now, we're back to kind of what it was like in the nineteenth century, Jenn. It's breaking down in. There is this the tools of journalism that I. Learned about trying to kind of have a an emotional day Newmont somehow with your subject, you know, where you come to a moment of understanding is becoming more rare. It's lesson vogue. Certainly, you know. And that's in dish into the for shorter everything, you know, shorter content and shorter attention spans. And you know, it's even happened to me, I probably read less, you know, New Yorker magazine than I should. But in some ways that just as segue for a minute at the beginning. You said you've written this really long book, and it is people know though, five hundred pages, but I remember writing this book, and I wanted this book to be a testament to the kinds of journalism that Rolling Stone used to publish in does still occasionally and to the whole journalistic history. They're not by writing about journalism per se at every minute in the books. A lot of the books about all these cultural figures Rockstars young all that kind of history. But I wanted. The book to be its form to be also matching the content and that meant riding long and making it dense in arly and epic. Yep. You know, because the epic has been sort of it doesn't maybe fit the times right now. But I wanted it to be that way. Because that was my commitment to the subject. Hey, I'm gonna pause things here briefly to tell you a little bit about our sponsor this week Scoggins. There is a story behind Scoggins. Danish inspired watches and jewelry. And when you take a closer. Look, it's easy to see what they stand for being part of a community making time for relationships and living in the moment. The minimalist design of Scott and watches reflect the less is more lifestyle of the Danish. People are they offer men's and women's watches, jewelry and even smartwatch is. They sent us one of these smart watches. I've seen it on my co host max linn skis wrist. It. Does not look like a smart watch. It looks like a beautiful watch. And then it just comes to life seamlessly. It is the first one smartwatch. I would consider wearing and it's kind of watch that will look good now or ten years from now because simplicity isn't just beautiful. It's versatile. So go to Scoggins. Dot com. S K A G E N dot com. You will get a special discount on your first purchase. When you sign up for their Email list again, Scoggins dot com. Thank you to Scoggins here. I am back with Joe Hagan. Let's talk about the book. Yeah. Going into this all admit. I'm never clear what it means. When a Bagger Phy is authorized or unauthorized GARRETT'S yon Wegner as told to Joe Hagen says there's this whole spectrum of approaches to both biography and autobiography so going into this buck, did you have models of like, this is how I see this book going. Sure. Well, it was all very worked out at the very beginning with him. Yeah. We had a big debate that went on for a month. What is this book? So he asked you to do he asked me to do it. We were having lunch one day in rhinebeck, New York and stenciled a meeting that he wanted to give me a contract Rolling Stone. And have me leave New York magazine, which I didn't wanna do why did you wanna do that? Well, you know, you were talking about the national review cruise thing in about the empathy. You know, I always felt that Rolling Stone really lacked that that they were so kind of built into the Democratic Party worldview that I couldn't do the kind of journalism. I wanted to to there. I felt like they were two and I'd written a piece for them actually a profile. Joe are Pyo the sheriff and Arizona, and I remember the editorial them getting in there and adding their little gain of barbs into it that would get more like their piece rather than the gun. I wanted to colleague a little bit of sensibility of an editorial cartoon just even the way that sometimes things are visually position. And they didn't do leave on this is maybe a piece less leg. Your New York. Peace and more say like Matt Taibbi is coverage which actually think you're very generous to. Yeah. In this book and saying this was actually the resurgence of yes, Rolling Stones political coverage. But that that style and the national review cruise peace can be more diff. Different than each other and approach well and just to your point just as a little bit of a digression, but he wrote that famous piece on Goldman Sachs. Yep. And I wrote a Goldman Sachs piece right at the same time that was much cooler in tone. Yeah. And actually had much more in different kind of reporting. Let's put it that way. You know, it was more in the belly of the beast. I actually got them to invite me into Goldman Sachs and gave me a tour of it. In addition to all these interviews I did with people current and former employees in his piece got a lot of attention. Of course, as it should have been it, could it was hilarious. You know? It was funny. And it the times it perfectly captured the rage that we have been kind of living in ever since. Frankly, I mean. Yep. So I get it. But so anyway, Rolling Stone wasn't for me yet the bottom line and not to keep good digressing with digression. But I think that there's another trend which is against the idea of access particularly in the political sphere right now. But I think also in terms of Wall Street and softer. Says hey, don't try to get inside these places while you're gonna find is bullshit and lies s if you really want to understand them never talk to them, right? Like in going after Goldman Sachs, would you find inside a Goldman Sachs. That's interesting to you that someone couldn't see without that. Well, I just wanted to see, you know, in some ways it allows you to demystify yet. Because you know, if you just read might be you think that it's like torture dungeon in there. And right. You know, Malaysian children are being whipped by you know, ogre of some kind and money comes out the other side. You don't I mean, I wanted to see it's a bunch of like guys from, you know, Westchester in their Brooks brothers shirts, or whatever the banality of it. Yeah. Because that's what was so horrifying about the crash is it's like the banality of a bunch of like, you know, weekend warrior, frat boys who went to business school who were just figuring out another way to mint dollar where and to me that was. Interesting. And it will the other thing is like. If you have that kind of access in your starting to work with the company when you go to other people who say were former employees of Goldman Sachs or people who had just laughed or even people who were still there. And you say I'm actually working with the company. So you can talk to me any of them would and they would not speak on the record. But because they felt like you were. Yeah. Kind of dip being fair. The they were going to talk out of school. And so that's just a different method of like getting access, but but that's the school. I come from in some ways, very kind of orthodox concept of journalism. Just you know, call everybody imaginable. Rhino find out over that. Why wouldn't you go in hell the fact call everyone? Yeah. Compile all the facts, I'll go I'll go into the office. Sure. Let me look. Yeah. I know and just see what I've never in. You know, the thing I got out of it. If nothing else it's a detail in the Goldman Sachs piece, I was walking by an office. And I just saw a group of men around desk in. There was their leader was standing and he just had a creek. I bet was whacking just whacking back again. I thought that was worth the price of admission right there guy and a pink Oxford with a cricket baton his hand. Yeah. Doing God knows what you know. And so it was trading floor, by the way. A list of people to call and the implicit instruction talked to this guy is is more or less. But winter promised you and terms to this book. That's right. So to take you back to Ryan back for a moment. Yes. When I when he saw my interest dimming in coming to Rolling Stone for people, listening ran Beck and Tivoli ordinary. Live on the outskirts of northern. Yes, right. It's like this is a little like gum kind of weekend town, Manhattan nights. And so he says wanting to rent my boxy in some ways that was barely perfect. John winner moment because he seeing that you don't like wanna come to his magazine inside. He's a little bit disappointed and he's going to figure out a wig get you. Did you explain to him? Why you didn't wanna come to his magazine in the same terms that you just excited any snow at the time it kind of happened quickly? He just me hemming and hauling I wasn't saying no outright. I was saying. Yeah. Let me think about it. Hey behind a busy. Yeah. Maybe I could do half and half. So he offers one he right? My Baga fy, and I had to think about it. And then began a process of me processing that the reality of what that would mean. Yeah. And what if it was going to happen? What kind of book would? I wanna right. Yeah. Naef tim? And this is my first book. Yeah. I was like, well, I'm not going to let my first book be. Some kind of like half ass as told to authorize crap. Yep. Just not who I am. I just as I told him at the time is spent, you know, fifteen years building my career here not gonna stop doing what I do for three or four years writing your book. I if I'm gonna do it has to be a real thing. And so yet e would pay lip service to that. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. But and then began a string of caveats and in terms of what he didn't want me to touch or or write about or why don't you just do it? As an authorized thing you you'll be able to do more or less what you wanna do like. And eventually wrote a letter to him to set. I can't do this because he was just showing too much need to control. And I realized that's the kiss of death. You know, and then he eventually said, well, what are you write down what you need in a document, and like a legal document, and we'll go back and forth until we get them where we wanna be. So to your question about authorize unauthorized the book is. Basically an unauthorized book because he didn't read the manuscript or have any control over. And that was the main thing I needed, and because has to be me has to be my thing. I have to be able to the end of the day shut a door. Right. What I think? And then have it come out of the printing press have you ever an reverie thought if I just handed yon Wegner, this manuscript and a blackout marker? What would this look like yob wished he would have flipped out? If I had given it to him in form. I mean, he just let me just be Frank with you. He somebody who has the kind of ego in his living in the kind of world that he lives in one of wealth in kind of bubble. And he's got an autocratic personality. Anyway, he's not in touch with reality. That is in this book yet. And he can't stand was in this book because it's too real, you know? And I get that. But I knew it from the beginning. And so the conflict went have been I want these seventy eight details. Remove now, it would have been I want this book removed. I want this book dead. Yeah. And was that something that you picked up on early. We told them you couldn't do it. The fact that we were writing a legal. Yep. Document to proscribe what was how it was going to work. Yeah. Told me a lot and his big sort of insurance policy at least as he saw. It was to insist that it'd be fact checked which I was going to do anyway. But I don't do it in writing. He thought that would just mean we'd end up showing him the whole thing. And that's not what it meant at all. It's kind of a big mistake to make us a like lifelong magazine editor to -ssume that fact checking is going to like show you quotes, right 'cause it's pretty fundamentally the opposite effect. Will he tried to get that in the contract that my you review all quotes with fan? I said, no, and yeah. So that. Tipped me off really early on what I was dealing with. And I kind of knew it already just hanging around him. Like now. Kind of rich. His ego was rhino in. How his worldview was very, you know, the kind of person that I had never really hung out with or spent quality time with who if you're at the top of the heap in American society may be more common. Sure. But it's pretty shocking to be around. I think probably in the same way somebody's around Donald Trump, or they see that level of ego, the kind of self involvement how everything kinda curls back to them. And it's all about them. He's not novel in that way. There's lots of people like this and in our society, but John was one of them in a big way. And I had not I was sort of. I've said this in in interviews before and I just want to explain a little bit. What I mean? Which is that the how this inner Tom Wolfe in may just sort of like clicked on when I was around you. Yes. I thought. Wow. You just wanna write about this? Because it's so preposterous in some ways it so broad stroke in colorful, the way, he was, you know, just you can't believe somebody who any had this incredible history met every rockstar in history, and he'd made history with Rolling Stone and his ego matched that or what he thought he had a chief d-, you know. And I think you can you get the impression from reading the book that if that was not his personality. None of this would have ever would have happened salute dozens of historical moments, just like where a reasonable person doesn't do something risky and egotistical and infrared and for worse like he makes fortunes and loses fortunes in order for you to want to do this book, though, I got the impression that you had to find him fascinating. You had to find that. This guy was interesting enough to carry five hundred pages, right, which is actually kind of flattery in its own right? I think well a lot of people said that. To me. They're like how could you not like it? He's a narcissist. It's five hundred pages. What would you like about it about him? Yeah. I would have not thought that yon winner you had five hundred page and some people said he doesn't justify it. You know, some critical people. But I mean, I'll say to this books credit. I ate this book up. Like, I can't remember a book in the last book. I had this kind of relationship with was like easy riders raging bulls. Which is I don't know if that's comparison you've gotten before. Well, I loved that book also book. Yeah. It's deeply unflattering to people who I actually hold in greater esteem yawn win or people who I really artistically idolize now. But totally compelling reading you now just like, yes. And it was definitely one of the models. Yeah. You know, this sort of huge explosive thing, you know, like this grenade journalism thing that I was everything, you know. It's just chock full of stuff. And it's a good setup. Similarly in that you have the story were tons of people. Those lives or crossing each other repeatedly over decades and side note, they're all famous people who it's kind of fun to read like a few anecdotes. Exactly. Well, that was definitely in my world. And the other was David Haiti book positively for St.. Yep. Which I what I loved about that book was he took a slice of history, and he dove it even more deeply into it. Young and used it as a cultural setpiece, and basically describes a soap opera. Yeah. You know, a between these four people, and what I loved about that was it queued me into the fact that so much of history has to do with relationships. And at some point when I was overwhelmed with all of the kind of like, researching this book yawns archive the sets outrageously large archive e had in all the people. I was interviewing it was like to proverbial firehose trying to drink from the fire hose, but I realized the way to kind of like deal with this book was to take all of the big relationships that. On had and described them in kind of almost like a serialized TV show that you would get to see all of their different twists and turns with each other. And then out the other end of it comes Rolling, Stone magazine and all of these historic events, and somebody wrote this after the fact, and I've since really realized that this is what I was doing maybe unconsciously, I wasn't aware of the definition of the phrase or the word pick arrest, but I've since looked into it, and it's the sort of old like Don Quixote, it's like the fifteenth sixteenth century as forum in which there's this rogue character who's going around in Syria. Lies stories kind of outwitting everybody. Yep. And misadventure having misadventures, and then when the key things about the Pirot, I learned is that they never change and the thing about yawn. That was the most challenging to write about wasn't that. He wasn't interesting enough. His history alone made him inch. Interesting. You know, you could just watch him pass through history. And it would be interesting. But that he doesn't change his character fundamentally remains the same. He seemed to me to still be the same person. He had always been kind of like a person who's may be emotionally locked into like the moment is mother left him. You know, if you wanna get like psych wanna one about it. He has this sort of like eternal Peter Pan yet quality to him. But he also has the captain hook side yet. And those are the kind of two themes that were constantly. Kind of wrestling with each other in the book will the idea of him being stuck in time as rich because he idolizes people like Hugh Hefner who literally are stuck in time dressing like a like nineteen fifties bachelor with a pipe, and by the way, the title not of my book. But of the magazine is a Rolling Stone gathers. No moss. He didn't gather any moss. He was to remain youthful yet, and he also managed to create a cannon under which the music popular at his own youthful. Peak would remain considered the greatest music and considered right at least in his own estimating still sort of the hip Buzek. Yeah. Never. Yeah. It was sort of tyranny of his youth. Yeah. Was always going to be there. And and for years it worked for years. It was a thing. And I get that. I mean, look, I'm the generation younger. Than boomers. But I'm basically inherited their worldview, I inherited their their music was my inheritance, and we all listened to it, and we're into it. It was powerful. But partly you now realize it was powerful because they institutionalized. Didn't it was ever where you went right? And that he was a big part of that. No one had to capture that in the book. When I look at the major characters in this book, I think Jane winner. Yon winters wife is almost as big a character as yon winner. She's the yen to the Yang is the fifty percent owner. She's kinda the only person who has there from the bottom to the top entering bottom. Also Ralph Gleason who is the co founder jazz critic, but he died along the way of this journey. I'm interested in once you have these gazillion hours of interviews. And I wanna talk about that process, but you start seeing. Wow. Like, I can't tell the story without Jane Wener. In fact, she is central to everything that happened here. How you started thinking about charting her courses over the book and about having a a shadow of foil for a main character in a piece of biographical nonfiction like this chair. Well, the seeds of it were planted at the very. The very outset. Because the thing that yawn was very paranoid about me writing about was his sex life. Yes. And of course, he was closeted for most of the history of Rolling Stone or a great chunk of it. I guess half of it. Now, they think about it. And then there was this other kind of niggling fact there which is that Jane winners family had put up most of the money start the magazine. Yeah. And those two facts of him being gay in her having helped him, you know, chief financial power at the beginning seemed I knew in between there there had to be something fascinating. And as I got into it. I realized that everybody was mentioning Jane would interview people may be like, well, you know, the key deer stories, Jane. I remember boss gags telling me that knows like, okay. And he was like she never gets talked about. But she's the one that everybody liked. He's always saying, you know, everybody wanted to hang out with her. You know yawn was flying around. But she was the one. And I thought oh, that's interesting. And then I realized nobody ever interviewed her. And so I spent a year trying to get her and. As in that year in which I was interviewing tons of people and thinking more deeply about her and his marriage and getting him to speak more openly about his own sexuality, and he talked about how he had been in love with this man in the summer of nineteen sixty seven right before the magazine started and how that love affair lasted for four years. And I thought well, that's interesting. That was before you got married. Yep. And then I interviewed Jane sister before I interviewed her, and she told me, yes, she found out about this through intercepting, some letters between the gay lover and yawn. And I said a win was that. And she described and it was before they got married, and then I it just was like, whoa. There's something fascinating about this marriage. It's like one part denial when part bargain, you know, there's something both flexible and fraught about. This marriage that I have to get and as I once I finally got started interviewing her she was a little reluctant. But then when she got her going, she was quite honest at begin to realize that this marriage was the core of the book. And you know, you think okay, that's a personal soap opera, and then there is Rolling Stone magazine. But they're insufferable. You've got the co owners are in this relationship in the magazine always was and is maybe not now, but was for years and expression of yon them. It was his world that he was framing. And he's the one that's deciding who's going to go on the cover, and he's the one who's deciding who's going to get to edit their own interview, you know, and all of these things and an obsessively curing it. And so to the degree was an expression of him, you need to know who he was into me, a realized also that a magazine publisher by his very nature has a serialized lie. Life. And in a way, the book had to be serialized had a serial set of different set pieces that take you in depth into a time and into the relationships that were prominent at that time, and so, you know, at the beginning of for instance, of the nineteen seventies period and the book it's first chapter temptation is he betrays John Lennon and right around this time, he's kind of falling for hunter Thompson. And whereas John Lennon had been the key figure almost amuse of Rolling Stone in the nineteen sixties hunter Thompson is about to become his muse for the nineteen seventies and involved in that is both Jane and Jane's her own love. She had a love affair too with this folksinger name sandy bowl. And I thought God is the four of them. It's like this interweaving soap opera between all of them out at the end of it. The equal sign at the end of this. Crazy thing is fear and loathing in Las Vegas. Yeah. And I just thought that's so fascinating. You know it. So that's the story was it difficult to balance that part of the story where you've got John Lennon and hunter S Thompson and love affairs with addicts and people dying and people living in their office. And then, you know, the last one hundred pages this book spoiler alert. Yeah. Like, it's like a lot of Mick Jagger on his twenty seventh cover of relics. No, right. Getting five stars for his solo album. Right. And like in some ways, the romance is a bit gone. Oh, yes story. That's what compresses rapidly. Yeah. A lot of people were mad about that. Some of the employee's of oh extent, you know, like the second half employees people who name in there. Yeah. They made their career in the nineties or whatever. And they're yeah. Because they came in. That's the thing about a place. Like Rolling Stone people came in even at later hours later years with that kind of history and that romance as a kind of temptation as thing that they wanted to be a part of they went to touch the hem hunter S Thompson. And they wanted to be volved in this. And that was a power that John hat, and he wielded over people, you know, because that was his power. He was the gatekeeper. Yep. You know, big theme of this book is the power that was afforded people who were gatekeepers at a time. When gatekeepers were meaningful thing, you know at a time when there was a limited amount of pages for things to be printed on people like, Hugh, Hefner and yawn. If they had a big great idea, they could create a circus tent and underneath that circus tent. They were the ringmaster. And now, it's hard to imagine me. Maybe like the head of Facebook or something it's yeah. And it's just it's not the same. But this book is an interesting discussion about how 'gate-keeping is a self invented profession. Yes. There was no Rolling Stone that predated Rolling Stone. You kinda just set up shop. And starts a, hey, gotta come through this gate and at first people laugh at you. Yes. And then eventually you got enough people behind the gate, the people start taking you seriously. And you right now, you build it, which is romantic in the era of Rolling Stone. And then by the time, his founding, the rock and Roll Hall of fame is just kind of like crude a little calloused and just seems kind of cheap almost it's lame. Have you been to the rock and Roll Hall of fame? I have an it's kind of sad all these years of hearing about it in Rolling Stone magazine. It's interesting the whole allusion. Yeah. Like the wizard of Oz is everywhere in the nineties. I read about people getting inducted into the rock and Roll Hall of fame, and you see like a still image of an it's like, wow. Yeah. That you know, he's in he made it, and then you go there, and it's just like a like kind of a crappy building and Cleveland. It's looks underfunded. As there's the exhibitions. I would say are kind of like will you? -pected a like Hard Rock Cafe. Yes. Just a few pieces of Birch in in a glass case. I don't know. Like once you turn on the lights in the bar. It's a little bit harder to see. So so romantic about the whole thing. Well, and so this gets to the maybe a larger point for me, which is that the challenge of this book at the outset in the way that I began to philosophize how to write it was that I at this late hour in history of rock and roll when it's basically over as a relevant cultural history. I would go to the bookstore. Go to the music section look at the stacks of rock books there and realize, you know, this sort of like romantic, hey, graphic view of the rock and roll age is just not going to cut any more, you know. And now on the other hand, I'm writing about yawn and Rolling Stone. Which makes it easy not to romanticize in some ways because he was such a kind of. It young. Now, he was an entrepreneurial capitalist who had Dettori talents. But the core of the book is about his Embiid. Yep. And you get to watch the Embiid drive. The culture drive the world that he's a part of which is a bunch of other people who are in business. You know, drive it to the crest of the culture straight into the White House with Bill Clinton playing a saxophone solo and then slowly decline as the internet kind of displaces it and disaggregated the whole thing, you know. That's what the you know, the title is about. So anyway, the is about emission I began to think the opportunity in this book was to stand outside that tent that John is the ringmaster of which is not as easy as it sounds because you know, I love rock and roll jerem. I have friends who work Rolling Stone. And I know it's a history and at the time before the UVA thing because this whole thing began UVA disaster. It was a credible. American yonder press. But I realized I had to stand outside of it and get through the layers of kind of shellac that had gone onto this history and get to the down to the wood of it again. And that was going to make it look more raw. And and by the way, yawns archive allowed me to do that yet because in their letters that are written in nineteen seventy two and you see there's nothing romantic about these letters their business getting conducted. So when you look in his archive his archive is just like physically what what am I seeing what does that person's archive flick first of all stored in a special archival center called Iron Mountain, and it was literally in a mountain. And so he had so searchable and digitized in terms of you could see what was in different boxes and our five hundred boxes. So I would say, Mick Jagger. Right. And then say twelve boxes would come up and say, these all have Mick Jagger materials in and this is a process he's been paying for over time onto a management company. Someone someone has to go in and type, Mick Jagger. Mick Jagger, Mick Jagger. He had it civically curated the I professional Curators input into these different boxes and all organized, some of it's in plastic. It's like he realizes the value yet telegram from John Lennon. Yeah. And the idea is that when someone does I'm sort of interested in people who are like historic sizing themselves while cell alive. So you're thinking some time down the line university is going to take on the Rolling Stone archive. It'll be the Rolling Stone archive at UC Berkeley. And he's just like making it really nice to try to England. He wants to sell it. Okay. Yeah. In fact, he was in talks with the new York Public Library at some point to sell it. I don't know what happened with it. But the fact of the archive itself, it's depth. How he collected every last thing there were literature from couches? He bought in like nineteen seventy-one young. I mean this sitting in there. I mean, there's everything was in there. Yeah. They were stacks of memos. That were like anti called why you're. Route call her back yet like stacks of these things from the seventies. And I actually went through them. You know, it's just to see if there's anything interesting in here. So you didn't like there are some of this unflattering material was just in the sitting there waiting shirk angry faxes between. Yes, now had been on the margins. I think it had been cleansed some of it had been screened. But there was plenty in there. Implanting just fascinating stuff. I mean, it showed like him Cording advertisers, record companies in the late sixties and just his sort of confidence in his era Gance and his sh- occasionally, his humor, and just, but this sense of this kind of operator the very present in this archive. You really see it and feel it and later there was another person who worked at Rolling Stone who was a big figure in the seventies who is incredibly embittered towards yon. His name's Joe Armstrong, and he had also saved everything from that period. He'd only been there for four or five years, but he saved at all any. Senate all to me, and it was all the missing stuff from yawns archive, and it had incredible stuff in it just like real rich material that all ended up in the book and in just altogether. It gave me this feeling of these are young arrogant people who are in control of the hippest thing imaginable. You know, this youth culture bible with hunter S Thompson as like the hood ornament of thing. I mean people wanted this and that gave yawn such power and confidence, and you can just see it and feel it, but he was a workaholic too. He was like a, you know, charred driving guy and to me that was like had to be the metabolism. In the engine of my book was to show that feeling of him kind of like clawing his way up the mountain. I think the book does that pretty effectively, and I think the books a little unusual and that. Generally, when people don't have nice things to say about someone they try to like lesson, Ed or, you know, sugarcoated a bed or and say, you know, but we were all high then. Yeah. And the people who have gripes with him who are mostly famous seem very very, comfortable airing them. Yeah. In fact, like the way you presented is like almost without hesitation like so you get a list of the people to talk to from writing. This list comes from beyond winner of intentional people. Well, I would go to Yang and say can you put me in touch with these people wanna talk to these people most of the people in here the non famous. Yeah. I would contact independently. Yes. And that's the people who worked at Rolling Stone. Yes, bull who who had business relations? That's right. And in some cases, they would go beyond me. Like, okay. If I talked to him and yet like have at it. Yeah. And then there were some people that are difficult to get through like, Mick Jagger. Indian would say, you know, hey, can you talk to yet? My Baga refer which she loved saying that. Yeah. Who loved having a biographer. Yeah. Everybody had a gripe about Rolling Stone. Yeah. From some point in their career because in the seventies. It was a brutal magazine was not like the magazine that you think of now. No, which is doing, you know, pretty much like celebratory profiles famous people right in the seventies there. Critics were bitchy. Yep. Their profiles were you know, had daggers out. You know, it was an in many ways, I was probably inspired a little bit from reading Rolling Stone seventies version because that was when it was the most vital. Yeah. In the reason, it was the most vital is because there was actually power in rock and roll at the time power in the record business. There was money young now in fame, and these guys were calling them to account the way one does to power as a journalist. And that was why Rolling Stone was so exciting because you could just feel the the self importance of the entire enterprise all the way around from the Rockstars to the. Analysts and the journalists had such power that they were going to have fun with it, you know. And so I remember thinking this thought whether it's good or bad or fair or not. But I'm gonna treat you on in his history as if it mattered, and that it was powerful. And I'm going to be truthful with it and be really straight, and I'm not gonna put more layers of shellac on this table. You know, I'm gonna make it have the life that it had at the time. And what made that easy again was the archive you'd go. And you'd read these things, and you'd say I feel like I'm there, and you know, there's all instance, in the book where I found a cassette tape were yon, Stu people are gossiping about Jahn nineteen seventy one, and he had this affair, and it's these two people talking on the phone and fall on his cassette, right? There is a fascinating history. And there that I've heard touchdown at other points, which is basically people in the war Holly in New York City, nightlife doing basically podcasts yet after they go out where. They gossip about people veteran talk shit and are doing a secret oral history that's rife downtown New York. That's what Danny fields was doing which ranges from banal to. I would say in this case sexual extortion. Yes. It's actually none of these were very ruthless gossips their attitude was Sharkey Jackie. And they were mean. Yeah. I mean, I was like I mean, he's basically like one of the first recorded like revenge porn victim. Yes. In scituate. That's there's a element to which that is true. And, but when it was listening to these tapes, I it gave me such a palpable. Feeling of what it was to be in this world back then? Yeah, you know, not everybody was in the rock and roll world. Not everybody was cool and not everybody had access to all of this stuff. But the people who did were very unique kinds of people, you know. So this was there kind of like mill you and yon was sort of trying to navigate through it. But I remember listening. Those tapes and in the background you'd hear like Ajay guiles album playing and you would just get this feeling. You can hear the TV set on. And you I thought if I could make this book feel a little bit. If I can scrape off a little the feeling of what it's like to have been in that time, then I will be doing service to yon story. Yep. Not writing about it from twenty thousand feet as like and then lo he went and started Rolling Stone magazine. And that was never going to be a book I wanted to write. And so that the downside to that is he was gonna hate it because it's going to be so raw, and it's gonna show this raw young arrogant ambitious guy cutting deals and doing what he did that tone in that style of making it feel like you're there the only books I can think of that do that in this way are books that are literally oral histories like I'm thinking of Capote, and what's the one? That's the she was like a Warhol scene purse. And that's the Sedgwick. Easy sedgwick. Yeah. For you. Was there ever a version of this book where you were just going to quote people like we whether you're just going to let people talk. No. But I did play with the idea of doing interstitial oral history of just yawn talking to give him his say or right? But he's a very kind of like mumbling and occasionally incoherent talker. And it just didn't feel right. And it would deflate the narrative momentum that I was trying to achieve. So I didn't I always wonder something like eighty like how massaged is this prose writer read this. Well, because it reads the well, I'm it was. I mean, another thing you learn from that era is like, yes. People had journalistic principles, but things were a little faster and looser back then stakes may be weren't quite as high. They weren't as high, and nobody was really going to call them on it. Yeah. I like who was going to say anything, and let's say they did misquote you dodged or quote, what we're going to write a letter to the editor. And they could either. Publish it. Or not. I mean, young had no recourse, really, the only recourse back. Then was I'm never talking to them again, which happened dip with John Lennon or tapping ten years took ten years off, you know, same with them Joni Mitchell, and people who were just infuriated by things that were in there that that was your only recourse is just don't talk to them. Although as you learn you on was so powerful that you know, you were kind of losing out to not get that coverage. If you had a new record coming out or whatever. So it's a, you know, it was a different world. Tell me about three types of interviews that for this book, the yon- winner interviews, the very famous person, Paul McCartney kind of interviews and the people who were there in Rolling Stone, maybe aren't famous, but were first person I witnesses to a lot of the stuff in this book. How did each one of those interview types workout? Well, I would say, you know, in terms of the quality of the information yet, basically reversed those. Yeah. I mean, it one thing if I would direct you to in other people who decide to read my book is if they go to the acknowledgments page, there's a whole paragraph where I say I would like to thank this list of women. Yeah. Because it turns out in this like crazy male Centric rock and roll age of the sixties and seventies. There were all these women around. But they didn't have the power. They have the job checking department of. Yeah. Or if if that, and but they were paying attention and they had such great observation such psychological insight into Yang. You're like, I'll tell you on was John was this was this narcissistic believe, you know, who was a genius. But was hard to handle, you know, and they would just tell it to you straight. Whereas a lot of the male not nece was not every male interview, obviously. But many of them were like, let me tell you a story. And I happen to be the protagonist of it. You know, what I mean, there's a lot of that. Or they know they had you know, they were grinding an ex, but so yon could be really interesting as an interview if you boxed him in and got him there. You know, what I mean, his top line messaging in an interview was to get past that he had to get past it because it was such like a non specific. He was great, you know, in that'd be like the entire description of like Joe history house or something, you know. And so. You know, you'd have to like we'll tell me about the time. He did this to you remember this, and you'd have to kind of force them to remember some things that he didn't really want to remember. Yeah. And then he'd be like, oh, yeah. I guess that did happen. You know, like he had to be backed into stuff I felt often occasionally you'd remember great anecdote like the time that he and Truman Capote like broke down car on the way back from a gay bar and had to walk through the desert to get to a too. I thought that was. That was great. I loved that. Now, then the rockstar thing was a mixed bag. I mean, some people are giving you very sort of canned stuff in your challenges to get past the canned stories, but I was surprised in many people were I guess reading my book was that a lot of them were willing to air kind of conflicts and different kind of ups and downs that they'd had with young and Paul McCartney. As you mentioned was definitely the most shocking to me because I I went to England to meet him to this place in the country that he had a studio at their and I expected nothing. I mean, I was like I'll meet him he'll say a bunch of like kind of blowing things at maybe I'll use and maybe not and we'll see how it goes. How long do you get like you say like if I come there to get our, okay? And I ended up getting more than I could ever have dreamed. Yeah. I mean, I was there for like two hours and probably more an hour of it was interview in an hour was like hanging out with. Him as he liked played musical instruments in his studio, and showed me Beatles memorabilia, you know, just crazy things that were insane for me. But like some of these other Rockstars he'd had so many ups and downs with Rolling Stone. And he didn't forget them. You know, they stuck in his mind as little barbs that he still had resentments about in the reason Paul McCartney's was the most interesting is because the history of the Beatles was wrapped up in Rolling Stone. You know, I mean the breakup of the Beatles, especially was well covered by Rolling Stone and Rolling Stone was on its face a partisan for John Lennon side of the story. And it always sort of gave the backhand Paul, and okay that was nineteen seventy seventy one this break up his happening. But it went on for years and years and years and years, and when Lennon died he became this icon and Rolling Stone had a lot to do with turning him into one. You know, as we now know yawn winter and Yoko Ono became very good social friends in that was. Kind of like a friendship of pragmatism there on some level. The first of many cases of collusion collusion influence, editorial coverage and our perception of absolutely. And she said as much said that the issue marking his assassination, you know, helped turn him into an icon and koso-. Conversely, of course, Paul McCartney resented that Rolling Stone had made him into the Cy con and resented that. He was constantly cast as the second banana, young even extending into the rock and Roll Hall of fame. Yeah. In which he gets betrayed by Jahn. Once again, as is described in the book, or at least claims to you know, I don't like decide as a judge allegedly allegedly sub. So the you know, what are you start to realize? And I think that was shocking to me wonderful for my book was that, you know, you think that these things happened in nineteen seventy one and that six months later, they got over it and they moved on with their life. No way. They just never. Get these people. They stay have huge legacies that they're burnishing at this stage in their life. They no longer care. They don't give a shit. They're gonna tell you what they think all rich. They're riches hell, and now they have left or these grievances. So they're like sure I'll tell you about my grievances in and when it comes to yon, I don't even think twice about it. Now did yon win or not think that Paul McCartney was just going to air him out the minute. He got a chance that's the part that I don't I think that yawn just figured that. They would all continue to kiss the ring on some level or that they would defer to him thinking that they wanted future coverage and Rolling Stone. And the equilibrium close to death at a certain point that like how much coverage are you gonna get that is what it was all mccart, and you have one more album in him tiles. He doesn't need a relic stowed review. Now. No, he didn't. In fact, he just gave his big profile to g q Essel. So for me. It was like this grab bag of wonderful story. Suddenly, and then you also realize that yon had a kind of cycle that he went through with different people. He would be their friend. Give them wonderful coverage bring them into his fold, and when he no longer needed them or decided, he was another bright, shiny. Object over here that I'm going to pursue. Yep. He would sometimes betray or backhand, or at least it was perceived as portrayal or back in the person would feel like Jahn dropped them. Or suddenly, put the hatchet in them. You know as art Garfunkel of Simon and Garfunkel says in here, you know, when you on puts his arm around your back. You gotta look and see if there's a dagger there and the best sources for me where people who had some perspective, you know, who looked back on it and didn't just glorify it. But they looked at it. And they were like, you know, we thought we were doing X in turned out. We were doing why in the world is turned into Z, you know. And there was some lament, you know, and I felt like the though some of the lament that people express to me, I I would trust those people sources because I felt like they weren't trying to present me with their beautiful, shiny anecdotes. They'd been buffing over the years. You know, some of those are fun. But there was a one woman in LA. This woman named Joe. Townsend whose name comes up occasion in the book. She's nobody would ever heard of she was sort of like a jet setting rich hippy and her father was had been the head of Avis rent a car in the sixties and show. She had this beautiful place in BelAir. She's delivered in it. And she had dated all these famous people in the seventies. And I remember her just having this really philosophical outlook on what had happened in those years, and what had become of the world. There was something really a poetic about her. And when you meet somebody like that. And they're trying to say, hey, listen, I know it all sounds romantic to you all these things. But a lot of it was destructive. And look where it lead us in the world. You know, we climate change in this terrible, governance and all the dreams we had did not come true. And in fact, we're going the opposite way. So what the hell, you know? And I started to think I guess I need to be able to have that prison. I need to be able to use that filter to look at the story a little bit because you know, we've read enough books glorifying the sixties and seventies to know that it was glorious, right? But as I was finishing the book, Donald Trump was being elected, right? And I remember thinking to myself, and I wrote this line at the end of the book, you know, it's the story that begins with John Lennon on the cover of Rolling Stone in nineteen sixty seven and ends with Donald Trump in the White House. And in many ways, the book takes you there. I wanted it to, you know, take shoe through the culture as it metastasized into what it is now, and it had a lot to do with a sense of as I put it in the book and people can agree or disagree. But the age of narcissism the sort of like worship of celebrity and yon was very much into celebrity just in worshipful of it and glorifying and turning it into thing, and eventually celebrity displaces a lot of the ideas that they originally started with. In my estimation. And that was a narrative thread that I began to pull in the book. Did you read every Rolling Stone? No, I read a lot of them. Yeah. As I got into the eighties. I started to skim. And there were some actually in a Rolling Stone looked terrible in the eighties. But there were some great material in their great reporting. One thing decision. I made was that. It couldn't be strictly story of what was in the magazine and couldn't be strictly a story of journalism for one. I didn't want to read, and I don't think lots of people want to read about just a lot of journalistic derring-do stories. Yup. And then the other problem with his I'd bring it up to yon, and he wouldn't remember any of them. He was not himself super fascinated with all of the big marquee journalistic pyrotechnics of the magazine over the last twenty or thirty years. It seems like the time for that book would have been like the late nineties early os. When I peak hunter Thompson fever, and yes, I don't know how hunter Thompson is regarded now, but I would imagine like a high school students have a different relationship with him than they did when I was in high school. I would think so and I read him very differently from this kind of position in history. I've loved reading fear and loathing. Again. And it was funny to me. But then I think it was shocking to me to learn studying the history that his career was so short that his years of productivity were miniscule compared to the years and years in which he lived dined out on his legacy. Yep. And became kind of character of himself really quickly. Yeah. And I was like that's more pathetic than it is a great. And I knew that was going to piss some people offer, you know, that find him to be a beloved figure, but I found him kind of gross and pathetic towards the end of his life. And I was not going to I needed to write that, you know, especially his end was horrible. It's strange because Johnny Depp. When I was in high school was playing hunter S Thompson. Yeah. Now, I don't know if you read that profile, Johnny death. That was Stephen Rodrick Monterey pace recently has become not a hunter S Thompson figure, but a similar figure and deep declined living and 'isolation in kind of a reality distortion. Field totally stating explicitly that he wants to be like hunter Thompson in that s. And what was the the interesting about the story that kind of meta aspect of the story is that I found all kinds of letters between yawn and Johnny Depp over the last fifteen twenty years in which Jeff is calling him unclear. No when they were extensively buddies. Yeah. And I'm sure yawn got him the access or that the access came because Johnny Depp, went yawn said my understanding that story was that Johnny Depp actually asked for that store. That's right. And he went to yawn and yon was extensively his friend. And they had you know, done hunter s Thompson's funeral together. They had been big buddies in the letters they wrote to each other were super chummy. And you're my buddy, and chump chump. And also, by the way, Johnny is the godparent of one of your kids. So this is nowhere. I can go that does not overlap the star. I could just yell out a random celebrity and yet get me there within five second. Right. Well, I mean, but this goes back to the thing I kept coming across and that I wrote about. You know, there's two sides to the on winter story, which is that there's the seduction, and there's the betrayal and it happens again and again in it's partly just to go back to journalism as a craft. You know, the dark side of journalism is this is what's always happening. And but he was doing it from the top echelons of our culture. And so whereas I might have an enemy, and you know, this mutual fund investor. I wrote about, you know, fifteen years ago, his enemies are huge figures in the culture because he would have written about them in a way that in like in. They would have blamed him. Thank you so much visit view, you're very welcome. I appreciate you. Having me. It's fun to talk about the and the book is now in paperback. Yes, sticky fingers, I actually say I think I kind of liked the paperback cover the hardcover. You know, you're you're not the first say that in bookstores now. Yes in bookstores now go pick it up. Thanks to you. Thank you. Hey, thanks for listening to long form. Thank you. Joe hagan? Thank you to my co hosts maximum ski and Evan Ratliff. Thanks to Geno Pifer for editing. This episode thanks to Tyler mcclosky for being our intern and thanks to our sponsors, mail chimp. And pit writers. You know, he's getting touch podcast at long form dot org. C an extra week. Hey before we go. I just wanna thank Scoggins again. They make some great minimalist. Danish inspired watches and jewelry, they sent as smartwatch. Which is just excellent. It doesn't even look like a smart watch. Which is the best part about it. It just looks like a beautiful watch that you'd wanna wear now or ten years from now you can find them at Scoggins dot com. S K A G E N dot com. You will get a special discount. If you sign up for the Email list there. Thank you Scoggins.

Rolling Stone New York City John reporter Mick Jagger editor Goldman Sachs Jane Wener Wall Street Journal Rolling Stone John Lennon soccer Tom Wolfe hunter S Thompson Rolling Stone magazine Joe Hagan Evan Ratliff Joe Higgins Aaron Lamour