35 Burst results for "Rolling Stone"

Wolfgang Van Halen on his Debut Album and Influences

Rolling Stone Music Now

02:33 min | 6 d ago

Wolfgang Van Halen on his Debut Album and Influences

"Hearing the whole thing. It does emphasize to me that it's dead on to say two of the touchstones here are foo fighters jimmy world. You and i have been talking about it for a while. And i mean obviously there's a ton of influences and their stuff that only you can do a lot of that but when you think of what lineage. That's what it is. Tell me about like discovering those bands. It's not like you had to dig deep in the crates to find them. They're pretty popular bands. But you know discovering this bans personally really specifically what you kinda took from them as far as inspiration. Yeah when it when it comes to. I always had this dream of doing an album with me playing everything. Just like dave grohl. Did the first firefighters album. It was just a thing. I always wanted to try. It was always on my list of like this'll be really fun. And when i got back from the two thousand twelve Van halen tour. I was kinda just like okay. Well what do i do now. And i started writing like taking it seriously. And that's when i wrote the song mammoth and it was like okay. I think I think i'm onto something here and that's kind of where it all started. And just from from the band's. I would listen to all the time. Everything from foo fighters to jimmy world to nine inch nails to tool to alice in chains queens of the stone age. You know it just kind of those influences really seemed to inspire me and Yeah i mean th but with the main thing just the dave grohl doing that first fires album and just he. I always had an affinity to two bands like blink. One eighty two and and jimmy world. I really love harmonies. And i think that's where my love for like harmonies melody. Came from with bands like jimmy world. 'cause they're just so strong with that type of stuff so i really laid the foundation for me in terms of that. Mammoth which is a aptly titled. Song is one of my favorite tracks on the album. Tell me about especially since it was the beginning. Tell me about that one coming together. Yeah it seemed to kind of it. Gave me the confidence to kind of be like. Hey okay i think i'm on the right track here. I kind of hit the the tone and the pace of what i was going for for something you know. It felt knew it felt different. It felt something that was like original in my own. It didn't sound like van halen. It didn't sound like anything. It just sounded like this might be what my music sounds

Jimmy World Dave Grohl Van Halen Jimmy
Best Covers of Bob Dylan Songs

Rolling Stone Music Now

01:41 min | 2 weeks ago

Best Covers of Bob Dylan Songs

"It is an opportunity to reflect upon all that bob dole has given us and he's he's given us a lot. Maybe we start by taking a look at this list that we at rolling stone released this week to celebrate the birthday and it was the eighty greatest covers of bob dylan songs and let's start with argument ranked very high on. That list is knocking on heaven's door by guns and roses. And certainly when i was in high school i thought that absolutely ruled. I don't know. I don't know if it's great horrible. Bob apparently hated it when he was asked about it. He said something very interesting about guns and roses basically suggested that they were fake. Which i don't agree with him on but he was not a fan of it. which isn't unsurprising. I just don't know if it's good or ridiculous. I i can't decide what we're we're obviously. We institutionally landed on great. Since it's like number seven and list but what do we think beyond. I sort of scratch my head a little bit at that one to being so high up on the list you know. I think it's also a case. Where in bob's original of that. Most of his originals are hard to top. That one secure. Bob's original is so it's so kind of ghostly powerful in high always found two guns and roses Screeching and so yeah. I wish they'd been a little lower on the list myself. I say yeah. If you look at the guns and roses songs where they covered nineteen seventy-three soundtrack classics. It's the worst live on. That dies much much. Better for nineteen seventy-three psych soundtrack. Song by guns and

Bob Dole BOB Bob Dylan
Axl Rose, Guns N' Roses, 1987 Interview

The Tapes Archive

01:46 min | Last month

Axl Rose, Guns N' Roses, 1987 Interview

"Hello hello My name is steve harris. I'm calling japan. Yes what's happening guy. A high axle hold on against cigarette. Okay what's happening. We're kind of a little bit worried that you know in the middle of your big victory return there. You'd be a parting. Instead of winning at the hotel for the phone call dawn setting up to thirty to come over to be now. i just got it yesterday. Because i went from indiana. And i've been there two or three years. I went back to visit my family. My fans. why did you decide to sit that right in before in homecoming there. Well just because it was like. I had been back two years last time i was back there. I just told myself. I'm not coming back until i got a record out couple kicked. Oh you'll never get anything crap like i said. Okay i got three days. Go back and just see what's like it was great. You always been known as the town rock and roll back then up there. Yeah up debt but you have to remember that in indiana will opinionated and biased and things like that so i have a real open mind. I listened to a lot of material but listening to a lot of material. You listen to the rolling stones within within your fagor. People think like that. They're you know. Call you all kinds of different days depending on what. You're listening to it. Since i listen to everything. I was called everything in the book. Still way when you when you were growing up. You're not that old. I found twenty five. I'll be twenty six february only ten years ago. People were were still thinking like oh yeah well indiana's really closed off from the rest of the world. Maybe not chicago so much but even chicago. Is it a huge city. But it's not like la or new york or texas or florida. The midwest likes to just keep itself to itself and everybody else has problem. They look at it.

Steve Harris Indiana Japan Chicago LA Midwest Texas New York Florida
Who's Next; Album Retrospective

The Loudini Rock and Roll Circus

02:14 min | 2 months ago

Who's Next; Album Retrospective

"Who's next is one grace albums ever. Have you ever heard it. Go out and get it. And that's for much of the podcast. Thank you and we're out. We can do the brief history all. They did a brief history. Let's go ahead and do a little bit of dig into just a little bit deeper there with the holocaust started and what was going on already. Who's next by the who august fourteenth nineteen seventy-one ten years before i was born but i am familiar with the album Fifth studio album like liu said it developed from the aborted life house projects which was going to be a rock opera to follow tommy which. I'm sort of glad they didn't do that. Because then have another is really silly movie that i can't sit there but they did salvage some of the songs for the next album. Eight of the nine songs from lighthouse for featured on this album The one that was not was my wife that was written by john entwistle It's heavy on the use of synthesizer Especially for songs won't get fooled again and babo riley. It was an immediate success when it was released viewed by many critics as the best album or their best album and one of the greatest albums of all time. It was reissued on cd several times with additional songs originally intended for life house. The first session for which became who's next was at mick jagger's house star groves recorded there at the start of april nineteen seventy-one using the rolling stones mobile studio and that's what i got. Okay that's the there you have it. It's sort of like the beginning of it. Let's talk a little bit before we get into. Who's who's next You got under way to put this in in kind of history. Tommy was a total like revelation. No had done and fact pete townsend was sort of jokingly calling it a rock opera developing it and it was really kit lambert. That was like now now. Now like let's let's go with that. Let's let's see Kit lambert was their manager and producer at the time and he worked very closely with pete and he really encouraged this rock opera thing and it really became big like freaking

Babo Riley John Entwistle LIU Tommy Kit Lambert Mick Jagger Groves Pete Townsend Pete
The Life and Music of DMX

Rolling Stone Music Now

01:42 min | 2 months ago

The Life and Music of DMX

"We're going to talk about de mex- great artists who died at the age of fifty and we're going to look back at his career and kinda just get into what made him important. Were made him interesting which was a lot. He was a fascinating complicated gifted troubled artist. They had a lot of sides to him is pretty interesting to go back to the music to go back to his life store and just we remembered. What a complex dude he was. Jeff you're a great piece about the amax. Maybe can kind of just sum up some of what you said there and some of how you see him in context. Yes i mean. I think as you said you know. He's obviously a really complex figure within the world of music and within hip hop as well in. It's always funny in situations like this for me. Because i'm relatively young. In comparison to most of the people who i think spoke out most about him. When i was really first coming out i was like five or six years old and even then even still you know. I have such vivid memories of those songs kind of raining. Everywhere i went and as i got older and as i got into teenagers adolescents. College years looking at someone like the mets are looking at his legacy has been so interesting for me. Particularly as some of his interested in the ways in which celebrity functions in our culture in our society. And i think is for all the amazing music made for all the amazing movie and television appearances that he's done and for just what a positive cultural figure he was overall. He's such a good example of the ways in which i think. Our celebrity culture can fail people despite their

Amax Jeff Mets
Neil Youngs Lost Classics

Rolling Stone Music Now

01:59 min | 2 months ago

Neil Youngs Lost Classics

"It's neil young's archives volume two thousand nine hundred seventy two two nine hundred seventy six. We have with us ed martos. Andy greene rob sheffield and david brown to talk about this box. Set andy maybe set us up with both the significance of neil young's archives as a thing. Judging by this rate. I guess he is about ten more archives at least to go and then also just this incredible period. I think this is one of my personal one of my favorite periods by any artist. Ever so they have a box focusing on. It is pretty dreamlike. But andy go. It's a really amazing thing. 'cause back in the eighties. He started talking about archives of box sets and it was every interview he gave for years. But he didn't put it out intil. Two thousand seven endows the start of his career through harvest which is great stuff but my favorite period is the mid seventies and this is the period when he wrote songs at a psychotic rate. He wrote songs so fast that there are many albums that he shelved completely and he finally did the seventy two to seventy six. It's ten cds. There sixty three songs had never been heard before which is astounding because skied an album. Or two for your back than antes released the time since then. So this is the mother load of sort of the four best years maybe of his career at a songwriter. And when you think of it being the best four years of one of the best players of all time you start to grasp the significance of this project rob. Maybe you can explain. I presume you agree that this was certainly a peak period enough to agree that peak period for neil. What's great about this period for you of new young. Well this is a period. Where he what is most oft quoted lines ever where he got tired of the middle of the road and he headed for the ditch

Neil Young Ed Martos Andy Greene Rob Sheffield Andy David Brown ROB Neil
John Mayer ‘berated’ by Taylor Swift fans after joining TikTok

Colleen and Bradley

01:07 min | 3 months ago

John Mayer ‘berated’ by Taylor Swift fans after joining TikTok

"John Mayer joined Tic Tac, and then he got taken to task. Good bye. Taylor. Swift fans who hate his John Mayer guts. So John Mayer joins Tic Tac, and then he gets roasted by Swifty's. They flooded his post with comments denouncing him. For leaving Taylor Swift in 2009 member. She was 13 years younger than him. She was only 19, and he was 32. People were writing, John, Don't you think 19 was too young? Somebody else made a comment which received over 30,000 likes on Tic Tac. And it said You're not safe here. John. Oh, moly. Wow. He not his audience. No, not his audience, and all. Several fans were quoting lyrics from Taylor. Swift 2010 song Dear John. She wrote about him following their split. And at the time, John Mayer told Rolling Stone that he had been really humiliated by the song. And then Jessica Simpson was laughing all the way through the whole thing. I mean, well, yeah, there you go, You know? Did

John Mayer Swifty Taylor Swift Taylor Swift Song Dear John John Rolling Stone Jessica Simpson
1996 Interview With Flea Of The Red Hot Chili Peppers

The Tapes Archive

03:32 min | 4 months ago

1996 Interview With Flea Of The Red Hot Chili Peppers

"I. I'm fine thank you. How are you want to start off by asking is strange to think of yourself as an arena band. No not really. I mean because we've worked for so long to get to this point where we're playing arenas spent so many years. Starting in this lawless little clubs were way up to mega domes and It's been a very gradual thing so it hasn't been like all of a sudden opinions. Bq jelena's like this for so many bands. Were working in for us. So it's not i mean. Are you glad that you worked your way up that way. I felt good about where at how we got at. I feel like that we've worked hard and we have a good understanding of what it is to be where we are understand the value of work. Can we understand the value of discipline and understand that the fruits of creativity feel like this is the best lineup since the first lineup of the band. I can't say that now. I think this is an expert lineup. That i think would different than any other lineup and i think we are smoking but I think that the john fashanu lineup. This very amazing. And i think that the original is really strong and misdee- initial impetus further suspend. It's hard to compare them. You know they're all hello. John fashanu dave navarro very different people very different ideas and very different ways of expressing themselves. I think this is a great one. If i didn't feel it was clear them. Smoking banned in the world. I wouldn't be out here playing. Arenas was it a goal to get to this level I kinda like often some foggy distance. Perhaps all the player is no. But i more thought of like playing there was a place called in los angeles. This computer called perkins palace. I think it holds about fifteen hundred or two thousand people. And i see parents down. I thank god that was my biggest goal palace that was always thought we make it like the perkins palace. That would be like my dream. Come true the greatest thing in my life. Us kind of clips. That haven't you. We could do that. You know obviously power. You can make enough money to paint event and have another job. You're doing real good chat and I think it was in the rolling stone piece refers to this as a new band with new priorities. Is that the way you see it to I don't know my priorities aren't any different. I don't know what he's talking about the new band. Dave definitely has different priorities in his life than anyone else has never been in. This band has narrowed personal satisfaction. What made you pick up a piece when you originally started playing bass. Hello slovak said to me We've bass player in my band wheel and the world. Yeah that's that's how. I think most bass players start out here. The band needs a bass player and And and there you go. Yeah i guess so. Yeah and did you become as great at as you are by just just constant practice and or mean. Ross run economy. Great thank you. I do i want to call you. Thank you very much. I i developed my style on the base by just trying and by listening to music that i like listening to a wide variety of different musics and trying to understand different feelings as music in lots of different types of music and just being myself not trying to be anyone else and by a really loving firstly. I think you know just truly loving nothing you hills strings. Nothing feels when i get inside. Someone's kicked

John Fashanu Jelena Perkins Palace Dave Navarro Arenas Los Angeles Dave Ross
The Beach Boys sell the rights to their intellectual property

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:41 sec | 4 months ago

The Beach Boys sell the rights to their intellectual property

"Right. We got the beach boys here. Latest artist to sell their masters. The iconic artists were able to the iconic Artists group Rather was able to buy the group's intellectual property for an undisclosed amount of money. The deal get the company the Beach Boys masters, part of their publishing rights. And their brand, which includes the beach Boys likenesses. Band member Al Jardine told Rolling Stone. The decision allows the company to make the final business decisions which is something he thinks they need. He noted that the band has tried to expand its brand, including things like restaurants, but It's failed in doing it. Oh, Okay. Hmm. It's failed. Okay.

Al Jardine Rolling Stone
"Midnight Train to Georgia' songwriter Jim Weatherly dies

The Paul Finebaum Show

02:57 min | 4 months ago

"Midnight Train to Georgia' songwriter Jim Weatherly dies

"I've been listening to your program for the last couple of days. I don't know if i miss this one. Johnny bolts best. Quarterbacks passed away on wednesday. jim weather You listen i. I i i. I saw that yesterday or last night. And i'm glad you brought it up because i never. I didn't know jim and was too young when he was starring it out at ole miss on pre national championship When he was the quarterback. If you do you remember that is correct But that was nineteen hundred nineteen sixty two right but would you want to know more about his music career than i do about his football career. He was one of the net epic songwriters of that era. He wrote One of the most famous songs in the seventies of midnight train to georgia for gladys knight. He wrote Neither one of us. And i think the best that's That's rolling stone. Had a big article on him and the latest things happen. Yeah they named Midnight train to georgia one of the five hundred best phones. It is it's in fact i. I heard i was thinking about jim this morning and i played that and it is just you know he was. He recorded his own music. Well he had he had a hit as well. I'm i'm very familiar with his music. And i'm so glad you mentioned that because this is part of what we do that sometimes we we. We really don't pay enough attention to older. Exactly art archie archie manning Said that jim weatherly was his hero. Growing goodness i know he would he would go to. The delta gem had a band in high school. okay and jim weatherly and he traveled of course through the little thousand mississippi and archie went to a concert or at Rosedale mississippi back in the well that had to be in the late fifties right and he said that he had that elvis. Look you know jet black hair. Handsome guy and he was mesmerized. Usually get archie on to talk about a. I'm i'm glad you said that because that's my fault. I knew i knew he had passed away. And i should have done a better job of but it's rare. I've always wondered about him. Because i knew he was. I knew he was a songwriter. And i and i. I would air of teenage to to growing up so i mean i knew that music very well but i i knew very little about his his football career because usually you run these guys never have. I think he spent a lotta time in nashville and hollywood. So i never saw

Johnny Bolts Jim Weather Jim Weatherly JIM Georgia Archie Archie Manning Gladys Knight Archie Football Mississippi Rosedale Elvis Nashville Hollywood
Flaming Lips fans attend concert in bubbles

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:26 sec | 5 months ago

Flaming Lips fans attend concert in bubbles

"Concert over the weekend, the van finally hit the stage in Oklahoma City Saturday after the show was delayed due to high coronavirus cases there. At the concert, each fan or fan group got to enjoy the concert from inside of a large plastic bubble. The band was also inside of their own bubbles ahead of the event, front man, Wayne Coyne told Rolling Stone. It's a very restricted weird. That's understating it. Just a little bit. Wayne concert

Oklahoma City Wayne Coyne Rolling Stone Wayne
Unraveling America

Travel with Rick Steves

04:24 min | 5 months ago

Unraveling America

"We're all glad to have survived. Thousand twenty the change in the us administration suggests it may be time for a different tone in how americans work on the issues our country needs to tack. But are we up. For an essay on the unraveling of america an anthropologist. Wade davis wrote for rolling stone last august. Got people talking. He joins us now from his home near vancouver. Bc to explore. America's changing role in global politics is essay is sort of like a letter to a neighbor who needs a little tough love and that neighbor happens to be a canadian anthropologist. Wade thanks for joining us. My pleasure could be with you so you wrote an article. That apparently is the most widely read thing. Rolling stone has ever published. Will it hit a real nerve. Million people read it on the site. It trended number one for five weeks three hundred and sixty two million social media impressions within two months and my visitations to my wikipedia. Site soared from a modest one hundred fifty a day to over four thousand. Just hit this nerve wrecking a none of us expected that nervous like that Little quip that's going around on the internet suggesting that to live in candidate today is like owning an apartment above a meth lab. Robin williams. Actually your essays. You say. it's a love letter. But it's a love letter called the unraveling of your neighbor america. How is it a love letter. Well i think when you have someone you love and you do. A family intervention. The most important in the first thing have to do is hold a mirror chisholm to show how far they've fallen. Because that's the first step in the path of rehabilitation and. I think that things have happened so fast. In america that in a way people look in the mirror and they still see the myth of their on exceptionalism and they don't necessarily see how far things have changed and i think kovic revealed that you know it didn't cost the country to fall but revealed to what extent the country had fallen. And i think a lot of that's just about the nature of community and i think where canada's not perfect place but it is interesting to compare the consequences of covid in the two countries way. It's it's interesting because americans. I think we take up a little bit offence when somebody from country critiques us. But we're more likely to listen to canadians. And it's so helpful for somebody to remind us that the global view of america has changed a little bit. I mean people used to look at us differently than they do now well as a great reporter for the irish times you know. They've been many motions expressed about america's since world war two but one that has never been there is there now that was pity. And that was how the world saw america's frontline healthcare workers were waiting. The arrival of emergency supplies on air lists from china. It was almost like the hinge of history opened the asian century. Pity that's something new. Another thought that. I've had is. When i if i ever refer to america's as an empire people take offense to it but we're an empire to me and empires rise and empires fall. I'm a historian and and it's frustrating to me. How unable or unwilling americans are to realize. History may be speaking to us in your essay. You reminded us how empires come and empires go. Well no kingdom expects to fall and they all do you know historically if you think in european tradition. The fifteenth century belonged to the portuguese the sixteenth to the spanish to seventeen to the dutch. The eighteenth to the french and the the nineteenth to the british. The british empire actually reached its greatest geographical extent in nineteen thirty five. But we know of course that by the end of world war two empire was bankrupt and bled white in the torch had in fact passed to america. What clearly yeah. I mean if you look at the numbers after world war two we were so dominant and comfortable thinking. We're the last great superpower. But of course as you said look at what the past has taught us and i think pretty clearly right now. There's a changing of the the torch ever further westward in it and china is emerging as the next great superpower I mean i don't necessarily look forward to that moment with any kind of The light and i think if if and when we find out that this is the fading of the american era. I think we'll be very nostalgic for the best years of that era.

America Us Administration Wade Davis Kovic Robin Williams Wade Chisholm Vancouver Canada China
Show 6a Comedy via Radio, Music, & TV  Redux  Aleck, Kaner, & Goldthait - burst 2

Standup Comedy "Your Host and MC"

01:57 min | 6 months ago

Show 6a Comedy via Radio, Music, & TV Redux Aleck, Kaner, & Goldthait - burst 2

"One album or yours. Dez gainers the top forty. How long george benson stumble into walls on quay cores rulli nelson. Maybe i should have loved you and could have maybe longer than i would have with. You always online nerves. The rolling stones Aw that's all i remember. That's good laugh georgia. Proper blew my son last night. That's why i drive right through the red lights. Glock must be slow to people that understood that a

Rulli Nelson George Benson Georgia Glock
Taylor Swift Moved The "Evermore" Release Date For Paul McCartney

Mojo In The Morning

00:54 sec | 6 months ago

Taylor Swift Moved The "Evermore" Release Date For Paul McCartney

"And then she said but i found out you were going to put it out on the chance so i moved to jeans. A man she found out we were coming out on the eighteenth so she moved back to the tenth. So i mean you know people to keep out of each other way. He said that the beatles and the rolling stones used to do the same thing back in the day. Oh you want me to play another job. Thanks told you what. I was enjoying listening to simply having a wonderful. We were drinking the stones and say. When's your single coming up. Old june thirtieth joke. We'll put on july thirty just you that more often nowadays big rappers with big beefs like two pac and biggie. They're people used to do that as much as they want to. Squash each other and be dominant. They didn't really want to go up against each other because they had the mutual respect of. Hey we're both making money

Beatles Biggie
Bob Dylan Sells His Entire Catalog of Songs to Universal Music

Business Wars Daily

01:53 min | 6 months ago

Bob Dylan Sells His Entire Catalog of Songs to Universal Music

"Dylan sold his entire back catalogue of music to universal music group earlier. This month price wasn't made public but estimates range from three to four hundred million dollars. The catalog contains about six hundred songs composed over sixty years over the years. Dillon has sold more than one hundred. Twenty five million records and at seventy nine years old. He's still performing globally for the last several decades until the pandemic he performed more than one hundred concerts per year. Not surprisingly the ceo made su nami sized waves the new york times called it a blockbuster deal and said it may be the largest sale. In history of a single songwriters music dylan status is unlike that of any other musician in the twenty first century in two thousand eight. He won a pulitzer prize for quote his profound impact on popular music in american culture marked by lyrical compositions of extraordinary poetic power in two thousand sixteen. He won the nobel prize in literature for quote having created new poetic expressions within the great american song tradition at the time. The nobels permanent secretary. The late sarah donahue's compared dylan to greek poets. Homer and sappho dylan is also the recipient of numerous grammy awards and the presidential medal of freedom. Moreover dylan is seen not just as a cultural icon but also as one who has kept the copyrights to his songs even while allowing many other musicians to cover them. He's also allowed his music to be used for some surprising commercial undertakings like twenty nineteen super bowl budweiser ad in two thousand four. Victoria's secret out. According to the wall street journal copyrights to the compositions themselves are distinct from recording and performing rights among the songs in the catalog at universal acquired or some that have gone down in history indeed changed history like blowing in the wind like a rolling stone and yes the times they are a and

Dylan Su Nami Universal Music Group Sarah Donahue Dillon Sappho Dylan Pulitzer Prize The New York Times Grammy Awards Homer The Wall Street Journal Victoria
Manure for Enlightenment

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:40 min | 6 months ago

Manure for Enlightenment

"Mall. Thanks for coming on my pleasure. Dan great v. here. So let's start. I'm sure you're not surprised that i'm going to start here with your personal story as i understand it. A big landmark in your personal and contemporary of development was going to prison. Can you tell that story. Yeah absolutely. I'll try to relatively briefly so yes that was A really important time for me. I spent fourteen years in federal prison. How did i get there. I was one of those baby boomers that came of age in the sixties kind of classic angry young man graduate from high school in nineteen sixty eight completely. Disillusion daily naked justifiably or not. That's what was going on with me. Both families up but a lot to do with the cultural stuff. All the assassinations and so forth and i grew up in the midwest roman catholic up being basically good family but we out her issues. Alcoholism and things like that. There was quite painful. Sixty eight was one of the multiple two issues culturally in this country. I just went headlong into the counterculture went off to a big state university but really majored and drugs and rock and roll and antiwar politics and any other crazy again bombed in. But i'd always been a spiritual seeker. In fact my family always thought i was going to go into the priesthood early on or something like that so i'd always been as brutal secret. I continued that all along. And so i ended up eventually leaving the country. I just became so alienated. I in part to get away from the drug culture house and baldin and partic- nixon was reelected. I i just wanted to get out and also was on this search for something authentic. I remember at a time in my childhood when i felt really plugged into reality things. We're very ribbon. Really been magical and that kind of just gone away at some point and that's probably a normal developmental process. But i never made peace with it so i was always hungry for that looking for that and you know the drugs were some mirage of that but obviously with a lot of baggage and if you got a hole in your gut indicative propensities that can take you down a lot of twisted roads. So i did leave the country star traveling as an ex pat throughout latin america. And and that was very transformative time. I've spent a year living on a sailboat to another guy night a small native both that we learned how to sail and kind of an incredible life for a while and just living off the ocean literally and and then sold. The boat continued to south. American and i had some notion about getting to prue and finding something magical there and had nothing to do with drugs. I don't know where. I got the idea but i did get there and did. Discover something quite magical. They're just environmentally. There was some kind of real magic in the environment. And unfortunately the first time i came back to the states. When i ran out of money. I had to come back and work for a while. I couldn't bring them with me. So i realized you know it was still environmental and anyway this went on and eventually at near the second time i fell into or may choices rather engaging kind of small time cocaine smuggling originally just i was i had a connection and i would purchase something for people who are coming down and smugglers and i can make like a thousand dollars and live off that for six months down there so i continued like that for a while eventually got involved smuggling myself to come back to the us. And you know that kind of path remained intertwined. While before i could pull it apart. But when i came back for the us for was to go to nairobi university. I'd been trying to practice on my own for a couple years. High mountains impro- in a little place that bay remote valley up above the sacred valley. The incas and i zeroed in on the tibetan buddhist tradition reading the few books that were available at that time. And and then when i someone actually showed up at my house there with a copy of rolling stone magazine in nineteen seventy four with an article about that first summer session. It was kind of legendary in boulder at neuropathy vendor open institute and when i saw trump firm shades name i just knew i had to go there and so i did and went. Got my master's degree there. It was very intense. Contempt would've or clinical contemporary psychology program. And that was very transformative in the process. I became a student but i kept his other shadow. Part of my life a secret for quite a while from teacher from everyone i would disappear once or twice a year. I was able to live outside. The system continued to pursue my interest and so forth and my marriage was falling apart. I kept those problems at bay with money. And so i had all this cognitive dissonance and when i was traveling with my teacher which i was very fortunate to some develop that relationship and travel with him a lot as one of his primary attendance and when i was on retreats and i spent about half the year and retreats programs are traveling with him and then i was leading a very sane life and now go to this completely crazy life back and forth and before i could tease that apart i ended up earning my way into what originally looked like a thirty year. No parole prison sentence

Dan Great Baldin Partic Midwest Nixon Nairobi University Bay Remote Valley Latin America Neuropathy Vendor Open Institu Rolling Stone Magazine United States Boulder
FX Developing The Rolling Stones Drama Limited Series From ‘The Crown’ Producer Left Bank

The KFBK Morning News

00:38 sec | 6 months ago

FX Developing The Rolling Stones Drama Limited Series From ‘The Crown’ Producer Left Bank

"Me to introduce myself. I'm a bane will. This might be something you want to watch a cable Syriza dramatizing the rise of the Rolling Stones coming to FX. Hollywood reporter says the new scripted series about the stones being developed by the same studio behind the Netflix series. The crown, which is controversial. By the way, the Stones reportedly have authorized the use of their music for the serious FX has ordered two seasons of the show. I think I'd run watch it. Yeah, I think so, too. I love those. No rock band documentary drama documentaries are executive producer Jensen says FX does a terrific job productions. All right, Okay, let's get outside

Hollywood Netflix Jensen
The Dylan catalog, a 60-year rock 'n' roll odyssey, is sold

The Gerry Callahan Podcast

08:23 min | 6 months ago

The Dylan catalog, a 60-year rock 'n' roll odyssey, is sold

"I got a question for you. Are you doing fan. Bob dylan fan. I'm okay with them. But i'm not a hardcore you bet. If you're if you don't like dylan you better get ready. Because you're going to hear a lot more dylan. I'm telling you why. After i tell you about shed concrete this homeowners and builders out there you know what i'm gonna tell you. My brother-in-law greg at the folks that shake crete they have a huge selection of pre cast concrete steps. You got to check this out. There's a tv commercial. Would meet in it and you get to see all the great steps that they have to offer but you can do that on the website you can stop by and see whether you're building a new home where you need to replace an old staircase. Shay has great vibes with designs for any home. They're veiling concrete. You can customize your steps with beautiful stone granite or brick. New staircase can dramatically upgrade the front entrance of your home. Maybe that's tom brady. Inches el ni. They can't seem to unload. There's little bungalow thirty three million dollar home. Maybe they have to upgrade the steps. That's how you do it. Most cases can remove your old stairs and heavy walking a new set of front steps within hours. And just like that. Your host looks better houses worth more and maybe trying to sell it. Maybe it helps you sell it. It's new steps they can. They can really help you move that old home and make it look better and so quicker you can learn more about chase pre cast concrete steps steps at a concrete dot com to stop by one of their four state of the ad for scillies. All over new england. I bob dylan. And i love these stories because this this is what the taylor swift it. Which means that they will wake up and actually have some interest in this topic. Talking about my girl taylor. Swift sold her music catalog to what's his name scooter braun. Oh yeah and then complains. After bob dylan sold his music library for three hundred million dollars. That's right And by the way He sold is popularly. Seventy eight which is another one of those amazing miracles. The bob dylan still around still kicking. Well did you hear what he said about this jerry region. But here's what's going to happen you me. We'll be watching You know football game. We're watching wednesday night football thursday night football tuesday night. Football game mini mini games That around these days and there's gonna be a commercial for flow or he'll be commercial for you name it Gimme gimme some tv for apple apple. Lot of apple commercials. That's a good one apple amazon target. And it'll be Some of my friend is blowing in the wind blowing in the wind or something blue. What's blue some blue jet blue. And they'll be tangled up in blue. You'll go what bob dylan. His stuff is going to be of vera readily available companies to put in tv commercials. Because bob dylan sold out. It's bob dylan's if you don't like it if you think you know that he's Not that kind of guy that he wouldn't ever seventy-nine by the way he sold out. He took the money. God bless him his family's gonna why he needs the money but his family is going to be fabulously wealthy for generations but companies like target nap bullen and whatever flow what is flow sell insurance. Press gress yes i defense. They're going to be able to play. Dylan's pay whatever the going rate is and they could play it and you'll hear it all over the place just like you here. You know the rolling stones in some cases or taylor swift and other artists who was amazing. When i read the story it was about some of the other artists of fleetwood. Mac sold theirs for like. I get the number here here. It is eighty million dollars they sold. It wasn't even the whole catalog eighty million dollars. Fleetwood mac and dillon skate. Like columbine could probably name more wallflower songs and he can bog way. Bob dole i. It's right over my head. I have no idea i look. I'm surprised he got three hundred million. Based on the fact that that ship has sailed a long time ago dylan receives a lump sum between two hundred and four hundred I'm not sure what the what. The stevie nicks sold their publishing catalog for eighty million dollars. The dylan portfolio six hundred songs while other bands who have sold their catalogs sold. You know taking the money. Blondie barry manilow and the estates of john lennon and kurt cobaine. I believe john lennon the beatles. Paul mccartney bought them for like a ridiculous amount of money Like eight hundred million. Paul mccartney owns well. Didn't jackson by michael jackson and then mccray jackson and a falling out story there. But there's only one to look up jerry. Three hundred million eighty million two hundred to four hundred million. What did what did brian. Wilson's father sell the beach boys catalogue for another against the wishes without the kids. Even knowing and i think he sold it for like seventy dollars and a coke or something new never spoke to his father again obviously but if the beach boys is the one you would want because of the catchy jingles. Yeah that's true point and that the father sold it for nothing. He had no idea what he had. And what the value of wasn't a guy goes. Hey i'm gonna dig deep here. I'll give you five hundred dollars. Whereas i sold and brian wilson was never the same after it happened. It's a good point. But i think dylan's got a lot of those you know catch even though they you know might be whatever. The revolutionary songs at times they are a change in blowing in the wind and songs like that which will which will fit nicely in commercials. And we'll be sick of them all with and i'm sure he had control over it and limited the exposure but i guarantee you. He sold the rights to some two songs to some commercials. I assume right Yeah i guess. So i mean i don't blame me if you're gonna die soon and you wanna take care of you. Offspring kids grandkids. You say. What the hell. What do i care if not be capitalizing on all the different changes that are going on in the music industry. I bet it's like a five person team that he has controlling the catalog right. Like it's a he. He owns time. Bob no one said a need the money for anything the the couple couple of years ago. Long before covid were dylan on went on tour and performed at three hundred nights in a year three hundred nights in one year deal and he was like seventy five and i don't know anyone that went to see him. He wasn't playing the big rooms anymore but he's just addicted to performing and singing his songs and i must have just an insane amount of money already. I mean just. But it's like what bob cousy sold all his Collectibles always memorabilia. He said what do i need it for. This is going to pay for my grandkids education. And can you blame him for that. I wouldn't. I'm a big lira. Guy when it comes to rock and roll. If you consider dylan rock and roll and dylan for what i again. He's not my bag particularly. I don't have any bob dylan on my phone. But his his lyrics. If back on my i always think that you know if you get ten best lyrics of all time. You don't need a whether they know which way the wind blows is one of the great lines right and i'm with you. I'm a lear. Emma word man to and i love you know singing along to whatever tangled up in blue and he. He won the nobel prize for whatever writing. Poetry didn't show up for the award. You know. I believe. I believe greta thune. Berg was second so she'd go toward for him but no he won the nobel prize. I think he blew the market and show up to get the thing and these the only singer or songwriter to win to win it

Bob Dylan Dylan Apple Scooter Braun Football Taylor Dillon Skate Shay Tom Brady Blondie Barry Manilow Paul Mccartney John Lennon Kurt Cobaine Mccray Jackson Greg Swift
"rolling stone" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

08:00 min | 7 months ago

"rolling stone" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"Sixty four was an amazing year. You also had who baby baby which also mean. Tell me about that in the same year man who was. Isn't that crazy. That as much as the songwriting on that song. I i. i just think of your vocal. What do remember about recording that if anything maybe yeah okay. brian Baby was one of those songs that i call a mint to be song. It was an accidental created. Because of the fact that it was just something spontaneous the miracles. I used to sing a medley of love songs by other artists in our show. And we say that every would went and one night we were at the. How data in washington. Dc and we're singing this song and there was a group called the schoolboys. At that time they had recall. Please say you want me to which was the ending song that medley and so we we've gone to please please. You will meet to we. We did that and the girls they love the whole so at the end of it rather than ending it i started to say ooh baby baby and the guys who so in tuned to grow up together and been saying who ten years old they heard me and they just started to harmonize with that. The crowd went crazy. So we better jet research and we're gonna get that here so every night. We started to do that. Man and the crowd went crazy. Never heard that it went crazy so we said okay best. We got home and write this. And that's what we did was a time that you started writing some songs for marvin gaye. I wanted to talk about a little bit about branding firm and in your relationship to him. He was a complex guy. I think there was a lotta love between you when he did interviews for auto biography. He talked about he. Felt like you were out doing him. In some ways during the sixties what was the. What was that relationship lake. You mean the personal relationship with marvin. Yeah model was my brother man margaret. Atwood get almost every day. I mean you corner me. We played golf basketball. What it was we we we all the time. And and all the guys in motown man see multiple is not just a record company. It was not just a gathering place for artists and stuff like that. When you hear about the motown family that's real and for those of us who were still alive that still exist. We were brothers and sisters together. We did everything together. We did picnic. We had dinner together. We we socialize together. We did everything together. Man we just a big family and that included not just the artist but the people who in the staff the musicians everybody we just had the motown family man and this what it was so montana will very close man but we were competitive like i explained to you earlier. We had the motown but everybody was competitive. Very had this this saying that he came up with and he posted it on the wall at his field. Competition breeds success so. We all competed against each other like mad dogs. Okay but in turn. We helped each other. Like i said the monday morning meetings where we could take each other to critique the music to try and make it better and are using example like this norman whitfield turned out to be my biggest rival for the temptations. Okay if norman whitfield was doing a record on the temptations because everybody hung out in time when you would choice. That's why you were to go 'cause everybody was there. It was like you know you go there and you do your work and you're gone. It was a hanging place man. You go there everybody would be there so we around doing something whitaker music. He's looking at his record. Coming up claps avenue because roma was the two and he was working on his arrival but still he was my whether we're competing but we were there for each other interior. I can be doing solar inaugural amendments temporary. Okay smoke and that's how it was there man. It was beautiful. There's never been anything like that. Brian and i doubt seriously league whether they ever will be again absolutely. I mean you've said that marvin gays What's going on. Is your favorite album of all time and it was number what we recently did. A big poll at rolling stone actually just was selected as the best album of all time on that poll. Fantastic do you brian. Because his prophecy man. What's going on. And what he taught what he's talking about in that in record man is happening more now than it was then known saying. it's prophecy i would go to modern. Cb sydney piano writing to solve what's going on and not just be sitting there with him. Just wait for him to finish that we could go do some some attorneys smoke. Got his writing this man. He said yemeni. I'm sitting here. Is a god is writing this album so i believe him because prophecy in the initial argument over that album when when it i was or the song actually berry was opposed to it. He didn't see it coming from marvin all that. Did you take aside. Initially in that dispute no take sides margaret my own side stubbornly. We'll still no matter. What so he just needed you know. He had done the album and he is buried. A discrepancy about it. Embarrassed thought it was the because marvin our sex symbol. See my was sex on what as out sex symbol. you know. that's how we booked him. And now we advertise sex symbol guy. You so bury thought was a bad move for. He'll some political. You know an roberson no. He's it's time for this man and he stuck to his guns bears it. Okay when he said we're gonna put it out income wrong. You come to me apologize. i mean i'm gonna commute. I'm apologized you wrong. you go to me. he's So barry had to go to in a jets. Now i that emotion which wrote a couple years later sixty seven. I believe that started. Because i think it was our cleveland. Said i second that emotion conversation and he laughed. wasn't that funny and then realize that was the song simple a simple as that man she like. I said i don't need to be isolated. Made you might say something right. Yeah it's about giving credit man but but yeah we shopping of christmas shopping in a department store and he was getting something for his wife the counters and we were talking with the lady was selling stuff in whatever it was i forgot now and she said something and rather than him saying the old saying i second the motion he said oh yes motion so the girl and him emmy laughed a second more. You know many wieners emotion we all. We all laughed about you know and then walking out of the store and i say hey man that's a hell by the oppo salt. So that's why i wrote it now. If you're composing music usually do it on piano right. Yes or just by myself without any music. Marvel once claimed that you could. He said Smokey can only play part of the piano. What he was talking about is the one that he claimed. I think he was just being. Maybe a moment. He said smoking would be smoking. The greatest he'd be even better if he could play the entire piano. He only complained part of it. I don't know what he meant by that about some. You know that doesn't matter because he's right about that. I'm not i'm not fluid on the don't play like i wish i could but i've made willing to ride and play well enough to play play something But see maverick has really played piano. He stevie really played. But i don't really play but i can. I can play but he was just on my ass. You talked about me so 'cause we did that to each other skull bagging on you. You know you spoken about the fact. And i've seen videos of dancing early on and you're you're perfectly good dancer. But that wasn't your favorite part..

marvin gaye brian Baby norman whitfield motown Dc washington montana oppo Atwood golf cleveland stevie roberson basketball barry Smokey
"rolling stone" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

07:08 min | 7 months ago

"rolling stone" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"Smokey robinson grateful and blessed and that gives us a reason to look back at his entire career and to dig into the writing of some of his greatest songs. Smokey thanks so much for being here. Well bryan thank you for that. Introduction man moved to see at. We'll call it a route up taking you with me everywhere. I go so according to some accounts it was actually partly your idea to start motown records that you said to berry gordy your good friend you said why should you let the man take the royalties. Why not sort of be the man yourself. Is that how you remember. Baby was a record producer. Songwriter in detroit. When i met him and nobody had been paying either in law saul for jackie wilson. Etta james and people like that you know and nobody really was paying him and then when he started to manage the miracles on me he put us with a record. Company was normal town at the time he put us the company call in new york and the ad lot of popular artists at that time so we had a mild hit record with them and we had four sides with them and Didn't you get a check for about three dollars. A three thousand nine hundred ninety cents to three nervous for the writing and the producing an artist royalties in all the royalties that went along with those four sides and i got a job was was a him because it was in the five and in are rejected that time and so we knew that so it was just a it was like insulting. I guess he'd had enough so he bought eight hundred dollars from his family and started his own record company. it was. his idea was not my idea. My idea was to go national local and we put out another record on the miracles of me. Call over there and he was trying to decide because it was breaking big in the detroit area and he was trying to decide what recovery he was gonna put us with nationally for national distribution. And i said to him. Why don't you just do it yourself man because nobody's paying us anyway. We do that so might as well take a chance on not paying our sales. That's what that was wasn't the idea for him to start the brecca company that was his idea but for to go national. I suggested that to him now. Berry gordy great songwriter in his own. Right and it seems like the very beginning. He functioned at the very beginning. He functioned as a little bit of a mentor. And a t-shirt shirt to you in the first on a writing at that time. What did you learn from him. That took you to the next level with your song writer. Brian The first day. I've met bay cody man. The miracles miracles at the time. We've got matadors and we went for an audition for jackie wilson's managers. Which was shoe should make a jackie. Wilson was my number one singing idol as a kid growing up and he was so detroit. And i would have walked ten miles to see jackie wilson. At that time you know so to find out. We got an audition with jackie. Wilson's manager was huge for me. And so we go there and We had a girl with us claudette. Who was my first wife. She was my wife attack who still teenagers but her brother had been singing with us until we graduate with my school. Then he had his mother to sign for him to go to the army so when the auditioning came we needed that other boys so we took her with us. So we want to be saying five songs that i had written and thinking that that was going to get us over with these people because they were loved the fact that we had our own material berry happened to be at that audition just sitting there. Waiting deterred some songs. The jackie wilson. When we finish singing songs his managers told us that they you know thought we would never ever make it because we were too much like the platters who were the number one group in that time. 'cause the a guy singing. I had a girl in the group and too much so we would never make at the audition was over. We had failed the audition with them. Very came out to follow us out of the out of the audition hall and as assault came from. I blame at him bubble so he took an interest in me. Because my songs in those days brian i could always ryan from time outside and sixers i. I could ride. I was writing poems and stuff at that time. And i always ramps up but my songs did not have continuity so started to teach me how to make my songs have continuity and to make everything in the song tie in together. He told me the middle of the beginning. Billon the ending have got together and got the means something conglomerate and he taught me started teaching right salted but them in continuity then and did he reject a bunch of songs early on. Oh yeah yeah. Hey man. I can do some. If i go to bury might reject those now he goes. That's where we are together. You know so. So yeah he did. That's who he is. You know he did that. Everybody hallelujah hollow nor with feel mickey stevenson. All the writers. Wh we we did notice. Hey man this is not cool. That's why we were so powerful man because we had a music man at the hill. We had somebody who's first love was music and producing records and writing songs. He was leader. So that's why we were so strong because we would go to him you critique every day we critique each other. We had monday morning meetings when nobody except creative people could come in yet and they started at nine o'clock. You got that nine or one you were locked out and we had to create meetings and we critique these other music everything that you recorded for that week on whoever you recorded though. We did that to each other. So that's that's why they were so powerful because we had a music man at the helm now motown's first million seller was shop around. You've said you ridden in twenty minutes thirty minutes whatever. It was very fast. How did that out of that habit songs at bryant sounds different man Things are like that some slow you know. In contrast batman it took me five years to write cruising so shop around with just one song that throw it out. And i wasn't really reading shop ronco myself because we had an artist named barrett strong with huge record money. That's what i want. And very good nitsana for him and so he told me he said. I want you to an album barrett so i said okay fine so i started to announce thought about money. That's what would you do have money. You scout so starting and went to bury it. When i was very excited by make slow like i said in twenty thirty minutes it was done and i looked at him and we went out to the music hall and we started to assess To play for him and he got excited about it. Because anyone changed the chords blah blah blah so. We did that and he said. I want you to sing. This song. man said no man. I wrote this off barrett. Noman will do the sameness. No rover we whatever twenty minutes. He goes to your records on miracles in you as it. Okay fine so i did. It was a blues singer. So i wrote shop around. Losey an hour recorded on the miracles of meat. Okay the record..

jackie wilson detroit motown Smokey robinson Berry gordy barrett bryan Etta james saul producer new york mickey stevenson ronco sixers assault Noman writer batman Brian The bryant
"rolling stone" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

04:37 min | 8 months ago

"rolling stone" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"I used to feel so famous around my shows because you're always never it's famous as you are look. The five blocks around the menu. Play. Like you're. GonNa. Feel famous. Go, than go to the restaurant next door. So I just don't have a distorted view anymore and also getting rock ignites. Now is kind of fun like people like. In there you're like, oh, it really is just my hair. Did you just say recognized yes. I have not heard that before. Is that is that your own invention or is that some is that a friend's? Got Up from pop punk world actually I, Can Chad Gilbert. We went to Disneyland once and he was like this is like rocket is city because pop punk kid fil of Disneyland. Recognized Punisher can you? Can you give me one more shot? Well, there's fans cleaner like I said which I love right what else? Yeah. Everything was like an inside job that doesn't make any sense to other people This has nothing to do anything but my Dutch tour manager WHO's like six seven Right before you on stage every night he goes, let's do it to them before they do it to us. That's we don't know what that means. It's I. It's my interest. He should text that to you every night at eight PM wire at home. Used to be in a in a metal band called dowse oath and they had dildos as they are of course. So he's he said, I want to ask about before we wrap up will there be more better oblivion community center projects will there be more boy genius projects. I hope. So the ethos of both of those bands are. Is Really Fun and. I think the weird part especially owning label is like you know this contract at this time. So this person has to be working on a solo record or whatever like it's just a lot of mental math but I hope that are stars align at some point because I love van so much I feel like it makes my solo music better. What are your ambitions for the label? I WANNA stick to. Signing people who write good songs I. Think it's easy for me to hear cool production not like dig deeper but I want to truly be able to connect with people on lyrics, which is hard, and also like a lot of that means a lot of different things it doesn't have to. I definitely. Just don't WANNA sign people who sound exactly like me or who sound exactly connor or whatever like I'd love to kind of reach throughout genres basically, science stuff I feel really stoked on not not because I should or because it's cool. Are Super Happy Artists allowed totally totally I feel like. Again, happiness to as funny and sadness. And I just am curious because I feel like I can't predict your reaction to various musicians. Do you have any musical relationship or thoughts on Van Halen I mean Pasadena Represent, right? Yeah. Totally. I think it's advantage. Elena's super super seminal. I also was kind of like a Hessian tween. So definitely learned a lot of inhaling guitar But. Yeah. I mean, also they were the ones who invented the rider trick of the EMINEM's right. Absolutely. Love that any you know the story. Bina. We actually on this very show we had the manager for Van halen wrote a book who invented that trick and he very adamantly explained that about how it wasn't. It wasn't right without it was for safety. Yes. Yes. Because if they can't get that, right, they know that everything else might be dangerously wrong. Then like a huge beam overhead, my follower playing guitar. Yeah. It's a great trick. There's nothing better than when you forget to change your writer from the United States to Europe and you have guacamole on your writer in the states and then you get to Germany in its a can't and it's called avocado sauce. That's. You have to follow van Halen's example and avoid those kinds of things that I was scared almost going to tweet..

Van Halen Chad Gilbert writer United States Europe connor Elena Germany Pasadena
"rolling stone" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

04:57 min | 9 months ago

"rolling stone" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"He said, he you know this bar you're in was a lesbian bars gas and he said, and you have a very large lesbian following I said, yes, and he said one might. That, you're a lesbian as one might yes, you know. And I I, left it there and I This is my first album and I totally expected for him to out me. And the article never came out. So so is either someone on your end or it might have been my publicity company might have nixed it. I don't know behind my back not telling me. But so you know a good rolling stone reporter did his did his homework and? A article never came out. After after. Luther investigating. It was nineteen, eighty eight. How did you come to be a restriction? How does anyone you hear you hear you know blinded by the light and you're like Oh. That's it. Again growing up in Kansas we had a great radio station there call Kyi one or two is a rock station. and. In like seventh grade my. I was twelve floor eleven twelve, hundred there I I had I had mono. I. Was sick for about two weeks. Three weeks just in bed and my parents gave me their radio alarm clock because we didn't have a TV upstairs and I. so I would just. So for about two weeks straight I listened to the radio and I listened to it all day. All night does all this rock and roll stuff and when they played springsteen I sat up and went what is that? And then right after that, he came out with. Born, to run, and of course, the minute you hear born to run, it's like it's over and that's when I was starting to form my idea of what kind of artist I wanted to be. I had I had started playing in these bands a little bit. I was messing around writing my own songs I. I had this this desire coming up inside of me and I said, that's the kind artist I wanted to be I, want to write songs that make people feel the way he makes me feel I, WanNa sing with this authenticity I I want to perform like that I I want people to. When I when I play and so. From then on it was what would bruce do you know what always struck me about your performance of thunder road with him at the unloved is that you were singing it in the classic way and he at the time was in this ambivalent place he wasn't fully rocking. He wasn't. He was in a few years away from with these and it's like you feel almost dragging him into the rock version. It's a really interesting tension. There I gotTa tell you. He came to the this show and we rehearsed upstairs in this It'll dressing room we rehearsed. Okay. You're seeing NASA and I'm like I'll just sing the 'cause you know the the second part I'll just sing along with you. And so we go down for soundcheck and he goes where's your band? Dude is just me and you. And I are just going to sing it as a yes. Just this is unplugged. It's. Just bland. and. He's like, Oh, any Kinda was like shaking. He hadn't Tom Jody and done anything yet. And his unplugged you remember his unplugged was like no, and he played it with the whole man. Yeah. So he he cites cooks Amigos and he watched the whole show my whole show from the wings right there. He wants everything I did and then he came out and say it with me and he'd never done that and I and I to me I thought everybody everyone just gets up and said that's fine. But he he really that's I. Appreciate you recognizing that because him and I it was it was great I. It's one of my favorite things I've ever done of course sing with Bruce Springsteen but just the performance and I kept messing up on the end if you watch it Because I was like dude I 'cause I just been out. You know out proud for about a year I said, I, WanNa sing so mary climb man not just really means a lot to me right and. It's so we get to the end and I would just be so just staring at him and listening to them and the lying came, and I just totally blew the line I. Missed it up messed it up. You looked at me and all. So we had to do it again and you'll see if you watch the performance at the very end I almost float again I step up and I sing Mary Climb in and the camera shot is right of of him and he turns and he kind of laughs because I almost blew it again and it's just it was just a great. Significance. Of that of. That Land Kurmi. Spectacular. That's I wanted to talk about just go through some of the greatest hits. If you don't mind just you know I'm the only one you.

Bruce Springsteen Mary Climb reporter NASA Luther Kansas Kyi Tom Jody
"rolling stone" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

08:16 min | 9 months ago

"rolling stone" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"You know they didn't really want the real story and and so it didn't work you really have to. Her story still isn't told there still isn't that great. Great, story of this, this woman who completely went against all female norms in the sixties and presented this amazing powerful thing that was frightening and then just put his burned out and on. I still hope that someday it will be made but yeah I was taking acting lessons I was in it we did a couple of. Of screen tests and things like that, and it was written and then it just went away because that's the way. Hollywood is it just? Goes Away. That's one of the great loss projects thinking because he wanted a few people alive knew this funny. It's funny that my voice went out on that more. You're one of those people alive. Who could've? Credibly done missing yourself. You know thank you. Know she gets them young actress, but you know that's probably what they'll have to do is is get someone to sing to the masters 'cause 'cause she's just so. Unique in an individual and you could probably get some great. You know get like Don Muscle lead to play her you know and and then just use the masters and it just a story that should be told. So you very dramatically kind of went off to Los Angeles in this very like sort of cinematic way who when you when you're young woman, tell me about that sort of journey. I grew up in Kansas where all dreams all you have is your dreams you have is is. What you want to be you know, I, had played enough that I knew I could go out into the world and I could go to a restaurant or bar or club or something I could make. Ten I could live I could make twenty five bucks a night. and. I could live I knew. I. Could do that I could. I could go down I could busk on the street and make enough money to live. So I didn't I didn't have that fear. So when I came out to Hollywood I, unfortunately had an aunt who lived in Silver Lake and I stayed on her couch for a while until I got up and not. But. Then when I got here, it was nineteen, eighty two and all the places I thought I'd go down to the troubadour Jackson Browne was, and by the time I got there nineteen eighty-two was all hair bands and SPANDEX. God I don't fit in here and you couldn't make any money in these places because everybody wanted to play them. So you had to play yet a pay to play. And so. Fortunately I found work in women's bars ground. So I was able to support myself but I kept thinking who's ever GonNa come see me and discover me if I'm in a women's bar but it there was the wife of the wife of. My manager was friends with the soccer team and eventually took five years. But eventually, you know the record business community found me and Chris Blackwell after I had been turned down by everybody because they used to have to come out to lesbian bars in one, thousand, nine, hundred four, which is not it's very hip now to go to the bar but nineteen eighty-four, this is not something you wanted to do and they would come out and see and they I mean I saw presidents of companies I was turned down by everybody and finally Chris Blackwell walks in years four songs from island records. He here's four songs and says. Yeah, I don't know why you're not signed yet. Yeah, and he signs me and it's done not. Did you first make contact with a Q. Community in la or or was it in Boston or earlier where I kind of like? Well, the late seventies seventy, nine, eighty s when I I like went to my first gay bar was actually in Boston seventy nine. You know and that was just just. As a crazy experience for a girl from Kansas it was know really. I mean. It was fine. It was just of lesbians in a bar but I'd never seen that many people who are like Oh. Oh, there like me and here we are at one place. And then it wasn't until I came out to La and I moved on to Long Beach and started playing in Long Beach, and there was a strong strong. We certainly didn't call it Lgbtq back. We just say the gay community and it was the lesbian community in the gay community and and the lesbian community was really really strong. They had the women's movement. It's sort of came from that, and then the early eighties when the AIDS crisis came that's when we really started organizing and getting together the boys and the girls Would would get together and organize and make things happen because we needed to. We were fighting for our lives and that's when I really became part of the. The lgbt community surviving through decades begun to think can be like a certain point can start to feel like your time traveler a very slow time traveler because I mean if you look at twenty twenty America and Nineteen, Seventy Kansas the difference in visibility acceptance everything is just incalculable. Well, I have to give it up for Kansas they're actually doing. They're actually on a pack now to really become much more progressive from the election that they just had and. They elected. Johnson County in Kansas elected. A lesbian. Native American woman. To. Represent them, cherise. Davis. Just amazing and they're moving and more democratic ways. It's I coming from there I know. The Kansas people I know the other good their God fearing people. Yet there's a there's a sense of we're not north and we're not south I grew up. We were it was very integrated. It was black and white are I had one high school in my my town and so everybody went there the better off in the poor kids in the we had an army base in those kids would come. So we had kind of this interesting flair of kids from around the world. So there's just a a sense of live and let live there that I think is really going to show up in the next few years in Kansas I think it's my talk. I think Kansas is going to. I have a Lotta Kansas I i. don't see it as backward as making people. Thank my dog again. Yeah that's great and it will and twenty twenty versus Kansas in the seventies again. Yeah. This now and I think when around the time Chris Blackwell's signed you, I think he's he sent to you something like what are we going to do about the there? While it was the album was just about to come out and it was the last meeting of everyone remember sitting in. The room where ones at the table and they're like, okay what's going to come out and you're GonNa tour this you can do that. Well, what are we gonNA do about this gay thing? I mean the and it's like well, I'm. I'm obviously gay. You signed me to gay bar I have a girlfriend. I said, well, I don't ever want to live a lie. I can't pretend I have a boyfriend or pretend something I'm not I'm just not going to do that. And they said well, that's okay. Is Long as you don't flag wave whatever that meant we didn't have the rainbow flag. And then you know four years later I came out. And start flag-waving but they were all they at that point. They were very supportive of it. They changed with the Times too. He said no one actually in those intervening for years. No interviewer asked you the question it just never never came up. I was actually thinking about this morning because I know I was talking to. Rolling Stone. And I remember my very first rolling stone interview. And I was always expecting someone to do their homework and find out that this bar the case Sarah and Long Beach was a lesbian bar and maybe they would ask me some questions about that. and he did he said..

Kansas Chris Blackwell Hollywood Times Long Beach La soccer Jackson Browne Don Muscle Los Angeles Boston Johnson County twenty twenty America Silver Lake Sarah Davis
"rolling stone" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

06:14 min | 9 months ago

"rolling stone" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"Love will live on your most recent album and it's about a very different kind of trauma. But you know you say, I, did not shatter did not crumble within die of chosen to live. I'm no longer down and so much stronger. Now I've got so much to given I. Think you've you've overcome. A Lot. And I I wanted to. I wanted to start by offering condolences on a loss. I can't even imagine. Thank you so much and I don't know how you're doing all. You're doing now in the face of that loss and I don't and the only reason I would ask is maybe something to share that might up other people as far as being able to move on. Yeah. Well, the. I realize I started thinking a long time ago that maybe things weren't happening to me maybe they were happening for me. You know maybe this was the path that I needed walk starting with just being gay and trying to make it in this world with you know. As a as a female is a lesbian rockstar. You know that that first thing and then cancer and then losing my son that's that's probably probably the hardest. Deepest. Lunar or caught but. As a mother of. Someone who was addicted to opioids. It's A. You know it's a struggle you want to help your child you want to you want to make them all better. He he was a young adult. There were things out of my control of course, and there came a time. That I needed to. Really, sit down with myself and say I I can't. Save Him. I can't give up my life and go try to live his life for him. And I had to come up against the possibility that he might die and I had to be. Okay. Not Okay but I had to be able to go on living. Of course, it's nothing apparent ever once. But as a human being. I needed to. I needed to be at peace with a troubled son. Who did the best he could? Who believed what he believed, and then his life ended way too soon. You know there will always be that place in my heart and my soul that. That has a little bit of Oh. What could I have done? You know and I is it my faulty ended this way and all that sort of thing, and it's it just gets smaller and smaller because it doesn't serve me anymore and and where he is now he certainly doesn't want me to take that on. So if you know if that can. Help any parents who might be torturing themselves without you know I. I hope so it's it's you know life. Life is II believe life is is meant to be lived in as much joy as we can. But life is also contrast life is also up and down I I've lived enough of it now to to know an and you can't lay down you can't be shattered. You can't die and give up you know that's And that's what my son did. You know it's it's. It's to be lived. It's it's to learn I know I, still struggle with it. That's that's what I can say. Yeah Was the family holding up Well. Again, when you have a family member who has been struggling with opioid addiction, you know it was a good year of us. Knowing he was really in trouble and kind of ups and downs, and it wasn't a surprise again to the family you hope okay this is the time he's going to. This is the day that he's going to say, yeah I. Can. I can do this I can get through and so so we know we all wish the best for him and supported him and loved him. And yet we know that this was one of the what could have happened and it did. So we we love each other. I have to thirteen year old twins that are just. There's just so clear and and they they loved him so much and still do. And they're happy. He's out of pain now. You know and my oldest daughter who is probably closest to him I'm your she struggles but we we help each other and you know it's just about love. It's just about talking about it's just about. Being in the moment with it or not disturbed all the credit in the world for pushing forward and projecting this much again strength. What's it been like to return to music in the face of this? That's that's where all the healing is before his death I had been doing a daily little little concerts from my home. So much fun. You know four songs I was really getting into the I was going deep in my catalog and I thought Oh my gosh I'm. Wrong ever recorded and I got really close to it I. You know hundreds of songs I I was playing, and then when that happened, I stopped and I let go and I grieved and and after a few weeks I was, I was like this is this is so hard for me my release the thing that makes life make sense has always been my music I have always been able to. Saying, an and breathe and and let it out and get the emotions out through music. That's it has saved me my whole entire life. And I knew I. I started with is that appropriate? How do I? How do I get in front of people? Now how do I how do that when you know they? They know this pain they know what I'm going through and. And, so I what my wife and I did the you know the week after he died, we started coming out here in our garage. That's that's what this is. This is our garage. And and we. We created. Something we've.

pain
"rolling stone" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

04:13 min | 11 months ago

"rolling stone" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"I won the Nobel Prize. Still hear that call from time to time is. A little bit of regression or fixing Oh, no, no, no. and. I lived through enough of those things. And then you know the devils output in that song. You know people that my my from my purse rookie Ben and my roommate college start at first band together hunter, of course and. And Phil Clarke wrote pilots at forty back. They were now. Yeah, they can have devil, i. didn't you know as a Jesuit? Catholic trained altar boy I. had a little angel didn't go far up. The devil was still there, but you know I think a little more the devil it'd be so I'd hang with the budget. Law. That feels thoroughly into bass night. There's there's no. No I would Mardi gras this year in new, Orleans, No accurate I remembered what state I went to Mardi Gras and before that and you know and I had like. At AIDS Akilah with the phrase, they dinner was in bed. You know I did I. Did I had a really good time? It didn't think funny. It asks us. Thought about that how I done it before and I was okay with the now and I have probably had a better time because I remember the whole thing. When I really listened to the Song Margarita. Ville, I've always heard the melancholy. You know I mean it's not like. It's not even a subtle thing it's it's amazing. It's a big part of the song, but I don't know that people get that from the song. And maybe it's because of your upbeat persona or or weapons is so fascinating that Asong with that obvious smell, calling it not only became gyping and obviously the pin of this brand mosquitoes, and so how how kind of reconcile? Fascinating. A and I never thought about what he wrote it in like started in Austin Texas in a Bar for the most familiar plane to go back to key west, and I finished it in key west and. Played in the barn, people liked it, but I go back to raccoon. Said what you never know what the public's going to buy. You'd never do and the interesting thing to your point. Is that when we did the musical and we did the play when it was presented in the play by Chris Actually the director and Chris Yonki. The music directed at work with their. They did it as a melancholy song. It is goes into the versity end. And you know. Crowds of people had heard that song. Heard that way in me to went then. You know. Yet there's there's a little Malachi here, but you gotta get over it. Always love that part of the show because you know. Audiences like when I'm playing, it's like. And at this point, people were listed in like they were in the theater, and then by the end of everybody's singing, and it kind of takes its way out, but it's like the theme of Mardi Gras as folly chasing death. You know so you. Got To have fun to keep the devil wise so. But I love the way that they did it. There and I've never done it that way by Sherlock listening to. Another son that you know you play pretty frequently, and it's a great song come, Monday, and when you play it for David Letterman years ago. You told him that it was. Who in it was his personal request? Which is nice, but you told that you were genuinely dark. Place when you. I wrote it for my girlfriend at the time. Wife's still now, and we had been in Montana with visited friends and family. There you know this this is right after like the Rancho Deluxe states. When did the music for that movie? And I went off to work, and I was I had to go to San Francisco and I can't quite remember. We may have had a five, but we may not be getting along, but I was in a Holiday Inn Mount. Tam Is this and her wrote that song. When you listen to it now, almost a studio, it could be an entirely different artist isn't a whole world of of.

Mardi Gras Song Margarita Chris Yonki Nobel Prize Phil Clarke devils Ben AIDS Akilah Malachi Austin Texas David Letterman Tam Holiday Inn Mount Ville Montana Chris Actually Asong San Francisco Sherlock director
"rolling stone" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

07:12 min | 11 months ago

"rolling stone" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"Am Brian Hiatt in this is rolling stone music now. Feels like we could all use a little escapism right now, so it seemed like a decent time to play my recent interview. Jimmy Buffett who has a new album out called life on the flip side, but we kind of talked about this whole career going back to the earliest days we talked about everything from his friendship with Hunter S. Thompson to the fact that Bob Dylan has named Jimmy is one of his favorite songwriters in the two of them actually spent time together in a boat one day. Got High and then later, Kimmy met doing again and it was a very different experience. We spoke about his prowess businessmen, and how that relates to his artistic life. We spoke about the future of concerts and a whole lot more. But he started talking about that new album life on the flipside. Let's hear what he had to say it. Take it chronologically when we started. Thank you about doing an album. We haven't done one in like seven years, and there were two things about that I didn't know where the album was still be viable dinner out. She'd be uploaded likelier to songs, but We still are playing hand, and we've got a great little studio down in Key West and my creative side have been working in musical theater with the show on Broadway and then touring show, so I was working on that a lot actually rewriting songs and stuff like that. You know doing changes. So, once, that was put to bed, I said. We need to do an album. And we had some good songs and ideas, and so I concentrated on writing. This is like a year ago. So and we said we're GONNA I'm just GonNa concentrate on writing these songs getting some other go to people wingman that I. WE WOMEN I use. The right will just concentrate on that and we want to go to key west record. And I want to go to. Cuba shoots album carbon because I got a friend of their Roberto solid whose photographer, but I thought life on the flip side was referring to the Gulfstream and having spent so much time in Key West myself and having a family. History of my grandfather was a say it was. You've got into my dad. Sailing in and out of Havana harbor, so that was originally it and then life will the flip side also the tongue in cheek was those people remember? Forty fives will remember. There was a flips out those that will will ask questions, so that was a hall initial thought process, and then along comes to pandemic and the title. mean, it's amused again away, but he never supposed to be that but. The solves when they came out. Chris Blackwell's dear longtime friend and Yo- for what he is input is very valuable to be in this whole process. When I sent it to him, any played at, he said yes. Scott that Jimmy thing going. He said, but in only black way said, but there's a sharpness to it. Our yeah, there was a little sharpness through. He picked it up right away so now when you hear all the whole album together. I think that it's doing its thing. You know when I'll make a record I. don't make it from me once it's done. People can interpret whatever it is. They think I'm saying aware whatever it needs to them to me. That's what a collection of songs on an album because I'm still an album guy and I wanted to be an AL, and I did the sequence myself. And when you sequence things on a record, I only know one way to do it in that slack. Alab show is only a few tricks that should do. It's about energy, and it's about recognition so. I got enough songs that people recognize that they can sing along with so when it before. When he did a new album, you can never put borking songs added to a show. They'd walk out, so you always try to pick. The would fit into what was working before. So that's the same way when we did the songs that we did them in Kia. We cut all the tracks and five days in Key West we were. We were hungry to get in the studio. And you know vibe was going, and you just go with, and so when that happened in a sequence that I use that energy and there there was no recognition because. The song so. But I just wanted to take that energy like it was sentenced to maps. That's how I did that makes sense. How has your songwriting process change ears? I think tend to use collaborators, maybe a little bit more since pummeling, and for a while. It's not a recent thing A. How's IT changed? Since say like their early seventies like what's been the question in your process. It's changed in the way in the beginning of anything like I didn't call right with anybody because I. didn't know anybody else you know you. Nobody really was was around and. People were listening so when I got to Key West, and the very first time would jour-jour Walker drove me down there and I fell in love with us and move there. You know I'd have like a really bad years in Nashville, but I was still right, so I came to key west with a little bit of luggage and a lot of songs, and that environment being in there, and then soaking up the cultural aspect of from pirate days to the writers to you know the tolerant lifestyle. That island had you know there was the navy? There was a gay community. There were hippies there were. Just I fell right into it and took songs. There and I think I soaked up a lot of that. When I wrote those songs which we did. This album I went back and listened to those first three albums a lot. Because that was the previous anything else happening where I met people that are wanted right with or other people Mac McNally wasn't around in and out here in your pretty much co riders on a lot of stuff is will kimbrough and and then now I ran into Paul Brady when we run Ireland credible writer in so none of that was happened, so you kind of you had your own stuff there and a lot of it, and I had enough to almost made three albums. In those we albums were the songs I went to key west and I wrote a few there, but I would save seventy five percent of them were written in time period when I was. I was working down there. I'm working in bars and you know when working on the coffeehouse tour, you know you start out like in the Carolinas or you know he'd go to. New York and do the bitter end or something, but. There are a couple clubs Florida boy. When I got to go to Florida, you got very excited to go down there. A lot of that writing was done and coconut grove when I played there. I forgot to key west him. They moved in with me and. In Ja did I went back and listen to that I went. We rank us. I got him a bicycle listened to the ad and listen to what we're doing. New All grow around town. Listen to what we did back then, and that's where I got the idea. White Sport coat and a pink crustacean was the first ABC album and I want. Put on a sport coat and. Go to go to Cuba side and that was. A we're one on that Alma or one of this house. I mean when you when you think about what you put out between seventy, three seventy four. Is Crazy if you could go back and tell that guy from nineteen seventy three all the things that happened to you since what would he maker? Hours on.

Key West Jimmy Buffett Cuba Brian Hiatt Kimmy Hunter S. Thompson Chris Blackwell Bob Dylan Florida New York Nashville Alma Kia White Sport Roberto Scott Carolinas ABC Ja jour-jour Walker
"rolling stone" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

10:46 min | 1 year ago

"rolling stone" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"Producers said that that was the song that made him want to do the whole record. Don't great song and it has. It has a real girl. GROUPIE BURP back ragged. Dan Warwick kind of just seems to come from until I rose from the diner. Music lasted literally said. Where did this come from because this wild is a whole different? Feel and he's the song is written from the San of a woman who's who's really the metaphor for the sixties when women threw off all those expectations and said no we are people and we can work and have children and do all the things that we know we can do. And so I got to my toe into from out of the fifties kind of GonNa get my toe into the sixties and once I finished the Song Senate to Burt Bacharach and said I just want you to know. I love your dirty socks. uh-huh he called me to that it's grains and it's really cool. Did you. Model it after specific back things because it's just everything the cords everything is kind of out of moves to the left of where I think of a lot of your stuff. I mean yeah I mean anyone who had a heart welcome by all. Those songs had those classic jazz chords a more. Interestingly where the fact that his his melodies were so you've memorable that you weren't even aware of Biscay words were and I've repented household where music was played. All the time and records were always being played and my parents. Parents were always playing with their friends in saying up late at night and there was just always music and so back was big favor. Print a A swing band swing band. Yeah and they would come home after their gigs and I mean they weren't you know they were just playing around local areas in staff but the ban was great they read charts and they you know they they were great and we would lay on the stairs on the other side of living room wall all because we wanted to hear him playing down there and partying and listen to music and dancing and they you know you go to bed and on the other side of the wall. We don't WanNa miss it but yeah I mean it's kind of an ideal way to grow up but when you're a kid you don't realize that not everybody else's screen at that way seeing that everybody's household is doing that very thing drinking smoking playing records dancing when they were young late Twenties early thirties. Even all the way through their forties and your mom was. It was a piano teacher. I was a lawyer and she actually she taught you Pana. No no no. Because he wouldn't teach it she's like that is one val. I do not want. And she's a great teacher. But you know I think there's something really nice about having somebody else. Teach your kids so you don't have that ongoing argument. Was that your first instrument. Yes as I said Instrument I think the The story I think your your sister said there was a lot of expectation that you'd be home practicing piano every day. We we had a practice every day at least for thirty minutes and we my mom taught a. I can't remember the name of the the style style of teaching that she did but she had a Pianist or their four pianos in her room. And so we would all be practicing. There'd be at least two of his pressing time one in the studio and then one in the living room and my mom was saying in the kitchen. That's I B flat. Always listen this James Taylor. They could play by ear so that was sort of the demise at night classical training and you learned everything else by air guitar or did you ever. Did you ever tar lessons number so you obviously have a really good year. I get ear. I mean I have a good enough ear that unfortunately I I wish I taken lessons and I wish I would have really learned all the you know the proper techniques and get around and I think in some ways when you are at school old you find your own your own feel and you know while I play Bass on my demos and while I'm writing when I bring somebody else into replace it. It doesn't feel the same so that I wanted just keeping it but I wish I was better than I am but I am what I am but you don't but you don't have that urged to like show off. I mean kid. Rock collaborated with it. Used to do a thing. He went around the stage and showed that he could play all the instruments. I mean you play a lot of the instruments I I don't know if it's like a male female thing or just a personality thing but you don't. You're not really showing off. It's always the tools to more into the words. Playing instruments was a means for me to get my ideas down and I started playing bass. I just got sick of the way I was writing. I would write you know if I wrote on Piano Hannah. There are certain cores and certain progressions that felt natural. And then I would write melodies to that and you can't just write the same thing over and over and the same with guitar are you know when you're limited or when you're just used a certain things that feel or sound right you you don't write great melodies melodies to the progressions and so then I decided you know I'm GonNa Underwrite on base because I can still get the rhythm but I'm GonNa play the notes on the base to just outline. What should work with the melody? And it's really been a great way for me to write. I started doing that on club sexual. You made the cover of Bass Player magazine. So little embarrassing. Listen I've had to apologize to quite a few players Dorsey included. I'm like I don't belong on it. I don't know I don't know another way to look at it. This look like you like prints your multi instrumentalist. Prince was a genius on everything he attached. Actually more so than any musician ever played with. I mean the guy was stupefying but yeah always on the plane I was on the cover. Your what was your print experience like. I mean it was amazing. It was like stepping into a whole different inter galactic plane. I mean he just lived to breathe and eight music everything in his life revolved around. That and I mean there's something really heavy about being in his company because he knew he hangs out with people that he feels like can hold their own so I mean just to be invited into the inner circle and be hanging out with him at Paisley Park and to record with him and then to go play with them a a couple of different places amazing and you know it's I always say it's like playing tennis with John McEnroe if you're a pretty good player and you got there with him you find that. Wow I'm actually a little bit better than I thought I was. He's making me at my game. I still can't beat him. But you know it makes you. It challenges your level and and with Prince. That's you know that's that's definitely what my my relationship was like with him. He's super funny. Obviously brilliant brilliant and smart. Yeah you know I wish I would have stayed in touch with them through the years. Not that I could have done anything but we kind of partways disagreement about doing a TV thing and I wish I would have reached out to him not that we were on bad terms. I just second lost touch with it. You know I wanted to ask you about growing up with the stones uh-huh because they're one of your biggest influences if not possibly your single biggest influence at some point and yet some of the lyrics are very much from from like a dude perspective and they faced accusations of of pushing it a little far in that in that direction over the years. So how did you see yourself in relationship to kind of like mix lyrics and in relationship to that whole band who I mean they were. They were not allowed in my house. I I I didn't get to listen to the rolling stones and probably mostly for that very reason. I also think my parents thought it was racket. They were talking about Bob Dylan worst singer ever we. We never listened to Dylan and we never listened rolling stones and I was aware especially when I got into college. I mean I was playing there. They're in cover bands in high school. But when I got into college and was a cover band and we were doing a lot of that stuff that you know it's pretty sexist. You didn't really think about it that much because you were just covering covering it and I was the keyboard player and you know as I've gotten older it does leave a little bit of A. You would never say that. Now I mean there are things now we always love. You'd never say that now. You know and it was a different time. It was they wrote the book you know they were the inventors of the Rockstar Persona and the women that board. That train with them you know and but yeah. They were very influential on me because for one thing they took the music that what I grew up hearing and they made it for me understandable. I didn't love country music when I was growing up and they took the music that I was. You know that was fully my musical environment in my hometown. All the country music and music. I've grown up with in that area the Delta and all and they made it they made it rock. They they made. I could understand it. It was like something about it. Resonated with me and I wanted to be Keith. I didn't ever want to be Mick but I wanna that'd be Keith. And Charlie I wanted to be one of the guys you know that was one of the things that maybe gravitates to Stevie is that even though. She's a female same with Linda. Linda Ronstadt same with EMI. They held their own with the guys. And that's because I grew up at a time where there weren't that many female aside musicians you could either hang with the guys are you. Couldn't and so you became one of the guys. There was nothing taboo. You know speaking of the stones you have Keith. Richards on this album and speaking of gender relations instills lyrics brilliantly. Kind of flip this song the worst. It's much more expected from Birmingham from him is at this moment in his is evolution. You can expect him saying yeah. I'm sorry I'm just that guy but that relationship to that emotion is not all relegated. Not just guys I mean. Don't we all feel that way sometime and that to me was just such a great country song. I mean talk about a great Tanya Tucker Song I mean if you ever had a moment moment when you look back and thought I've done some really.

Keith Prince Linda Ronstadt Bob Dylan Burt Bacharach Bass Player magazine Senate Dan Warwick James Taylor Tanya Tucker Birmingham tennis Rock John McEnroe Dorsey Richards Paisley Park Mick Charlie I Stevie
"rolling stone" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"rolling stone" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"Now they're talking about eight million copies of a record and so I feel at grace goes a long way and my challenge exercise and having grace about it is my exercise and letting go and that would have been a great lesson for the people involved in that record as well now that not everybody goes around. It's funny separately just a thing but leaving Las Vegas and you're already very accomplished and professional singer singer. Obviously you've done professional backup seeing for two major tours including a Michael Jackson tour. That was like unbelievable. You'd so you could sing however you wanted leaving. Las Vegas is such a sophisticated vocal. Because you're kind of you're fully in character you can technically. You could sing a million times better than you do on that recording. You're hitting that character actor so perfectly and I. I was thinking that that shows. You weren't a kid. You had enough experience to work at jobs and you know I. I think when you're an artist and you find the courage to be okay with the vulnerabilities and actually dive into those vulnerabilities. Particularly drinking helps hopes that that sometimes it can certainly be a detriment but can also sometimes help you get outside of the head that selling you that things need to be perfect perfect. I also had a producer bill. Trial has brilliant producer. Who always thought that being able to sing really great was an interesting and so he would say never use is brought to you sound to pro and and drinking? We drank a ton on that record. When when I think about what what would you drink? Well well I mean that particular not was the night I officially divorced Keila but what what else you know what I when I think about that record not to spend too much time on it but You know exhilarating to be around people who are highly intelligent and very artistic but at the same sometime we pride ourselves in being misunderstood and being misfits and that sort of thing it was a hard record you know it was hard record and that was as part of it. You know you bring to album making you bring all of the good and the bad and the ugly and that's what's beautiful about making albums I mean it's one of the reasons I don't WanNa dude anymore because I don't feel like when you get to a point where you show up been. Everything's pretty neat and tidy that those albums necessarily -sarily fully illustrate who you are. Nobody's like that real life. I mean everybody walks around with their woundings. No matter how much therapy you've had or what antidepressants anti-depressants you take or whatever deep down living and growing up and losing people and all those things are hard and it's not possible possible to walk into a studio and dive into all of that on the spot and if you're a person who's raising children in that kind of thing you can't just do it on command. You know a full body of work that gets into the hard places requires a lot. You know requires really facing a lot and and so yeah. I mean this album for me was about as emotional other projects I've ever made so emotional target talk sometimes throw. The new album is extraordinary. Actually I was at a lot and and one of the most ambitious arms you've ever made so if you're going to go out which I feel like some of you might might regret calling it your final album because that becomes thing to talk about again and again and then. I wonder if some party was like Oh kiss a while ago. They had their farewell tour and then they came came back and did their final farewell tour. Maybe I'll make my final final record but now I'm telling you the experience that I had with making the album. That really was the the moment where I felt. Okay this is this is something. I don't WanNa follow up was the night I was singing in the studio trying to figure out how to sing with Johnny money and I had recorded the song to click with his vocal before. I even asked the family about whether I could use his vocal. I had the demo mo so. I recorded him singing and just playing the piano never even wrote a note just played along with him and that's what it is as and when it was done Steve. Both of us were just like and I kept it that way and I told him I don't I don't WanNa sing on it. I just wanted to be like it is I. Don't WanNa hear me on. It just want I want. I want him. This is perfect the way it is. And he's seeing on it so johnny cash record you've seen and so we got permission from his family. And then I several times. I went in and took different hitches et one night that was in the studio and it was late. My kids were already in bed and I was in there by myself and I just felt his presence and I do think there's a very thin veil between all the spiritual troll realms you know and I just felt the weight and breadth and profundity of him singing those words at this moment and Saying along with them and I've found my place in it and when I was done I called Stevens said I don't want this to be the last. I don't even want to hear myself singing after this. Yes well. This'll be the beginning the middle and the end whether it is or not. I think I'll feel comfortable making records as I records but putting Out Songs.

Las Vegas producer Michael Jackson Keila Johnny Stevens Steve
"rolling stone" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"rolling stone" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"And I think also there was something important about the grouping like having so many of the really big ones happened within like one year that made it seem unbelievably Erie like there was some sort of selection happening there. But I think that every generations going to have that in like eventually just gets to be your turn. We you start losing the end of the day when you start seeing people, you know, you see in the names on the newspaper or. On the TV on your phone and the numbers next of those names start getting closer and closer to your number. That's when it really starts to start to pay attention in a way, like if you're sitting in a room, and you hear somebody call your name ears perk up a little more listening to wrong some music now, I'm Brian. Hi, liz. My very entertaining interview with rob Thomas who has his new album coming out at the end of April mentioned that there is a funnier dice skit that he and the members of matchbox twenty did about the song smooth. And it's funny, of course, because matchbox twenty was not involved with the song smooth. But I think they may be jumped at the chance to mock smooth because at love to put those guys on a lot of tech during asked him about the song smooth because they must have complicated feelings about it. I'd imagine we actually hear a little bit of this funnier dice get the hot one. I'd say about seven inches from the midday sun. This guy couldn't handle the heat word of the wise in this town gets rough. You gotta stay. There you go. Maybe look that up as I wrap concern that is worthy song smooth and attending phenomenon headed pasta. So you should definitely check that out. So that was today's show I should mention that next week. I have my first book coming out. It's called Bruce Springsteen the stories behind the songs, and I've been all over Sirius' other channels. I have a guest DJ spot coming up on east radio era few times, maybe look for that. But the book is basically it's about every single Bruce Springsteen song from every album, and I'd love it. If you check it out hit me up on Twitter, high ABI, let me know what you think. But again, this has been today's Rolling Stone music now we'll be back next week here on Sirius XM's vine town. One of six the meantime, we are a podcast download as a podcast to podcast wherever your podcast, and maybe listen nice reviews, especially in IT. It really helps the rankings were of mildly interview have to believe a review and as always thanks for listening. Cenex.

Bruce Springsteen rob Thomas Erie Sirius Rolling Stone liz Twitter seven inches one year
"rolling stone" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"rolling stone" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"Hey, I'm Brian Hiatt. This is Rolling Stone music now. So Gary Clark junior as new album pull this land coming out Mark's. I and my colleague Patrick Doyle came in right here in the Sirius XM studios the other day and sat down with Gary talk about the new album, which is real step forward for him. Gary's this great blues. Guitarist who doesn't want to be just a great blues guitarist in two thousand eighteen he wants to make music that transcends the blues and speak to this time. And I think he started doing that. There's a great new single that will talk about called this land out. But let's hear what Gary and Patrick Doyle had to say. Can you tell me how you made this record because most people think of it like you go into the studio with producer, and they kind of guide you along than a label puts it out and sort of structured thing. But you didn't really stick to any rules with this thing. Right. No. I didn't Warner was cool enough to let me just go out on my own a loved the idea of production. I got into music because I was drawn into. Arrangements and sounds so they let me do my thing. I went to washy this is how it started off. So I knew how to make a record in wanting to make something. But I didn't know exactly what I was gonna do house gonna approach it. So I've always loved making beats and finally stepped my game up and got a new NPC figured out. How to use it? And I really just started messing around from there. My buddy, Sean McCarthy hooked me up cool guy, man, he'll be able to hard-drive of all this music. I never really heard before I most maybe ten thousand songs or something like that. So I'm just running through trying to find samples and flip things up and just make for myself. And I'm thinking it'd be a record and also trying to figure out how to record into this thing. So I started feeling like I was starting to get somewhere. Still didn't know what was going to be. And then I finally made this be this track on record called. I got my eyes on you. And that was one of the things like Lockheed uses for me, I could put some guitar on it. And you know, I think we could really do something here play drums on it. And then. Gazza-like? Now, you're terrible. Do better do use to play drums in a band. I used to play drums in certain bands. You know, like I'll be maybe third string. They called me up. If the good guys weren't there. So I'll maybe third or fourth string. And how it back if you guys up, but I have no discipline as a drummer. I think every single place in the song as an appropriate place for a drum fill saw. Yeah. I haven't been called for Joan gigging thing, I got fired without being too. When I was in the studio talking to Jacob who co-produced did some engineering on the record with you. He said that he thinks you're such a great ATar player because of your skills as a drummer. Well, that's very nice. But I think however for this record a muscular as drummer were not needed. Yeah. So that's we brought in Brannen temple Jay Johnson who are world class and laid it down so..

Gary Clark Patrick Doyle Warner Jacob Brian Hiatt Rolling Stone Sirius Sean McCarthy Brannen temple Mark producer Lockheed Jay Johnson Joan
"rolling stone" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"rolling stone" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"Hey, I'm Brian. I this Rolling Stone music now a few weeks ago. I sat down with Stella we talked about his new album look now and whole lot of other stuff. You can read some of that interview. In the latest issue of Rolling Stone. You can watch some video of it on Rolling Stone dot com, but here in Rolling Stone music now we have uncut version, and we're going to play it for you right now. So you look now enjoying Mesli and album that demands headphones. I would say you described it even in your thinking before you made the album as an uptown pop. Yeah. I was just trying to think of a way to distinguish it from Leica sort of little box with people going mad in you know, kind of rock and roll record. That's obviously that which we've made like put the red light on play hoped to get the magical take. But me, my band would tell you that sometimes I've had to settle for tight that they there's a little thing went wrong. But I got it. Listen, it's got the feeling and that's one kind of record. You can make him. This is the other kind which is you work out what you're going to play. And then you go in the studio with the confidence, and the you know, what the picture is supposed to be and try and get it to sound as free as he can. But you know, that you're gonna leave spaces for other elements. So that's the uptown on just in the sense that it's a little bit more. Chosen rather than just dab a chance. I guess curious as to what other albums what other artists were residents of that sort of uptown pop neighborhood business does. The one I mentioned to Pete Thomas was dusty Mavericks, always been a favorite record because they'll see made a lot of records that were great because of a singing and some of the really great arrangements as well that we made in England when she went recorded in Memphis that was a much better feel so if we could get a feel, and that's what marks the way we think about in the way, we feel music now, particularly as this group impulses, a different group than the group has started out with we we've favor, and you have strengths in different areas on that first group because of the three of us that have played together for forty is should have lent something, you know, blue should have gathered some things, and maybe put aside some of the qualities of music, but that seemed all important when we started out they make if you just stayed with the same playbook. It wouldn't be very interesting and Davey brings a lot of different things too. Because he's a guy plays with a predominantly rhythmic feel. He can still come. Out with nice melodic inventions. But that isn't his main thing it's the groove. And and he's a great singer, which we didn't have any sings in its audible, whether I was a singer early on, you know, like so whenever any way to do the vocal arrangements on records, which usually tracked in the studio. Now we've worked for a couple of years with a couple of really great saying we've got a repeal. So I worked out all the vocal arrangements in my demos. But Dave nicer the cast them. So let's sing this combination of his head this combination here, and that brings it it makes it, you know, rather than just sort of getting the typical sound of a group, but actually work out in the same way as you would you wouldn't settle on just any orbital sound keyboard sound, you were continue the one you wanted. You know, having seen them live completely by multiple times. I completely by the impostors is an entirely different band than the tragedy. Of course, the difference is one person. Yeah. But that's a big difference. There's a lot more Erin space. You know, it's different and we're all different people than we were forty years ago. Why wouldn't we be there's this idea of sort of a romantic primitivism that sort of privileged in the discourse about rock and roll people want to believe that in some cases, it's better to know nothing and to just have it come from your soul with no knowledge of the craft of music or the craft of songwriting? I can't let elements of my truthfully myself, particularly with regard to the Tom I understand that..

Rolling Stone Davey Stella Pete Thomas Memphis Dave England forty years
"rolling stone" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"rolling stone" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"Hey, Brian, Hiatt in this Rolling Stone music. Now today we're gonna be talking to an actual rock legend. Johnny Mark, who has a quite excellent solo album out called call the comment. He also has an autobiography that's a couple years old with his permission. We'll talk a little bit about that because it's a great books. It is still your life even if it's a couple years old, but welcome. Thanks, Brian. You invite people like to say you were a gun for hire, which isn't your favorite phrase, but you were doing a lot of different things, your phone, it seems like it never stopped ringing from the moment. You the Smiths ended reading your book. It's like the phone just went from one thing to another, or is that allusion? Was there ever a time when things were follow and quiet and you wonder what you're doing? I don't think so. So you know, my phone didn't really need to ring for the guest for the full years, thousand motive smile. So it wasn't like every day a phone was constantly ringing, but now. Got to be top player make and playing shows with, you know, locally for me pretty much my favorite musicians. So it's kind of been like a an amazing of trajectory us right word and journey say, okay, what you mentioned about the journeyman thing and the gunfire a lot. I mean, I star of vice even in nineteen seventy eight. That phrase was so worn out seven in nine, you know, for journalists to use the phrase, gunfire higher. I mean, really, it's light nights are we talking about the Doobie brothers fan? So so I don't really, you know, never really want to engage without kind of rhetoric. Buffing may be the is on people kind of understand my ammo now really, which is just kind of plain simple. Bena musician won't into with interesting people on interesting projects. You know with some hopefully interesting outcomes would hopefully stand the test of time. And I think the was really beautiful and important part of matzo posts. Rear those is done us still detested time as a few electric songs, certainly thoughts. I would've, hey it to have missed work in on, and then the list goes on and on this plenty of things with the pet shop. Boys, I would hate to have missed out on an would have really not wanted to miss out on doing some the film about dome with Zimmer and the still continuing to really so all makes total sense to me enough ill, very fortunate to be doing in frigates players. Seemed like about the best job in the world. This album as with all your soul stuff so well produced and you're the co-producer on it, you've done some producing, but I'm surprised that that hadn't been a big focus of your career because I think you would have big incredible fence a made a deliberate decision to turn down low to production office loss because been produced a search, a massive, emotional investment if you are doing it right. And in a way you almost be. Being a nice person, you almost put more responsibility on yourself for is particularly young is than you would on your own records to be a little. You know, I don't know. Just Mara fight about Moammar coats. I enjoy the of production and a lot of what I do want. One of the things I learned over the earliest McRae was arranged -ment. You know what I do. Technically, this month began a little too Museau. One of things I learned while I was working on even before the Smiths really would these experiments was making with putting towels on tape was arranging I was fascinated with the way these glam rock records were made when I was a little child basically and how they will put together. I really love that. And you know, one of the things on good, but I just out an out, turned down a load of producing and still do because I would care about it like it was my own record in some ways care about more than it was my own Recco because you're the protector of. Of other people's dreams, hopes and dreams. So you'd better not mess it up and it just his his, not worth it for me really because there's other things I need to be pointing my time into. So it was really not made me make decision. What's your bug from the new album?.

Smiths Brian Johnny Mark Zimmer Hiatt Mara McRae
"rolling stone" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"rolling stone" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"Oh god no i'm like literally my nanny it's like one of her favorite movies and i'm like i swear to got all fire you oh like come on i was like contractually obligated i did i wanna do it do not show my children until they must see um it's just something that i've i'm it's not that i'm like mad about it it's just not something i wanted to do you know so i'm like oh i want my kids to see me doing things i love it like being good at it um so i'm sure they'll see it i'm sure my or older too has seen it uh yeah or older to us but but they uh they um they have to love me so you know even if they see it um but no it's i'm i'm trying to hold that offer as long as possible i short cool stuff right like you know drastic park can harry potter 2005 siberia moves come under the guns who that don't be amazing little kelly clarkson thank you so much always a pleasure yeah yeah really appreciate man you've been listening to rolling stone music now i'm brian hyatt that was mean kelly clarkson that's it for today we'll be back next week here on serious exams volume channel 106 at one pm eastern time next friday in the meantime we are a podcast you can download us his podcast subscribe to his his podcast wherever you get your podcasts maybe leave us a nice review if he can especially on i tuned and we will see you next week and has always thanks for listening.

kelly clarkson brian hyatt harry potter
"rolling stone" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"rolling stone" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"Listening to rolling stone music now i'm brian hired in that's me and kelly clarkson we'll be right back with a whole lot more the majan learning about jazz from herbie hancock photography from any bullets or cooking from gordon ramsey well now you can with master class masterclass produces online classes topped by the best in the world each classes shot was cinematic production quality and offers ondemand lessons loaded with exclusive content you'll find only on masterclass juice from classes taught by over thirty masters including film scoring from hans zimmer comedy from steve martin filmmaking from martin scorsese and much more whether you're pursuing your passion developing a career for just looking to learn something new master class gives you access the vested their craft you could master yours interested in more than one class check out the all access pass the new all access pass you can unlock every classroom over thirty masters offer the price of to rolling stone music now listeners can get the all access pass a master class dot com slash music learn from the best in the world at masterclass dot com slash music that's master class dot com slash music brentnall about to ask kelley about her very first audition for american item which remembers about that so let's hear what she had the sat i watched your initial televised audition from dallas an american i just rewatta for first time he or she sang at last and he said i was so happy because the british man didn't make me cry.

gordon ramsey martin scorsese kelley dallas brian kelly clarkson hans zimmer steve martin
"rolling stone" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"rolling stone" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"Hey i'm brian hyatt is rolling stone music now kelly clarkson is back on tv and the focus and had a chance to talk to yesterday about returning to the world a reality television after many years of absence as well as our excellent new album here's some of what she had to say singing stay tuned you come so far since idle obviously and it's been so many years everyone was asking you about you know why did you choose the voice over idle mike question really is why did you go back on tv at all and what doubts if any to you have about entering this world again after having a very different kind of career for all these years yeah i mean you know i'd love to say that there were a ton of thought about that dan um but there really wasn't i mean honestly i've kind of been the kid the one thing that hasn't changed about me um is i've always done what i feel like my god tells me to do like i wanted to do like regardless if it's a thing that management or my label is like into or not like i've always just kind of and like you know i have one life and like i you know i'm not afraid of is that all of this goes away and i really just want to do what i want to do like oh then what i love and what kind of speaks to me in the moment and um and you know this was kind of a no brainer i mean because my husband also manages blake shelton so you know we split our time um with you know our family and when he's out there with him more on the road with him and and uh it kind of made sense like we could all be in one place i'd get to like work with you know kind of pay it forward with people that were once me um and i really do love the show um i've loved it before it even aired um because we're managed by the same company i.

brian hyatt kelly clarkson dan um blake shelton