19 Burst results for "Roland Pease"

"roland pease" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"roland pease" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"BBC World Service on today. Thornton action. I'll be looking into the way the US midterm elections will alter the treatments of science in Washington DC change that could alter the way the authorities rector disasters like this California raising and there's no reason for these massive deadly and costly forest. Fires in California, except that forest management is so poor politics. Science and disasters on science in action. Coming up after the BBC World Service news. BBC news with Debbie rests. US media reports say the CIA has concluded that the Saudi Crown prince Mohammad bin Salman, ordered the murder of the journalist Jamal kashogi the intelligence agencies findings of partly based on an alleged conversation between Mr. hustle g. And the crown prince's brother, prince collared, he's such a cool the journalists and assured him he'd be safe to visit the Saudi consulate in his Dan bull. Prince collared denies there was any such conversation. Almost exactly a year after an Argentine submarine disappeared in the south Atlantic. The navy says it has found the wreckage San Juan which had a crew forty four was located at a depth of eight hundred meters. The number of people reported missing in. California's worst ever wildfire has risen to move on a thousand a local sheriff stressed that the list could contain -plication because it was compiled from multiple sources he said seventy one people are now known to have died. The surprise winner of the presidential elections in the Maldives Ebrahim Muhammed solely is about to be sworn in Mississauga favors close relations with India in contrast with his predecessor Abdul Yameen who was considered pro Chinese president Hassan Rohani over Iran says there's potential for a huge increase in trade between his country and neighboring Iraq. The Iranian economy is currently under increasing pressure from sweeping US sanctions imposed after President Trump abandoned, the international nuclear accord. Five. British government ministers are expected to meet this weekend to discuss changing the draft Brexit deal that the Prime Minister Theresa may presented last Wednesday. The five have stayed in the cabinet despite their misgivings. Stooling any immediate challenge to Mrs Maes leadership. They want the deal to resolve the problem of the free flow of goods across the Irish border after Brazil leaves the European Union. BBC news. You're with the BBC World Service. I'm Roland Pease bringing you science in action which this week is fully focused on events in the United States where the politics of science has become increasingly fractious, which makes the outcomes of the recent midterm elections, rather interesting, and that could change the way politicians respond to hurricanes and fires California.

BBC BBC World Service California United States prince Mohammad bin Salman prince collared Saudi Crown Thornton Saudi consulate Washington president Roland Pease Dan bull Mrs Maes south Atlantic San Juan CIA Ebrahim Muhammed
"roland pease" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"roland pease" Discussed on The Science Hour

"This is the podcast where we view you. The highlights in science health and technology on today's show, Carolina in southern India is still recovering from extraordinary floods that peaked over two days in mid August in just a moment. We'll hear how these kind of extreme Mancini floods off three times as common these days as they were fifty years ago. There's the prospect of a new way of treating epileptic seizures device that is implanted in the brain and can locally deliver at drug to treat epileptic seizures. It also has the ability to detect a seizure and then turn the pump on and deliver the drug to stop the seizure. And we'll also have news on a checklist for doctors that could save lives. Post-strike. My steer guest today is Jason Palmer, an editor at the economist magazine and former BBC science reporter. And among other stories, you'll be bringing us news about how air pollution may harm our intelligence. I will. It turns out that pollution is bad both for body and mind, but I am appalling recent flooding and careless south west India reminds us would a double edged sword. The South Asian monsoon is bringing blessed relief from the summer heat and much needed water to the subcontinent each year. It also threatens to wreak havoc and destroy lives. The devastation in character was exceptional. A million people have taken emergency shelter in four thousand relief camps across the state. Nearly four hundred died NASA this week, released satellite images, underlining the widespread flooding for sense of perspective. Roland Pease turned to climate scientists, Roxy coal. The Indian Institute of tropical meteorology is currently visiting researcher at the US as Nash. Shnell Otani can atmosphere. Administration rox sees research has shown that Mancini's have been getting weaker delivering less rain. On average, though extreme floods have paradoxically become wabel common, but it turns out he also had more personal reason to be interested on this occasion. I was really from Carolina. My family under lettuce are all right, and my parents, they're seeing this kind of fled for the first time in the life..

Mancini epileptic seizures Carolina India Jason Palmer Shnell Otani Indian Institute of tropical m Roland Pease economist magazine NASA visiting researcher BBC reporter US editor Nash fifty years two days
"roland pease" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"roland pease" Discussed on The Science Hour

"Insomnia them a more on that later this week, we've learned of a cross between two ancient lines of humans, the Denisa vans, and Indiana tells way back to genetics. Again, jeans decoded from bit of bone that sat in a cold cave in Russia for tens of thousands of years. Genetic show. The ancestor had uneven father and the and the tomb mother. This is a fantastic insight into our deep past which follows the discovery of the Holden, ease of lineage from other fragments from the cave a few years ago, and the realize ation that most of us have a little admixture of. Even own and until in all, homo, sapiens genome, Chris stringer from the natural history museum in London spoke to Roland Pease and explained why this cave was so crucial to this finding. This is in Srb area in the outer, I region and it's been under excavation for many years, probably half a century and it's only in the last ten years, of course that it's become so much more important with the advent of DNA work. And there are just, I mean, I get an impression it's piles of bones in there. There are thousands of bones and thousands of bone fragments from the summit. There's also eulogy stone tools that has many animal bones. So it's a complex site. It looks like there was human occupation there for probably a hundred and fifty thousand years, and we now know the in that occupy patient in the early stages at times when Antonio's there at times they were Denisovans there. Then later on, we have more than humans there in the last four thousand years or so. And what we now have, of course is a lot of genetic information. But if it's coming from tiny, Franklin's, so the disciplines are known from couple of bone fragments in, I think, three teeth currently and the Amazons from for a couple of bone fragments. And that's the thing is DNA because you talk about niece Avensis we've always known about them, but actually the only evidence for them is the DNA from some of those fragments. Well, yes, there's a bit of morphology of couse of the teeth, very big if they were not like Nanto teeth or more humidity, but that on its own didn't tell us who these people were. The rest of the emphasis of couse. He's very fragmentary. I should also say that now even getting DNA from the cave sediments so we can even met the presence of humans purely from the DNA they left behind are the when they don't, or maybe when they had a we in the Kibe, whatever the DNA is there as well in the cave sentiments. Now, the new chapter in this is one of these bone fragments contains roughly speaking is understand it an equal amount of Denisovans DNA and Neanderthal the way. That's right. So this fragment from its mighty. Condo D..

Chris stringer Denisa Insomnia Indiana Roland Pease Russia London Antonio Avensis Amazons Kibe Franklin fifty thousand years four thousand years ten years
"roland pease" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"roland pease" Discussed on The Science Hour

"That kind of thing. And so so tell you have a really excel A-Rated maturation process? It's two weeks. I mean, the pool's themselves lost week, so chill three months at most, not so much make hay Wilson shines, but babies was the rain pools. And the other thing that's really interesting about is that the other side of this is these fish age, fantastic quickly, and that the coming really important and really interesting study for scientists Trump to understand what aging is and what what James Dean, they live, fos young effectively. They live fast die young, but they h FOSS when they're about three or four months old, they saw aging. They start losing the color patenting. This point stop curving the fins get a bit gammy. There. I saw it goes continent new tricks. They developed cancer, and it's quite sad story really an by the time. The two years old I really credit on are supposed to the points is that puddle probably drive up long before so they don't need to live. The old age, but presumably there are lessons for migraine had well, this a couple of things that reading festival, it suddenly makes studying fish, which a bit more like us than cruelly. That's the sort of aging model fantasies, you know, if they age quickly, it's easiest. Do you work in the lab? The other is giving us new insights because we can do a lot of interesting genetics within we can still live history to try and understand visa deep questions as to why do we grow old and die, that sort of thing quite profound, coda cheerful so often and perhaps could we stop it all too late and there's a lot of research going into how this could in fact be possible aging isn't just useful into bits this actually defined process in many cases. And for example, if people who have very very low calorie dots, don't try this at home without doctor of a show, signs of delay, aging animals. We, you strip. The calories also have delayed aging so is not. Inevitable, we could manipulate it. Perhaps this little fish teach us something really interesting about not tape this molecular biology behind pla- it's been a pleasure having you in the program. It's been a pleasure. Also, Deborah Cohen produce it. I'm Roland Pease. It's been a pleasure to have you listening..

hay Wilson Roland Pease Deborah Cohen James Dean migraine Trump cancer three months four months two weeks two years
Congo’s latest Ebola outbreak taking place in a war zone

The Science Hour

03:30 min | 3 years ago

Congo’s latest Ebola outbreak taking place in a war zone

"Start with the new and very worrying outbreak of the abode of virus in the Democratic Republic of Congo is just two weeks ago, the authorities they had to Clinton early outbreak in the west of the country to be over that success was put down to the rapid response approach device after the poorly contained epidemic in west Africa in two thousand thirteen to two thousand sixteen, but now more than two and a half thousand kilometers way in north key province near the border of Uganda, they've been thirty six deaths as we record this program, some of which have already been confirmed as Ebola. It's the same strain as before, but the outbreaks probably not actually linked the problem in dealing with it as the deputy director of emergency preparedness. Peter Salama. The World Health Organization told Claudia Hammond is this outbreak is going to be far more challenging to contain and even riskier. For the medical staff involved. The outbreak is centered around Mela beco- health zone, and particularly around us Motown cooled, men Geena. That really is the epicenter of the outbreak. We are however, receiving notifications of suspected cases that go beyond this particular healthy area and health zone. So they're being investigated in there more than thirty suspected cases currently. That this outbreak is completely separate from the one that was only declared over a couple of weeks ago. Is it because it's it's so far away across the other side of the country. We don't have definitive evidence as yet, but nor do we have any reason to believe that these outbreaks connected the distance between Ecuador, province and north keeping provinces is around two thousand five hundred kilometers. We know that this outbreak is likely to have taken off towards the end of July, and there were no active cases in the Equitor outbreak. After early Jews, how worrying is this new outbreak? This outbreak is extremely concerning in the Ecuador outbreak. I spoke of number of complicating factors, logistics affected health workers were infected early, which is, of course a ruse fan publication. The fact that the sites were much close to forested area. The fact that we have multiple sides simultaneously to address in terms of outbreak response. The fact that we also had proximity to Buddha's. So in this outbreak in northern kiva province, we have all of the above, but above and beyond. All of that here, the biggest constraint is security. There are more than one hundred groups in the North Kivu province more than twenty highly active and there is of operation really of Aleppo. Unfortunately, we've many of the areas which we're going to have to cover to reach all of the context out of the eight million population of northern kiva. One million people are internally displaced, so it's a population on the move, so that must make it much more difficult to work with communities. If you've got communities. So broken up on areas of conflict, metro difficult, much of this province is in UN security level for and what that means in practice is that many of the roads will have to travel alone who require escorts. Now, staff will require security, pistol protective equipments and not just the regular PP. We're used to using any Bill. Outbreaks to protect from infection, and we'll be relying heavily on the UN to help us with negotiations if needs be with some of the armed groups in order to access the population.

Ecuador World Health Organization UN Roland Pease Democratic Republic Of Congo Claudia Hammond Deputy Director North Kivu BBC Peter Salama Ainsworth Aleppo Sarah Uganda Motown West Africa Clinton Two Thousand Five Hundred Kilo Thousand Kilometers
"roland pease" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"roland pease" Discussed on The Science Hour

"Which backed thousands of planets using the transiting technique basically spotting a fractional blink and a star's brightness if a planet pass through our line of sight and where keppler lead test is going to go further roland pease has been talking to test mission deputy director of science sara seager the aim of tests is to find thousands of planets but it's not so much quantity this time but i want you to think of it as quality that way the missions ambition is quite simple the special thing about tests is the stars at searching are really close to earth now may sound like an oxymoron because stars are incredibly distant but the closer the stars are the brighter they are and we're able to do more than just find planets just finding tiny so i don't think sarah siegel minted so dismissively is the previous hunter satellite keppler did extremely well within a couple of years of its launch lost decade it was yielding an unexpectedly rich harvest of discoveries as project manager john tros told the bbc what we've seen already is a lot more planets than i think we could have imagined and if you take that number and then increase it for the galaxy we're looking at potentially four hundred thousand planets in our galaxy nobody could have guessed that before kepler but who needs so many as sarah c i said before knowing the plane abundance of planets orbiting other stars means it'll be easy to think about the quality planets close enough to warrant kaffa scrutiny capita stead fixedly in one patch of the sky within the constellation cygnus to watch the flickering of every star in view tests is going to scan bit by bit the entire sky without worrying about remote objects but it still takes good uptakes the test cameras are fantastic maybe the best ever think of it like a glorified telephoto lens but everything's incredibly customdesigned did you know that the aperture size is only ten centimeters they're actually quite small cameras but the point is that these smaller cameras have very wide field of you and the cameras are aligned so that they cover a strip of the sky ninety degree by twenty four degrees so if you think about like the sky is being like a celestial sphere test takes one strip of a hemisphere and it's going to tile the sky with each strip i covering the southern hemisphere then.

roland pease deputy director john tros bbc kepler sarah siegel project manager sarah c twenty four degrees ten centimeters ninety degree
Brazil's defiant Lula expected to surrender to police Saturday

BBC World Service

01:57 min | 3 years ago

Brazil's defiant Lula expected to surrender to police Saturday

"Let's being confusion this week about what british detectives can and can't tell about the nerve agent used in the poisoning of this script house last month so for science in action in a moment i turned to a forensic expert in the us who's dawned the kind of protective has map gob we keep seeing on the news a nice aclu's the detectives are seeking for example what kinds of traces might be there showing where the poison came from that's on science in action with me roland pease after the knees bbc news i'm john shea police in canada's a fourteen people have been killed in a collision between a truck and bus carrying a junior ice hockey team the humboldt broncos fourteen other people are being treated in hospital the crash happens near style in the province of saskatchewan north and south korea have held talks to discuss the setting up of the direct telephone link between the leaders of the two countries the leader the the line will will for the first time connects the offices of north korea's kim jong un yong on the south korean president moon jae in in seoul president emmanuel macron's party is launching a door to door campaign in france to ask voters what they think of the european union the aim is to prepare the posse for european elections in may next year using the same method it used to years ago when it began mister macron's presidential campaign at least forty people are reported to have been killed in continued air attacks on a rebelheld and clave near the syrian capital damascus the attacks began on friday afternoon going with the rebels broke down the former president of brazil luis inacio lula da silva has spent the night at a steelworkers union building defying a court order to hand himself in to start serving a prison sentence for corruption his supporters have surrounded the building situated in a suburb of sao paulo lula built his trade union and political career.

Lula Da Silva Steelworkers Union Brazil Seoul Kim Jong Saskatchewan John Shea BBC Sao Paulo Lula Nerve Agent President Trump Damascus European Union France Emmanuel Macron South Korea Humboldt Broncos Canada
"roland pease" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"roland pease" Discussed on The Science Hour

"Earned what is it about them that makes them so deadly what is it they do to the nerves in simple terms they destroyed the nerves and they did very quickly and once you'll notice the destroy your body very quickly shuts down with nerve agent poisoning you you generally suffocate because you'll lung stop working they fill up with fluid i suffocate that's hamish bretton gordon speaking to roland pease when refugees injured in the syrian conflict who've lost limbs have been receiving three d printed prosthetics the artificial limbs are less expensive and quicker to produce than traditional prosthetics and in a trial in neighboring jordan results so far suggest that the devices are durable and effective and i've been hearing more from saffa her fat he's the technical coordinator of the three d prosthetics project at the msf foundation there's a very large global demand have upper limb prosthetics and we felt that the it's pretty neglected population and the specifically in the humanitarian context i feel the pediatric population could greatly benefit from this technology and places where they can fund access to a prosthesis the fact that they're growing so quickly they could potentially need a new prosthesis every year or two so being able to cost effectively design and deliver a patient specific device to them very quickly and as i mentioned cost effectively could be a huge benefit of applying this technology how do you make these prostheses so it is a pretty long process and we've been fortunate enough to have a full clinical team behind us so we have physiotherapists prosthetic clinician and occupational therapist and i've been the lead on the technical side there's a lot of clinical valuation assessments that go into the process of front and understand what the needs of the patients are and what they're expecting from the prosthesis as far as the.

hamish bretton gordon msf foundation nerve agent roland pease jordan
"roland pease" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"roland pease" Discussed on The Science Hour

"Hello i'm roland pease and thank you for downloading the science ira from the bbc the podcast where we of you the highlights in science health and technology on today's show the currents of change in store for our oceans owing to global warming that's in a moment as speculation continued about the type of nerve agent that might have been used to poison a former russian spy in the uk this week we hear about the devastating effects these substances can have on the body breathing of course is the most serious problem uh people expressed in of agents described defeating like had banned being held around the chest in addition to which she get infusion of liquid into the loans my studio guest today is bbc health amazon's reporter katie silver and you've got us another health story some good needs from australia that's right so it is the idea that hats stay may become the first contrary to radic sabah cancer and that's all to do with vaccines looking forward to the details that first though to a study looking at how our seas and oceans might in the longer term be affected by global warming a study published this week in the journal science looks further into the future the most the effects by twenty three hundred if we don't change our behaviour could be very serious but then it will not be just the direct effects of warmth that matters but the knockon impacts on ocean circulation patten's own conditions rant antarctica and the global health a fighter plants and the plunked like organisms of the oceans optional professional at luv casa is familiar with work this written country which acknowledges the difficulties in socks projections but concludes the mere possibility of the forecast declines in ocean productivity is highly concerning so this study is about changes and ocean put actual production in this case means the amount of biomass that is produced by fighter plankton and this is important for two reasons it's the base of the marine food chain so as eaten by a new plant in and out of clayton and finally by fish.

roland pease bbc nerve agent uk amazon katie silver casa clayton reporter australia
"roland pease" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"roland pease" Discussed on The Science Hour

"A been chicken but but how how did they translate all of this information into something useful well as i said they're looking at 12 from bed species and what they're doing is all the data they're a savings at all the ways that they limbs move and obviously you can see the ways that the lakes move the way that the wings extend all that belbey muddling this difesa and that should hopefully be alberta advised them on how dinosaurs moved as well brilliant thank you very much barbie now the annual meeting of the american association for the advancement of science lots of tongue twister held this year in austin texas completed this week on the agenda what topics that range from the difficulty of conveying science of climate change to those who need to know to the growing impact of artificial intelligence and the hunt for other earth like planets my lucky colleague roland pease was outlet soaking up the sun and the science and one session that court his i was on the study of planets caught in the process of being boon around newlyformed stars karen oeberg is an astronomer at the harvardsmithsonian center astrophysics she studies that growth process in lab experiments and also with a joint alma telescope a radio telescope set out in the atacama desert this piece of kit has sixty six detectives that compare count with incredible precision the molecules that build planets and perhaps even the molecules that could stall lonely form one she spoke roland pease at the conference it's amazing what alam unable us to do is rooted chemical pictures of their birthplaces of pilots and that has just been possible before alma threeday map out the chemicals structures were planas our current reforming going was picture a stall forming with his private may be huddling world it like a friday and you have the star of the middle but then you have a sort of this distribution a disk of swirling destined to rome yeah i think that.

american association roland pease harvardsmithsonian center alberta austin texas karen oeberg atacama alma threeday rome threeday
"roland pease" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"roland pease" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hello and welcome to science in action your pick of the week's best and breaking science news i'm monty chesterton filling in because roland pease has left the cold and wet believes hq in london for the sunny loveliness of austin texas it's for work allegedly and he'll be reporting from a big science conference there later on in the program with the latest from the us science funding cuts will also be hearing about the poor animals who get all the effort of changing color in winter only to find that the weather hasn't changed with them if you're white and there is no snow around you than you look like a light bulb hobbling around on the brown fourthfloor and you're much more likely to be but first a little blast of country in his lung tynan was it's lama yes is tell me when at sings sometimes it's hard to be a woman for those who choose to be scientists that agenda means they're likely to be underrepresented and underpaid fortunately if there's anything science is good at its collecting and analysing the data which should be the first steps to fixing any problem science reuter ed yang wrote recently about this in the atlantic frum a personal perspective he wondered whether women are also missing the chance to share their expertise in his journalism and so he's taken a scientific approach to his possible bias step one identify whether this even a problem he explained his method and how it all started so this was an exercise that one of my colleagues adrian the france did a few years ago when she found about a quarter of the people who she quotes in his stories were women and i had a look at my own work and found that it was exactly the same proportion are certainly expecting higher than that and i think it just made me realise that like even though i think of myself as someone who cares about equality og i was contributing to this world in which winds voices were undervalued an under appreciated so i started the.

monty chesterton roland pease london austin us tynan france ed yang adrian
"roland pease" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"roland pease" Discussed on The Science Hour

"You quite interesting with little helicopters they fly the helicopter so drone over the blowhole of the whale it exhales and he woke up a little petrie dish and you catch whatever comes out slight breathalyse ing aware breathalyse aweil and then you can tell all sorts of things about the uh the condition of the animal because la funky and the bacteria in the viruses will be in there and think is crossed that the populations doing i i think they having to having seen some of the populations in other parts so like new zealand they've seen them start to bounce back other hopeful around south georgia it'll be the side thanks jonathan over in warmer waters off the great barrier reef off australia and we may from counting wales team the story conservationists counting turtles not the title number but the number of females and the number of males because they think there's a problem and there is uk conservationist brenton godly of the invested exeter is familiar with the work and he spoke to roland pease about michael jensen study jensen on his colleagues have cotti really quite an elegant and largescale experiment looking at the sexual issues of titles in the great barrier reef so basically what the been doing is the being guna catching turtles out in the forging it here investigating them by taking genetic samples and either looking at them with lots of scopes to worker what sex they are or taking blood's to do hormones to find out what sex they are because you can't always tell from the site and the bottom line is that the population is getting turbie skewed yeah so basically they were able to track the individuals know their sex and tracked them back to the nesting colony where that came from and in the northern more tropical breeding is it's almost one hundred percent female production no with cutting temperatures but in the southern more temperate parts of the great barrier reef as spell female biased 65 percent so what's going on why would.

georgia wales australia uk roland pease michael jensen one hundred percent 65 percent
"roland pease" Discussed on Science in Action

Science in Action

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"roland pease" Discussed on Science in Action

"Welcome to science in action from the bbc world service i am at roland pease in the sedition we go searching for something increasingly rare mailed turtles of the great barrier reef basically in the northern more tropical breeding areas it's almost one hundred percent female production no but in the southern more temperate parts of the great barrier reef as spell female biased burbot 65 percent and the blame lies with climate change and we've the search for a bitcoin buried in dna successfully concluded last week i'm absolutely pleased that someone got it and that had fun and that we get to tell the story might second reaction for about ten seconds was being gutted that we'd lost the money goldman about ten thousand euros poorer but please that dna storage really does pay out plus we have moldy concrete for a good reason and the story of optus out of africa is the standard picture of the origin of our species that homo sapiens evolved somewhere in africa sat around there for a few thousand watt tens of thousands of years until a handful of pine is headed north crossed the red sea and then spread vare them at least across the rest of the world and not only homo sapiens but earliest species of hominid did that too but for that lost wave of us modern humans understood the story started around 200000 years ago in ethiopia all kenya the travels following eighty thousand also years later they weren't in any hurry but today from at middle eastern corridor comes evidence that the first travelers had started moving much much earlier earlier than 200000 years ago substantially pushing back the date of all origins leading the archaeological and fossil digs israel host of its and meena weinstein ever on who told me.

roland pease climate change goldman homo sapiens ethiopia bbc optus africa kenya israel meena weinstein 200000 years one hundred percent thousand watt ten seconds 65 percent
"roland pease" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"roland pease" Discussed on The Science Hour

"Feeling a lost several days then he just gone under the pain nina subsided in it i felt from dusty we'll find out where this patient decided to go later own also the surfers around britain's coastline taking in not just the waves but some antibiotic resistant bacteria and stay with bogs the global atlas of soil bacteria that shown that a small number of them seemed to be key wherever you go my studio guest today is bbc's science reporter helen breaks and you'll be sharing secrets of adult install it so i'll be telling you am how a dolphin can burn up to thirty three thousand calories a day without putting on weight that sounds like an awful lot now he's a good piece of trivia it's sad that a handful of soil contains more bacterial cells than that all people on earth and we haven't known that much about them until this week with the publication in the journal science of a global atlas of seoul bacteria identified by their dna the surprises that a small knock we're of bacteria seem to be key wherever you go in the world match the universe is richard baljit was one of the contributors to the project and his work means keeping banks of the stuff in his lab as roland pease discovered what is it a source of that we've taken from our experimental science which are sort of just to the north of mantras twer and we've many work on russell insights moore entrusted in the microbiology of russell and soils and how that changes in relation to plump divest you've management so this is four hundred grams will subsoil hammadi monte craves that could be literally billions affiliate vigil microbes in terms of numbers intend to species like with the thousands of different species of bacteria fungi that could be kilometers of fungal hifi and also there's lots of animals there as well lemon toads mites colombo and could trade worms things so small i could actually see it victim fizz already or would say a handful of soil contains popping mole bacterial cells than they're all people on earth soils harbor of fast.

britain bbc reporter richard baljit roland pease nina helen breaks seoul russell moore thirty three thousand calories four hundred grams
"roland pease" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"roland pease" Discussed on The Science Hour

"Shapely you need to be what can the sequencing to be well as is most of the secret hat how do you how do you how do you threat the base gather on necklace basically in the right order to give you the the final prescient you want that information is stored in dna this a sequence of different chemical letter spells out instructions nicely think they're twenty minute masses that'd be twenty were letters write they're not there are four and the way the cell cruces together intergroups history if you grouping together and groups a three there are enough different combinations of at the sixty four to give you a code there will let you spell out instructions for a string together twenty different amino acids are expert when need made before here this next interview from brian employees is that week to think of four letters that maker of dna agc until you have a rather limited alphabet until now it's become less limited yes so what they've done is they've actually managed to not only create and and get a about shame to tolerate two new letters was really cool new now is that nash get the bacterium treachery read the information in that's and gets another amino acid that doesn't exist in nature and sticky since reporting on this yet and this opens up a offers possibilities indeed as roland pease has been hearing from one of the scientists involved floyd rawlings berg of these scripts research institute in california what we've done is we've integrated an unnatural basepair into the information storage system of a cell and so it has the sell literally grows and does it's things with a man made part in its dna and eventually in its are in a and it can translate protein with it so it it's mostly a normal organism but it has a manmade part that's working in it and so it's not a synthetic organism it's a semisynthetic and so the startingpoint easy in the genetic code normally that the full genetic lexus a cgmt and you've added two extra lexus into that code yeah that's right so what underlies.

nash amino acid roland pease brian floyd rawlings berg california twenty minute
"roland pease" Discussed on Click

Click

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"roland pease" Discussed on Click

"What out a new way of getting online wirelessly vat via the light bulbs in your home or office because lightskinned potential the carry data and sam but i say potential they can't nice just the whole idea of this concept in fat is cold life fight the idea has been around for awhile but now products are beginning to appear what are the first firms to market is pure life i his chief scientific officer harald hass brought the idea to wider attention in its heads talk in 2011 well now the edinburghbased company has recently held a product launch and roland pease was that experiencing flashbacks yes pun intended to some of his favorite old movies it's part of the charm of old films shape flashing morse to shift with the ludford shots was oldest lamp bleak kicks in the dog ben eliezer a second but according to digital signalling i was reminded office my head for launch of that liked base while he five replacement for wi fi warriors the more you coming up this woman's history i argue that night is the mother of all countries bye bye internet byebye wifi by speeding up the flashes of an oldest lamp more than ten million fold and building the right kind of receive odongo via laptop pure life i think they've lost conquered the trick for making the light bulb of your desk you'll connection to the internet house i'm chief scientific gulf itself khilaifi okay so how wealth got my tablet in more heinz honey going to convert this into a light communicator so this is a thunder let top it has a used be connection and what we have here is the world's smallest life fi longo the size of a memory stake and it connects this tablet to the internet using light above us if i put that in you see the red light and if we go into the light we should be able now to connect to the internet as we connect with other devices suits just like wife argument connections you see the data link is established we see a it to rates of europhia ball to thirty seven point five megabits per second and it's getting the data from the light above us emptied don't let he'd be have here as well as an infrared led integrated so we also transmit data back to the lights off okay so listen if the guy bbc.

harald hass edinburghbased company wi sam chief scientific officer roland pease five megabits
"roland pease" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:15 min | 4 years ago

"roland pease" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Most votes in the opening round bbc news this is science in action from the bbc world service our aim at roland pease and today i'll be putting the science of krakatau the most famous of volcanic eruptions through the rock crusher temperatures up to about a thousand degrees and precious up to about maybe six kilometers on me the crust volcano in a lab volcano anna exactly we seek the wreck of the first ship sunk in world war two the thenia september third 1930 nine war against germany is declared that night a german submarine saw it and fired a torpedo that hit and disable the ship slowly avenia started thinking and we've the sounds that are helping ecologists the state of the forests in southeast asia we start with mathis co 2 monitoring satellite oh co 2 which was launched mid 2014 and it's just released its first sweet of data carbon dioxide a has we all know is on the rise because of the fossil fuels we burn the cement we make him the forests were funding but the releases not steady the orbiting carbon observatory as it's known in full is there to reveal the way concentrations are influenced month by month by the environment it's polar looping orbit carries over the whole globe nearly twice a month so that is data compliment the continuous monitoring them with one hundred and fifty sniffing stations across the planet but my question to deputy project scientist anne marie eldery is how a satellite can see an invisible gas we have a method of detection evolved looking at sunlight that gone through the atmosphere reflected off of the surface of earth in gone back up to our instrument and certain molecules can enter actor absorb light in very very specific patterns so we're measuring lie and a wave link where carbon dioxide is the key gas that changes the light spectrum so we can get him measurement of how much carbon dioxide the light pass through when it went down on the surface and backup to our spacecraft and it's.

roland pease world war carbon dioxide bbc germany project scientist anne marie eldery thousand degrees six kilometers
"roland pease" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:36 min | 4 years ago

"roland pease" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Designed to new technology that could see every childhood vaccine delivered in a single injection tiny nontoxic caps heels would be filled with vaccines and sealed the full their contents we released over several weeks bbc news this is science in action from the bbc world service with me roland pease and it's been another stormy week their brand new update coming in late this morning at hurricane armagh yeah now a hurricane this morning as a tropical storm so rapid intensification occurred what we experience is like something you see in a horror movie and we had cars playing on my heads we had thought he would contine as flying left and right hurricane jose which continues to turn its way out there in the atlantic off the harvey erma jose am here are hurricanes only increase we've the expert input and advice on understanding the statistics of these things we hear about the new boss for nasa and we've molecules on the move when a oh what a step size overpowered six worlds all haunted oils of the whole step thighs florida dodged a bullet was the phrase one american newspaper used that not all of it and certainly not many caribbean islands by the time it made landfall on the leeward islands harken was already on the way to breaking several wreck coats and matching many others for example its maximum wind speed of nearly three hundred kilometres per hour was sustained for thirty seven hours longer than any.

nasa bbc roland pease armagh three hundred kilometres per h thirty seven hours
"roland pease" Discussed on Science in Action

Science in Action

01:55 min | 4 years ago

"roland pease" Discussed on Science in Action

"Hello i'm roland pease and at the close of the last science in action podcast from the bbc world series i promise we'd find something more lifeenhancing than had dominated the knees last week well today we do have the promise of unusual rooftop firming it is kind of magical you get all of us growth and oldest vegetable and always produce and what's driving it also fantastic fish and we've microbes the term rubbish into plastic but for the most part the niece this week has been taken up with potential disasters whether it's the devastation from hurricane umer following close on the heels of harvey which will doubtless returned to at some point in a later program all the escalating nuclear threat signal by last weekend's bomb test in north korea towards another young kids holtz you will follow you'll get arching aimed at the politics of north korea's nuclear ambitions are complicated but that underlying by the country's technological capacity to develop ever more powerful warheads and to make them missile ready and on knowledge is similarly based on our technical capacity to eavesdrop on their efforts the latest test was the sixth since 2008 six and undoubtedly the most powerful apart from the official boasting that this was a more powerful hydrogen type of bomb our best insights come from the seismic shaking the decimation triggered sieg hecker emeritus senior fellow at stanford university's center for international corporation insecurity is the world's leading expert on north korea's program five lake no clear indication that they've been able to for two for very large supply greater than about one hundred followed kong for their fooled on the order of four to five times larger than previous largest for what we can tell for certain they've been able to produce then depth native very large nuclear device would such an explosion be consistent.

roland pease world series harvey north korea senior fellow stanford university kong nuclear device bbc official sieg hecker