19 Episode results for "Roger Ebert"

Roger Ebert on Money Movies

Motley Fool Money

00:00 sec | 9 months ago

Roger Ebert on Money Movies

"The Motley fool money extra. I'm Chris Hill. In a few days. They'll start handing out the academy awards so before Oscar gets his close up. Let's spend a couple of minutes with Roger. The league great. Great Roger was the first film critic ever to win the Pulitzer Prize. His column in the Chicago Sun Times was syndicated to more than two hundred newspapers across America and he published more than twenty books in his career as much as anyone. He was a life-long fan. And booster of movies. and the art of filmmaking back in two thousand and two who molly full CEO. Tom Gardner talked with Roger. Ebert about great business movies and the future of blockbuster video now we play a game each week on the show in which we call by seller hold but before we get to that. I want to just ask you because we're a business and money show. Is there a single movie or one or two movies that stand out in your mind as being extraordinary a films about business or money that our listeners. For you know I think the funniest line of dialogue The David Mamat has ever written was about money and came in his movie of two thousand one called Heist the heist Danny Devito is trying to convince Gene Hackman to pull one more job and she says he doesn't WanNA WANNA do it really goes sailing and it'd be just as you got to do it and Hackman says why do I have to do it. And devito says for the money and Hackman says I don't like money. The veto comes up with this classic. Ma'am line which ought to be the motto of the Motley Fool. Everybody likes money. That's why they call it money. Okay now let's play by seller. Hold we present you with a person place or thing. An event theme an organization and we ask Hugh if it were a stock. Would you be buying selling or holding away by seller hold given the encroaching technologies blockbuster. I would good Cell and why because I think that electronic means of transmission are going to eventually replace the trip to the video store and I think blockbuster itself is investing in that area. I think they'll be video on. Demand will come in by satellite or Internet Roger. Roger Ebert was right to sell in twenty ten blockbuster video filed for bankruptcy. That's for the money quote. He was off by a little bit but correct in his sentiment. And it's not the official motto for the Motley Fool but it is definitely how we like to begin motley fool money each week. I'm Chris Hill. Thanks for listening. We'll see you next time.

Roger Ebert blockbuster Gene Hackman Motley Chris Hill Danny Devito Roger academy awards Chicago Sun Times Pulitzer Prize Tom Gardner Oscar CEO David Mamat America Hugh official
11 Trivia Questions on 80s Ebert Movie Reviews

Trivia With Budds

00:00 sec | 2 months ago

11 Trivia Questions on 80s Ebert Movie Reviews

"It's eleven, Trivia questions on a movie reviews by Roger Ebert. I'll give you an excerpt from a review. You tell me what movie he was reviewing. This is trivia with buds. And welcome to another episode of the Trivial Buds Podcast I'm your host Ryan Butts thanks for checking on my show and thanks for telling a friend about all the tribute fund. We have here every single day. There are nine hundred and fifty episodes to listen to so make sure you hit subscribe. So you never miss a new one in go back through the archives and listen to all the old episodes. Easiest Way to do that is spotify I've been over there. You can just search trivia buds subscribe to it, and you can see every single episode right down to the very first one back in two thousand, seventeen if you. Want. To go check that out. Today's episode is all about movie reviews been watching a lot of movies and what did I just watch the other day? Oh, you know what we got into not movie. The good place finally got hooked on that. It took about eight episodes before I was like, all right I think I like this show I was always kind of like you know it's. Fine I like it but I don't love it and I started to love it around season one episode eight So I am in the middle of watching that that's our next show or watching, and I've been playing a lot of video games plan some Nintendo switch I got the bioshock collection of bioshock one to an infinite and it was on sale for thirty. Bucks. Amazon. came out in. May and those games all came out you know five, ten twelve years ago but I really like them. So it's very cool to be able to play bioshock on my TV and then take it in the switch forum and just walk over to the couch or the backyard or something and play a little bit horribly. So I am digging that and that'll be really fun to play that. On a plane as well. So that's what I've been up to I. Hope You are having fun passing the time on the quarantine on the lockdown wherever you're at I, hope that you're safe and sound and thanks for checking out my show today's episode about Roger Ebert Eighties movie reviews where to jump into eleven excerpts from those reviews for your Trivia questions for today right now. Here we go. All right guys it's Roger Ebert eighties movies reviews. Here's number one blank blank opens with a demonstration of the machine, which is struck by a bolt of lightning that fries it circuits and gives it the impression that it can think for itself number one blank. Opens with a demonstration of the machine, which is struck by a bolt of lightning that fries at circuits and gives it the impression that it can think for itself. What is this movie from the eighties with this Roger Ebert Review there are two words blank blank. Number Two dangerfield fondly believes Jason, is a fraternity member and a star of the diving team but actually Jason is the campus wimp the teams towel boy, and of course, he gets no respect number two. What was this one dangerfield finally believes Jason is a Frat member, a star of the diving team but actually Jason's the campus went the teams towel boy, and of course, he gets no respect. Number three the funniest comedy was a collision between British eccentricity and American. Craziness it started Kevin Kline Jamie Lee. Curtis is to American lovers pretending to be brother and sister who lived with. Michael. Palin in a jewel robbery caper. What is this one number three jewel robbery caper with Kevin Kline Jamie Lee Curtis number three. Review number four here was the years Wacky Special Effects Extravaganza of. Combination of live action and animation. The story is set in postwar Hollywood where cartoon. Characters. Aka Tunes and human beings exist side by side. What was this extravaganza of special effects number four? Number five one of Robert Altman's trademarks is the way he creates whole new world in his movies. He takes one of the most artificial and limiting of art forms the comic Strip and raises it to the level of high comedy and high spirits. We expect number five one of Robert. Altman's trademarks is the way he creates whole new worlds in his movies. What is this movie number five? Number six blank is a mushy and limp musical fantasy. So it's substantial it keeps evaporating before our eyes. It's one of those rare movies in which every scene seems to be the final scene and it all ends. And it's all ends and no beginnings right up to its actual, which is a cheat number. Six blank is a machine limp musical fantasy. What is this one number six? Number seven blank is a good hearted simple-minded comedy that will win a place in film history. I suspect primarily because it contains the movie debut of Dolly Parton number seven blank is a good hearted simple-minded comedy. That starred Dolly Parton in the movie debut number seven. What is it number seven? Number Eight. The teenager in the movie is named Jol his family lives in a suburb on Chicago's North Shore. It's the story of family that has three cars, the family station, Wagon Mom's car, and dad's Porsche number eight teenager named Joel in Chicago what is this eighties movie number eight? Number Nine Hoffman Stars is Michael. Dorsey character may be not unlike Hoffman himself in his younger days Michael is a New York actor bright aggressive, talented, and unemployable number nine unemployable actor number nine. And number ten. This is a movie that has a great many running scenes. It also has a movie about British class distinctions in the years after World War One in which the establishment was trying to piece itself back together after the carnage in France. This movie that has great many running scenes number ten. And the bonus for two points Burt Reynolds sleep walks through a role. He's played several times before but never so. Early what could this be? This is your bonus question. Burt Reynolds sleep walks through role he's played several times before but never so indifferently number eleven Those are all your Roger, Ebert, eighties movie reviews. We'll be right back in just a second to see how many you could figure out from those brief little descriptions. We are back with the answers to Roger Ebert eighties movie reviews. Let's see if you were able to get these correct number one was short circuit that opens with the demonstration of the machine, which is struck by a bolt of lightning and makes it think it could think for itself number one short circuit number two dangerfield believes Jason is a frat member, but he's the towel boy and campus went. Back to school great diving movie comedy number to back to school number three years. Funniest comedy was a collision between British s atrocity and American craziness was Kevin Kline Jamie Lee. Curtis in a fish called Wanda fish called Wanda number four pack special effects and tunes and humans who framed Roger Rabbit number four who framed Roger Rabbit Number Five Robert Altman's comic strip movie Popeye with Robin Williams. Number. Five Popeye. Number six blank is a mushy and limp fantasy xanadu xanadu Olivia. Newton John. Number seven blank is a good hearted simple-minded comedy that will win a place in film history with Dolly Parton nine to five great comedy nine to five number eight. The teenager in the movie is named Joe Lives in Chicago has a dad who has a porsche risky business risky business number nine. Hoffman Stars as Michael Dorsey a character not unlike Hoffman himself talented unemployable actor Tootsie is the movie now here tootsie number nine. Number ten a lot of running British movie chariots of fire number, ten chariots of fire and the bonus for two points burt reynolds, sleep walks through role. He's played several times before but never so indifferently that his cannonball run and cannonball run Ebert did not like it although my family thinks it's a classic. So there you have it maybe your family does to or maybe you're with Ebert maybe think he was sleepwalking through that movie That is today's episode Roger Ebert Eighties Movie Reviews from an eighties movie Trivia night that I did just recently hope he had fun playing along with that one. We the fact of the day for you and it is that sloths can hold their breath longer than dolphins can his net crazy sloths? Can slow down there breathing underwater longer than dolphins can. So there's your fact for the day. Thank you guys for listening to the show. Thanks for telling a friend about the show, and we'll see you next time for more trivia with me. Cheers.

Roger Ebert Kevin Kline Jamie Lee Curtis Michael Dorsey Robert Altman Dolly Parton Burt Reynolds Jason Kevin Kline dangerfield Hoffman robbery Jamie Lee spotify Chicago Ryan Butts Nintendo Amazon. France Joe Lives Palin
The Delightful Deviant Behind "The Human Centipede"

Here's The Thing

38:38 min | 1 year ago

The Delightful Deviant Behind "The Human Centipede"

"Approach. Listener support W in Weiss e studios. This is Alan Baldwin. And you're listening to here's the thing. The human centipede the only movie Roger Ebert ever refused to give a star rating to it is what it is. He concluded. It was the talk of the festival circuit in two thousand nine the talk at dinner, not panel discussions. It was too cruel to cracked high school boys were emailing each other gross out clips, many reviewers wouldn't even recount the premise. I will so feel free to skip ahead about one minute. The movie the first of a trilogy starts with the familiar horror trope of two pretty young women. Getting a flat tire at night in the rain in the woods. I thought you knew exactly where we were going. What was that? They end up in the home, but they demented surgeon. Then the familiar tropes, and because Dr Hyder once a get this respected separator Siamese twins has a late career goal. It's to kidnap three people sever their knees. And so their bodies together mouth to anus creating one long digestive system. It's oblique movie. Terrifying and bloody dealer. Lasers. Suave? Dr Hyder is Mangla like in his dispassionate cruelty and the victims play their roles with no wink, or nod to break, the tension, but shock wears off the movie that Roger Ebert refused to review is now firmly apart of the American popular culture, we have a long treasured tradition here on our show which celebrates the festival of lights. It's time once again for our annual. Oh lighting of the human centipede minora humans. The originator of the human centipede is improbably charming Panama hat, wearing young Dutchman named Tom six. He had just arrived from Amsterdam and brought with him his longtime business partner. Who's also his sister. We think how do you pronounce your first name again? Illona? Okay. So we've all met before because I was in that unique club of people who watched your magnum opus and was just knocked out. I thought Mike I I've got to meet the guy that made this movie, and you were so cheery you'll like it were so kind of animated and boyish in a way I was unprepared for like Ronnie Howard. Hello alec. I am Tom. This is my sister alone. And she was like Hello. Hello alec. No, black clothes and like spider webs in the corner. The dangerous thing right. You said to be going to redefine evil. Yes. Said I gotta chill. I thought man if anybody's going to redefine evil, it's you what is a horror to you in film in filmmaking. Do me is when you're in situation. You're that's doing to an asshole you're in a situation where you can't leave and it's worse than death. You wanna die as absolately? Where did you first get the idea as simple your idea? Yeah. Definitely I was watching television. And there was a child molester on and he did the most terrible things to children, and he got a very low sentence because of a mistake they made and I was angry. And I said they suit stitch his mouth to the anus of federal amazing because that would be a great bunch L something good out of a desire for Justice absolute emerge. This twisted idea of your films. Absolutely. You said this man should have his mouth sewn to the the aims of the famous talk driver hands on. Need because death would be severe his knee ligament solution. We can't run away. Absolutely. And then I immediately my then girlfriend. I put her on the hands and knees, and I took a picture, and then I fold shopped her behind each other. And I thought that's a great idea for a movie. This looks amazing. But at the same time, it's so incredibly horrifying the idea that you have to saying well wouldn't say swallow your part of a champion digestive chain hideous in your movie, this is not an act of Justice. We're not taking the child molester. Now, I did is important for show him. Right. Your first film. There was no Justice. And I thought I need one of those old villains s the Finkelstein. Dr almost created a Peter cushy had can you imagine he did over seventy films and the guy was never cast as a horror villain. Never never. What did he play old? Good guys. It's great. I'm sorry. I'm gonna really gonna struggle the. Straight face with. I believe a meeting you in person after all our conversations, but before you made this movie or you saw this horrible child molester who was not meted out a proper sentence for sure concern, what was your childhood look into filmgoing. I already loved horror films went to video stores, and I my parents, let me rent all those horrible over your favorite films kujo from Stephen King, although sev- zombie films. Everything I swallowed it up, and I have this really big imagination. So when I was a little kid. I said I want to be to make films when I grow up. Yeah. Definitely you make films a little camera when you. My grandfather, KMart K. It was a horror film alien came ING out of guy stomach. Yeah. Definit- riffing on play playing John her character. Definitely. So you had did you what kind of describe to us if you can in the most simple terms, those affects work. Did you have like a talk a mannequin that you had built puppets? And the guy with a hint in. It's coming out. I built his body and all of course, in a simple way. But it's already works. So what did he do for a living in how did he die? What was the setting? Was it Estacio something something like that my room into this giant style all of very low Bunn? Very this law small guy twelve for. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. That is already maybe. Where do you go to college? I went to the New York Film academy strangely enough. I did a course here in New York team here. Yeah. I came here. How old eighteen and I just wanted you something like always wanted to make films. Let sent him to New York because here I still remember there were guys from the film industry talking about film, and making film and got me so in onto Shostak, and then it's all it was only two months in Quebec to Holland, and I was hired as a television director for the first big brother show in Holland. And I was very good at it. So I brought it in the world. So then journal the the big owner of big broader he thought. Yeah, you're one of our best director. So he sent me here, you tell American directors taking the big brother program of which they do quite often they do with Saturday Night Live yet. They do all those types of programs, and they bring them to other countries and debt them up in that. So I was going willing television. But I always wanted to make films. So then I my sister who was in law school, she quit loss. Yes. She didn't like God. And then we started the six hundred company and we made three films in Holland Dutch language films. Now, one is the two women are trapped in the department store. Yes. Yes. Absolutely. Honey's? It's like a children's movie for a little Sweden innocent. So so that's the first film Janis the second field. The first one was the one in the in the gay disco Amsterdam in debt time had a very famous gazing all over the world. And I have a couple of friends who are gays, and they told me those horrendous stories about pill, popping and all the things you do in Amsterdam. But when you're hoppers. So I made a film about that. And then I moved onto honeys, and then I went onto make I love reach. And it's very cool. It's about a famous Dutch singer he plays himself, and he's obstructed by two very fed people who live in a trailer park and the woman is his biggest fan, she Dorsey singer. So they abductors misery. Absolutely. But it gets worse. She wants to have his baby. So we get natural way. He has to stay in trailer till she becomes pregnant so the husband isn't capable of of free produce. Absolutely. So have to bring in a stud, so to speak definitely and this famous. He's a famous musician seeing in real life is real a handsome guy. Yeah. There's a good looking guy. Yes. What what is his name roofing, Reese roofing. Yes. At the time. You made the movie how old was he? He was about forty. I think so he's still a little bit of tread on the tire wasn't completely out of the business. It was still young enough to have to light his fans. How do you? Get him to come into the movie where he has to sire the child at the morbidly obese woman. He thought it was for a Kenneth camera show this real, no. And he had to think about it. What was it about thought? He was game. Yet. Exactly that guys. Yeah. How do you call it? He thinks he's Stott. He does all the training. And he's absolutely. Yeah. So I thought he was down nicest extra horrible if he has to make laugh to this news. And do you see scenes where they're making? Evidently, all my definitely how long did it take to shoot that movie three weeks till you re weeks you're shooting, and how do you get the money for the film when you're walking into rooms we're gonna get to this especially with the centipede series? How do you get people to give you money when you get to the distribution part? What do you say to them? Well, he lo ASA genius had bring in money. So she rings the whole we f- this famous magazine in Holland, which called quotes and all the rich people are in there. So she just goes through the cellphone nine of ten people. They say you're an idiot fuck off. But like one there's one people that say why one who just can't say not Lona. Absolutely. Then I tell the story, and they they want to be in the film business. Yes. Was a film successful. Yeah. On a Dutch scale, it's very small film make money. Yes. But not like your. Because that's I mean you, and I both know that's mission impossible money, but the unless you've our mission impossible, but the. The investors got their money back. You did the first two so dreams was the third the third one. Yes. You did. The first one was called gay Amsterdam gave you don't really want or too much from the theme times that gain after them honeys honeys. Yes. Just loaded with double entendre. Yeah. And then and then I love yes. Which one performed the best at the budget. Pretty premature saying they made money. Yeah. But I liked the third one. I love three's. Absolutely the best that that's that's the black humor dark. It's it's getting my way what were some of the difficulties for you in handling the cast. And there would you're getting people to do these very compromising. I mean, it's one thing to say that someone's going to do a sex scene with the morbidly obese woman in your kind of sending up that as horror, but the actress who was hired play the part. Did you have to be like overly sensitive to how she was treated? And how she felt you have to be charming always to actors in situations. Like, and you are charming. Thank you. And. Yeah, the lady I told her how. Yeah. How with going to be and she she trusted me so much. So she's let's do it. I don't have any fear or whatever, let's do it. And the guy was a little bit has. But I said come on threes you have to do this. You're fence. They're not really having not really. But berry looks very I'm gonna go home and watch it tonight after my wife falls asleep. That's what I call midnight showing in my house. But. It's it's such a delight to finally meet what are you New York again here for of fly back tomorrow when you come back again soon as possible. Movie we need to do a movie. Let's so the movies make money, and you reward your investors. They get some kind of you pay them. They make some kind of a profit. Yes. So after. Gay and to them honeys. And I love Driss. What's the next movie? The first centipede the first humans, and you get the idea from the guy who gets the lowest, and where did you do your casting for the film here in New York because I wanted to after the lead actresses the two girls who undergo the procedure loan, and I went here to New York, and we had like like fifty or sixty women coming in all young young attractive. And I told him the premise and showed him the drawings. Eight and nine out of ten said, your European crazy. They were angry at me if you didn't know what it was about when they came in. No kept it under wraps Lutely. I said a European horror film said coming. Explain it to. Absolutely. Anything on the on the Email, and you explain it. They won't come. They've on combs the visions. Yeah. So does smartphones. They stay they wanted to hear more. And then you put him in their hands knees. And a lot of them leave. They think are as the next round limitation. Then how many remained on their knees and said, okay, let's go for like five left, and we chose to India. And to were absolutely troopers. You'll have to be so yes, they're artists. Right. So they just wanted to work with dealer once you show them Dita's real they were like I want to be in a here. So now, both these women are very pretty and very fit and very sexy. Young ladies in the business. And so when you're shooting the film what's the first day of shooting. Do do ease them into it. Or did you throw the right into the icy cold water? No, we slowly started. When the car in the forest and stuff in them getting the flat tire going to house. So we slowly build up for them. Yeah. Yeah. Because it's it was too much. You can imagine really really definitely we gave them massages when they're on their hands and knees, really treated them. Really? Well, what exactly did you have to do hygiene wise to make everybody comfortable about sticking their face of the person? Yeah, they're little frayed that didn't fart or something. You have to be very with that. What you eat. Yeah. Very thin latex between their mouths and the butts. So it's something in between, of course. But it's close. It's. Yeah. It's minimal because otherwise it would look fake. Yeah. So day shower, very well. And they and then they would do these and they were on their hands and knees in the formation of the human centipede for how many hours a day which. Not very long. It's like we shoot like ten minutes. And then they break take a break. And then we put them back in days were the in the centipede mos- almost four weeks on their hands and knees in the centipede nod that's three weeks. I think three weeks of sounds like hell hell three days would be more than I could bear. It's hell when we do our movie together. No more than three days of center type of. Not going to happen. So when the time comes to distribute the film. Yes, you could minimal distribution, correct? Yeah. Yeah. No who is the executive with that. I have seen. I have seen as Jonathan Simmons. Jordan. Wonderful filmmaker film executive heat wave guys Mike you'll he loved the feed that he got it. Absolutely entertaining. What happened we showed the first centipede at the fright fest and in London and exploded, they're really all the people who started talking about it and then fantastic fest in America. They give us a call this an Austin, Texas, and they played it there and they're exploded again. And then Johnson came to us. I have to have that film. I the. Yeah. And you made some money. Yeah. Money, we use you you distribute, the movie the movie played in theaters for how long and what what parts of the world because it was banned in many in Germany is banned in in England. It's it's cotton stuff was banned in Germany. Yeah. Yeah. Definite God for family through the internet. Yeah. And new SeaLand partout is banned. So there's a lot of banning going around. But film do well where where's the audience America and law? Tom six movies in England, America, and Japan, Japan is they crave. A good nasty definitely on all fours and they react differently. When they see the film days cheer. Ed, they are so happy cheering a suit. And immediately went on their hands and knees, and they wanted me to lay deter and crazy, and I love it. You're you're the they do these tributes. Oh, yeah. They do. They do they form human centipede chains outside the theater and well in Americans, I told them. How David Spade he made his Halloween costume with Sarah Silverman in the backup. Leave us or pictures of that coming along in America. It's pretty it's on the Conan O'Brien show. I I saw it. Now, the movie is distributed. What year does human centipede come out and ten came out that long ago, and so two thousand ten it comes up and you get these scathing reviews oh saying. Oh, yeah. So you're saying threats lots of their visually. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Lots of them. Did you need like beefed up security in your life? Bar to when we had to premiere in America. We had a guy that's glue because we got a picture so of guys with guns, and they say you're worse than Satan. We're going to human centipede in partout in America. Where was that Austin, Texas Austin? Yes, that was a big fence pretty cool. What was the theatrical run that run for few weeks weeks? Definitely go on your streaming online. Where did you make most of your just so people understand how these when a movie like this, which is very potent? Yeah. And very ugly torture porn, as you know, was used describe a lot of your work. And I want to get to that. In a second win. The movie is is such a strong reaction. Yeah. I'm assuming it's in and out of the theater relatively quickly. Add definitely your online. Yeah. Feel deed that works the best. Imagine is that where you made your money the day. Yes. And the movie was a success financial. Oh, definitely. We're going to the second. Yes. And the second one let's say I think is a masterpiece it's a work of art because his idea that I've never in my life. I mean, I'm sitting there going. Oh god. No. I mean, we're watching the opening sees a man who works in a parking garage. Who is a lonely miserable. Misshapen kind of cloven hooved man is there watching your original film on his computer and getting the of these going to create the movie. Absolutely. So in the movie part to you summon back the actress, yes. Which of the two actresses was the one that came back actually Jenny she came back because he calls her and says, we're going to go another round we're gonna do the sequel. What was the phone call like for you to call Ashland to come back for round two? Was it easy? Very easy. I Skype with her. And she was so overwhelmed with successful part one. She. Yeah, she got the. Yeah. She was star in her in the horror, Sean. Yeah. Definitely. So I said actually we have to bar. And then I told her what it was about. And she had to swallow a few times because it's way worse than then parred one this really a picnic in the park part one. But she such a trooper. She said, let's do it and she'd never complained, and if you see what happens to her in the film yet, it's stuff not who's the actress the kind of crow like woman that plays. Martin's mother, Vivian Britain. That's an Vivian Britain as the actress in Richardson, a British actress, and I love her very old wonderful rail. She has because when he gets out of the bed and his belly sticking out like a globe. And he's in his bed is moldy bed. Yeah. And the mother's like, you know, you wonder what's kept them other from like disposing him or just shooting him and leaving getting rid of him. It's all so sad. Who's your production designer who who creates the Tableau that? Is Martin's bedroom. I do that myself. Yeah. Yeah. Figures, we have more live. Yeah. Definitely we go out for a location hunting. And I think this is the place and the basement apart. Yeah. Yeah. And. Yeah, yeah. Love dance. Yeah. He's hopping pimples, and it's all over the bay. Kind of body fluid is used into the. Yeah, I like your mind. Yeah. You can see it's all their movies is that's all their dealers apartments. Very neat claiming is that sort of castle. But like wet stones very gleaming modern edifice and. Down to the laboratory. It's very gleaming and eat and clean. That was your idea. Yeah. What was the doctors aiming for some Dr Hayder Hayder, and it's a combination of two real Nazi doctors from the second blooming. Yeah. It's it's based on the with the twins idea. But it's Dr hyme, and Dr Richter, and I made it into Hyder hyme and Richter yet become highter, what did Hyman Richter do doctors as well. Okay. But those stop we don't we don't want to go to. Okay. Key to the darkness in any horror. Film is the editing. The claustrophobia the sense that something someone is lurking. Just off camera editing can make a mediocre film. Good and a good film. Great one of the best film editors in the business has Martin score says his longtime collaborator Thelma Schoon Baker. The thing is you see that we create that violence in the editing room. There's no way that deniro could take an actual punch all the times, you see it in in the film blood and saliva would spray off it, but it's not actually violent when I get it. I make it. Here. The rest of our conversation in our archive that here's the thing dot org. When we come back human centipede creator. Tom six explains what he's doing next where the human Senate peed trilogy is body horror. Six says his upcoming film deals in pure, psychological horror. This is Baldwin and you're listening to here's the thing. If you watched the first two installments of the human centipede series. The first thing you notice his the stark contrast between the two villains dater laser the domineering aristocrat versus the misshapen miscreant Lawrence are Harvey director, Tom six explains the different is that deter yet like huge career, he seventy films, and he's a big serious actor stage actor as well. What about the actor the played Martin again? What's his name? Lawrence are Harvey did like very little things. Yeah. Doughnut commercial? Yeah. Exactly, very small things you mentioned in an interview that I watch said you wanted to Casselman who was the opposite of shortly. Yes eater. The doctor in the original film gleaming, kind of intense genius. And he's very eccentric. And even aristocrat. Figure and Martin is just like, you know, like somebody expect rated on the ground eases the blob of the disease were, but that guy I when I saw his appearance I said, he doesn't have to speak in the film. It's just as presence is still strong while deter is very trained in performing with words and. Very commanding repairable. He should play fun on film. He looks reminded me of fun Kharian. So what did you cut out of the film that you didn't put in? There was even is your plan. Even you sit there and go we have to lose it. It's just too much. I put everything everything that comes to my mind. And I put in the script is in it, and you shoot it. And then you cut it. And that's in the film. Yeah. Yes, I'm shoot very economic. So I should exactly what I want rep is no seen you shoot. We you say, oh my God alone. Even I have gone to impart to the famous rape scene. And the guy puts the bar prior around his penis, and then rapes his centipede, that's the most gruesome part in the film, and we were shooting than half of the crew they went crying and they walked away. And I was like cheering odd is brilliant. It's like a same. It's almost and I looked behind me and all those people are gone. They're left. You couldn't they couldn't take it. Wow. And I was it like with the crew like did you feel the crew respected? You. And the way remember not all director respected, the movie could be, you know, a love story or a musical comedy. What have you not all directors are respected by the crew? Trust me. But did you find that your crew did respect you sit there and go behind your back? They go guys how they probably have said it, but maybe because of the of the charm maybe and because I'm enter chested. I bring them into the story and the adventure. And I tell them they know exactly what's will change us here. Maybe days, they stand there, and I left for example, part one we at the scene where the centerpiece of shifting for the first time and feed her feeder, and he filmed at house in a suburban area were other houses were around it and people were hanging out of their windows looking at this though scenes ever horrified. But the crew was laughing everybody was laughing ever. You can imagine a situation like that. Yeah. Well, kind of I. Completely now. So number three, I have not seen, and I do you think I should see definite? Okay. Because I would told but that was the weakest of the three I don't I don't. Talkers Coppola analogy goes even further because obviously this godfather one thing for the two goes to another level. Then a lot of people thought godfather was a letdown. It's the best one of three it's satire, I go back to my original punishment idea. And it's for the prisons. So I translated to a real situation where if you do something horrible, you go to a prison, your sewn into human centipedes, and according to your sentence, you put in for a week or maybe twenty years, the centipede thing is is the sentence you've been talking, but this giving back to definitely the original my ID's child molester. I think crime rates will drop like bans in whorehouse because nobody wants to be in a human centipede. Yeah. I think they live actually the I think medically you die. And I I tell that the real doctor in Holland, and he made the he said that people were to pass their waste product India mouth at into your bloodstream. You're into your digestive tract, you would live if they get fight men injections and fluids they could live like that for a long time because it's not long. It's not for a long long time. If you get the right long enough to survive their sins, evidently because the feces is not attacked by outside bacteria. Right because it's contained today's in one constantly. Absolutely. Yeah. You're giving us a lot of fun. Oh, yeah. Help me for east have gastroenterologist -sulting you real surgeon in Holland who wants to stay anonymous, but he made his very detailed operation report. And he was on the set as well. Helping got pretty cool. That's why it's cool is out the word. Okay view. I want you to view, your you're you're free to say, whatever you want say how long did that take to shoot that was about six weeks divorce are longer shoot because we had like hundreds extra extra prison. Yeah. Big prison unless you had a star in the lead role. Definitely Eric, Robert. So Eric Roberts is one of the great movie actors asked several years, and I worked with him on a film. How do you get Eric Roberts to come? And do the third installment. We had a Skype conversation with him. And he loved the first like you love the first. Yeah, he got it. I said, yeah. You wanna be in part three. And if I don't have to be on my hands and. Centipede me know, exactly. Yeah. And he did it and he was governor of the state. So he says prison is in the is the one that comes up with the idea of centipede in everybody know, that's the content of the warden comes per. That's Lawrence are Harvey at brought came back because. See this. Harvey and dealers in it. Dior's the warden and Laurence r Harvey assistant. That's like getting Marlon Brando end deniro to be in part three together. That's totally different roles in totally different roads completely on and Eric plays. The governor of the state, and what is his what's his arc? What's historian is is really a cost inefficient. So there is looking for solution. Yeah. He since to shut the place down and figure it out. Absolutely. May come up with an idea under pressure, and they built the centipede system, which is very. Buddy. And then the governor comes in. And of course, he says this this will be the death penalty for you. But then yet he understands situation. And then he says this is exactly what America needs. Like that. Yeah. Check it out if you want. It's I think it's the best one. Did you have to pay Robertson real money to do the move cheap? It's not like Hollywood money. Millions. Yeah. Those guys don't come cheap. Definitely now. So you connect on Skype with your sister. Yes. She really your sister. Or you say, she's you're. Co-producer faces sister just to further ingratiates. She's my sister. So that kind of takes it makes a little family. It is a family business. One hundred percent. Yes. She's literally your sister. Yes. Okay. I'll take your word you hook up on Skype. I reach out to you. Yeah. I saved my I just kind of talk to the sky. Yeah. You say to me Alec. We're going to have a group of people who are like an elite of extraordinary villains. The all people who are dedicated they love human suffering the original concert noneya club. They were all wealthy because they could fly to ear to Mexico earthquake see death and destruction of people dying and suffering. Yes. And then you see to me I want you to play a unconscious, but rather than killing to cancer you will giving people more cans Tara page out of your own life. We're going to have your wife be much younger than you, very beautiful very fit and you want giving your wife's to cancer. Yes. So I'm sitting there, and I tell my wife is my wife like literally. Looks at me if you saw the look on my wife's face, she was like the whole dream of working with you just died. One of your life. That's never going to help you never to be within fifty miles of this guy. He sounds complete total nutbag want that energy on you. When you come home from work. No, you should see him. He's very charming. I'm very Bouillon. And she says, no, you can't do the movie. So then we talk and say, okay. So here's another idea. One at the people in the in the film is going to steal the corpses of celebrities. So I want you to come in shoot for one day and you to play yourself dead ends a casket and women casing out the joint figure out with of the dole frame house. You're gonna get the body out of there and you play yourself debt, and I thought fantastic. And then I couldn't even make that day were did you all that still in the movie, it's all in the movie? So so and so the league of extrordinary villains ninety is men and women. It's no changes to all-women now over women. Yes. Even scarier because when when women. Yeah, masturbate on the misery of other people and then joins debate to suffer. Yeah. Exactly. So is. Yeah. It's the worst human emotion. It's shouted and Freud it. Yes. Which happens in real life? But in the fill in America two thousand eighteen. Definitely. But it's dark and powerful redefined evil. Yeah. I think so I think so. Yeah. The women are in the league. How many actresses did you have to five five five women? Where are they from America? American. Actress anybody we would know no big names. No. Who's the most well-known just got Morris? It's maybe Jessica Morris. She does series on television and stuff and was it difficult for you to entice people to come do this movie days. It was very you can imagine. Because like you I told them the story. And so many were offend eighty percent leave the yeah. Almost the same and smart ones. They stay in. Listen more. I love you. The people who understand the small ones they say, that's the name of your biography. I also it's an analogy for the film going audience and everyone who works with you, the smart ones, they stay. So eighty percent of them aren't so smart, and you should for how many weeks we show it's almost a month. Again, a little bit the same where in the Hollywood hills. We had this beautiful the budget of the film was Deloitte. I am not allowed to talk about money. But she is she's the money girl. It's a secret we won't say anything, but hold up some thinkers. So I can have an idea this much. Okay. International women have mystery. Yes. But you shoot in LA, no union issues. Oh, it's all nonunion. We never had any the unions coming bother you because they know your name they knew he were if they see and they monitor these there's a casting call American actresses actress going to do a film sag doesn't show up and hassle, you know, because the actress also were known union so days if they were not in the union off, they are how do you call? How do you? Call the fight Cora. They can they can do outside. Right. Executive do some some. Yes. Yes. Yeah. Now, are you glad to get away from the centipede thing that's done this done? No never ever. That's not well, not so fast fast. No, no. But I have so many more ideas in my head is exploding. So the own any club is so very new fresh original. That's what I like. And that's where I go for when she saw the law, Scott. I did he was overwhelmed with how powerful it was. It's evil. It's really evil when you're watching a movie like Frankenstein. Yes. There's some moments of humanity. If you decency in the world that self definitely movies. There's none now Martin has some humanity. Don't you think because he was abused? As a kid. He is some you pity him room said he audience feels for him not everybody, and there's a lot of black humor in my films. A lot of not all of them club. Heavy moments of decency, definitely Hannity. Otherwise, it won't work. I it's it's it's Bella senses. Between you manatee real eveland also dark humor, everybody sees. But it's yeah. It's it's a difficult road to walk on if for an audience, I think it's like six into city, but then on evil steroids. It's it's evil. It's sex in the city the five women. But now it was four and six, okay. The bonus bonus sexless plus one she enters the group of fifth when you bring you bring in a film. Well, that's a wonderful setup. Maybe a political thriller. You can't do where the doctor is someone who you go to to cure cancer. And they're only giving you more cancer. That reminds me of certain political figures in this country today, wouldn't you say, absolutely? And when they don't have cancer. She just tells them they've cancer just to witness their she. In that as well. And her. She's she's lesbian now in the film. She has his beautiful girlfriend is smooth he'd drinking very healthy girl as she hates that she she looks at the she wants to destroy healthy. And the moment she she gets sick their sex life goes through the roof. You can imagine. What's your next movie? I have to line up, and I can tell about course. Yeah. But evil films as the evil. Yeah. From my horrified. Did you did you might not be your were though, it might it might not be evil enough? No. I mean, I have I think it's a great idea. My everybody loves it. But nobody wants to make it. Where's my alone? I would love to work with you. Stay tuned. I might eventually read redefine evil alongside my guest human centipede creator. Tom six. His upcoming film is called the noneya club out early two thousand nineteen this is Alec Baldwin. Here's the thing is a production of WNYC studios.

Tom six America Alec Baldwin Martin Amsterdam Holland cancer New York director Alan Baldwin Roger Ebert Mike New York Film academy Laurence r Harvey Dr Hyder executive Holland India Lawrence Skype
"Never Knew Love Like This Before"

Couples Therapy

00:00 sec | 9 months ago

"Never Knew Love Like This Before"

"Hey Naomi here to talk to you about stress and skin we all know the stress can affect the way your skin looks but luckily there is good. News Sephora has your solve loves you can quench your dryness with top. Skincare picks from drunk elephant. Tasha Barbara Tarum. You can target signs of aging with fresh and Dr Dennis Gross Income Readiness with lineage. You can get this entire skin saving lineup. Only at Sephora so go to your nearest sephora store or Sephora DOT COM in distress your skin open your hearts losing your butts and it's time for couples therapy yeah this they can both talk with brunches and cousinly too messy situation. Sits unconscious and coupling from Netflix with lots to single them with the Mulu Tech sex regret. Regret Sophia. Jubal you were eating therapy cavity baby week. Hey everyone I am. Now I am Andy and we are a real life couple a real life couple of comedians and on this show we bring you the best sets from our live show where we have comics who are close do sets together about their relationship and ship. Sometimes you do other things. This is one of those. You guys were shaking it up today. Okay it's going to be something different before I give you more let me get into the housekeeping. Yes that's how you know it's GonNa be special we're doing housekeeping right up front. Yes we're not even fake asking each other how we're feeling today. We already know to get into. We have a live show coming up on the eighth here in Los Angeles. We've had a string of amazing live. Shows just had the kids in the hall on the show in San Francisco's and I'm very excited to come back to Los Angeles On the eighth at the Virgil APM. So far we have a couple comedian media couple yes baker and Andy Hanes. Yes to wonderful stand ups we have dwayne Perkins and Shintaro Jackson yes. Interior Jackson is writing on the saved by the Bell reboot. I have so many questions questions. She's running saved by the bell. He's writing on Brooklyn nine nine. What a what? A Combo. A dynamic duo they are we are going to have such a great show. You should definitely come through that you guys my mother will be in attendance so stakes are high. I believe I said that last week. I'M GONNA keep saying we need bodies in the seats. Okay 'cause she comes through show that's not full she's GonNa make. Why do you do a chauffeur so far? No people that's a real question she'll ask okay so we have got to be ready for. Its gotTA fill those seats to make. Naomi's mom I was going to say happy satisfied and also it is a good show so you're not simply doing a Mitzvah. You know what I mean you are having yard you're experiencing What else can we take? Oh when McClellan covy coming on the show to advice episode Wendi mcclendon Covy from the goldbergs Reno nine nine one one from brides bates you guys were in a indie film together. We're in indy film. Together she's so funny. This woman has been in these streets. It's acting role. She is five cats. We will be discussing that so if you would like her and us to answer your relationship advice questions and you you know. Things surrounding relations family friends XS siblings. Anything you know. We'll answer it because I think I know everything you can on any of the any of the platforms hat forms. Also we do prefer though voicemails because we love hearing your Dulcet tones and the number for that is three two three five two four seven eight three nine. Of course do do that between now and Friday morning yes of course. If you didn't write that down you can find this and you can also get tickets to the live shows on the website. Couples therapy pod dot com on on the right side of the page. And if you don't mind if I have a slight plug oh please you might share with our friends. Some people know that are listening and you certainly we do for the last ten years strangers have been coming in and out of our house but I do a podcast called beginnings and the tenth anniversary. It was just on Sunday. Eh commemorated the occasion with a special interview with Stephen Merritt from the magnetic fields man. I've loved since high school. I went at his apartment in New York. When we're there over the holidays and we had a really great conversation? So Beginnings pod Dot Com and you can also find it on pretty much wherever you get your podcast cast from. I'm so proud of you. And the beginnings is really your longest relationship the way I feel about criminal minds is probably even beginnings except whereas I watch criminal minds you actually create create beginning. You're invested you are booking your interviewing. You're editing you are posting. It is your baby at the one thing I get to do that. I'm I have complete control over every aspect of when you also have some really great fun. Good guest people. You've gotten to come over to our house over the years. Always surprise me especially because you were doing it before for everyone and their mom had a podcast. So back when you'll be like Oh yeah I'm interviewing somebody like they're really going to come to. Iran does house and talk to you like I was like what is happening but now it's like we do it every day. Girod Rod Carmichael Rolling Up to our first apartment floor. Walk up with Lago meeting tonight at midnight after finishes shows like Caroline's or whatever no Oh God back when the bug novelty you go to any length to any length to get a good interview and Damon Lindelof Spin On. It's been a good show anyway so if I can be so immodest you must in two thousand twenty no modesty out today. Yes you guys. India's we always say you know gone a couple of everybody dot com and you can get tickets to the show you can get our dial a number you can also subscribe to our Patriot and I feel like this episode. We're giving you now. This is like a taste of what the Patriot is. This is just I mean. Andy getting into it goofing around talking about where we're at. This is the kind of thing you would get for your five dollars. I just want you guys to hear it. I also yes kind of. We'll talk about where we're so. It's a real heart shaped Gab fest. Hardship gabfest indeed and Ian. I time getting married later this year. That is the plan and so she got US feel an all like tender in style chicken shit and Stahl GIC and shit and it's so funny because I was earlier like being a decade and a lot of ways I was like oh well looting doesn't change that much like getting legally. WED doesn't change our day to day and yet now that we are like like planning to do all that stuff. I do feel the difference and I do feel like the excitement surrounding and being like Holy Shit is your heart filled with love or fucking whatever my I would love and shit and that's where on that but it was just funny because remember i. I joke with you Andy. Did you ever imagine your greatest love will be with a strong black woman and I always ask you that and you're always like oh I don't know I never thought about it. I didn't think about race right. Well it's you know when I I was younger. I I think this joke that you telling your comedy central special where you talk about like the things you imagine when you were like when you were a kid about getting married so I never had that same experience. I don't know if it's like whether it's just like the contingencies of being a quote unquote dude. Where you don't think about weddings weddings and marriage and stuff like that and who you're going to be who's going to be your partner or if it's just because I was very emotionally repressed growing up? I don't know what you know what what is but I didn't have that kind of like I never thought I just assumed that like I didn't even assume anything like I was about to say. I just assumed it would be like a Jewish wife or something like that. I didn't even have any of that. My future was just this like you know like in the never ending story when the nothing comes. It's just like this sounds like depression. You're with a blanks. Me The space of nothing. I'm about just like the nothing I think at the end of of it right there. It's just blackness right isn't just like a white space or something like that. My future was just. This was just a white space. Well the truth now how you train a white space. That ain't the truth now. What it really was? It was just this kind of like blank. NECE and I'm like I guess I'll like I think partly I mean if we're going to get deep if we're really treating this say we treat a Patriot episode. I didn't like to think about my future because I knew at some point in my future was death and so if I did not think about my future. I didn't have to think about that and I can just concentrate on. Whatever was going on at that moment so if I'm a teenager you know right drinking Coca Cola's with my boys basketball and quote the simpsons? Oh my God. I love it when I was a teenager when I was in my twenty s when I was in my thirties. It wasn't that always happening. You know we get twenty ounces of coke we go shoot some hoops and we talk about whatever the simpsons episode was that we had that whereas you you know maybe like growing up in New York going private school it was like going to go in the upper east side. White Boys are all around me but I also never thought I would actually make I. I long term life with one because growing up. I didn't really see those examples around me and I remember like my family. My cousin would be like I remember when we were young. Okay do not shade. Her she is you know sh she doesn't think this way anymore but I remember when we like twelve thirteen. She was like Oh no name. I couldn't even imagine like kissing white boy like it was like it was like they were another species it was foreign. You know whereas I think me especially on pop culture. Yes in the nineties. We had so much television that at the time but also a lot of the shows. I kid also super white shows everything the Disney channel was pedaling. Take eight and so the one with the the dude who had a Indiana Jones said Shiloh. Move Oh that was after. That was after my time. I'm so I remember the name of the show by talking about. That's how I la booth popped off with that Disney show but at the same time I didn't see a lot of it and even now in twenty twenty you and I we will. We will whenever we see an interracial couple that is our makeup meeting a white man in a black woman. We always Kinda give each other a nudge and we're like do you see you. Do you see that dynamic couple approaching and I'm almost always calling them hotter version of us over unless version of us. I'm currently comparing our hotness. Do they where do they fit in attractive level right. That's my sickness but I'm thinking about it and I think that it's also been in my head sue because this whole you know the Royal Family Meghan inherent so I was like what were the interracial couples growing up in popular culture in either. I are earlier in media. That really influenced me and that were also kind of imprinted on me in an early way and when I started talking to you about this you had some in your history like people you thought of two so basically you guys. You wanted to like a little list. I've made for fifteen top interracial couples now like us live top fifteen. IRC's RC's of our flavor but now also by we say top that is not best. Everyone's thriving we're talking about what we say when I say top we're talking about the people who has influence. They're talking about Tom in terms of sexual top or bottom also that but then also like where they are like. Who's who was imprinting on me? who was in affecting me? Who got me thinking about? You know a love like this you know and so that's where we're at Liden respect for me now. I am saying this is the top. Definitive ranking Oh a definitive ranking. IRC's of our flavor. I love this talk. All right you guys this. This list is about to pop off a the people never knew love like this before. Yes I am saying. You're you're saying these are the this is like it could be any order really yet. It doesn't really matter I'm saying no we're counting down. Yeah Okay your. We're counting down to the number of for all historical. You know what I dare you to add us. Please please are welcome people to Atas. Okay you guys is number fifteen top fifteen inch racial couples. Okay this is a GimMe Megan. Markle Prince Harry. Obviously obviously I mean. Look I started with. For instance the a couple that is kind of in the forefront of everyone's face right now is like Meghan Harry and issue so interesting how people were like how people blame her for for like Harry's leaving England because of her and it's like first of all you know here. He has been loving Africa from moment. One this boy. It goes to Botswana on vacation. Is Harry the one dressed up like a Nazi well that too. It's called growth. I think look if that was Megan. If you had a Nazi pigeon you'll pass we wouldn't even it's called growth. I think when we talk about malignant tumor in his brain and allowed him to dress like knots. Berry got it. I don't you I I know people grow and change. It is a little while to be but it's damn it. Let's let's pretend something. What if you had everything else is the same about me me? And there's one photo of me dressed Lake A. I've tried to think of something that's analogous dressed like a proud boy. It looks like a proud boy in my past. Oh absolutely not right because it's like you ain't perfect so I'm already dealing with some baseline flaws just in just isn't any human and you gotTa Laugh from Zach in the booths. I feel really good God to have. But it's like if you already working my nerve and then you come through at damn photo. Oh you out. I need a free meal that bad that I'm going to date you but you know what Meghan is has a more open heart to me hard as more open. You mean does she I think so and then she would over England and people fucking destroy her and she was like oh no no no. I got to go home to Canada. I got to go where I made suits where I feel safe. We have a friend remember. We don't friend who when we were at a party a friend of ours theorized that the Queen Kicked Megan's dog down the stairs. There is no proof of this. We don't know this is accurate. But it's all part of like the speculation as to the darkness. Meghan was facing the Turkish. She's facing is such as part of a royal family. That has a history of centuries of racism there is. I mean we're talking about a colonial power eh into India that wedded to Africa like characters. Welcome Meghan Markle is going is gonNA lateral that. I doubt out cornet like if you could mutate Cornell West and Oprah into a single being who bell hooks if you have every black leader that's living. I doubt they could combat like you made a mutant like oh you mean like the perfect woke. Transformer Transformer buggy stars align. They still couldn't the royal family that it's so that the racism they are so deeply ingrained in blood right right right. There's no way like they don't even even think about it. It's like it's not racist facts. Here's a question to me. Meghan ever guest are in blue bloods why we can look around. I'm wondering IMDB at us. I dare you to add us. Tell us if Meghan markle ever did a guest role on. CBS is blue bloods. Okay number. Fourteen frank farmer in Rachel Marin now you may know this couple also as Kevin Costner and Whitney Houston in the bodyguard. Okay tell me tell me. Yes we are doing fictional fictional. Come in rely set up top young black women. Tell me if you was living in ninety three when you Kevin Carey Whitby whitby out there crap. We're you like never knew. Love like this before Now now I've got a question for you. You do not allow me to carry you into to crowds out of crowds in famously way more than you. That's the only reason why but I'm seeing that iconic bodyguard image also in the movie movie poster. That was a big deal in the nineties. Especially because Whitney was like black America's daughter you know what I mean like she was like from the Church had the most perfect voice of an angel angel like she was like all like she was like she was like our as as a culture a homecoming queen in a way like that kind of that kind of woman she's like held up is such a perfect good girl. Yes and then of course. She's like in this movie the Psych. It's a kind of a thriller very sensual. And then Kevin Costner Ninety three the height of his game. You know what I mean. So so you've got these two stars and for a while frank farmer you know. He's on the low he's like I'm Anne Frank Farmer I know he's just to protect okay. He's not trying to protect not connect necked falls in love. That's the bodyguard. Number hold on was nicknamed the thrasher. He's a farmer frank farmer thrasher. I don't get the reference. This species called thrashers Forbes about far loom you mentioned in thrashes. Just hang out in the fall. I'm sorry that I grew up in the suburbs. burbs of reading right next to a country. Suburb called Daniel. Boone farmland. Yeah you could go in reading. You could go from outright farmland to gang controlled intercity with in. I think twenty some odd minute literally the thing I love about reading the most. It's like you're almost browder reading being insane so many strata so many strata number thirteen. You know we talked about Meghan. This little friend Meg Serena Williams James and Alexis. Now when we were talking about this before we got on Mike. I protested this one but I felt Serena's contribution bution to positive contribution to the world outweighs redheads. What's his name Alexa? So Hendin the creator creator of read it read pill man himself. I know but I said I was like I was like. Oh I hate him but also like their love is so inspiring. Every every time he's in the stands at one of her games. Serena is a true queen. They have their baby. They all seem they're not really like into like the fame and bullshit like I like for someone who for me for him for someone who is with like you know one of the best female athletes in the world. He's not being. As grosses grosses he could be slash grosses. I expected the founder of read it to be well in terms of trying to use her to give himself that kind of front facing more. I mean you and I are like that in the sense that you are a world renowned stand up comedian I like Alexis more in the background. Orion and like Lexus. You just needed a message board where people come together and say anything. So it's not like I behave. I don't know I'm not a you. Don't do a stand up show and then you're done I shove you aside and get up on stage. It'd be like look at me to use the same. He's like demure. He's he's confident confident. We are the same in the sense that we're confident enough in ourselves. Yeah they don't need to push our lovers aside the spotlight and point the spotlight us. What I love and what I was looking at what I love most about their love is that when they first met Serena was not checking for him? Okay they were in Rome at a hotel. He sat next to her like her table. He was sitting and and they tried to get him to leave by saying there's a rat over there what they told him. Don't sit there. There's a rat over there something to get him to like. Get up and move to another place. What a strayed? Second can we play your ear. CERITA I'm Alexis. Okay yeah so he just sits down so imagine okay. So just just imagine it Serena and Alexis meeting okay. So I'm Serena Okay my body's banging okay. I'm in a probably by a pool. Maybe I'm in my swimsuit. I am Coca Queen Some lessons on and I notice a tall kind of lanky. Bearded white man approach. Have you guys ever used read it. Oh do you mind if I said Oh. I'm sorry you probably shouldn't sit there. There's like a rat over there definitely. There's definitely a rat there weight up. I'm sorry why should I mean. Look if you don't want me to sit down that's totally okay. But what do you mean. There's there's a rat what I mean by. That is that there is a right. There is probably a vermin circling the table. That you're about to be at and so if I were you I would probably just moved to inside the hotel. Probably your own room actually do right if I ask why. You're okay so the rat hanging out at your are you. Are you actually just calling the Iraq. No no I would never. I would never security scary. No I would never do that. I would never say I got death. You just say you don't want me around. I heard you call for security first of all what is strange to say. Okay fine okay you can. You can sit at our table. I'm convinced as Iraq okay. I'm not lying but if you think I'm lying or if you think table and us at our table it's fine. I just it's a weird excuse. If you don't want me here you could say you want your or you could say oh. I think there's blood or something on that seat. Sorry why would there be blood on us. I don't I'm trying to think of a better reason. Why should sit down that there's a rat around the rat if you're here hold on a second and so you ever been on reading? This is how their love began. Okay this is our theory all fighting. This is Andy Screening Alexis heredity. That's what right it is. That's what tennis is in some way. polly volleying volleyball there. There you follow the ball back. uh-huh thinking volleys a general okay. Great only to the ball. You Volley what I love those. I wish I met him and he was like our creative read it. She didn't know what read it was and I was like. Can you imagine the power. That has to be Serena Williams not living in a world where she doesn't even know what read it is the power the power the freedom so rina have you ever heard or read it Well I'm sorry candy bar and He's like I love how you make me like. I think that's what it was. He loved her. She nagged him. Oh Yeah Okay number twelve. This one is one when Indian are talking about this and I was like there have to be more than the ones that have touched our hearts and then of course as I found out information should they touch my heart now. This is the ultimate example of a love like this before who could hear Mabel growling in the background everyone do her distaste for interracial love. She supports supports it. She sees another dog. But okay you guys number twelve. This one was like huge. Okay I just found out Leslie. UGH ABS and Graeme Ram Pratt. Okay Leslie Adams. She has been in this game as an actress. Since one thousand nine hundred fifty one she was Kizzie and roots. Don't you play me. You don't know Tony. Ed Ward Winning Leslie. Am I correct about that. Also what did you say when you saw her more recent picture Oh from deadpool leslie retire legacy and we were researching. IRC's of our flavor of we found we stumbled upon gums and Cram Pratt Trek. And you guys this is. This is like I was like Oh wait I know the name and then we're going through stuff and I was like Oh right. She's in Dead Pool Dead Pool. Yeah that's it's what I said. You did finishing my sentence. Maybe you guys less in Grand Prix have he's he's Australian trillion and like Lesley noted to be taken with an Australian lover. They've been together since nine thousand nine hundred sixty five yar leslie a Grand Pratt. They were married at time when it was illegal to be an engineer statesman was loving girl. They were on the run. This was love on the run. They weren't ready to the RUMBA. They lived in New York. But it's like so wild. She met him when she was performing in Australia. And they like Kinda started up some because obviously you saw Leslie and was like I need I understand. I know how Australia India Australia. I'm telling you could have had my pick but I was weary. I didn't want on a date. They kept trying to touch my hair. I said I'm out but let me tell you what I love about this. So when he was I wanNA marry you. She was like 'cause the thing is in Australia. They don't have African Americans certainly not many nine hundred sixty five so they don't have the same associations that we have like the same legacy of racism against black people right they have their own version is totally against people so she had him moved to New York City for a year before they got married so he could see what it would be like to be an interracial Asia in America and decide. If you wanted in. y'All y'all talk about Alexis they we're doing a damn trial period. She was like okay. Come through four year. See if you enjoy America six. And they're you know America America in the twenty twenty not. I would say not great with race not great not great sixty five and they have together ever since you guys they have been together. I have a right to sixty seven or eight. Yeah so like yeah this is still like like I mean even in New York you know Jim Crow Shadow and I cannot imagine that and like trying to find that out but like I had an experience like I get that feeling though. Because do you remember when data the Israeli Vegan investment banker who did a semester abroad at a black college. I remember you talking about it certainly now now. It was like early in our relationship maybe three or four weeks in and he lived in Harlem Harlem and we were meeting in between our two houses. And then we're going to walk to someplace in the neighborhood. who was like nighttime? We're like walking on Lenox and one thirty fifth and his own black man was riding. A bike rode his bike alongside us and he started started yelling at me. He was like what you do. And how dare you. Don't you know they used to rip the babies from your womb. And he was saying all of this to me and then here you have this delicate white boy who only known me three weeks and now he has. He's like in this situation and it was one of those things where it was like. You know we got through it guy eventually left. There was no like if he's a qualification and then like later were at his house. I was like do you want to do this. Him Her knee. I was like Leslie. I'm like this is what it is. Do you want to be part of it and I said it was just because it didn't surprise me that it happened but I was like. Oh yeah this new for him. He'll know it'd be happening now. New Streets he may not want to deal with this shit. He decided he did so. Yeah you had to get an American Jew from the suburbs Christian suburbs of Pennsylvania already. Yeah Yeah we've had our share of black men in Harlem giving me Stink Guy. Yeah just guy though. Have you felt it or does it. Usually 'cause I pointed out to you. I every once in a while I'll notice it okay. Yeah I always think I would. I look fine when I'm out in the streets. He's y'all looking regular alot busted a target gene no makeup on my face they go look and either GonNa take come out here with a face be not at a low lift. They like you do with this cyst. I'm like okay. If you want her with the face beat you gotta take her with with the target genes. Thank you if you don't love me to argue jeans you don't deserve me off as me. Am I all right number. Eleven right right before we go to a break you guys. This is just one you know I wanted to leave you just on the edge of your seat with a real driving a real bomb you guys. There's next couple. Is Angela Howard strong black woman and met Stone Co Creator of South Park Us. Is he the voice of Carbon. WHO's the voice of I know what's carpet? It sounds like is this with the black. I have not seen South Park at probably a decade. I know I haven't seen it in forever to but I was like okay. Matt Stone has a black. Why if they have children they're lovestruck? They met when she was an executive at comedy central. Isn't he a former Mormon a foreman a forum and Eric Forman. Yeah is it is it. Is he not a foreman. Them are both them. They used to. It'd be Latter Day saints their now former Day saints. Wow I didn't do enough reason because I'm wondering 'cause we do know that the more mature well I mean they wrote the musical. All they did which was wonderful but you were the churches they say right but Isn't that what we're church famously racist yet. They decided black people with people like like nine thousand nine hundred seventy or something. It was like Oh God told me that people can we get that We found a new plate. We are just digging out in the backyard. It's all about this new. That apparently says that black people aren't humid. So can we not play taxes anymore. Basically the bland. But I'm like so so into him and Angela. It's surprising we did not know that was what I didn't know that's a bomb. I need to drop well. He says okay. Actually stone describes himself was ethnically Jewish. His mom is Jewish so honestly Angela. How has drew boot just like me? Do you see how these relationships are reflecting our love and so many magical ways through through many facets closer to you let me sum up to him more couples you guys. We're going to take a quick break and when we come back we're GONNA keep count dropping down. Hey Guys Naomi here to talk to you about getting healthy is it just me or is it hard AF mostly probably because I'm not got into vegetables now if you're anything like me or if you're already healthy but you feel like you're not feeling great and WanNa get healthier. You should try. Ritual ritual. Ritual is an obsessively research vitamin for women rituals essentials vitamins have all the nutrients. Most of us don't get from food and it comes in a clean absorbable form. There are no shady additives or ingredients. And what I loved about the ritual. Vitamins you just take two capsules a day. You get nine nutrients you you need to support your health. Hello simple the ritual. Vitamins are also very pretty. There are clear vitamins. You can see what's inside so it almost feels like I'm like kind one of magical like I'm at some cool apothecary. And they had a nice minty fresh tab in the vitamin bottle so the vitamins tastes mindy. You eat the vitamins you got fresh breath breath and the vitamins are so chill you can take them on an empty stomach. You'RE NOT GONNA get nauseous. It's not going to happen rituals going to hook you up so if you want to try. The ritual essential vitamin for women. That contains everything from D. Three to a mega three. And if you WANNA get vitamin delivered to your door you're easy to start easy to take a break. It's only a dollar a day to have all the essential nutrients your body needs delivered every month. So if you WANNA get ten percent off during your first three months and and fill in the gaps in your diet go to ritual dot com slash therapy to start your ritual today again. That's a ritual dot com slash therapy to get ten percent off during your first three months. And we're back giving you a taste of what the patriarch can be if you just signed up Eddie and talking about some of the interracial couples that have touched our hearts every time I visit great top it during episode to episode four pose. I think it's anyway. So why don't we keep the countdown rolling in at number ten. Who is number ten Ted Danson and Hook Goldberg? Yes not all. These couples are still couples. But this so so conic truly. I caught the iconic. It had to be on the couch and it was also again. We're talking about forty years things that have touched us. They were together ninety two ninety three three okay so I'm like nine ten. Starting my puberty body is growing and changing. I saw made in America with Nia long and Whoopi in Ted. That movie was here. That was like Whoopi plays her mother and then she's looking for her father. Her father is white. And it's like a whole thing because we'll be scared try s didn't know about the sperm donor again. I have made America two decades but it was huge and again I remember seeing that on TV and thinking like wow you never see this before you know you. You never knew this before so it was very very huge however didn't last and I think there's a lot to be said for that so it's lessons to learn. Perhaps exactly why did last well. Nine hundred ninety radiate apparently they met on they met on the set of the Arsenault Hall show so many great loves was was Clinton Plane while fell and then they did that made in America America movie and then they kind of got together in ninety two but then I'll be like they broke up in ninety three ninety four like it did not last very long. Well here's the question that then I'll ask you and maybe listeners. You're too young to remember. There was a roast of Whoopi. Goldberg are were famously. Ted Danson welden black face. He was in black doc face. He said the N.. Word he pulled out all the stops with. I mean word offended but with with her permission and when permission but goes before a time when people were cancelled but even then people were mad. It was like DEFEC- and then what he tried to come in and defend him and say look you know I put him in touch touch with the man who did the face plate. I helped him work on his act. I showed him the jazz singer. Exactly and then everyone's like that will make it right. Like people were still his in so this is why another relationship matters to me because it teaches me a lesson I think is a lesson you learned to never let your white lover where black face we'll arts afar never data white man who wants wore Nazi before jest. Never let your white lover wear black face. Yeah these are very sir. It always Nag a man and always always negative with a rat negative man with rat. Okay this rat posed by by the way that there was a time when a joke we have at a time. Where like if you accidentally accidentally you accidentally use a word like you meant to write? Can't use the you on twitter. You're there was a time. Were you purposely. Do Black face. You have a very long career. I know simpler time simpler time this next couple number nine Roger Ebert and Chaz Hammel Smith who. Don't talk enough about out there. We do not talk enough about Roger Ebert and his black wife okay as a culture as a community. We're not talking enough about Roger and Chaz Culver Four for the Culture Borna golder. Why are we talking about Roger? And Chaz you know Roger Ebert as film critic okay. Apparently trademark human gene Siskel trademarked the phrase two thumbs up real. Did you know you could trademark dems up. Yeah I honestly didn't like Cardi B. Like copyright ochre or something I guess so I mean you know. We live in a capitalist nightmare so sure I guess copyright whatever you want to thumbs up short thumbs sideways copywriting that anytime any way they should have just copyrighted anyway pointing north northwest in writing southie hitchhiking. You have to pay money dude. Don't you check out and I remember. Roger Ebert film reviews like that was like a big deal. I remember being so surprised when I finally hit a black because he was so like he reminded me a saltine cracker like his his demeanor because he was it was kind of a scholar. Who is a very dry? Like he seemed so uptight and I was like you down with. Okay tell me more leaper more and I was like very impressed. I would love to go back and see how he rated Chazz Palminteri movies if he gave them an extra thumbs up. Just because Castle Hassle. Chaz kind of has the same name as wife. So what extras down you. What I love okay? First of all also Andy. Did you know Roger Ebert also briefly. Deflated Oprah okay. Okay what what what. What does the Internet says? Maybe there was certainly friends. Maybe there's a dalliance we don't know but here's a fun in fact and this is again a love like this before never knew he was fifty when he married Chaz and he said in his memoir that he he vowed never to marry before or his until his mother died he was like I'm not going to get married until my mom dies because he was afraid of displeasing who let's see. See what did he rate psycho. It's also though like but to me it's also like you are afraid of displeasing your mother Roger Taber and then you took black lover. Is that what you're afraid. Your mother couldn't handle that what he thought he was like. Okay I know I wanna Coca Queen and my life is she is a mother. Roger Ebert Mas Racist. I'm sorry she's been long did but that's my assumption about you. Sorry Mama Hiebert opened up if your carpet and you'll find racist drag her drag. The ghost of Robber Rajouri yellow. Got Him a bed. That was my impression surprised to find out. Roger Ebert was married to chance I was like. I don't know why we still have this mentality in our heads. interracial couples are surprising. prizing it some way. Especially when it's not like in my mind you gotta be a beefcake you've got to be a beefcake beefcake when it's like a doughy white guy like me. Yeah thank you I am on the edge of. I'm we'll see we're remember this year. We're supposed to get in shape fit. We're get an apocalypse buds. Right if we're going to body weight we got to be able to carry all of our provisions that are back. We're GONNA Survive Mad. Max Stop eating eating those Matt Snacks. Oh yeah kind of just because I also I don't. I'm not one of those kinds of people that pays attention to celebrity couples if they happen to like flowed into public consciousness. Am then like. I do know that channing. TATUM is getting back together with Jessie Ajay. Or whenever somehow it showed up on twitter yet. I'm like I guess I know this fact now right right now you know I forget like half of Heidegger niggers being in time but now I know chatting dating with that one piece. SEGUE HALF A book. Jason finished channing and Jesse it was like okay. I got to get rid of about twelve chapters. Yeah just keep it so. I'm not a person that pays much attention to especially like calling. Roger Ebert. Celebrity is really pushing the bow. It is Roger. Ebert was babe is well known a well-known film critic wit WanNa Pulitzer Prize for film criticism. Name anyone else. That's WanNa pull her political only film gritty. That's my point but I'm just saying we as a culture. We don't pay attention to poetry prize winners. I've just say Auburn is a big deal and share. Why by his son? I'm not disagreeing with you. I'm just saying that it just doesn't enter my spirit consciousness. I used interesting interesting name award winner besides Cold Mayor Amy Schumer who was covered the village. Yes okay number eight. Who knows where I think so I think if we did number nine then number eight and the doubt number eight? This is what I bring up to you. I probably brought up to you. The first week we started dating there are no longer together. But it's always worth mentioning Robert Deniro in grace. He's hightower. You must okay true. True love a beacon. Well your beacon for a while for a long time. Of course they also. There was a lot of drama drama. Well they marry in nine hundred ninety seven divorced in nineteen ninety nine got back together. Thousand one remarried again in two thousand four four and then divorced again in two thousand eighteen. There was a lot of like separating in there too you gotta keep them separated. Whatever talking about by the way because the minute I just said that I was like like? Is he talking about racist. No no way you're talking about be about is a dexter. Is that his name from the offspring index or the show time show like separated. You know maybe maybe it's got to keep your dark passenger singer separate but Robert Deniro. Grace hightower was like where are they coming from also like like these women are all just such gorgeous paragon. That's the thing if you look at pictures of like Deniro and Roger Ebert and then grace hightower four and chas has not Palminteri. The women are gorgeous and the men are their reputation and their their fame. Cloaks there looks I wa I mean yes but don't you. I don't know I hate to make all the gender generalizations Sion's but it does feel like in that generation like the older people sixties and up and stuff like it was about a man who had a good job it was powerful and I just need a man who's like you know. Got All his stuff together. You know what I mean like all women regardless of race it was like I need a man who got everything under control and I feel like nowadays we talked. I want a man who goes the therapy. You know what I mean different things. We want anything ever asked grace if she could milk him. The absolute silence. What is that from? I got devils Falker. Can you walk me okay. Okay Okay we every did you quote of all Robert Deniro Soubra. Did you just quote meet the fockers. yeah beat the fan whatever. The first one was the family. Is that the first one meet if the parents can you we. That's insane which I've never seen that movie but I I got Nipples goodfellow. Hello can you believe me the Goodfellas it was a they were meet the parents. It was referencing his life from Goodfellas when he asked Ray Leona. If you could Malcolm Yeah goodfellow here the titular line. I don't know if you knew it did have the line but Grace hightower also. She's she's related to the character from patted me. Yes definitely. I've thought that for years I've thought that for years. You know that connection is like obvious seven okay number seven. This was a new one to us. We found out about just last year and we both got excited. I think you told me about it. So that's how I know those things are impacting you jody Turner Smith British model and actress. Yes and Joshua Jackson. We're talking slim from from Queen's slim and Pacey yes lemon pacey slim and Pacey are married. I didn't they got a baby on the way I was like. What could you no pay us with? Diane Kruger okay. I guess it's just coming out. I love celebrity gossip. But after Diane Kruger he just was like. Give me a coca queen. Wait she slim and not queen. Oh right I don't know why I called her slim quit. That's my. That's what a great musical lineup queen. Lean and whatever pays pays e. Mike pays me my friend Mike. I don't know I used to be the rock band Oxford Comma but the reason why this is like in my head to we're talking about again. Oxford claps why did I call it that if feels so silly to talk about interracial couples like what's what's the big deal who cares but Kinda wise because Jodi Turner's machine tweeted recently she was like wire Blackman's why black men coming into my DM's calling me a Bedouin CH- Jesus and that is a phrase that was used to describe black slaves who were kept in the masters bid for sexual purposes. Oh Shit so. In Two thousand nine hundred twenty people are calling her that term simply for loving Pacey and quite honestly. Who didn't love Pacey? Who doesn't by the way Josh Jackson is that a wonderful career since the end Dawson's Creek? I think it was like something's creek. Feb John J- I love the French fringe the affair. Look I know Joshua's more than Pacey. But as someone who was very much in her puberty during during Dawson's Creek fucking know habits Pacey and he was always the one for me. I was like Joey. Why you fucking with Dawson to whoever? You're around when he start ovulating that's you. That's imprinting exactly. I try to have her on the show at some point but also like she was in jet being very naked in the TV. Show jet on showtime and it makes me feel awkward. I don't like no I don't like seeing people in real life who I've seen a movie naked. It's awkward if feels uncomfortable. It's very uncomfortable so I don't like knowing what's everyone should cover up everyone. They should just wear wrap themselves in Cape all humans. Andy you start to rethink things. Number six is right before we take us. Drop another Bob Shammy. Well this is a bomb. We all know and love fits fits at Olympia. Pope Command scandal. GotTa have it although you Tony Goldwyn Kerry Washington when you would watch this show. Every time I walked in for some reason fits going down on Olivia. That's ABC baby literally Vice. You gave him to isolate not very different episode. We seventy times you've been watching. You were watching it. I I walk into like. Oh Hey Naomi. Do you want going going down to the Bodega. And you want me to get you a diet coke or whatever and Fitz is going down seventy separate times now. That makes me think that that's all that happened on that show. No No. There was also political injury but in order to get through the intrigue. Someone's GonNa go down somebody GONNA keep. Oh that's that's what it was. It's like doing stretches exactly right and that was really. That was a couple that like they were like. First of all scandal was a phenomenon I really scandal was one of the I shows that kind of helped to build this community of quote unquote black twitter. Like people Thursday nights people would just be tweeting about scandal like back and forth and into it and at the center of this show was this star crossed intense love between fits and Olivia and it was like we'll get together. Will they go to Vermont and make jam. Will he throw away his political ambition and it was like Oh my God the intensity it was wild. Carrie Washington wearing an all white outfit holding a gallon of wine. In in a single glass runs into the Oval Office and she has oral sex. was He good at it. I think based on Libya's respond to you right. She couldn't she couldn't get enough of it so he was great. It was great extent. He was married to somebody else was the president and they she was fucked up right and I I was like why can't interracial love. Just we're about to take a break you know. I know we all have to deal with varying levels of stress every day. And did you know that stress can actually affect your skin because it can stress can cause dryness signs of aging readiness. But here is the good news. So four has got your solves with their amazing skin saving lineup for dryness. You got drunk elephants f-bomb electrolyte water facial it's cooling quenching overnight mask that visibly visibly plumps and helps restore the skin touches. The serum stick visibly plumps fine lines with targeted hydration and Dr Barbara stirrups glow drops fights dullness and gives as you a Glam glow you see signs of aging creeping in. Well well well. Fresh is a Lotta youth preserve moisturizer targets signs of aging with antioxidant packed hydration. Dr Agenda's grosses stress Rescue Super Serum Busse radiance with superfoods niacin abide and the Nash Sicker Repair Sleep Mask Calms even the most sensitive redskin overnight. So keep your stress causes cross skin concerns and check with his entire skin saving lineup. Only four at your nearest a forest or Sephora dot com to destroy your skin today Edward Back. We're in the final five baby tidal five. Now if you've been making bets on who is going to be number one. I think you'll probably be correct as to who the number one of our flavor is but what does surprises prizes. What a surprise me because we just talked about it? You're the one that ordered them so I am genuinely flabbergasted. All right why did you hit us with number. We're at the top five number five. Hey like Chris. Rock said top-five. What Chris Rock said Alfred and Roderick Spencer Surprise Albery one of the greatest? Black Tra- Sousa by oughta Alfred Would Roger Spencer. He is a writer why they're in the top five. He wrote a movie for her to star in. Andy that's the dynamic I want for us. Hey I'm tried right. What I see Alfie? Woodard out here being amazing. They've been together over twenty years. He is writing vehicles for his queen. I was like this. This is a power couple loving alfred. Everything she's ever done. She's one of the best actors in the world production companies. That are listening. I gotTA vehicle for for down. You need to have several vehicles. You need a fleet okay. You need a fleet of vehicles. Go Talk to my agent at garage. Grow Hey I signed with yeah ruined this beautiful page around go we does. He just worked but nervous number. Four beary are- alad an Irish west reformed. CWC The flash don't you tell me Berry Nyerere's okay North Stanford CW dramas all the comic ones except for tomorrow. which is? That's the only one that I watch exactly but I started with the flash and I love the like leary from episode one the Holdings Berry Loves Irish and there was a fourteen year old girl in me who like was considered ugly and sexless in private school. which is like my heart was like singing over like watching the sweet white boy pine after Gorgeous Iris and he liked her and then she has somebody somebody else and then finally they came together and like they're married the most like tender love? Their love is the anchor of the program they are allowed to be the speed force. Course encircles their love this before surface their love Berry. And Iris Okay. Yes the flash. I was a grown ass woman when flash I came on and it touch my fucking heart. Okay okay candice. Patent is Irish. She is too cute too good. I like like her. She's like very Sassy. Don't play on twitter. She just does not fucking looking here and I love everything about her. You know that although shitty fan boys were up in arms because like in the comic book I don't know I don't really read. DC comics but like in the Comic Book Irises White. Oh my God. It's like those people who got mad about hunger games when there is a black white or black and it was like insane to me. I'm just like children. He's fighting to the fucking death. I'm sorry if the race is what throws you. What why Peter Parker like the whole thing remember when childish Gambino Beano who wanted to be play? Peter Parker Yeah and just like who gives a fuck. Let them do what. He's a good actor. He already a boy that spider powers. I don't understand why we on the Mona Mona race when the basic premise is off the rails so number three. I'll tell you one problematic race thing Cilacap in X.. Men Ed in the ladies go on a did something like some procedure on her and made her Japanese. They did a procedure. Yeah yeah they didn't they don't actually talk about how they did it the comic book but she's British they she gets captured by a Japanese. Mafia group called the head. Ed turned her Japanese. Yeah Wild Room know that it was about the hand attorneys. I like Japanese and they literally just did it like last year. Oh God to admit it. Or they're like finally after thirty years the like. This is a little problematic. Maybe we should maybe the fact that we changed her race science the Magic to be fair science may also use magic. I believe I believe. Dan Spiral from the Mo.. dovers the door to this tax. I Love Your Comic Book Facts. I appreciate when you tell me I. Do you open the door to this by talking talking about the flash. I truly have never known a love like this before number three George Lucas and Melody Hopson George Lucas. The creator of Jar Jar banks. Yes George Lucas creator of jour- beings. Okay here's the thing that's a wonderful wonderful. IRC mellody Hobson okay. She is a businesswoman in her own. Right okay. She's a co CEO of a company. She's the former chairwoman of DreamWorks animation. Okay Okay and apparently George and Melody met at a business conference in two thousand six and started dating shortly thereafter. Can you imagine what that was like. What do you think George Lucas's game is like the meeting when He? He saw melody across the crowded conference room and he came to her I created Landau coercion. Excuse me what is your name Sir. Hello my name is George Lucas. Breads Call Me George. Okay Jar Jar. I don't know what you want me to say. George George George sorry. It's George George Indie. Why do you make these couples? What do you think George Lucas is like? What do you want accurate? You want to restart this what do you. What do you really think George Lucas's like here I'll be her? You beat him be asking you. What do you really think George Lucas is like? I don't know like I feel like I feel like all he does is talk about medical orients and like deep mythology analogy of the jet is. Do you think the way I felt when you were talking about Ceylon. PLC is how mellody Hobson feels when George Lucas talking about the deep mythology. Yeah again yeah. I don't know what your excuses but he at least multi-million like one hundred millionaires and billionaires. They're probably right. That's going to woo anyone right. Yes really love me. That's what I'm trying to tell. You OUGHTA Damn Time yes do. That's what I try to tell you. What the seriously what do you think he's GonNa Talk? I don't know he like all I know about as tire life is star wars. I know number two this last last two final two babies to Sean and Angela from boy meets world shot at eight. I've said this time. That was formative for me. When I saw Sean and Angela together I'm women's world show that was so white all around the not only do they have a black character but they also chose to make her love interest and make her like the better one like she was? When got sean to kind of mature and get his act together? Also what I love to shooting high school schools do battling in real life. The actress who played thirty at the time. And it's like that's not an example of black. Not Cracking I don't know what is she. Thirty years old planned sixteen trying to help rather strong wrong get his life together. I mean black don't crack is in like isn't routine Owsley like in her nineties or something like that looks young also like Cecily Tyson also ninety-three looking younger routine. Sicily is up in here. Giving US looks and she's ninety three now watch boy meets world growing up. Did you did. Yeah it definitely like is a thing that probably stuck in my head. I think like as much as it as for you. Yeah because again for me my future is just a blank space. I'm just like because again. My parents brought me up in a way where like they didn't talk about differences but with ninety one in a way that was like damaging like like not teach you that there actually are differences. It's just that the differences don't match right we're different but we're all equal right. You know what I mean like. I don't deny were different right. Well we're all equal so I was like. Oh well I can marry literally anyone. Yeah Yeah So. Did I draw a lot of jar jar binks with breasts. Tell me no sidewalk baby. We are at the number way number one now listeners. I assume you know who this number one. IRC just like us is perhaps you've been waiting per she'd been saying when are they going to get to it. How tone deaf? But this is the ultimate the paragon of sensuality. Grace Style and love. It is to people who certainly in this House that pulsa the number one of our flavor go do you from iheart studios the Hollywood. That is David Bowie and Imam. ooh You GONNA put West. There's at me I dare you David Bowie and Iman. We all knew that was a love that was in the he one of the most amazing musicians of of in the world her the top model in the world for so long a pinnacle of beauty and grails top model. The world's top top model. I bought Imams makeup as a child on the Internet. When you couldn't find black skin colors? She had her own makeup line at a time where there was no makeup cup for dark. Skinned women okay. Thank honey I was ordering Iman okay. In two thousand one trying to get coverage Iman is an icon. She was the one she was out. Here telling the world black is beautiful and then Dave Bowie's say we should all have sex with everybody and then you put together that strength strength beauty class and charisma. You Got David Bowie. Edema Grace Jones and his band. Who Knew who knew as most people? Thanks everybody you guys David Bowie name on a truly iconic truly the number one David Bowie pass issue. Okay what would you you did a comedy show. I did a powerpoint presentation saying how we should take over after David Bowie passed away. Not right after right. Something called class class attacked. And yes a year later. So I would say that you and I should take over as the most iconic IRC. After them I mean I'm trying that's why we have to do. Our weight. Loss lies like them. They're like too sexy draft. Because it's so funny like when I was growing up I didn't really know anything about David Bowie. Besides that he was like hanging hanging out with nine inch nails so the Bowie that I knew from when I was younger. I'm afraid of Americans Bowie which is like to me. Like my Bowie. Hunky Dory Era Bowie and so like the older like version doing like industrial music and stuff like that. I'm like okay. Oh yeah the deep voice like post a lodger deep voice took me a long time to get into it. So you're staring at me listening. I was listening to you and love is how many white men have a conversation. That goes my Bowie. Because he's made music over so many eras of if this my bowie changes moee you guys. I hope this little change this departure from the every day. It's a little bit of like what you can expect. If you're to be a Patriot we get into like topics deep. We talk about our relationship. Sometimes music comes did eh but we just like to talk about where we're at and how these things affect us. All these couples are love. And there's so many not on this list but the point is when Andy and I got together together I have to say I just never knew love like this before. I never thought I would and I hope you guys feel the tenderness and we will see you next week. Thanks so much. Hey y'all Naomi here to talk to you about stress and skin we all. I know the stress can affect the way your skin looks but luckily there is good. News Sephora has your solves you can quench dryness with top skincare picks from drunk elephant Tasha. I'm Dr Barbara Sarum. You can target signs of aging with fresh and Dr Dennis Gross Income Readiness With Manezh. You can get this entire skin saving lineup lineup. Only at Sephora so go you're near Sephora store or Sephora DOT COM in distress your skin.

Andy Hanes Roger Ebert America New York twitter Leslie Adams Meghan Alexis Shintaro Jackson Iris Okay India Iraq Meg Serena Williams James TA Sephora Grace hightower Roger Berry Nyerere Los Angeles Meghan Markle
The Wizard of Oz  Seth Godin

This Movie Changed Me

00:00 sec | 11 months ago

The Wizard of Oz Seth Godin

"Hello fellow movie. Fans I'm Lee Percy and I'll be your guide this week as I talk with Seth Godin about the movie that changed his life the wizard of Oz. If you haven't seen it I can't really remember it. Don't worry we're gonNA give you all the details to follow along the way that hi who des Chances are if you grew up in the United States. You've probably seen the wizard device. Maybe you didn't rent it. Maybe you side at school or maybe it was just playing constantly on TV like it was in my house but either way it's one of those iconic Hannukah American movies that is referenced by several other movies and also according to the Library of Congress is the most seen movie in movie. History really unleash that she was going to. She says Dr Duffy laughing things. You always get yourself into a fret over nothing now. You just help us out today. Hey and find yourself a place where you won't get into any trouble whether as many trouble he's suppose measure is such a place but in case you haven't seen the wizard of Oz. Here's what's going on in the movie. There's little girl named Dorothy played by. Judy garland her dog. Toto and a tornado has just hit the farmhouse in which they live somewhere in Kansas. The transported to this magical land where which is exist and the great wizard of Oz rules all over the land and Dorothy and toto follow the yellow brick road road toward emerald city to try and find their way back home. Along the way they meet a scarecrow that needs a brain attuned man who's missing a heart and the cowardly Lion Ryan. Who wants courage? What did you do that for? I didn't buy them doors blatant I. You're making why You're nothing but a great big coward. You write a column. I haven't any courage at all. Scare myself it. That's too bad. I just gotTa tell you how I feel. Wow come on yeah sad believe believe me missy. When you're born to be sissy without the show my prowess have to be honest Wizard of Oz has never been movie that I understood. My father used to watch it every year when they would show it on TV. And all I remember is falling asleep during it so for me going into this conversation with the great entrepreneur and just wise man Seth Godin. I was really perplexed. I wanted to understand what it was about this movie that I was missing and after hearing him talk about it I went back and watched it and I think I finally get it. I'm not afraid of her. I'll see you could save me to the wisit. Is it now whether I get a brain or not. I'll see you reach the wizard whether I get a hot or not. Oh you're the best friends anybody ever had and it's funny but I feel as if I've known you all the time but I couldn't have occurred i. I don't see how you weren't around. When I was stopped and sold altogether I was standing over there rusting for the longest time? I wish I could remember but I guess it doesn't matter anyway. You know each other now don't we. That's right we do jewelers joy on the surface. This movie is about a little girl who gets lost in her magic nation and all these things that are shadowing things in her own life on a farm in Kansas but then there are all these other layers and a lot of depth to each of the characters in the movie. I never would have seen without Seth Godin help the biggest idea that I now take away from the wizard of Oz is one that continues to drive him. It is up to us and we can do it if we want to would like to take you back in time time travel together with you By asking you to close your eyes and for ten seconds think about the first time so you saw the wizard of Oz. Think about how old you were where you were how it made you feel. And then I'll chime in when the ten seconds are up so what memories came up for you then quite a of memory and nostalgia there in one thousand sixty six. My parents bought a color TV. And I'm pretty sure it was February. Worry we're sitting in the living room. And it was the annual showing of the wizard of Oz and that movie of course begins in black and white and Sepia talents and then transfers to color and as somebody who didn't grow up with colored TV. That was an extraordinary thing. Mostly my memory is. Is that feeling of safety with mom and Dad and my two little sisters sitting in our little house in Buffalo New York watching this miracle happened on TV TV in front of us. And I've probably seen it ten times fifteen times since then like everybody else and one of the reasons that the wizard of Oz is such an important movie. How is that? We've all seen it. Yeah so we're touchdowns a touchstone exactly off. Aw Roger Ebert is a film hero of Mine and those reading his review of the wizard of Oz and he had so many beautifully perceptive things to say about it And you framed it in a way that I never thought about He says here that they're elements in the wizard of Oz is powerfully phil avoid. That exists inside many children for kids of a certain age home. Is Everything the center of the world but over the rainbow dimly only guest that is the wide earth fascinating and terrifying. And it just wouldn't when you were a kid. What did you perceive about that movie for me? It's always been about the instigation that Dorothy was perhaps the only genuine independent young woman heroin in movies for decades and decades. You've talked about how there's never been a teenage girl like her right in film in that way. Yeah I mean treated without misogyny without sexualization position. Here's this person who's a hero and the thing about it is except for her accidentally killing both witches. Everything else that happens happens in the movie happens because store the instigates. She says. Let's go. Come on let's go. He can help. We can go there and that Adia that a young person can take action is extraordinary and the way it was juxtaposed deposed with the vaudeville stuff with the fantasy stuff with Munchkin stuff. made it feel safer because it wasn't somebody taking action in your school or your playground. was someone taking action in this idealized world but what I took away the biggest thing I took away. It's up to us and we could do it if we wanted to Kansas where I live and I wanna get back there so badly. I'm going all the way to Emerald City of us to help me you'll going to see a wizard. Do you think about what was it. Would give me some brains. Hi couldn't say but even if he didn't you'd be no worse off than you are now. Yes that's true but maybe you better not. I've got a witch mad at me and you might get into trouble which I'm not afraid of a witch. I'm not afraid of anything except delighted match. I don't blame you for that. Thanks a whole box full of the chance of getting some brains. Won't you take me with you. Why of course I will? He Ebert says in his review later on. I'm just thinking about this as you're talking that They're touching on the key lesson of childhood which is at somebody. The child would not be a child. That home will no longer exists. That adult will be no help because now the child's adult and must face the challenges of life alone but that you can ask friends to help you and that even the wizard sort of is only human and has problems of his own. Wow Yeah there's there's so much dissect here You know the idea that the wizard was a con man but a kind man with a golden heart is another great juxtaposition. That humbug was a term that people used to use a lot in the P.. T. Barnum days and it was the idea that somebody was not only a fraud. But gleeful about it that when you went to C. A. P. T. Barnum show. You knew there wasn't really a mermaid in the other room and you were paying knowing that you were going to get fooled and getting fooled was part of the deal but it's interesting because when she finds out that she's been fooled by the wizard. She's not angry. I also that struck me watching it again. This week was that she's very kind and actually. Their interactions are very kind. Kansas life in those days never having lived there and never been there then. Oh your dog behaved. We're GONNA kill him. Oh the house got blown over by a tornado. Well we'll just have to recover. Yeah and yeah. Life was really hard hard and I think that Dorothy lack of bitterness throughout the entire movie. Except when she's trying to protect toto Again it gets under our skin. Looks like we came a long. They cry Darcy. We're going to get you to the wizards. We suddenly cut to make running away in. They get failing she may be dying and it's all my fault. We're I walk. How much now? Ah a couple of bits of backroom because I'm a marketer who looks at culture that I think needs to be mentioned because the creation myth here is essential when the movie came out it was trying to chase after Snow White. which was the most successful movie ever made? At the time and fourteen different people worked on the screenplay as see whenever that I was like Oh my God how did this even get made exactly and five different people worked don directing it. The first director got pulled to gone with the wind. I mean it was a complete accident. Did this movie even got made and when it came out except for the new ORC times almost every critic hated it hated it and so what we learn here is that you can create an act of genius without being genius and that the critics are usually wrong. Yeah and that the cultural aspect of we saw in this new space on TV they were. It was optimized to make an impact again. There could only have been one movie that pulled that off at happened to have been the wizard of Oz but what is so cool is that you can whistle a couple notes or bring up a line from it and the other people you're talking to will instantly know I know what you're talking about. And that's what makes culture culture when amends is an empty kettle. He should be on his metal and yet I'm torn of law just because I'm assuming that I could be human if I only had a I'd be tend to be gentle. I hope you're enjoying my conversation with Seth Godin about the movie that changed him the wizard of Oz each week in our newsletter. We've asked you to reflect and share the movies that have changed your life. It says he was changed by the movie. The cider house rules she says the characters in the movie were so real authentic living from their own truth and and so kind. I just wanted to have that aura around me in my living dicta courage of knowing your own truth and holding yourself to living from it gently and not just for your own Sake Jake but for others to thank you Susie for sharing your story with us and being a part of our movie loving community devotion and really you think. You gave a keynote speech at a marketing conference where you talked about the wizard of Oz. And I I love what you said. So if you don't mind read back what you said there. He said Dorothy goes to the wizard. And explains what she wants. And the wizard says I will help you but I bring me the broomstick of the wicked witch of the West He. He didn't need a broomstick. He had plenty of broomsticks. He was sending Dorothy away so she wouldn't come back. And there are all these people in your lives when you go to them for reassurance when you go to them to be picked who say I bring the broomstick and they send you off because they need it but because they don't want you to come back and it's fascinating to me that you were able to see this in the movie and it's clear to me that it's shaped your work. I'm just I wonder if you could talk a little bit about that. How it has shaped your work and how you see marketing in particular? I began my career as it's a book packager and what book packagers do is The same thing movie producers do. We're not always the author but we put together the team and in twelve years. I did one hundred twenty books but along the way. I got more than thousand rejections but publishers. Who would send me a note saying we read your proposal? No and and sometimes they would say no but sometimes they would say but we wanNA broomstick I And what I discovered having wasted time for years and years chasing acing broomsticks is it sometimes it makes sense to go get a broomstick but usually it. Doesn't that usually what someone who says no to you but with a broomstick request saying saying is I don't have the heart to tell you how I really feel but how I really feel is. This isn't for me and we get so easily confused because because we don't believe we deserve to be rejected and we have trouble empathizing with people who say this isn't for me and if we can forgive the the other person and forgive ourselves when someone says Nah I don't get it. We can say to them. Oh well it's not for you and if you try to make it something for them you'll reckitt so instead the right thing to do is do what you need to do. And Find Your people and that is how in fact the wizard of ars found its grounding as well is that each year year after year the people who got the joke wanted it again and the people who didn't didn't tune in. That's that's okay. You want to be ashamed of yourself. NAPA VISIT AWS has every intention of granting. Take your questions but first you must prove yourselves woody by performing having a Fetish Malt stick a witch of the West. But if we do that we'd have to kill let again bruce. Grant Yorick quest now. Go but what Josh One of the things you talk about in that keynote speech that I really loved Because it's another one of my favorite scenes in the movie which is toward the end. You talk about that pantomime epic scene where the wizard turns the scarecrow and the tin men in the lion and he says you already had everything you needed. Tell me a little bit about why that's seen is important to you. Well it goes with the line just before or that which is ignore the man behind the curtain. We would like to believe that the man behind the curtain is actually pulling most of the strings in our life that human beings are storytelling machines. We look for explanations and we don't have an explanation. We assume it's demand behind the curtain. Who has somehow pulled a lever ever and when we're not getting what we need? We assume it's because we don't have a diploma or we don't have a watch more. We don't have a badge or a certification advocation are bravery but in this century badges are worth way less than they used to be and one by one. We are seeing that. Our work describes who we are not our certificate and if we can merely do the work and show up then we have a chance to make a difference about the heart that you promised tin man and the courage that you colleague Lion Scarecrow. Why why anybody can have a brain? That's a very mediocre commodity every Tuesday animus creature that grows on the Earth are sinks through slimy seas has a brain back where I come from. We have universities seats of great learning where men go to become great thinkers and when they come out they think deep thoughts and with no more all brain they have one thing you haven't got a diploma. Therefore by virtue of the Authority vested in me by the University Committee Artem E. Pluribus Onum I hereby confer upon you the honorary degree of T. HD HD HD doctor thing college some of the square many two sides of an Isosceles triangles remaining side. Well I you know I never had seen the tin man the scarecrow your co and the cowardly lion in this way again. Roger Ebert quoting him because he blew my mind with a lot of the perception that he had. He said that they were projections of of every child's secret fears. Are we real. Are we ugly and silly. Are we brave enough in helping them. Dorothy was helping herself. Just as an older child will overcome fears by acting brave before for a younger one. Wow yes no that's brilliant. That's why he was Roger Ebert and we're not exactly. He had everything he needed and he was able to show us what he saw that we we just didn't see and it's funny because that's not from frank bounced. That's a sort of an accident because there are plenty of other characters in the original books which I spent in our hours reading. The books are all over the place and the biggest difference in the books is is is a real place in the books that the dream sequence was invented. I did buy plays and movies done before this movie and they just fascinated from the book. There's so many layers and depths to this film both in the making of and actually onscreen that air just fascinating to learn about. Yeah it's a microcosm for what was going on then for the rise of TV and for me for who we are now than when I think back to nineteen sixty six or nineteen sixty seven watching that movie with my parents and my sisters. There's and about all the possibility and the doors have been opened for people with privileged like me and people with less privilege. What do we do with it was? Do we go through the door or not. Go through the door. What does it mean to see possibility where other people don't see it and if I feel like I'm flagging egging in this journey than it's worth listening to the soundtrack or watching it one more time because if Dorothy can do this thing she did and I know it's not real life it's ours? Well then what's keeping us from doing. How will you help me? Can you help make you. You don't need to be helped. You always had the power to go back to the. Why didn't you tell before because she wouldn't have believed me when you had to learn it for herself? What have you learned Dorothy? Well I think that that that it wasn't enough just to want to see Uncle Henry and em. And it's if I ever go looking for my heart's desire again. I will look any further in my own backyard. Because they're I never really lost it to begin sat right you know I. I have to say this makes me WanNa Watch movie again after listening to you talk about it and seeing it in that way thank you for that. Is there anything else that I didn't ask you about it. That you that same. You know. I think that the reason we watch movies isn't to pass the time because even in today people will go to the movies and check your email during the movie so they could just stay home and check their email. I hate those people by the way they kick them and take them out Almonte Quite Yeah. Exactly I think the reason we watch a movie now is so we can have something to talk about with other people and more important with ourselves and if a movie can't deliver that to you that it probably has an achievement. Its potential and so for me. Most people don't WanNa talk to me about the wizard of Oz. But I WANNA talk to myself about it so I love that thank you I so appreciate this and really. You've changed the way that I do this movie. So thank you well. We're off to see the wizard rough to see the wizard. The wonderful wizard of Oz. We hear years a wizard ways if ever there was FG. Odin is an entrepreneur author. An agent of change who in two thousand eighteen was inducted into the marketing hall of fame. You can find some next level wisdom at his daily blog log which you can also get as a newsletter on his podcast Akimbo or in one of his many bestselling books including this is marketing. The dip and Lynch Pin The wizard of Oz was originally produced by MGM Studios and is now owned by Warner Brothers. The clips you heard in this episode are credited it entirely to them and the music feature from the movie can be found on the wizard of Oz original motion picture soundtrack Turner Entertainment at this conversation about the wizard of Oz has resonated with you. Consider checking out the other episode. We released this week about the nineteen seventies. Movie The WIZ. It's a fantastic modern honoree telling the worst story. It has a castle of icons Diana. Ross Richard Pryor and Lena Horne the music and the episode alone will help you breaking out. The dance moves the team behind. This movie changed. Me Is Maya Tarot Chris Cagle Tonio Kristen. Lynn and Lillian Vo this podcast is produced produced by on being studios which is located on Dakota land. We also produce other podcasts. You might enjoy like on being with Krista Tippett and becoming wise find those wherever you like to listen or visit us at being dot org to find out more. I'm only Percy remember if someone tells you to go get a broomstick chances are they. Don't don't want you to come back uh This podcast is produced by on being studios in Minneapolis man sound.

Oz Dorothy Seth Godin Kansas Roger Ebert Emerald City Lee Percy United States Judy garland Lion Ryan Library of Congress Dr Duffy Buffalo New York P. T. Barnum Krista Tippett director Lion Scarecrow Adia
Really Awful Movies: Ep 300  Predator

The Really Awful Movies Podcast

00:00 sec | 6 months ago

Really Awful Movies: Ep 300 Predator

"Up of the news this evening is speculation concerning the real facts behind the Department of Health announcement about a radioactive spill. Supposed to have a cut yesterday at the state nuclear plant. You'll die only to live again in a young body. Then you could tell me if the operation was a success. You're listening to the really awful movies. Podcast celebration of Genre Cinema. Hi My name is Chris and along with Jeff. We talked about movies. That aren't really awful. At all Horror Action Kung Fu musicals post apocalyptic women prison films and much much more bureau rescue team assassins. Now what are we going to do it? A part of the world where there are no rules. We pick up their trail at the chopper. Running down those hostages before anybody knows we were there. What do you mean we deep in the jungle when nothing? That lives is safe. Lou's ear during a world of hurt Showtime Jin odd and a rescue squad. Time is being led by the ultimate warrior. The best. That's why you're here but now something waiting for us so it ain't no man. They're up against the ultimate enemy. Only mother has ever been on her before she says the jungle just came alive and we cannot see no bodies we had nothing but it seized a heat of our body and the heat of our fear whatever it is out there choke hotline once is accused for pleasure you will live for. Sports columnist wanted the time for all this time. It's the wrong men to hunt if you please can kill it. Twentieth Century Fox Presents Arnold Schwarzenegger's just Predator the hunts diggins Friday June twelfth at theaters everywhere from our respective downtown headquarters. Here's episode three hundred the iconic action film get through the Chalk off Predator it through the Java utter twice in this movie a London. Arnie sites is his favorite line from all his movies. Guy Has had a lot of conic lines whether it be all be Bach. You mean there's nothing from kindergarten cop. Of course it's not the Tuma Not The tumor. Yeah there you go well. Three hundred is a nice round number. And we thought we'd save this touchstone of the action genre because this coincides with the soon to be released book that we co wrote about all things action called mine's bigger than yours. The hundred wacky EST action movies and so we are super excited about that. It's available for preorder but it will be in stores provided any stores exist of September October for anyone. Who's really into like fucking fisticuffs and Chop Sake and people being shot and fire escapes and like Anna. Claire will falling over fire escapes people instead of crumbling in the heat the way they should when people doing parabolic arches from spalding. Exploding cars taciturn. Heroes uttering one liners before they give Villains beatdown if you were not that different you and I have a really not all that different in my friends I have a gun pointed to your head and might be hero or the villain. I think you look more like the villain I got the I got the beard so I can be stroke. I'm stroking it right now. So that makes me. Are you referring to your beard? Alan Rickman beard and die hard. You no longer than that off you are. Usually the one lowers the tone of discussions. I'm must be a pandemic getting to my head. So how'd you come to a Predator? How I came in Predator is the fact that you can live in this row without knowing what the Predator is I mean. The Predator is such an iconic character in the space of cinema and believe it or not. This was my first viewing of Brenner. I have not seen this before. I feel like I have seen it. Because you know for so many friends of seen it and they've talked about it and I've seen alien versus Predator and I've seen prager too. I've seen bits and pieces on TV here and there over the years. But I've never sat down from minute. One Minute whatever watched Predator and I gotTa Tell You. I was on board from the very first second. I loved this movie. This was a hyper McKee's mal exemplar actually Conrad so Chris. Do you come upon Predator. You must see when you're a kid. Oh so as a kid but I didn't remember that moment when Carl weathers clasps hands with Arnie in that though I was almost like over the top with stallone I mean where the two Belgian biceps part may here is. We're all in the quarantining isolating times. I'm not able to remove my son from the recording proceedings here but so if he if he's chiming in apologies no just you would have been like obviously thrilled to bits that Carl Weathers Apollo creed was Ns as well. Oh yeah no sir. Although he did play some I guess he did play antagonists although he wasn't tag missed in In the first rocky but then he became a competitive rocky in the subsequent sequels until his untimely death spoiler alert in part four at the hands of one Ivan Drago. But Yeah I was. I was very happy called. Weather's as the Cigar chomping Dylan and he. He blames Arnold Schwarzenegger forgetting him in the ABBOT OF SMOKING CIGARS L. Yes and such as his charm that even though he's he's kind of a villain because he's one of these sort of tie wearing Washington D. C. Types who is no longer involved in the action and is is a pencil pusher so pencil pusher yeah and he becomes involved in essentially compelling this force to go into what is effectively a suicide mission says and was with this fucking die business. Yes you gotTa love it. Every time already says fucking sounds so lift Lewis every time he says fuck. Oh yeah it's just so fantastic. His delivery is pretty on point. Although I got admit that there are times. I wish he'd been speaking in his native German so I could have understood. It is that I mean and there are times I really wanted to use subtitles but let let's lay the groundwork a little bit for the movie year. Because the Roger Ebert describes it as Rambo Meets Alien so the first twenty minutes is effectively Rambo with this kind of mission behind enemy lines MOTIF. And then it just pivots into this geiger alien creature coming out of the woodwork. And it's I don't know it's it's a testament to the star power of Arnold at the time because if you put anyone else in this role I think this would have died on the vine. Potentially it's not really sci-fi not really action pure action in the work I can gotta was. Yeah no I think it's how for action. I mean the pride before the Predator shows up. It's straight ahead action film with the as you said before with this This crew that Arnie leads going into the jungle for this For what they thought was a risk of me. A cabinet minister so nebulous unnamed country. I mean Mexico is filled in Mexico. They don't name the place. I mean it was the eighties right. You don't want to ruffle any feathers causing need diplomatic spat. They're the best as caught weather. Says they're actually assigned to go in there and the hope is to assassinate the rebels of whomever I guess the Russians that that would be the villages. You're in the eighties on there to I. Guess provide guidance. Let's say it's a bit like strike commando with Red Brown? So there wasn't Russian and he was played by a Swede into bulk of them. Were just generic. I guess sort of Latino stereotypes. But it's funny and Arnold said himself that he's not like a this is not a hit squad they assemble. It's a rescue mission so he doesn't like to be perceived as the assassins that really out there to perform a mission to save these cabinet ministers from from their capture. The square the circle as we were talking about rock you earlier. The cast of this film was when they were talking about making a rocky sequel. This would be after rocky four when he vanquished superhuman the arvin drive on. They said the only thing that rocky was able to physically go up against at this point would be an alien would we'll start occurring and they came up Predator while I'm glad you're on board with it but maybe we shouldn't have expected anything else because I mean it's on McKiernan Tiernan who is like brought us die hard so I mean. His vision is so incredible and I mean it. You'd be hard pressed to find a greener movie outside of the Italian Cannibal. Genre like fiscal or like Hertzog like what the. It's almost a character. This is the greatest movie ever. I mean birthday was last week right I was. This is one greenness movie screener. How Green is my valley. Was it greener than green of reefer madness than the Green Mile? The Green Mark wasn't particularly green. No Not really God but the cinematography was incredible. And as you alluded to the mission is where a lot of this action really takes place in the alien comes by midway but the action shoot. 'em UP action against the rebels is so fantastic and we got to talk about the crew that Arnold as assemble this often Abbott track team of superstars. I mean you got Jesse. The Body Ventura of my governor could kick your governors ask fame. Is there another think of the had two future governors in it? Oh my God yeah. Good call you know. I can't think of any I just bought. It's also got like genre stalwarts that I think one of the the guys is from what is it. A warriors like one of the one of the crew. I believe Bill Yup Yup and I mean Bill Duke just though Duke. Oh man like what an iconic face late. He's basically all iris out like. It's unbelievable I think it will on the show. You referred to Yaffa Koto as bacchus man. Hollywood it's true but I mean whole yeah. What a team. And you see these guys of course on on the chopper. And they're listening to like Little Richard which Jesse Ventura's got cranked up now. What's his character's name again of late? Blaine yeah and he's got the the tunes just going and that's par for the course for any like Vietnam movie. You GotTa have some you got to have either Fourteen saw watch our or something like that one of the requisite Vietnam era songs. Yeah well at least that was era on point. I mean this one was like you know what fifties rock and roll but it's sort of fit and then as they're about to jump average. Because these are I mean you know you mentioned Hendrix their paratrooper like Hendrix was and so they jump out of chopper and they they know descend down. I guess they repel. Is that the word. I don't even know military terminology. But once they're in the jungle man they are really deep in it and this is so I mean it was so spooky with them like yet traipsing around there. Oh Yeah for sure and as saying before I mean th th this would have made a good movie this damn good action movie before. The Predator even shows up but when the Predator does show up with his heat-seeking vision. I guess you would call it a go overdrive in this. Become something really really special. And it's amazing. The far reaching impact. This film has there is a football player. Speaking football is Carl. Weathers was a cup of coffee in the NFL. He also played for the Lions but there is a pretty big name. Nfl player when he gets to the quarterback to sack them he does a Predator celebration and so he spreads his fingers out and he does any flexes his muscles and it's pretty cool and he he obviously got the idea from the movie. So if some don't don't be football player. Referencing your movie you know that. It has incredibly widespread appeal while the word Predator who has taken on a new connotation because of this movie when you hear the Word Predator you think of this you think of This creature poets chill binding. That's that's a different sort of Predator. Let's say it's true and it's I I go to ask like how the Hell did you watch predators alien before this movie like? How does that happen? I Dunno I just go for the SHITTY ONES. Before we go for the for the bonafide classics. That must've liked. How did that not color your perception? That's just I. I usually want to see versus the title of any movie. I just run for the Hills Batman v. Superman can do for you. I gotta say let's say Freddy vs. Jason Really exploded that myth nevertheless that was really bad as but pie but anything versus for the most part of not overly keen on but yes. I'm so excited. You got to see this for the first time. No anyway they must have seen it at least three or four times and it just brought up such incredible memories especially when Arnold is like a slathered with mud and that seems to deter this creature. Some point for reasons unexplained no from what I understand by. Slopping yourself with mud mythbusters actually busted this myth. But apparently it's supposed to lower your body temperature and so that way the the heat seeking capabilities of the Predator vision wouldn't be able to To detect arnold because his body temperature is now lowered by slopping himself with with this particular mud now of course site is a myth by works in the context of the movie. Couldn't you have just jumped in the water to do that too? Because I imagine that would have been fairly cold water. Got I don't know? But I mean speaking of unexplained instances I mean what was this creature doing on earth to begin with is at least in that crappy movie alienated that we podcast it. The the alien was bounty hunter looking for an escaped convict here the Dais X. Mac whatever you WANNA call it. The thing that starts the narrative is just a part of a pot like spacecraft that plummets to Earth then all of a sudden you have this alien creatures skulking around in the Bush in the middle of Whatever Bolivia or God knows where. But that's what makes it so cool because he's the Predator he's Apex Predator. He's the hunter. And that's what turns this from an action film into horror film because he started. I mean you talk about the Bass Serie of this This crew and they are. I mean these are all hyper man. These are all big hulking. Man Is Arnie would say but yet when it comes to the there and how many of them there's about five or six when it comes to the Predator. They're absolutely no matt whatsoever. They're the they're the pray and he and the Predator is the hunter. Yeah I mean I guess very Michael Myers before Robes Ambi- polluted You know John Carpenter's vision by delving into childhood. Alas but against Meyers. You don't know why he does it he just does it. I guess But I mean I guess what did it. Maybe his Crafts crash-landed now. Is it? Maybe but it really doesn't matter because in the scope of the film it's just there for some bad ass. Kills him the ever bad ass kills? I mean that I almost feel sorry for the rebels. Those guys were laid waste to in such extraordinary fashion Blaine alone. Has this just like seven inch. Wide Barreled incredible machine gun. Any wheels like it's a toy. An ounce ask the one that's ironically called mini gun. Yes most down like forty to fifty of his brow. Stereotypes in one go is this and an arnold also show some incredible prowess rigging up some pickup truck so that it can send like twenty of them running to the into the jungle. So yeah there's there's so much like Amos and strategy going into this I mean. Isn't that a song? Run through the jungle was just singing. Cr In like neither of us has any military background. But you gotta realize how cool it is to just raise your fist in the air and then hope Point fingers or something and then everyone behind you who is watching your command. Just does something. I don't know exactly what they're supposed to do. But that's super cool. And so they lay. Waste of all these rebel villagers and they're don't match for them and of course they come up with a lone survivor as rebel group. And this is a woman so I mean this was gonNA spectacularly failed Bechtel tests and my God and she was really immaterial as well with her failed the l. task he was basically the estrogen fuel character in the entire film. It's true and she was pretty expendable and several references to the expendable nature the members artists. But it's pretty amazing like they bring her on board and she tells this tale of this shape. I guess you could say speaking of Halloween. There's shape in the jungle. And they're like what are you talking about? She says yeah shape and she was terrified in. They kept admonishing her that tells the truth. Who was out there? And it's just this entity this thing. What thing it is. Oh it announces itself spectacularly because they see this predators handiwork from the remains of the previous expedition. That was there. So you see these four skinned corpses hanging from a tree. And they're like well. These rebels savage fucks rebels at all. So that wasn't that was so cool. They talk about the The noise the Predator makes I I was what he. This was subtitles What was what was your washing stars on. Prime is that what it's called Yes so I had to on subtitles. And how would you describe the The Noise Predator Makes Jeez. He put me on the spot here. That's trying to deal with the noise. My son is making it. Well I would go for it. What do you think well? I don't think anything has thanks to the good people at Stars on Prime. They actually called it a soft liquoring noise wicker noise. I never lie when I hear wicker. I think of Handles oh no way down command as well. Yeah bring noise. But it's more like this is sort of like sucking sound going in and out in and out and it's quite eerie. Yeah and it sort of I mean he's kind of a chameleon asking takes on. I mean it's a little bit like the shape shifting in the Terminator Reference in other film. It's a bit like Terminator two kind of with that almost silvery form that it takes on as it skulks through the jungle is sort of Read that is is ability. Okay so that's just for the benefit of the viewer and they can't see it not sure how that works but either a chameleon ability or an invisible liability one or the other one thing's for certain though it does bleed and this was a pretty funny moment that's one of the crew actually Nixon with shoots him and wounds him and the truth does not see any of the green blood. The girl who was in there I guess in their chart. She's the one notices and puts her finger on it. It's like these guys are supposed to be. The elite unit paratrooper like whatever navy seal types? And they don't even notice that things bled wounded. We'll speaking of blood One of this. I mean this film of course has yet conic line with trump up but another conic. Line is Jesse Ventura as I ain't got time to bleed. He's bleeding says I ain't got time. I mean how. How much more Macho Linas Air than that? Well paying. Don't hurt. From roadhouse around House Dalton. Exactly temptation salt gain too proud to beg com to bleed Davis. Or what did I learn? But when Jesse Ventura wrote his biography low those low those main years ago he actually held it. I ain't got time to bleed. So that's another example of the The resonance of this film his character was pretty neat to think given his stature at the time and the WWe yeah he would have. You would have thought he would have lasted a little longer. But I mean he meets his demise fairly quickly. Well this was Just even terrorist film debut so by now maybe that has to do with it. I know he ended up appearing. I think was five films without sports anchor not sure. But that's what really appealed to me at the time too because although his in ring work leaves leaves something to be desired. I think we're left On the Mike he was fantastic. All you is one of the best I mean at this point. He has his in ring days. Or Past We're in the rear view mirror so he was known more for his color commentator with gorilla monsoon. I believe they made a great team. Oh yeah that was fantastic. I don't know. Is this the point in the discussion where we can talk about what we've learned because we probably learned a lot? I mentioned on the podcast before the Predator was originally played by John Claude van Damme so they originally picked to play the Predator but there were two once they start filling realized two problems with John. Claude van Damme number walks either. You can't speak English so three problems number two. He was too small. He was only five foot nine. I believe five ten he still is. I believe the all the other actors just towered over him and number three. He had attitude problems and that was wearing. The suit was not comfortable of course and he complain complain so they ended up Booting off the set in favor of an actor by name of Kevin Peter Hall who stood powering seven foot two and Yup Yup and he also played Harry in hearing the Hendersons. Who last have you seen that one? I have but I couldn't tell you a single thing about it. Iconic film unfortunately compeer hall passed away at a young age but this Predator said he was forced to wear weight. Two hundred pounds is unreal. Can you imagine that like? Can you imagine the even? You can't even pick your lifting two hundred pounds alone wearing it and then you're in the jungle and there's a heat and everything and it must have been an absolute endurance. It was all the actors are included but for Kevin. Peter Hall must have been absolutely horrific conditions. While they're filming this film. One thing I learned is that as we alluded to earlier this is more of a horror film than anything else and it reminds me a little bit. Hybrid action reminds me a little bit of that film. We podcast that neither of US had heard from the eighties. Called up the final terror where it has all these different people skulking about in the Bush and they're being assaulted by this time unseen figure and they used their wits to eventually overcome it and I'm also reminded of Southern Comfort which is similarly applauded where it has a bunch of Louisiana State Guardsmen National Guardsmen. Doing the rounds doing training. And what are the Kennedy? Remember which and they're going around training on a mission in the by you in the swamps and they're attacked by some assailant so it has in common that kind of a survivalist horror bent to it. So that's end I also learned that this was not the critical darling by any means I mean I. I mentioned Roger. Ebert actually did give it three out of four stars and said that the characterization was suited effectively simple and it was very well shot but this was not exactly like well off in it was in the stations of their biceps and their muscles pacing. Pretty much it's funny. If if you weren't built it seems like the creature took you pretty quickly so I believe it was Hawkins and hopper and a couple of skinny Southern kind of stereotype guys. They got it quick and then or were the longer you you lasted so that was a pretty interesting. Although one can argue that bill dukes was more burly than buff. How good was with with the razor as a as a bit of a character tick that was so it was really interesting. Well I mean What would you call it? Bloodletting is was done by two of the characters. The Tracker Guide the native American Guy. He finally loses his shit strips down to his bare chest and goes to Amano. Amano tilt with this creature in before he does so he takes his machete cuts align across his chest. And then of course you have. Bill do cut himself while shaving. Gillette Shaving moment. There and that was that was kind of Weird. It was almost like us. Removing the sweat from his body the best man can get right. Yeah Yeah and this. This was the best. These men could get really just a bunch of any tactical decisions made by Schwarzenegger to survive the onslaught of this thing. And it's funny. The Danny Mall is decidedly low tech. Compared to all the weaponry they're using and I think that's pretty effective because it really shows that brains win out over. Braun at the end is just shot. A thing to smithereens but it was cool. How we jerry rigged a bunch of stuff that he found in the in the jungle to rid the world of this thing. What explosives they were. You know there's a couple of things I love when marking Art Films Love Massive explosions and I love man on fire. Anytime you see a man on fire at running around it just I don't know I. It tickles my funny bone. I just think of those flame. Retardant suits running around haphazardly. I mean this was one of the rebels running around earlier. Not the Predator but man. This one had everything a had the chop. Aw Man of fire at massive explosions at bulging by snaps and how enough ordinance to level an entire city remark in your office for those poor rebels though in there so much immolation and it was like you know Leo DiCaprio and the aviator like Burns. Eighty percent of their body is like these guys were so burned all over the place. It was brutal. These guys were decimated shot to shit and they pulled. No punches wasn't like eight where they just escaped unscathed the body count courtesy of this. Swat team or what everyone call. It must have been at least hundred if not more so for here. I mean how phenomenal as we segue into our star rating. I'll started so it seems like we're going alphabetically with our films now because we did poltergeist last week and our doing Predator and when I gave poltergeist four and a half stars and I'm going to give this one to four and a half stars I absolutely loved it on glad to. Here's I thought I really really held up and in many ways it was actually better watching at this time when I was like twelve years old. I really came to appreciate the directeur flourishes of material. I mean he just put his soul into this and he really tell. And that's not something you would normally associated with this type of genre. I mean let's be on especially kind of a mainstream film like this and for all its ten to fifteen million dollar budget. It looks much more. They've suffer twice that for sure for sure. Wa going to. I'm going to concur and give this a solid four and a half as well. Let me just demands the viewer's attention to so fricking captivating and I mean yes principal photography. It's you know I'm just pulling up a page here Tabasco and Polenghi Mexico and men. It must have been hot. Sweaty brutal brutal shoot. Apparently the cast and crew had MONTEZUMA's revenge. And all this kind of stuff right. That's right How do you stay? Rip When you've lost twenty pounds due to the shits I it was funny because Ari did lose twenty five pounds over the course of the filming because of the monsoon was revenge for you alluded to earlier. Yeah Oh God what a Shitty note hasn't gone well To Circle The Square. I guess For listeners really interested in John. Rowe I mean mine's bigger than yours. The hundred wacky EST action movies. You know this. This has is divided into nine chapters. We've got bad chop sake movies. We've got the you know. This genre is effectively which has enlisted men so bad army movies. We've got dystopia movies. People Really GonNa love it and we get to highlight what makes it so great as some of the lesser lesser known lights at the action. You know that would be your Rep Brown's victory as is rather than your top drawer Martini. Like you know Jason. State them fucking Schwarzenegger and Steven Seagal and everybody. So it's a real deep dive and some of the crazy movies and not just that but just like with them Death by umbrella we reversal world. We feel some Indonesia. We have films from the Philippines loss of films from the Philippines so we got some of the got. Some of the more well known fills got a lot of obscure stuff. So there's GonNa be a law firm that readers to discover definitely so anyway. We'll be back next Friday more fun or an action films. We'll talk soon all right. Take Care

Arnold Schwarzenegger Arnie Jesse Ventura Arnold Carl weathers Roger Ebert Red Brown Blaine Jason football Chris Bill Bush Department of Health NFL Green Philippines Lou Sports columnist Alan Rickman
Page 21 - Lorne Jones

The Basement Diaries

49:08 min | 1 year ago

Page 21 - Lorne Jones

"Hi, I'm Wesley Telford, host of the basement diaries. If this is your first time listening, I it is a podcast, where I bring artists or people I find interesting in the Chicago area and bring them down to talk about their lives and whatever interests them and today, I have Lauren Jones in the basement, and we talk about his experiences of going to anime conventions over the years. And how that's evolved over time. But I, I have a little housekeeping to take care of before we get into the interview there is only three weeks, laughed of the basement, diaries until our summer hiatus so during that time I am going to do some open mic shows around the Chicago area, kind of refined, some of my standup sets and start networking more and getting more people onto the podcast who I think offer different perspective. Gives than you've heard, and collection number one, because a lot of the people, I've had on here are either people, I've worked with my day job, or people I went to school with, and I just want to broaden my network, a little bit so that you will basement dwellers, we'll have more people to draw inspiration from I also have another podcast that will continue during this hiatus. It is called checking in with Wes, if you're not familiar with it. It's an offshoot of the basement diaries, you can find it on the baseman, diaries website, which is the basement diaries, pod dot com. Just go to the website and you'll find the checking in with west tab, you can find all episodes. They're basically the difference between that. And the basement diaries, is that check in west focuses on a specific topic. And I do a bunch of research, or I'm lazy and just bring someone else on who knows more about it than me. So I can ask them questions about it like this coming Friday, I have my own brother on. He's political expert, and we talk about the twenty twenty democratic primary candidates, and really get into sifting through all of these candidates, and how to make an informed decision on who you're going to vote for. To eventually get the democratic nominee in the twenty twenty presidential election. I'm really excited for that one. But today as I said, before, we have Lauren on, and we're talking about anime conventions, and how to budget, your time at anime conventions. And learn is like an expert on this stuff. And I had a lot of fun talking with them. I hope you enjoy him as much as I did. So enjoy page twenty one of the diary with Lauren Jones. Okay. Lauren welcome to the basement. Oh, hi. It's good to have you here. Have you too, sir? How's it going pretty good? We to kind of start this off just to tell the listeners how we know each other. We worked at target as day job all. Yeah. Together for about a year. Probably see some change will say maybe some change there. Yeah. So you were you're actually reached out to me to be on the podcast. Yeah. Just. The I, I knew you do a podcast annals. Oh man. That's cool. West does a podcast. That's awesome. May. I could be a feature guests. And like let me reach out to them that, hey, if you never need. I guess I've been to do it. Yeah. Well, I, I was I was honored that you reach out to me, and we've been talking a little bit before this. I found out, you have podcast yourself. Yes. Do I do. I do. Have a podcast on my pockets is the Dan pixels internet v up blow once a week. So it'd be like a very easy. It'd be like Tuesday. Wednesdays of blow days. Yeah. Yeah. So we talk about like, like be do game views movie reviews like just general life stuff about what's going on. We the Vandam Annan Dozo ally for some lay story. But usually it's a podcast, check out if you want to, like, pretty much do any editing famous time to kill the hours. Oh like pretty much like forty fifty minutes. Yeah, just well, yeah. And the thing I love about pod. Especially like that, where it could be about anything that you can just like turn it on in the background. Listen to the dishes or like. Moving. Distracting, my like okay. I need something on like used to be like, listen to the radio in the kitchen. You know, so that so radio became podcasts. Okay, let let me see with delays episode of like pretty much of this pocket side, Joe Rogan. Well he's talking about full hour. And he's just need to get tasked. Need to get some housework is just have them in the background was like, well, yeah. And it's it's like somebody is keeping you company. Yeah, exactly why you do like premiss. The anywhere. If you eat the biking on doing anything else. Yeah. And it's interesting to you brought up the point of like distracted my and all that. It's like I think we really do live in the age where it's hard to just sit still and like be in the moment without anything else going on is sold. True. I had I agree with you. Like for me like even when I go sleep on these something like noise in the background. Yeah. It'd be like, okay, well, what can I per- awesome? Okay. Let me why something on YouTube, and then, like something like a long the like something someone's talking about, like, oh, like fax in ending unusual down, just like fall asleep, and then yes. No. I wake up. It's just like something else is on. Well, okay. Let me watch that work. And then, okay, I love, I love the idea of you like following asleep watching something, and then it keeps playing throughout the wake up and you're watching videos. Netflix, Hulu, just like pretty much you sit there and lay on watching like, like whatever show in Nazi. No. You is like three episodes, like a hey, man. Go back and see what the last point I was on. And sometimes all you still watching hate. Yes. So no, I always way. Well, like when I have a day, where I'm catching up on a shower or something on my Ben watching it all day. I start to feel like shame like Netflix. Shaming me for like watching salon, because they're like, are you still watching? I'm like, yes, of course, you see watching it, and he's telling the judge don't just be Netflix who unknown going here. Okay. I'm watching this. I'm not seeing like man was a no. I'm I'm being tensely lodging this, so. Yeah, we were talking to about like anime conventions, because you've just got back from one. I just got came back from lunch and the Mason drew from on this past weekend. So it was fine. Yeah, it sounds like from what you were telling me. About it sounds really fun. I have honestly never been to anime convention. But you've been going to these for a while. Yeah. Foof of I'll say like fifteen sixteen years, I'll say about that. And what, what kind of gravitated you towards these anime conventions. Have you always been like a big anime fan? I have to say when you when you when you I was younger, I was, I will say, like, you know, like drag Mosey all ball dragon balls as like my and stuff like stuff like that. We use like Dink of cartoons. And he's in the know that up know this is asking the anime like Japan and mation like enemy was enemy about, and then you like this whole new Danes supposed to be more. It's different from like American cartoons is more life, greedy more by the more like is storytelling than like. Oh, everything's. I have like a happy endings like compared to, like, like, Abe. I love my X men cartoon that used to come on FOX, like famous on Saturday and Sunday mornings. And then animate. Like some of my drag Mosey, like the hill hill could also be like could be like injured or can be beaten, like watching, like those setting Moines cotton. Yeah. Like it's, it's not fun to watch somebody who does have to go through any obstacles to smuggle is all they come out like obstacle like towards the end. Like using life is not like that or like stuff like that. You have to have like a Bill dissolve in day. You work you over it. And then you bring us come out Batory as a stem back napping all episodes. It's like bills up the Al with anime attracting towards they all say, oh, man that's kind of cool. And it was like I need to find out more about this, like these followings these, like designs because nobody can say it was big Jag Mosey fan and they opened me up to like all this other like all this may the appreciate about Dan, like the, like the behind the scenes of choice after it's pretty much like stuff. Layout. On realize this is kind cool awesome. Yeah. Because you start to look into the behind the scenes stuff, and then is this, cool, the how that stuff gets made because it's kind of like with dragon ball z. And that's the only anime I really I mean, I know some others, but that's the one that I only golly, what is this? Why are they yelling? You want why the Yellen Felice like two or three episodes. Yeah, I love the, the whole freezer thing where and dragged that fight out for like a good ten episodes. Ways that why is the thing. If it was American cartoons. They dragged us out like maybe two episodes and then done. Yeah. Now, like, oh my God this tensions. They built attention for what reason like. Oh, this planet about to blow up is posible of climb poles blow up and very minutes man. This man like five hours on the planet still involved. It's still there is slowly like selfless blowing. Like, yeah, but that building over there polls have been blow up. It's so it showed the same shop like three times. Yeah, but we'll see won't okay this the fourth time. Okay. I'm sorry. Like may Kate. Okay. Goku do Goku. Why are you still under the on those? I remember in one part of it. Like there's literally like I think like twenty some episodes, and it hasn't even been a day. Yeah. Yeah. People like how long is this day? Is this like twenty episode episode of twenty four? Yeah. What is going on? You're like I look what time y'all start at five AM on. But it's so funny. Yeah. So, so you started to go to these anime conventions. More for fun, right? Yeah, it was when we started out, like we'll find so like just decide to buy swag to buy artwork t shirts like DVD's like DVD's at the time blue as came little bit lay by DVD's and tapes. And you'd be like, oh, man. I can get a whole series of my fists northstar Felici like Dame bucks. Boy bugs. Oh, this is crazy off watching this on like this channel. I forget what channel but on this channel and they only show like once like a month. So I the whole series in my hand out, that's like, oh, this is when Netflix and Hulu. Yeah, this. Before the time before, like, oh, you have everything your before they might even like ego to like a tornado, WalMart or like any other stores like you rarely see the animate on like items and stuff. They have you buy go like a Higgins with throwback Suncoast video like rarely you see those. Well, there's no peace Suncoast video. Oh, yeah. Like see anime stuff like my is a knee section during that time by man. Like now, you see, like almost anywhere like okay there's a section for enemy at best buy or. Oh, yeah. Like different sections at these details stores before us definitely in the mainstream. Yeah, you will definitely not like doing like fifteen is go. You may see, like one I mean like one maybe like drag Mazi ESP like that. That would definitely be. It'd be nice. And then I've been the election in the price would be like why can get this sheep. I can get a whole lot set for. Convention is bang at this store. Yeah. Like, I'm not gonna pay that much. Okay. And then you stole my okay go into this concept again, on this stuff, and during that time you can get like mongers and, oh, yes stuff. And like no. That was not at you. Can't find out like bookstore. So I'm interested alike from from when you started going to conventions like versus today. Like what is the biggest difference between anime conventions now and from back, then it became more maize me, it became more accessible to the public before you, you're seeing more and more people come in, and you see more people accepted asked like it became more mainstream, I before I used to not see kiss. Jess ads like buy. Dress as like a villain from ABI of game. That's like has like killed like X amount people. Yeah. I seem like Lou Gerstner says this care of downs, like was my mind is among my way, why were you want, like, what is this? Oh, I like the care that she's so cute. So fun. Well, yeah. And I think with YouTube now to, like, I feel like kids are being exposed to like a more and more stuff than maybe you and I would have been in like what is going on like my doors like love polka my dealings? And she like, oh well this episodes, nigh net flicks on watching on YouTube. I'm like, why are you doing in my healthy is not the band episodes and lamb? Oh, yeah. Unlike look okay. No, it's not just the episode. They of skip over. Okay. I got you. Oh, let me just get you, these episodes on, on DVD stanch on YouTube it. Yeah. Yeah. But no. Just like it became more accessible to like the consumer. Well, yeah, I'm interested. Like having a kid with because I'm really interested in this topic of like exposure to kids now and like YouTube and stuff. Do you, do you have to like monitor like, what your daughter surges on the internet was luckily for my daughter, she still had innocent stage? Three must joins on stuff. We'll like like that. She likes okay? So she was not going to try and go into, like, she's not going to go to like the recommended. Yeah. No, no, no. I'm just gonna go all like the stuff that out must he likes the joys. And yes, and they ending scary, or ending that, like, looks like a scary thumb thumbnail. She, like no don't want to know. Well, that's good. No, on the stick to stuff. I like stuff on to be like, okay, I'm on about this cool, pretty much like her big bands. Poke on and Minecraft. Have you guys seen detective Beka chew? I we see solve with a mom, but we're going to have a date. Pretty much when she gal like a school like premiums in the school year. We'll see again. Oh, that's great. Yeah, I saw it. I thought it was. I thought it was pretty good. Most of my friends day like only gonna see the sound way that's daddy. And during the time right there. Oh, yeah. That's, that's something for me and her to see someone like y'all Gasol. See that, like my friends saw on Thursday island to see Joan wick. So, like how has the kind of trade off, like y'all guys. See this. I'm we'll see something like a dumb action Louis. Yeah. Right. But, but. Yeah. Like for for daughter empty and she just like love crowd. So she was like on into look for how to make underground base type need to know how look on the ground base. She was look at the Bill by. Okay. This is no. I don't wanna know about that looks at, like okay that look what she knows what she wants and yeah, you'll see rose through, like, okay. I might design, maybe. Okay. Fine, fine. Perfect base sushi, usually, like, stop the video, and then, like looks at Mike different stuff to bring my okay? I need to do by see falls erections like all tool, you'll, so it's okay I do these different things to make it. So I pretty much trust. Mhondoro frame was knowing like L game, you know, the cash seagrass technology like when she was young like that. Isn't that crazy fast that like, because I have cousins who are well, they're like nine now, but when they were like four one of my cousins came up to me, and she was, like, check out my phone, and she had a nicer phone than I'd like she had like an iphone six I think six came out and I had some like Samsung and I'm like a four year old has a better phone than I do. I was like twenty two years, but the hell's going on, like, okay. And like my just this'll playing like late for me like a by like. Was younger. Oh, you grasp technology because like, oh Jason like deep dish. So you know how to set and like tons of cameras on. White guy again. I'm a technology. Now, you look at me. You know how to turn the computer line, set the prince who makes his label this is great and then like my doors are. Oh, yeah. I knew how do this, like, okay. And what's why five has bird and light on the field? Okay. Boom. We set the modem. Okay. Like how do look with stuff asked us Netflix? Go to my goal to her profile. Do all the stuff. Okay. Well, I guess just either win to you'll and you just all natural. But other than that, I will take the credit board. Well, yeah, and it's just it's crazy how how quickly technology is in banding as we're. Getting more and more into the digital age. But yeah, with so with these anime conventions now you're. I really think it's fascinating the way you kind of used it as an opportunity to create your own content. So tell me a little bit about that journey, and how you started creating content from going to these anime conventions. Why, why had to say it was just pay much of. Going to the anime conventions is like you go there, you know, you're going to have you want to have fun on joy yourself. Yeah. Then it just like he share these hilarious anecdotes. And all these by funding stories that may happen to you, or using the Cynthia having to you or like all these personal stories. You have anyone, like, okay, let's kind cool, some them like you can't really share some of them like no, like hearsay on you just like how can I cut cover this convention to pretty much like, that's my beauty? So someone like who's new? Liz, Liz, no listen to this, or pretty much like, oh, I wanna go to animate of Incheon. What was like, well, I need. No. What I need to do stuff. I need to do. What's funding to watch out or all these different stuff? And I'm like, why not just talk about why not just share this barrier. So pretty much like, oh, you may see do you go to different panels, if you see a voice after you like. Don't fan out just pay much. It's like oh hey how's it going? Can I get a pit? You, you. Yeah. Treat them don't want to be that weird eggs. I don't wanna be that guy. Yeah. Hi, mom. Ovalles guy working bills. I see this hilarious antidote. So on one time I went to see we went to see me and my friend, my partner Joseph, we went to see the screening of was one movie downtown is like a vampire movie. I forget the name of that movie but we went down there, and it was just a press review. I don't know. It was a press review, because I got those during time, have long hair. But my right now my hair. Oh, I'd love a matching you how long? Here and have braids and late. My put my all my, my not barb of as she used to bring my hands. Was the term useful? Just my hairstyle is always say. So she was like, breaking my, yes. Oh, yeah. Do you want to see this movie downtown? Okay. Sure, she gave me tickets. And then I notice press tickets Soma, okay, cool. We went was some general orange, people also those pressman moves there. So we send their now, what is movie and told my friend, hey, you got tickets to see the movie. So these days, I look Astle, the great Roger Ebert all my God. Yeah. Yeah. I was like, and he's from Illinois. He's like, hey, is that Roger Ebert? Yeah, they had to be. And this is like no this like the year before he passed bills to before these past. Okay. I am like. Little spongy, but he's with his wife. I am not going like no not gonna bother not bother going. Yeah. So I'm like three months. It was like, okay we hit my friends. I didn't s Roger Ebert. I'll say I'd be there is. So he China like dislike socal motion around, like make sure like just to the side to make sure the EBA. I think Roger Ebert man you kinda like Lou you've got a little bit. He's not the same like in the nineties, Roger you've like the surgery stuff like took your soul on the yeah, the I know this Roger either. And he was like golick excuse me. All you and his wife late budget. Don't one no one to talk to mental moment. Oh. And he was like, oh. That's so awkward. And he's like balked. Ultimately like yeah. That's why I say I told you as an so you, also you may have offered because you walk through kind of, like did like a soak the motion. So what do you want me to do to say? Well, I you you're saying, hey, I know just came came from this on just want to say, I appreciate your work about Evert. Yeah. Don't like talking. Did you complete soccer? He's like didn't know what to do was nervous. Yeah. They're human being as a human being does it don't be that guys don't be that person. Don't be like. Oh, what's your do like just be just be like cool? Calm collective, and I be like, hey. I really enjoy your work. Yeah. And see it here. And that's why took from that experience. See this. Okay. If I meet these levies, which I met, like a few on the hand like a few voice after somewhere. You just wait months. You be cool become collective. They are people just like me. And you. The difference is day are more famous you. And they have more exposed to have most supposedly you, you just say, oh, hey, it was only the streets normally spine school, and I like, okay, cool, not share information. All I pretty much the guy payments what to do at an make vision. Or what would they like say, for example? You come in on the Friday. Yeah. And all that art like premature wanna know what you officers are on. You plan to stay at the hotel. If you own a place, the hotel, do you. Do you restaurant at the hotel, how long did it? Because he wrested the hotel right now. You bought the pay our pocket prices. You buy more money right now because he's still last. So you're really getting detail low yet kind of by encounter structure your time at these convention. Exactly. So if you wanna pretty much like pre-game, you ideas, okay, how many days also free game for drink? So you learned how to budget, your time, right over the years. Yes. Over the years, I did you learn from mistakes? Oh, yes, mistakes, I have to tell you when one time like this. My early is going to convention, and before they go into the fan when you just sit there, like, ma'am homegrown. And they realized you you'll spend your budget. Yeah. Realize, oh I bought all this stuff now having a foodie. That would be so hard through like all that stuff. Yeah. Tempt end and you'd be like, oh my God wish I do. And then you like I have to survive on nothing but neutral game bars. And water and they had like stress L and then you have your blade. Oh, because then you can enjoy the rest of your time again, and then this is thinking about how hungry. Yeah. And this like, when your friends. Oh, I've spot, you mealy yet. The painting back later day in there like. Yeah. So by net Labor Day could come to a time. I own ma'am broke L the payment back in late. I guess I can't be friends you anymore fire. I guess I paid you back right now. But no, you learn from mistakes you learn them pretty much premiums. If you are going to drink in always make sure you have a full stomach also another thing I tell people is may show you wash makes sure you like buy hygiene is, is really key on. I'm sure there are there a lot of like smelly people around there. Also and known it became a day, like beam, so at these conventions but is actually true that they asked people like, please, please, please, please shower, the shower is non job that, you know, you smelt the whole convinces side of the room, the whole hotel. Please take a shower and people on. That's kinda funny. No, there's actually people about that life and not taking show at these. Inventions, and, you know, they do been up since like Wednesday Thursday since you got to Kahn. Din took a shower when the same outfit since Friday, all time Friday after Friday morning. He's dancing, he's like ooh. And just see the smell and the muss. Now just that in ties that with pretty much like a hundred or two hundred people whose premiums at the socialize. Yeah. And it just like a wolf Amy, you'll use just like walk around this area, smell, like, though, it's like sue destroying Nastya SMU, like walking around, like okay, like, you know, like five smell, okay? Well, now let me amass. Well, let me just hold my braille full. Let me just go around. Okay. Let me just try get out this situation. They I know people like stop all take a pitching. Oh, okay. At stay at new Stanton. I feel like I would have to wear like one of those flu mass. Gift was there a lot of people like Ramos. Now's weighing the flu masses at convention, and I'm like, oh, man. That's so like. Like a taco we, you know, we type but it's just like, no, it actually helps the I was wearing one just to see how is like my mouth is completely, like tech data is protected of bustle, in my nose is axes to small, this assu small was a fit my face, but I just had like halfway because like fall like kissy from a glass. Well, I feel like it could double as like a costume, too. If there's like a surgeon and some kind of animate like you can just pretend you're a surgeon from that show. I don't know true. But it just like people eight people just like just Jim Parkway at sometimes conventions on nasty, and then some people like, oh, hi five. I used to be a high five. This is great. And now realize we lost hands it. And now the new start getting worried about like all the germs and follow people's people is being. Oh, I got complex me. I guess, at this convention for maybe give them to me. Hi fi. To me hugs. Yeah. Usually people are, oh, give me a hug all hugs, free have high FIS all this stuff here. I'm like people are all high five. I'm like, nah, there's like. No, come on. I learned lessons giving high fives to do or like people deals. Are usually like just tap me. My shoulder desk that yeah. That's all I love it. You don't get like a high five no more me, and my friends more, and it's nothing personal. Oh, no. It's not that mathematically on nothing. It's just it's a business decision. I call it is a business decision to pretty much like, hey man, not getting Bislett, but I'm just hey man, just nine at the moment. I just don't want to get sick. So tell me a little more about the business side of it. Like when you go to these conventions now like what are your goals as far as like? I know you do some press there. Yes. Of course. Yeah, tell me a little bit about that will usually I would just. When we get access to cover the convention, I want to know that, okay? See the guest list and go with the department head of the press to figure out, okay? Where the timeframes that we can interview with this with the voice at the with guest having convention. Yeah. So just pray months, try like is there a group sessions or just one one section's just pay much of pretty much try figure out? No. What, what, what timeframe I all disguise Bedwar eleven like, okay. Well, let me Lanee plant, they lie. Okay. We have an interview eleven o'clock interview like as suppose three o'clock. Okay. That envy will ask to a half hour, you get that done, and then prey much like, okay. Going buying a day. My do some stuff around the convention side. Maybe look at like no, like the do Dillard's moons, he was stuff is, is judge, how long like this is like what they. Have access to like check out the ours. Allie Mae seeing like the local artists like all pretty much like, channeling offices. They're trying to sell this stuff seeing like the price range. Yeah. And they are pretty much like okay, well, other stuff like the panels the video game hall like how is all like, okay if I'm like a new Congo where the stuff I need to be at is. Okay. It's at this location next of this room next to this research. You're, you're kind of helping people like schedule out there as. Yeah. Like figure out, what are the most important? Yeah. Laying panels to go to exactly like also like oh, yeah. This photo shoots of like for like keenum hoist. Oh, there's a foles you keenum arts. What time is it? Okay. That's like seven okay. Well seven PM at this location. Okay. Well, if I'm going to go to this Pamela, by you wanted, like may give some times leave like these, like other half hour before ends, depending if it's like our pan. They locate who how long will travel do you do. Do you have suffered you, you Buffum dismal? Do you want to jump back off the hotel room or if you just go there by public transportation? Yeah, they must be like, okay, well, do how long have you won't be there? Do you own by everything? The first day they had to lug everything. Yeah. A lot of logistical. Yeah. It's just like a lot of things that come into play that you had too much like we have to check and balances and okay and to do this, this, like usually for me. Like, I, I do I check out this room before have my interviews. I check out the Desmond. Do a quick lap around do a quick lap in the all this alley. And like the room onto a creek nap and there to see, like, okay, what Steph I'm gonna check out check out this honest at this table, because they have nice shack is I wanna get. But I'm want to see the price drop off Sunday. Yeah. Oh, famous Sally. Oh, I like some of these ours, someone like premiums by some pans and stuff. Okay via game room. Okay. Maybe one place in ten minutes or blind playing. Games. What game to have? We're on the tongue mass back, maybe I will see like by east post players like pro players that pibe here for some like a turnament whatever's, I, maybe I'll see a friend made you mom. Like, hey, can be hit with me. I'm stuff to consider such a compact amount of time Jackley. So you've ones who plan out day this net. And we have like euchre friend boyfriend. You wanna pick out like days light. Okay. Spend time with. Yeah, exactly. And what we'll what you wanna do on one do this. See this X Y like just these different things. Okay. It's a playoff different different Danes. Because sometimes like with me, I usually just okay. Planned out in a group of friends, if I'm checking here at target democrat stuff up Ramos. Okay. Let me just like enjoy the con-. Some time to relax enjoy it rather than hustle. Yo. Yeah. And just like on. Let me go back to a hotel room laxed our e something because you'd be like, oh, I've been like. Yeah. Been like on my feet since like a long time. Get some few in my body for lay on today and see how things go. Well, let me ask you this. If you can answer this. What is the most awkward encounter or like situation? You've had at one of these anime convention. Can you think of one off the top of your head? I my media's of going to these different conventions. I have some funny funny, interaction people. But has to say the most recent one was the room. I was saying my friends, his on my friend's girlfriend. Broder guest was was with us by I met this guy before. So, yeah. Okay. A who's who guys? Oh, this was his face on girfriend brother said, okay well now met her. So he's all year but them to Dana. Okay. Cool wherever so he just knew guys could be be river's. Okay. Cool on school. Painless go be a mine on just like hey, just doing my convention stuff. Yeah. Viewing by walking around check on the dismal deals, also, but also at the time I was caused playing too, at the same time. So because guy told us shoot at twelve and my okay. Gaffe. Oh, this you at Trump. It was felt dairy of you haka show song says the main care. After some. Okay. Cool. I love that show. Yes. Oh, my got my outfit on, like everything is okay, like just ready. It's just if anyone know I have a yellow shirt with jogging pan blue navy. Blue geography has like black pants and had taped on my Rhys, but I took the tape off because it was sticking to my skin. So I'm like, yeah, I'm on. Have it like all on them by other China slowly take out like hairs on my resume. Now, just eventually, it was like it was too title and let me just take off. So for people don't know I have like tattoos on my I have like a baseball shirt right now with show, went out to buy have like a half tattoo on my left side. And on my vice I have a bicep, I have a bicep tattoo in, like, like, in my in the bicep I have another tattoo so pretty much of a by have tattoos. So under sending. No because they've got like. If you go to these different conventions some people got like tattoos on the arms or not, but not really all day or they cover up tattoos. I g got to cut my tattoos plans playing gay song. Just walk around the convention like this room. And this guy was like, was taking pitches of like the items of like the sales dill's Ville. Yeah. And that's a big. No, no. You don't go. There's a ru in like vengeance. You don't take pictures of like items. A is either you think you are stilling? Yes, film, they designs or pretty much just like there's this is like the place where they kind of show this is what this should be a that you make it they, they come in, and they bring majority of the time, make sure they leave. Nothing is trying to make sure they're like, hey, if you buy all the stuff people like from, from Friday to Sunday, if like if I sell all myself, I made coffee. Yeah. In the is someone taking pitches of my items and they go. Week, duplicate the same items. Dan? That's cool. That's not all and end the legal berry, legal and sky was taking bitches items. I saw the signs it, please do not take pictures of the items. Yeah. So I was like I went to a hey man, scare for I don't take no pictures because you kind of get told for that. And also, the number one, you get I know this your first convention, excuse me. So I don't want you don't get yellow and we'll be like, hey, this guy's taking pictures. You think he's still might desire doing this guy favor the famous Nola? Hey, just he's. Oh, yeah. Okay. Cool. Thanks for letting me know this. My first mentioned so. Yeah. No. So I only in trouble is okay. Cool. So he's a hey, man. He's like, hey, man. You got sick tattoos. I misheard them 'cause in Lao Vincent hall because he has softwares yet. He said, I have. Sexy tattoos. And I was like I stop. I was like, what? Okay. I don't stop here. Yeah. Al's like old old, okay? What am I took it back? Like, did he just I- sexy tattoos? And they the way, Allah, I went to my friends like Jesus. I secretary twos. I never had a grown man told me that has sexy tattoos. Yeah. Unlike this is just off the way late. Hey man on my no. You knew. Why are you say I have sexy tattoos for? I'll sit there like sold the like what? Okay. Well, I think I need to pre slab. Need to pretty much like ask them about the one ask them because they'd be like, oh, I didn't say so this, this, and that and now finally no, he said sick. Okay. That's much better. They're like, well. And I think part of it too, is probably they're putting your ego. And check your like. No, they're not. They're sick. They're not sexy. Yeah. Only okay. I'm like all these sick man as he was like saying, like, oh, I just appreciate awkward at okay. Like, but do we like, are you coming onto me? You know, me also like you saw in my shirt off. You saw me with my. We saw with this on for the past our soul. Why not address the Bill? I hate me. That's awesome tattoo. Yeah. Number like cool. Look. I, I seen. I, I saw another grow I if I saw, like I'm Walkin to stranger if I see someone were awesome tattoo for. Hey man has some awesome tattoos. Yeah. Everything say uses like. No. Well, you know what I think it probably was. Here's. Probably distracting, you're so that you would tell them to not take picture. Yeah. And that do me off. We actually liked your tattoos. I hope Phil. Maybe they'll say at premium free good money for all these that now. But it comes do me on guard. I'll kill to okay. Let me try and figure out and we set my mind to pretty much this. But, like go be hilarious Lloyd's. Tell tale too late. Yeah, I thought he says, sexy, and he actually is, so it was like, what in my mind sales like try and put the map again like how my tattoos sexy. Those wanted trying to figure out how my tattoos or sexy, I will have no neck, and we're gonna Montana Montana to death on check. I just have flowers on heart of rows of fish of forest, and I was like I said, okay, I'm so to Sean, plus part of this is sexy. That's one of my what part is the sexy. He listened. My chest. Tattoo is he's up of my left side ago. My less, I'd have to get the house, leave my side. Side is just like the coin fish don't like what sexiness, you talk to the fish. I I'm pretty sure or the roles this rose problem, it'll be the deadly. So that was like what? The other time had to say was someone confused me as a different and makers like oh, are you from this view game? And I'm like, no from this anime. Oh, yeah. But this big game where the same outfit of say, okay? I think I'm gonna game talking about, but no, no. I s interpreted. I implement this. I'm from this end may here. Okay. But it'd be cool you from this from this game I was like, okay, now's like for fair, fair. Okay. Let's say from this game. Do you wanna take a pitcher year? Mandibular. Awesome. Okay. I guess you just really wanted to take a picture. He just just wanted you to fend him his Bill this care from this video game. What's that straight before we get out say alright? Okay. Sure. No. But this is the beginning referencing the cantor wear black jeans. This is maybe there's a difference. But okay, let's file there's an important distinction. Yeah. Bothell is kind of cool. A touchy moment cosmic for years ago as, as taskmaster had little kissed come to me. Give me hud's analysts like what else in the like I'll anti hero. I have kids that all attacks messages. So great, it gives you also knows like okay, you should be right there, not supposed to be me, but okay, cool is that you might favorite hero this, like, what scientific word that our hero for house, like, had to say care days kid. The always be like his favorite anti hero. This is so weird though is kind of on cured down. Yeah. Somebody last question for you before we have to sign off here. I since I don't know too many anime shows, I'm interested. Like, could you rattle off, like a quick, top five for us, some recommendations or stuff? You've been watching lately. Okay. Yes. Beckmann people. So if you into our case, my personally top-five on cowboy bebop that will say is really good one. It has nice good music the storyteller. Also it wraps up the goods. Good twenty twenty six twenty seven episodes, and you can watch it like dinner. Drew does not be like, oh, wolf ascendancy knowledge, just once he's done. Second beyond recommend is Joe bizarre. Venture is one. The is the day, we as OB a pretty much all the ages famous busy pieces of, of the series but they. The only focusing on the bird part of Gioja bizarre injured, but they did the enemy of it, and they are going through, like part, one part, two part, three four point five, I recommend people always watch Gioja bizarre venture because a even though it's like Manley is like, oh my God. These polls his dick colors, and the schemes all like beautiful. But at the same time, we're in the Centric. And my point one is such a slow burn because like us again, I fell can't give a chance like Joe's bizarre bitch apart. One is a slow burn like that. First one phantom blood is slow is not like this at all. Like, like if you watch like our four five is like, oh, it's completely different. You have to do that, first part. Yeah. Of course. Are they kind of like setting up the pieces, and yeah, they send them like a story, I'm bills like part, one is like only like seven eight episodes. So it's like like done like after that they move onto part two. Okay. Let's establish these characters in this bloodline and this bloodline will follow. Through EJ every part on, I got three more. I will have to save something goofy, so too. So awesome on a dial always kind of joy. Because it's this high school. Bob, the premise, most of it's like all girl, high school, cast, and alcohol is focused on, like it came out, like in, like midnight, mid early to mid two, thousands and just focusing like all these different school girls pretty much. There's no main character is just all these different girls. So it's like an ensemble on samba cat. Yeah. Like this, this, my just tell night, like different different days different things happen to these different group of high school young, ladies and just highlights because some of these characters like okay, this is just not appeal coming. Is this is silly? Is this a entertainment sue, like it's warm hearted silly continuing the highest thing. Yeah. On my top. Favorite enemies is. City elevator. That was like pre mersal. Those like each episodes, like thirteen fourteen minutes was commodity high school and the different divisional. Is it might have like one of my favorite enemies because a they have a care of the nave? Freddie, Freddie looks like Freddie Mercury all my God. That'd has a guy. Looks dead on my frame mercury. He doesn't talk. He just imagined animated half. Mercury doesn't talk a sometimes it's posted like framing mercury has a microphone and just like the typical free mercury screen the poses, it doesn't make no noises. I just this strong guy with suspenders and like some dress, pants black on black shoes on anyone. Okay. This guy looked indicate like in the first episode like what is this guy? Name. I'll know unnaturally high schools doing really, he seems oppose it seemed like he's a non just bad ass. Oh man. I think we should call. I think I have name on a war of should nail. Think of Chicago. Freddie, like Freddie. Freddie, freddie. Okay. Freddie and is like a drawing of Freddie Mercury like would like with the yell like with the yellow jacket like seeing the Michael ninety two okay? And then Nestle the other classroom classmate is a real like, why does it go related this high school is all this random stuff at this Adamy very much is like, what is this a normal enemy? And the main character is what was like, okay, I'm a smart student, how they end up in this high school and to watch the monger in the read the markets and find out a realized that he took the test like, because he was trying to help. His frantic people say, hey, you go into high school, okay? Tell you what me you going to take this test at this high school, and then we go high school together at the same time. It's the okay cool to, and then he passed the test, but his friend had pass the test. Oh bombing. He was like saw enough, because I in going to this Dilek high. School, which I'm not really a delinquent on just a nice kid. They had to fulfill of violate to fit into with all these day rank. It's like being me up, but they only to be Monday, pretty much like so how tough they are all this other Vandam this, it's a silly dumb anime, but it's a wrong as I wouldn't call again on Cromartie of Romani highschool. Oh, they did a live action with life. Excellent is okay. But I prefer the anime because just like the sameness of drawings like all this random stuff, always happens. Also, they have on classroom classmate who's a robot. Not sure why you of over. But there's a okay in may get destroy. And then he just gets smaller and smaller like, why is he a smaller? Okay. She will wear all of these others are all usually not like storylines. Does it makes us the okay? Well, I guess this happened. I love surreal stuff. Yeah. So we're running out of time here, but just two more right out the top row are Phoenix. My and I have to say on try go awesome. Tell you. Yeah. And all this these description for people to check out, but yeah, we're about at the hour, Mark here. So I think I'm going to call it time on this. I could talk to you about like anime stuff forever, though. Yeah. Good. You talk about an may I usually a person likes to talk like they are conversations about different. Yeah. Well, you have to have you back on to talk about some other stuff. Yes, been great all that, you definitely know more about anime now. That's good. Oh to by convince yeah, yeah. So any of you out there, going to conventions, like, take it from Lorne? Yes, we're plan your day out all playing day plant, you, we get because as it can you'll be Kim can go by superfast realizing wake up is Sunday. What did I what did I do by? Exactly. All right. Well, thank you so much. Come take me by.

Netflix YouTube Roger Ebert Lauren Jones Freddie Chicago Lou Gerstner Dan Ramos Joe Rogan Hulu Vandam Annan Dozo Wesley Telford Wes Japan Thursday island FOX Bob soccer
402: Watches & Barbecue

Back To Work

1:23:40 hr | 2 years ago

402: Watches & Barbecue

"I'm Ron how are you? I'm finding how are you? Pretty good. All right. Thanksgiving. Good. Good. It was good as good. You know, you you you. Yeah. The kids school you gotta do stuff. It was good was any anything memorable. Foodwise that you want to report anything you would like to discuss. I rediscovered gravy. The gravy gravy. Not great for me. It's got a lot of flour and stuff in it. But boys flavorful, you know. We you know, we do. Now, I'm a pivot you ever you ever have spatchcock chicken? No. I don't think. So I sure what that is. What's the Hanway spatchcock chicken is a hell of thing is that where you rip rip the chicken open across its sternum. Well, it's where you have someone do that for you. You could do it yourself, but we have people for that. And we've started obtaining I told you before we like the air dried chicken Airdrie chicken is huge that real crispy makes less smoke. The air dry chicken is huge. Well, it's a big improvement over just whatever chicken in a bag. You pie. Airdrie chicken, first of all real great. But this batch cock spatchcock is where I don't know how to describe it you basically cut out all the insides and what you're left with is like four, depending how you cut it six eight beautiful pieces of actual chicken. It's kind of flat. And it's the best. I'm terrible. I don't worry so much about man stuff or being a man. But I am I am embarrassed that I am so bad at slicing poultry like I've watched videos about it. I've been taught by my sister-in-law who knows how to do these things. I still always mangle the chicken with this Egypt. Get your sharp knife, and you can just like slice up the breast into little strips. It's amazing. It's amazing special chicken. So we'll have that and most gravy. But the thanksgiving holiday was good. It's very early here. Dance for early. No thanksgiving was good. We did a little bit of visiting outta town. We did some hanging out watched a lot of king of the hill. What was your holiday like? You know, it was pretty good. Actually, we had my wife's in laws your house while not. No that would be my family, wouldn't it? If it was my wife's in laws. It was my wife's family my in laws. Your wife's in laws. That's right. It's very early. I guess they came and stayed in our house out, you know, sleeping on the beds in our house that kind of thing, and and so that was nice and that we all got to spend time together as a big one big family. And we got barbecue at one day, and we had a Turkey, which we don't I don't like Turkey. Don't like eating it. I feel like that's been kind of emerging sentiment. This year has been people out in selves as people who are sick of going along with the trend that everybody just likes Turkey a lot of people are are saying this year, you know, I don't I don't actually like Turkey. Well, the the only way to fix it for me is to get to a whole smoked Turkey, which you can get from. There's a few places in town new them, and that then I can turn and I can eat some Turkey. So that was good. That's what we do like smokey flavor. Wind up. It's good. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, I like making some kinds of food that are fun and even easy to make it home. But there's lots of food that I think there are foods that we have to admit to ourselves. We'd prefer somebody else. Make for us. You know? And I think that's that's a good thing to note to know, the kinds of things you actually enjoy making an eating versus the kinds of things where it's like, you just like a trial Turkey can be kind of a pain. I can tell you. Now. I don't like cooking anything. At all I used to enjoy it. But my love for cooking is. Is gone away. I don't I'm just thinking about food. That's four kids a kid far as I just have the one before it had a kid. I think I thought a lot more about cooking at home. But now there's just so much like you've got to put food in the kid's face by a certain time. And it's just this ongoing relentless rally yet so different when you're like when you're cooking for yourself or for a loved one and under another an adult spouse of some kind, and and you're like, oh, yeah, we could do this. And we can all let's make especially when it when it's with your kid, and they're just like starving looking you like, I need something. Like, you know, we're having hotdogs in the microwave. I know I know it's a little bit. Like the way going to the bathroom was when she was three. We're like there's two conditions. I absolutely do not need to go to the bathroom. And I'm dying. There's no middle ground. Right. There's no like listen listen to Peter and go to the bathroom now. No, no as more like find find fun and everything's emergency food or like, you won't hear a word about food all afternoon. I'll try to get her to have a snack, which he comes home from school before dinner is being prepared and serve not Ryan Sunday. Not during dinners preparation. That's the wrong time to eat his neck. Then you have no idea what I'm fighting here. Absolutely. No idea what I'm fighting here, you it's either it's either like so so I've been like SUV eating like say, like a rube roost for six hours or whatever not an act of six hours. It's past six, right? But I'll be you know, I I am the. How does one say I would never want to see I do more than my wife because I don't. But like I do a lot of the taking care of what happens in the afternoon and evening because she has a big lady job. That's I have made my life the way it is. So that I can be that particular man and parent, and sometimes I will try to make something nice. And I'll do veep thing called like have prepared like, and you know, me I like everything to be piping hot. Yeah. Done at the same time. Oh that's pill about it. I was going to say there's nothing wrong with that's commendable. But some people put the problem with the kid thing is like let's say even before we went from urgency to food urgency. There is still this whole like, oh, you know. It's like when you sit down restaurant and you get crackers for the kid, and they're always just eating a little bit. They're like little deer kneeling on trees. Yes. And you like hang on. I want all the food on the plate piping hot at the same time. And then we eat like people said going on here a bunch of hobos. No, no, it doesn't work that way because the emergency situation. Dare dinner. Whenever I. Yeah. You know, I just wanna I just wanna say that. I commend you. I commend you on this is a fee, and Dan, I don't know why even bother I think it's great. I think you should insist. I think you should continue insisting that half the time. I'll be we'll be sitting down enough said, where's where's my my daughter? She ate already. Well, how why did she? She was the only wake me for the important meanings. Tell me what's going on here. Now tell you what I will suffer gladly is. If you are legitimately starving, legitimately bronchial. I'll give you watch goodfellas because that's two in a row now, no two times. I will I will abide a rim of the starch if the starches done early, and I'm I'm not like you. I like starched I still like a starch with the meal often that's a noodle. Because my daughter likes the noodles say, you know, what you can have small Ramic in a small Remco of the starch before we eat. But you know, what she'll do she'll go she'll go self serve as I am as I am searing. The thing that I have been SUV eating six hours. She goes up and just casually opens the door treat yourself to or gain chocolate chocolate up routine. Drink excuse me. Madam. Who in the world? Do you live that you walk up to a refrigerator and treat yourself to a chocolate treat as I'm literally serving dinner, right? You're plaguing the food. Oh my God. And I here's the problem. You know, I love my wife. We've been for many years we've been there for for nineteen years. And I I love my wife, but she and my daughter are snacker. I am not a snacker. I eat twice a day. And I stuff my face twice a day the most unhealthy way, and that's how I eat and I want popping high and they're not they snack deers nibbling on the trees. I don't like that at all. It's difficult, Dan. It's very difficult. But anyway, love my family. Thanksgiving was good. She was only sick at the very end kids seem to get sick at the end of holidays. Yeah. But we we forced you to go to school today. So she's fine. I had my I had my birthday day hanging out with her at home yesterday. It was actually really nice. Oh, yeah. It was your birthday. Yeah. Doesn't matter. We I don't celebrate birthdays. We so we did that we hung out yesterday. And she was a really cool kid and and. He'll child is a nice child a six shot is no fun. But healing child getting better very very very loving child and other have dribs and drabs of deer nibbling all day. Some noodles chicken soup when I make no we we get the fancy chicken soup. You know again, right? We can. But my wife likes to get this gonna live gets this kind. It's real nice from whole foods. It does not have noodles in it one downside of having these in the soup as you make guess or imagine or no is it gets all starchy. So I hate the suit that makes it thicker is bad or good. I mean, even gonna Stu you want that. But if you have chicken soup, you don't want it to turn into some kind of like cornstarch slot in cube. And so I will heat the noodle portion separately from the soupy portion, and then will commingle them will be served piping hot together, Doug any gratitude for that. None zero panel notice it, but if you took it away, if they when when she goes off to college or something and comes out lost childhood loss, aversion. You know, they say they say, they say that's one of the freakonomics were much more of adverse to loss than we are into seeking gain more worried about like, I don't know exactly the science on it. But I think children are like that they're monsters, but it wasn't my holiday and now we're back area. Yeah. Very early. I I need to start preparing better. I did some preparation, but I did not do a ton of preparation. I had I had something I could bring up. There was interesting. Do it. Interesting. I haven't things I have I have eight lines eight lines in my buffer Vicent one. Dan, what's on your mind? These days this hap- this happened. This just this morning, but things like this have happened before. And I find it to be I find it to be interesting. So I in running fireside one of the things I have to do is support tickets where someone will have a question and not all the support tickets. Are there's a bug or I tried to do this. And I couldn't make it work. Can you help me that happens, of course? But a lot of the tickets are a lot of the support contacts that we get our people who just they have a question, maybe they're thinking of switching maybe they they differ question before they they're in the process, which they don't know what to do, you know, that kind of thing just general questions, and then we also get questions from solicitors people who wanna partner people who are, you know, all the normal stuff that you would imagine a business would get and, thankfully, how do you who's the producer? She also does a bunch of support tickets. She helps out by doing that. And it's incredibly helpful to me. But I think there are a lot of people who are on fire side or trying it because they know me from this show or. From the podcast method show that I've done in other words, they're signing up. Not just because it's fireside, and it's a good platform. But because it's the one that Dan made and they like, Dan, which is great. I mean, that's that's wonderful, and I'm pre- sheet that but there was one guy who contacted us and he asked a series of questions and had doing doing her job answered them in in the support ticket that he sent in. And apparently though that was not enough for him. Even though his questions were answered because this morning on Instagram there were a series of direct messages. Private messages waiting waiting for me. Now, I'm selling a watch. So I just go in and respond to everyone in some people had questions about the watch. And then there was this. Because that's kind of like your watch place. That's watch place. Sure, we're a place where you enjoy and talk about you share watch Instagram is for sale. So that makes sense for somebody would kind of right because I put a picture up, and I said this watches for. Sale DM me for information about it. So there's a handful of people that did that the watches sold, by the way. And I saw this guy and any a question. He's saying, Dan. Hi, dan. Dear Dan, he actually said dear Dan, I said, hey, what's up? And he said, I I I need ING your information. I am needing to talk to you. I said, well, you know, he said, I said, okay. And he said, well, he's at I sent in a request to you. But someone named Hattie wrote me back. I said, yes, I said it's that's her doing her job. She's doing her job. She's writing taking care of support helping out with support. And he is, but I, but I need you. I need access to you. I need to talk to you. And I said I said I said, well, I said this is my personal Instagram. I don't do support or things like that here. And we I said we've got a channel for that. And it it sounds like you're already in there as it. But if you have more questions, you know, please please ask I said, but here I said on Instagram, I mainly talking about watches and barbecue. I said I said we can talk about watches and barbecue if you'd like, and he said, well, I said, but, but if I said if you need help would lead love to help you, but it just has to go through our support channel. And he didn't like that. And he said, but I don't want to do that. I want I said why? And he said because here I have direct access to you. And I want to talk to you. I said, well, that's nice. But this is you know, this is the right the right way to do. It is to go in and files take it like you did and we can answer all your questions there. And he's said, but you love the podcasts. And and because you love them, you should help roughly equating the actual like pace and content. Yes series of exchange. It's not like to tax like an ongoing. This is over having conversation about the conversation with someone in real time. Now almost real time. We his question was he doesn't have if I'm remembering this, right? He doesn't have any money, but he would like a fireside account because he thinks it in about a year he will have some money, but he'd like to start podcasting right now. So could could he have an account for free? And if things go well in a year, he'll he'll pay me back. Okay. They call it a proposition bet, right? And. And and so I don't do that. If you want to sign up to a customer, you can just sign up, and you can pay like all of the other customers, or maybe you could save up until you had the money or you. You know, there's other free solutions you could use in the meantime, and then when you have the money come come be a customer. But that's and so I didn't remember who he was. But then when I went through the support tickets, I saw that he's basically just asking for a free account, and I should do it. Because I love podcasts. So I thought that would. But this is something that's fascinating to me as a stepping out of the minute and the details and thinking about the bigger picture is. You know, this is something I think when we look at social media, one of the things that I think a lot of people like about social media is it takes someone who is a celebrity. I a person who is in some way inaccessible otherwise. And now they're accessible you can get access to them instantaneously. And it's not even like writing a letter or even sending an Email to somebody where you wonder, oh, where's that going to go? It's just it's just gonna go way you feel like here, you do kind of have them captive in a way. If I wanted to talk to Mark mothers bought I could like DM him on Instagram and be like, dude like freedom of choice, man. You know, it you you you you spoke to me, dude. Like he doesn't wanna hear that. I don't think, but there's nothing there's no barrier for me just direct messaging him that. And I know he'll it'll get which is which is substantially different from. Out response where he said, I think so I got I substantially different. Anyway, that's that's the situation. And so I mean, I'm trying to make a fine distinction here. Like the person you're describing who you know, doesn't mean anything. I assume doesn't mean anything treacherous or unkind is even just by having that exchange with you that bizarre that inscrutable exchange Instagram. Yeah. Is asking for a lot of stuff. They may not be aware that they're asking. There's the big ask which is like they want the free account. That's a separate issue in some ways. But they're asking for like an ongoing they're asking for you to pay attention to them, and they're asking for you to interact with them. And like I said in kind of frustrating way, they're unintentionally asking you to have a conversation about the conversation. You're having right now. And I think you know, you're expected to be kind and civil about that and be very just fine. But it's kind of where you are. Right. It's like the nature of your query here is like what makes people. Well, it's kind of like it. It's. It's kind of like having someone call you. If you just if you're just complaining, that's that's not something we're addressing because I have a lot to say there's there's more to it the way that it kind of feels like is like if somebody called you and you didn't answer. And then like there at your house you like when you pull up you know, what I mean? And it had it's like I've had that happen to me in real life. Well, you weren't you know, you didn't answer your phone. So I came over. Well, like me not answering is not an invitation for you to use another means of of contact. And and so there was there was another. There was another guy on this is unrelated, but it's similar because it overlaps with the social network and business over social networks. Again, like on fire side, there's a contact page. There's an Email address it says if you have any questions, you're thinking about signing up or you just have questions click here, and you can Email us, and we get the Email and again like usually tatty that's going to respond. I if it's a question that she can't answer or doesn't know the answer to all all get assigned that ticket and all answer it, and like we have this process for reason. And and the reason is this. This means I get to focus on working on on making the service better, and she can focus on helping people who who are having trouble. And then, you know, taking what she's done, and we put it into the fact, and the fact gets better and fewer emails, and like there's a whole there's a whole thing. But you know, there was a guy on Twitter who apparently he was tweeting to the fireside dot FM. The fires FM account on Twitter, and he was asking questions to that. And admittedly, like, I'm barely on Twitter at all anymore. I just don't really use. It all tweet about shows. I'll just tweet about other things. But I'm not using it in the way that that we use to when it was fun. And and awesome. I don't even have an app installed on my phone anymore. I I mainly go there. I'll look at it. And then I'll I'll go away from it. And you know, I understand the importance of being on social media for a company and things like that. And I would suggest that maybe fireside is suffering as a business because I'm not voting hours a day interacting with people about it on Twitter and advocating for it on Twitter and telling everyone in tweet blasts, tweet storms and tweet threads how much better it is than other ones responding to every single podcast issue and responding to. Question. But the fact is like if you're a customer, we make it is super direct and straightforward how you can get help. If you need help, we make it easy for people who are interested in the service to ask a question. This guy didn't Email though, he was just tweeting the account just tweeting to the account, and then and then apparently he discovered that I was the creator of our side, and oh this is the same person. No different person. But it connected a second. And so he tweeted to me his looks like your. It looks like you're the founder of this. I've been trying to contact you guys for a while now. And I said, you know, like, okay. Well, you know, there's a contact form. And that's that's the right way to do. And he's a cool, but I'm asking my questions on Twitter. And I said, well, you know, in in my opinion Twitter is a is an awful place, and I'm not really here very much. But we may you know, here's how you can ask any question. We'd be happy to answer your question. But he said, well, forget it. This looks like a side project that you're not really serious about and it's probably going away. And and so, you know, otherwise, you'd be on Twitter answering my questions you'd be advocating for your service evangi think it where us evangelizing it all over the place, and the fact that I'm not on Twitter evangelizing. It means it's a side project. That's probably kind of go away. And an and he just he can't he can't be expected to like sign up for services clearly that people aren't really behind. And and so like this thing you're not gonna order dominos because it's not already in your kitchen. But all of this is very very odd thing to say that you I mean, I do I think that guy his initial thing makes more sense. It's not unusual at all to tweet at a company Albany, not at all I've I've done that. With companies tweeted into the blue about plex about ring doorbell or about all these various things, and in that case part of the complexity is there's the corporate brand. And then there's the help part of it whether the Comcast or the post office, or whatever, and you know, look for help in the name frequently in the header for that Twitter account. They will say if you're looking for help, you know, go here, but you know, in all these cases, there's a similar thing. Which is that. And maybe understandably, but I'm I'm I, you know. For sequel. Listen, listen to the let let me just read to the bio of fireside FM Twitter account podcast hosting analytics by podcasters, four podcasters Twitter's for fun, please these the inap- support button. If you need help that is the bio for fireside. Well, why should he have to read that? Right. Right. Well, no. I mean, I'm I you're you're venting. And I totally happen to agree with everything that you're saying I'm just saying to advance this as a field of study for us. Let's what that person expected first of all you don't want that customer. No. You don't you don't want that person? I mean, that's will be that. Would that would come a little further down the line? But I'll make the big reveal is like it's important. You not have that person is a customer, and it's equally maybe almost important since you are one or two person or three whatever size small is that you mustn't you mustn't take it personally or emotionally because that way lies madness because in the same way that you don't want. You would choose not to have your s man not everybody's allowed to. Contact you all the time, and they're not allowed to change the way you feel that I think is important. We I I think it's important to try. In a mindful way, not to carry that around with us because some people who are dealings, and that the person sounds like ding Ling, maybe they're sad. But like he's got his reasons he's his his reasons are I shouldn't have to read that. I am. And he actually said that he could find no other way to contact us. Well, 'cause that's have several bullets. I've written down while you're talking one of them is and this isn't old just not for us. But like it is very rare. For a stranger to ask themselves. If a stranger wants to move in passing through the ri- like if you is rare to in my experience, that's one stranger seeking to have contact with another stranger. It's rare for them to consider. What is the most convenient way for this person to receive and respond to this message rather than what is my preferred and convenient way for me to contact and the I don't think I coined this term. But there are people who like to turbo they liked to go straight from like the idea of like the term could I speak with your manager. Right, right. They need to go straight to the top. Now. I have to be honest with these people. It would not surprise me at all. I gotta tell you so often if I'm feeling a say it feel emotional about it somebody's been real, dick. And I feel emotional about a for a second and somebody complaining about something that I don't have any control over. I'm going to argue. I don't argue on the internet. Right. But you know, what I will do click on their username, God love, the fourteen followers. And. Almost everything in their account is about some combination of sports and complaining about companies in a case last week. I don't remember the user I went and clicked on this dealings profile and the bile on this was something like, you know frost. Dr valid ber this account mainly exists for me to complain to companies like it's not even that's not even their main account. That's the one that they use to bitch strangers. And like that I saw that. And it didn't make me mad. It didn't make me sad. It didn't make anything accepted. Everybody's navigating through this complicated world in a way that makes sense to them as John Roderick says we're all making our seven sided lighthouse made of dreams everybody's coming up with some way to cope, and in that case, maybe that person feels disempowered maybe feel sad. But there certainly are lazy. Let's be honest about that they're lazy because they are not legitimately trying to solve anything. They're yelling into the most convenient clauses that they can find. And then getting mad that Barack Obama isn't responding to them, right? Isn't that part of it? Like, what is the problem? What is this inservice of is this inservice of you getting what you need to make a buying decision about this product. Not really if you really if you were a grown man, he would go to the website and read up on it. You would do your basic due diligence. So like my first bullet in response is like I I long ago gave up on trying to fix other people. I have chosen to focus on improving myself. Right. So rather than me saying here's what everybody else should do is stop at took down. I took down my FAQ's on how to contact me. I took down all that stuff. It you're pushing a rock you are by its very nature of the worst. That human being is the lower. The chances are the will do even the diminishment amendments mount of research to find out what works for you because about people. And so like, how can I be better about this? And the way I could be better about this is understanding what problem I'm trying to solve used to say, right? Like, what problem are you solving? And you know, what level are you trying to calm? Push that. And obviously that person's not doing that. I don't want to be mean. But that's that's just that's a sad tomato. You can't help us at tomato. So I I would say, you know, in my case, I try to catch myself not doing that. Because I don't want to do that. I don't want to contribute that bad energy to the universe. It's unnecessary end. Like, but we get so wound up in these platforms. We get so end up in these exchanges. Who knows what kind of day that person had? And now, they're loaded for bear. And they're gonna yell at Dan. And then try to make you feel bad about yourself and your business, which is really crummy thing to do. But that's I try to catch myself saying you do what you wanna do. But I try to catch myself at that point and go like when what what problem I trying to solve. I saw this person to my mind has not really identified framed that addressed a specific problem there just is a pure ball of emotion right now going allow myself to some you know, what is kind of dumb ac- like I'm gonna turn into the big bubble, gum, wad of hair, and anger. Like, I don't wanna. Do that. So like when I try to catch myself, and like sometimes I'll allow myself my rules is once a month. I'm allowed to be incredibly cutting to a stranger really good at it. I'm only allowed to do it once once a month, and I tried to count on the deal. And then I never hear from that person again because I'm really good at that. But I try not to do that. I'm trying not to do that. Because I can't change people. And so in some cases, for me that means you know, what I bring up the shields, there's all kinds of taken down a bunch of contact forms. All this stuff. Half of our Email this week on back to work half of our Email our dealings wanting to talk about getting their person on the show. Yeah. As we said, we'll we say this periodically. We don't really have guests on this show. We certainly don't have CEO's on to talk about some up. That's what am I going to do? You know, I told you my honestly, my most nightmarish job a job that I feel so much sadness, and like battle Hoffer are the people in the TSA line. And this is this is somebody who has to stand there. For however, many hours six to eight hours and say to people lazy gentlemen, once again, if you have any liquids over three ounces needed to take get rid of that need not have any liquids. You gotta take off your shoes. Here's the rule of the month about whether a pad has to be in the bin or in your back because that changes constantly, right? It's the ultimate is a fan job. 'cause you know when out of ten one on a five people is still not going to remember or hear what that person's talking on right rested that person's career at that job is going to be dealing with people who either mostly probably unintentionally, we're not following what the rule needed to be. So what's he gonna do? We could become real sour and yell at everybody. Or you just say, well, it's a living. Like, this is the thing that I do right? I don't know. I'm sorry. I'm ranting. But but here's the big thing. So one is like the if you're improve as a human being that you the listener like ask yourself like what am I trying to solve here? And how really solve this. Is there any chance at all that this isn't a thing. I need. To deal with kind of just let this go. Right. But just imagine yourself just like opening fingers and saying I'm letting this go this is not a thing I need to do. And if you need to do it like address it as a as a somebody with respect and kindness toward whoever you want solution from because they're a person to right. But here's the raw truth raw truth is the kind of communication these people asking for does not scale up for anybody who is Grindal. It does not scale up. So before you go to Dan on Instagram and demand on his watches and barbecue feed that you talk about the business ask yourself. How would that scale up? If this were me and some people just love talking to strangers. I don't in that case damn mentioned it has five of those day. Now is that because you're doing it should other people? Do it is this the great way to get to Dan or whomever doesn't much as Dan, but whomever like it doesn't scale up. It does not scale up to you, man. People step into a little shed with you and talk for fifteen minutes at a time that. You cannot conduct your life like that. And it's unreasonable to expect other people to one reason we pay the big bucks to companies like it's an Omni group is that they actually do lavish a huge amount of attention on support like an improbable amount of extremely good support. That's why you pay forty eighty bucks for an out because if you have ever problem, they are so gonna take care of you. But boy, it's a lot to expect out of every stranger is that they stop what they're doing that second and talk to whatever's on your mind right now, you are if you do that you are a menace your a psychopath. You are a maniac and don't be surprised. Like, no wonder you're such a tad set tomato who would wanna talk to you. You're a bad person stop doing that. That's my feeling on. But you can't carry it around with you. I'm venting that because you're venting. No. I like you're doing that. You do that you do that. But it's just my goodness. There's so much opportunity to intentionally or unintentionally disrupt somebody else's day. What a horrible thing to do. Like, why would you do that somebody? But would you why would you why would? Behave like that. I don't know. Like like, you got your reasons everybody's got the reasons the terrible thing in life is every man has his reasons and that I found that to be very true. It's it's certainly been borne out in elections and in life is that everybody thinks they're doing the right thing. And I don't know. I don't know. But like, you know, we can't change everybody. But we can we can try to improve ourselves. And so we could ask ourselves like doing to make federal case out of this do need to demand somebody's attention right now. Do you really need to speak to their manager? Is that really going to help just pay the extra for the guac and shut up and leave? People. Yeah. What could you if you chose to do differently to guide people to other channels? It sounds like you don't want to be on Twitter all the time talking your company, not least because then encourages people to talk to you about. It says like I'm a guy who likes to talk to people, and I don't mind talking to people. But right now, I'm really hard at work on to really really big features. And once they're done I'm going to be able to take a break from building new features. And of course, always fixing bugs. But I'll be able to do more. I'm working on some cool things for that. Are I'll just call them podcast resources that that will will be really nice that Pete will help people with fireside people who don't give a crap about fireside, but wanna know about podcasting. It'll be good for that. So I, and then I imagine I'll take more of an active role in in in in things like Twitter. But I don't really know. I mean, there's the big contact link. On the website. And so if I was the way, you know, I may be the way I approach things is not the way other people approached him. I I ag- knowledge that, but if I was interested in in a website, if I was interested in, you know, all pick on I'll pick on fresh books. They're not sponsoring this week. If I was curious about fresh books, for example, I would go to fresh books dot com, and at the top there's a link that says contact us just like there is on fire side when you click there there's phone numbers, which I don't offer. And there's a contact form an Email address info at fresh books com- if I had a question, I would just click that and I would type it, and I would hit send and would go away. And then hopefully, if they're a good company, they get back to me. And if they're not a good company, and they wouldn't. But I wouldn't I wouldn't my first thing wouldn't be I'm going to go on a social network, but this brings up a bigger thing for me. And that is and this is also I think something that has to do with my age and my generation, maybe. I don't take social network what you're going to say. And I already. Because I whatever you're about to say to be true. I can promise I don't have such a different idea about so many things nowadays. It's shocking. What people think is totally normal to do. I don't think of social networks as as too serious. It's not too serious for me. Like, I don't think of Twitter is like a serious place to go to have real discussions with people Twitter's for like fun and goofing around and you talk to your friends and here, look, here's here's a picture of an airplane. That's painted to look like a shark. Isn't that cool? Look everyone look at this sharp plane that's Twitter, and I don't I don't take it seriously. And I find that other people. Let me say two different way people from my Arjun ration-. I think take it less seriously than people of younger generations. Maybe I'm wrong. This is an anecdotal observation. But like for me, it's it's not a primary form of communication by any stretch of the imagination. And if Twitter went away today, I wouldn't be very affected by it. I can see it has its uses. But for me those uses or entertainment, it's interesting because you can you can make a film, that's very important film. That makes a statement about something or sheds light on something or teaches important lessons, or you know, there's a lot of movies like that. However, there are also a lot of movies that just just are there to just make you laugh all give you two comparisons Schindler's List and pineapple express and pineapple express both of them are movies, both the made money. Both of them had famous people in them one has a very different purpose than the other one. But for me, I don't find like I'm not going to say, well, we're having important discussions on Twitter. I just don't think of it like that. I don't go there for like that. And so, but I realize again Merlin that I'm probably in the minority here. Now, I think a lot of people do take it really seriously. And it may be the fact may be that to to be as successful as possible. I have I will have to be on Twitter, I'll have to be evangelizing onto it or or at least having that account be interactive and responding responding. That's a new word responding to people in these needs to have some kind of a persona to almost there's a required is that how business is done today. I wanna paraphrase something that has I've heard credited to Roger Ebert, and I couldn't put my finger to it now because I can't type on during the show, but something that I've heard attributed to. Roger ebert. Something to do with looking at what a film is about. But also how the film is about it. Right. So I mean, this is I in the rat king of my information about Roger Ebert this feeds into this idea of like how he likes to evaluate every movie kind of on its own terms. Did it succeed at the thing that it was trying to do but phrase circus on I've talked about a lot is like what is this thing about? And how is it about it? And in this instance, I think one way I feel like and again, I'm another old man, I'm gonna even older than you are is that you can look at when you look at a platform that somebody's on you can look at what the what? So he's when you think of the content that somebody's posting somewhere. There is a content. There's the what it's about. But there's also the how is it about it? And I think one thing you say, whether you take Twitter seriously or not this pretty general. But like what I will say is this gets into the persona part is that younger people do seem to have more of a persona that they create and stand behind. That's just I'm the guy that always replies law. All. So for some if like myself like for better for worse. Yes. Sure. Manicuring and trying to like have Typos, and but like in I definitely have a kind of persona someplace, but I'm but I'm the way what it's about. And how I'm about are pretty close to who. I actually am like I don't say that many untruthful things, for example or say things like I'm not like putting up like a finger under my nose. And I like it's a mustache that is me posting that I feel like for some people. The irony is, I guess what I'm trying to get at length is that you may look at this as you don't take Twitter very seriously. But very serious about not taking it seriously. Now, I think the funny thing was some younger folks is that they don't want to admit how effing seriously, they take it. But they're persona is so glib. So like LOL like that you know, what I'm saying? But what is what is you? If you if you post LOL eight hundred times a day. And you're not a bought you're taking very seriously because that's where your time. Casual is you wanna be as as many like, you know, black lady response gypsy wanna post like, however, you decide to be like low key animate icon, sixty nine like, you're taking it seriously in that you are spending a lot of time there, your persona is spending a lot of time there in that case that pursuant is you I think we you, and I may not take very seriously, but we're very seriously serious about on. Seriously. We take it, and I do feel like I don't know if I'm putting this. Well, but I do think that's a distinction. There's a kind of a chronic casualness to the way a lot of people younger than us conduct themselves because they've grown up with it. There's a digital natives part of their life since they were children. And there's a kind of studied I don't give a. Fig to the way that they spend eighteen hours a day on the internet or with video games or whatever. That's that's one thing. And so it is difficult sometimes to communicate with somebody on a platform where you are taking it with different levels of seriousness or where you have different of commitment to what this is four. And how you know what it's about. And how it's about it. And and you can lead to a lot of friction. It will you're absolutely right. I totally agree with you. And and I think you've really kind of hit the nail on the head. And my question is is my attitude about Twitter the same as if somebody said to me, oh, I like emails not real like, I don't take Email seriously. If you're serious you'll right mail letter or I don't take phone calls seriously. Like, if you're serious, you know, you'll meet me in person. I mean is that what I'm saying is that I'm simply behind the times by not acknowledging that Twitter is now a replacement for other forms of valid communication or than. Extension of that. Because I definitely have gotten help from the US PS when I tweeted to them about a package, but guess what? I did. I I called them. I spent an hour on hold. I got disconnected. I wrote them emails on their contact form a day or two went by with no reply. I tweeted them out of utter frustration, and they provided a little bit of help over Twitter. Now that you know, I was surprised because here was one of the oldest companies of all replying on Twitter and actually trying to help even though they weren't successful. But. M m I, you know, am I having the same kind of response by saying to people on Twitter. I don't take this medium seriously for for this kind of thing. And also, I would say how how idiotic is it to expect? I know we have more than one hundred forty characters now. But how the Arctic is it to expect that anything real could be accomplished or resolved in one hundred forty characters. I know we're beyond that out, but still how much can you really accomplish on Twitter. What can really get done on Twitter? The answer. My answer has been and maybe I'm wrong, not not so much. So so little and it's like if I told you all you could do flash in emoji at me while I did stole new communicate. Now, as I just flash emojis of people like that's how I communicate like, that's where all my friends aren't talking about flash on in different people doing a lot of different things. Yes. That's a Big Joe. Yes. My question response to your question is a question, which is well if you were thinking about it differently. What would you need to change because you're implying that like, oh, you know, you're you're kind of asking like am. I an old man. Who's like not up with times kind of? I feel like like, what would you if you've if you've found that you did think about it differently? What would you need to change? Do you think there's anything you need to change? Or is it just your own self understanding of yourself? And how you I would say if if if the collective response to my question is yes Twitter is a real thing. And it's valid form of communication and in order to be successful to have a successful business. You need to be on Twitter and interact on Twitter and be responsive there. That's that is just as important as having a website or having an Email address or having a fax machine in the old days. You know, you you see in in in the nineties eighties and nineties you couldn't have a business unless you had a phone line and a fax machine like that that now we can have a business. We got the two things we need and end today is is having an interactive Twitter presence the same as having a phone line of website facts, which I mean like be glib. I'll be the law guy for minute. Well, the s the same question about. Paper. I mean with a piece of paper, you could write a really good fart joke draw the hulk or write a resignation letter or wipe your butt with it. I mean, the paper doesn't change based on what it's being used for if at all. So I mean, maybe I'm being glib there. But like it depends. It spends on. I mean, it's such a big thing. There's so many people using it for so many different purposes trying to figure out what it's for is madness. That's it's it's I mean, I just all be like voices in my head like trying to figure out like what is for how I don't think you need to change anything about what you do. You think you need to change stuff that you're doing? I don't think it's I don't think it's a problem. I think you're understandably frustrated with this. I totally get that. But like, you you can't change other people you I mean, it's I mean, I don't think you're legitimately asking will my business failed because I'm not on Twitter all the time. I'd be surprised if you're asking I think, you know, the answer to that. Well, it hasn't failed so far, right? Right. So. So I mean, it's what would it mean? Better. Would there be greater because my my response would be well, I'll hire someone then social media better. If you did that why would you think it would be better? If you did that. You're saying hypothetically is that three -ality that I'm missing I don't I don't know. If you really asking that. Maybe you are. I think I think you're understandably frustrated about this. I'm cure because I understand the fact, you know, the fact is that I might I might simply be because of my perspective for my attitude about it on my thoughts about it. I might be missing out on an opportunity, and like, you believe that I don't think he believed that I do know I do because it we're gonna hire someone to get on Twitter four, and that that would be that sort of thing that would be my response would be all hire someone to manage the social media accounts. I know someone that does that for a living and. Do you have enough traffic of that kind that that will be worth money? No, I think you know, the answer to this the answer to this is like do do your job. And like, and you know, here's another side of this that I will cop to is that I have to be really dead, honest with you. It can be very frustrating. When you know, you need to like in my case, not saying this with you. I'm not seeing anybody in particular. But it is sometimes frustrating to deal with the producer or to deal with the assistant can be real frustration. Because a lot of times that is mostly a source of white noise and someone's life, it's very unempowered person who only has the ability to say, no and no ability to actually negotiate things like scheduling, something I have I have plenty of experiences every year dealing with people who say talked to my assistant, and well, you know, what I'm actually not gonna talk to your assistant you want this more than I do. Why don't you when it's you grow a pair? And like talk to me about the thing that you want to do I'm not going to. Go on a fishing expedition to figure out whether Thursday's good for you. And then have a change because that person is not empowered to actually negotiate that with that said the reason a company is a company is that if it's an optimized company, even if they two person company, it was a one person company it's optimized around the best allocation of appropriate resources for doing whatever that company does. Now, if you're good at your company, and you're good at business business business unit. Stand one understands what it is. You're trying to produce you understand what success looks like if things go. Well this month. It looked like this. If things go poorly this year, it'll look like that I will know corrections to make I will know how to allocate resources, I know. This sounds really obvious. But that's what a team is like you don't call call up HR and asked for a role toilet paper. That's not how it works. If you were in any company my wife works for very large university. That's extremely compartmentalized into different areas. And like e because you know, the culture of the company, you know, how bananas it would be to just stand in the washroom and yell for somebody to bring you toilet paper. Ever. Let alone them to bring you bring your lunch to you in the bathroom. Right. It's not how it works, but normal slick civilians out in the world have a very strange idea about how to get things accomplished that doesn't change anything. Like, what what changes like, you still need to be the don't in the room and understand what it is that you're trying to accomplish with your business? Whether is it you're doing your job or your advocation. You're the one who understands how to accomplish that. It's it's just like you need an infrastructure that will support what you need to. Do you hire the right people for things, you know, this goes all the way back to those David Segal books back in the in the whatever that was in the nineties. The problem of the boutique web design company is that your constantly hiring for jobs. They're going to go away. And you're gonna have to find new jobs, and then do you need to get new people? And there's never the right balance on any given day really the right balance of people and projects, right? You're always like, you're always overstaffed, understaffed, whatever it is. But the truth is that's how a company works. You know, that anybody who runs a business knows that they understand all these funny examples that I'm giving involving bathrooms all utterly makes sound stupid to them. They of course, the understand that like there's a reason that you we have a receptionist receptions is very valuable job person knows where a lot of bodies. Are you go to the receptionist because guess what that person does not want to talk to you every time it suits you and the UPS guy talks to the receptionist. So so UPS guy does or gal does not have to talk to the CEO. That's not how it works. You have structure in a company, you go to the right place and any I'm sorry to give abuse term any adult knows that h-, you know, that if you actually want to get something accomplished, you can't just assume that you are the superior principle of Twitter who gets to go out and demand people come to your office right now. It's just not how it works. You Dan is like I think you're being a little you having a little fun here. But you know in your heart. She don't need to do that. If you do need to do that. Then do it very minimally get an intern and have somebody who can do that for you. I don't think you need to do that. Now. Now, at least because you are at a size. I imagine we're you still want be picky about who's allowed to be your customer. It's a huge thing. In arguments with podcast co host like I get not arguments, but I have spirit of conversations with people about the stuff in my life. I refuse to let grow. There's so many things in my life. I could grow that. I don't want to have grow their where they need to be. They will be maintained it will get better. But like there are so I'm an old enough man that I'm very picky about who's allowed to screw up my deal for what seems like a good deal to me. Like at first, you know, like I used to say about John Colton sites so much respect for him because he's really picky about LA who's allowed to screw up his career for Nichols. You've got to be picky. You've got to pick. You don't wanna be dick. But you've got to be picky about who's allowed to have your time. Who's allowed to change your thing? Who's allowed to nip yet your emotions because you let them and until you have. I mean, what he went to turn into like some kind of like you would turn to Gimblett you turn into like over. Hundred person organization. We're like kinda forgotten who you are. No, no, no, no wanna do that. I don't think you could get a kid to go do stuff on on social media. But then the question becomes you'll know that's gone great in three months because what has changed? Do you think that will minimize the number of dealings who were just asking stupid questions that they could go look up somewhere else will know, except now you're paying somebody to say sorry, we couldn't help you. You know? I mean, I don't know. I don't know. I just I think when we let too much of the world get in through an open screen door. Like, you're in for a world of pain. You you cannot let those people into your into your mind, you might allow them into your business. But you mustn't let them into your mind because you'll just you'll become a really sour sad person. If you'd like. Well, the dealings run your life. I think you're good. I don't know. He seemed good. I think it's all right. I mean. Fifty three minutes. My goodness. Yeah. You about something you like, but I'll tell you about something you like, it is the molecule are you telling me about the molecule tell you about the molecule tell me about the moment you with the molecule is a complete reinvention of the air purifier. This is not just an improvement on existing and I must say outdated technology. This was developed by scientists who son had asthma, and he was frustrated by the fact that hemp air purifiers didn't help his son. I mean, that's the whole thing that they're supposed to help. But they didn't. And as a result. He started saying, you know, what there's gotta be a better way. So he's he he spent twenty years developing completely new and totally effective way of removing indoor air pollutants. And and this is this is a very cool device. I have one of these, and I believe now you have one of these well, your producer Heidi was kind enough to listen to my pissing for months, begging them to send me one of these the jackals. And they did did as ever I am reluctant to. Stipulate stuff about science that. I don't know. But I can't tell you something about some crazy ass timing with receiving this thing. All right because funny thing happened, we are were in receipt of a molecule we've had it for I don't know less than a month now. But you know, it's crazy. Is it arrived right before the the name of the camp? Fire the smoke from the giant higher. Oh, yes. Arrived of just a few days before the air quality in San Francisco got really bad. So let me just toss out a few quick things here. There's an something called the by the equality index where you can think of it as a number, but you can just basically mostly displayed with numbers like his cream blue yellow, orange red or purple. There was a day week or two ago where San Francisco had the worst air quality in the world. We had on a given day worse than anywhere in Asia worse than anywhere in India. We had the worst air quality. We were purple with the worst air quality in the world one day. That's horrible. It was real bad. Wait, I want to steal your thunder, but put the molecule on your front porch and within an hour, California with all of -fornia is that what how about still getting thanking the school was canceled for a day. Oh, everybody's wearing ninety five mass. I scoffed at first, but in the time, the three minutes, it took me to go from my house to my office to record reconcilable differences. My eyes were like audibly water how bad, but here's what's interesting about that is we we were in receipt of the molecule right before this is not I can't promise. Your results are going to be like mine, but it was crazy interesting. So at first I was like, I guess this things I guess this things good. I won- with this. I bought something called a fubu. You can find in show notes, which is. An air quality monitor. That's pretty cool like internet of things air quality motor. So I was able to see how well the molecule was doing. Now, what's crazy was I brought this thing in in the middle of the battle. And it was it was doing real good at like bringing down to oxygen CO two levels bringing down particular matter. And in the midst of this this friends of mine were like moving for days going to other places because they are quality was so bad. It was like unlivable, but our house did mostly okay. At our thousand square foot house did did pretty good. And the interesting part is finally win the air quality got better outside. Then then you could see the difference because this thing had no problem gobbling up all kinds of stuff. And what's weird is you could really notice what was contributing to the air quality problems inside of our house. So like when you cook and run the oven. You can just you can see. The PM just go nuts because there's all this particular matter in the air. I don't know. I think this pretty amazing. I'm interesting mission to see like what happens a year from now. But like it has been a good addition to our home. I can't prove this was science. But I'm pretty damn sure. This thing saved us a lot of pain. That is awesome. Yeah. It was pretty wild. Again. I it's it's so hard to tell with stuff like what causes what? But based on using that to monitor the air quality. It seems pretty clear to me that running this thing especially in boost mode when it's really bad. Yeah. Really can't make a difference. I feel pretty confident saying that'll do that for a room, but even through most of our house, I think it really made a difference. I, you know, and again like all we can do is say, what our own direct experience of it is this thing has, you know, we we have we don't have any one with asthma in my house, but I have some allergies. And and sometimes my daughter gets that to an and those seem to be mostly gone. And also like I said in this is anecdotal. But it's. Seems like we've been less sick. And like the one time when my daughter got sick. No one else got it. So I you know, is it coincidence. I like to think it's the molecule. But I'm glad I have it. Let me put it that way. There's a couple things I've gotta tell you. The the about the molecule that it is. Introducing a breakthrough science that actually destroys the air pollutants at a molecular level, this is different from regular happe- filtration. This is what they call P E, C O PICO. Which stands for okay? Here is photo electrochemical oxidation nanotechnology. So this gets rid of allergens, mold bacteria, viruses, airborne chemicals. It destroys them. Unlike happe- filter, which is supposed to just capture them. This destroys them, including things that are thousand times smaller than the hep afield or can even trap. And and they did all these studies with allergy suffers and they've actually the studies prove that it helps it proves it. It helps people with asthma one customer even to the she's able to break through a nose for the first time in fifteen years. So this is this is a real thing. It's the research is backed by the EPA. And and so it's been tested by real people like us, so go check this out, you can go it's spelled a little different. Instead of the see there's a case. So it's spelled M O L E K U L E molecule MO L E K, you Ellie go to molecule dot com. And if you enter the code back to work all one word, you'll get seventy five dollars off your first order. This thing is great. It's made super high end. It looks beautiful. It's this kind of beautiful aluminum cylinder with a cool. Blue light that you can turn off if you want. Looks like a foreshortened leg if you can imagine like, you know, at Neil that bit in an airplane. It's an airplane. It's one of the Abrahams movies when when the guy answers the phone it's like a foreshortened phone like a Orson Welles shot. But it's he picks up the phone to actually really really big it looks like a big Amazon echo. It looks like a beautiful apple ish app. Very Alpi product with pleasant blue light. I can see that the movie you're thinking of his top secret from secret nineteen eighty four that should be our show art. I will. Okay, make it. So Dan, if I'll tell you this speaking of companies, buddy, if I had an office somewhere like some this is the kind of thing, I would definitely put in my office. Has three different modes that can run on and has like a sleep mode. It's very quiet or silent mode. Yeah. It has the auto mode and as the boost mode, which is a lot louder. But it's doing a lot more. It's moving a lot of air. But man, just having this thing in an office running in like auto mode would be very pleasant. It would be a pleasant way to have a little bit of white noise. But also just much better air quality people far in the office animals. No, no. All right. So so go check it out molecule MO L E K U L E molecule dot com and the promo code back to work, and we have had a few people on Twitter tweet us with pictures of their new molecule. So if you get one, you know, what there's a social network opportunity. Tweet us a photo of it. And we will we'll check it out. But be nice about it. Definitely be nice. It'd be nice molecule, thanks kill book. Now was it that there were two gags in this movie and on the answering the that is the one there's also the one where the guy has the magnifying glass up in front of his eye and he pulls it down. And he's just got a giant. I. Oh, that's good. Yeah. This is the Moselle Kilmer. Yeah. Oh my God. There's a thing. Todd vizier. He did front of the show. Todd I shot. He's he's talked about this incredible shot. It's like, it's it's Val Kilmer spoil it. But I mean, it's an old movie. Val Kilmer sitting on a train looking out the window. And you see the train pulling out of the station. You don't talking about c like, but then they pull they pull back and the station is actually the thing that's moving. It's on wheels moving away in Val Kilmer train, sitting spill, it's such a brilliant affect. It's like, it's gobsmack. I love your show are right there buddy that guy now. Well, anyway, trying to be nice people on the internet. Not gonna kill you. What do we got here house? He has. He I ipad working. It's great. I've really really using it quite quite a lot. I got a new case for it. Because I I'm still waiting for Logitech to come out with one of their really good cases and in and I went and I looked at the apple ones. And they were they were really nice. I'm not I'm talking about not the keyboard one. But just the regular folio one free for eighty bucks. And I thought well, I'll do something. I don't usually do usually with this kind of stuff. I'll say, you know, what I'll just get the apple. But I thought maybe I would give one of these other ones a chance because they're so much less. So hold on me, the grace grace here it is. It is the. Gosh. How does how does one even pronounce his Z to- top Z tall T O T O P? And it I half the reason I got this is because it's so fricking weird. First of all the the logo for is in show notes on add let me add this put it in here. I got it off Amazon I think it was twenty three dollars which is very much less than the price of the hoped. Shout. My gosh. Okay. Hold on put an here. It is almost now. It's shuts twenty three ninety nine and get a few different colors and two four two. No, it just said there's an air mass. Oh, right. Because the thing in the URL on my God. Oh, no. I know I read text. Trying it again. Did you check your? Do you wanna shoot January gems up today? Gems gems. All get it in the show nuts momentarily. But I'm gonna send you the URL. Just write your struts in your rails. Just struts check Straaten's. Okay. Psalms pensions. Alright sorting I said to you. So you can you can see this now. Wow. Yeah. Three bucks, three bucks. That's bananas. It looks the same as the apple one. Yes. And it is it is Z top case fry had pro Levin inch twenty team strong magnetic ultra slim minimalist smart case without asleep slash wait. Trifled stand. Cover fry pro Levin inch twenty eighteen black black due to talk to Tom. And so okay. Anyway, that is that is the thing and pets pretty, and then I had pretty. It looks looking. I love looking at it. It's so fricking print aids. Really cool. And so this one the reason I got this one is because just like the apple one it has it leaves the sides exposed. So you can charge your precious pencil, and and I thought okay, I will get this. It's twenty three dollars. So I give it a shot. And I was actually really pleasantly surprised with it. But there is a major flaw, and I might wind up sending it back. But it 'attaches very securely to the ipad. It opens and closes very nicely. And it's the one for people who aren't imagining this. It's typical ipad case, which has the three panels that fold together. So that you can prop it upright or prop it and set it up. So that it's angled slightly facing up toward you that makes sense. And and so that's that's nice. But the only problem is the end of the panel that is the one that's that essentially keep when you open it that keeps it in the position that you said it in. That magnet doesn't seem to stick as well. And it will wind up flapping itself open sometime which is interesting, but you got something to market so quickly. I I'm I. Hundred. I wonder if they had the leaks some ZIM some Michio men men quo's endlich, some leaks, and then they kind of like speculated on where that stuff with being just a tiny bit wrong. Welsh wonder I do wonder I had the same thought. And but the packaging on this the logo is so amateur and so bad in look at the bottom right corner of it. And then the other thing about it is it says on the front of the box. It says z to- top case comma elegant and Royal boy, and there's no space after the comma. I gotta send you a picture this. There's no space after the comma. Okay. So it. Yeah. It just makes it just the whole feeling of the whole thing is, but I think even for the twenty three dollars. I'm going to have to I'm going to have to send it back because that will that it just doesn't stay open wanna stay open. Does this mean I gotta buy the apple one cuts expensive? I guess I do. Oh boy. You see and Royal Royal. Oh, that's bad. Oh elegant Royal elegant and lack of space between the is really upsetting. See maybe. That's okay. And it says it's made in China. It's all right. I make that logo very upsetting logo. Oh my God. Oh, no. This is set very poorly. What's the space between inch and the open parentheses? Oh, I'm close window, man. That's bad. Shut it down you send it back on principle. Yeah. I might I might have to. Yeah. I love mine. I just put something in show notes for folks, check out you if you're a nerd with the pets stuff, you probably already know about this. But okay, here's here's one thing. People may may or may not know, did you know that when you use handwriting for example in the FM notes app notes when you will not turn it into text. But it will how does how does one describe it. It doesn't like transform it into type. But it does recognize it for search purposes. I don't know how many people know that. If you start jotting noted, I I realized that the other day when I wrote a note just wrote baba, blah inside this note, and then I saw over in the left with a list of notice that detected my handwriting and turn it into the words to give it a title. Did you know that in notes? No, I did not know that it's wild. So it does not transform it from handwriting into text, but it's somehow indexing based on handwriting recognition. And there are that do all kinds of. Stuff with that. I wanted to point to one that is an awful lot of fun. Just got a real nice update. And I put it in notes if I can find it. I'm clicking check out. It's called Neo me. Bo yibo. No home with me Niebolo v. I miss them. So while you were gone. I'm sorry knee. Bow Neil is your me. My script. My script dot com is slash Nabil. It's notes boy. This is a neat up and Federico off even find Federico's article federal John wrote a up update on this update. It's really cool. It's weird. This is not what handwriting recognition is not what handwriting recognition on tablet will look like in twenty years. Right. But it's pretty cool in two thousand eighteen so the mode when you're in one of these pages is you just start writing, and you can see right above where you're writing it's instantly turning it into a preview of what the Texas when you're done writing that paragraph or the bullet list, or whatever you hit convert and it turns it into actual letters. It also has this bananas thing you can add it has math ability to like do like if the kind of person who. Does that you can do like, you know, math calculations. And it'll do that. It's got a diagram functionality where you like draw a basic, circle, you a basic square. You wanna make a flow chart, and then you double click on it. And it converts it in snaps to whatever shape that really is. So it looks like a fairly realistic. Yeah. It's neat. It's neat. So I would just say if you've got a capable this works with the old ipad Neil old pencil as well. But if you're interested in seeing the kind of neat tricks. You can do with a pencil of whatever kind on whatever. Kind of I pet pro trainee bow my script dot com, it's a really neat app. And I'll find that Mex stories articles like him. Mek stories Niba. Yeah. I love mine. It's just the little big for like laying in bed. Yeah. You were saying that. But is it worth it got it? If you could if you could press a button, and it would become the smaller one. Would you do it? I think he wouldn't. I'm gonna got the one I got I think I mean, I'm gonna tell you know, that's how we are. After we've spent money on something we spend the rest of our lives trying to defend the choice that we made. Yeah. No. It's the thing is is the main way for me to evaluate it is as against the I ipad pro which was improbably large and my wife, still loves it. But it feels so silly to me. It's the ipad equivalent of the seventeen inch MAC mecca pro where it's like, oh my gosh. This actually is very silly. If you go back and pick up an old seventeen inch macbook pro it seems very very very silly. And I know some people some people not only like that giant size ipad. But would like an even bigger one. I mean, there are there are people's people out there that would like an ipad the size of an of an I MAC ably. Sure. Understandably, I guess, but no, I I I have tell you. It's funny. It's been a while. I'm trying not to exaggerate here. It's been awhile since I've used something for this many days and weeks, and I'm still shocked at how beautiful it is. Yes. Seriously is such beautiful piece of design the pencil. I mean, the pencil on the side is still a little wonky. But watching my daughter jammed the puzzle one into an ipad pro bold ones in charge. It just as I'm sorry. I know you guys out there. I knew my friends and bloggers. I know you guys love apple and you don't think it's silly. But it's silly. It looks really stupid having. No, I pencil coming out the bottom of an I totally stupid. Put in so anxiety producing you're like, oh, this looks this lollipop is so dumb. I really do agree. And it's something it's the one thing that I haven't like people people say, oh, you can attach it and throw it in my bag, and it stays attached. It doesn't it really doesn't really know. It really doesn't. It's it's okay for. But like if you're going to use it holding it, I know people like Marco, hold it a lot in landscape. I tend to hold it in portrait if you're holding in portrait mode. You don't want that pencil on there? I don't know. It's weird, especially if you have the eleven you can hold it at an any you can thumb type if it's in if it's in portrait mode, kind of kind of maybe years might be a little too big. But on mine, it's duels will baby Hans. Yeah. And so yeah. Just I trying to think of another way to do it. Like what what was another way to do it? What's another way? It's wits definitely way way way better the actual the actual white pencil. So many people talked about this. I don't wanna beat to death. It really is quite beautiful the texture if he'll be great to hold. I mean, it's pretty much the same point as before it's still the pencil. It is registering the pressure not the screen, which is such an interesting twist to me. But no, it's a it is a huge leap forward. It's basically like a new one point. It's starting over with the product the old one just feel like such a caveman thing. Yeah. Yeah. It really does. And I I love it. I the only thing that bugs me about it is. And I know this is like I've never said anything as far as I know. I'm never complained about the camera bulge on an iphone. I just that was fine. Because really I keep my phone's in case, and it's fine. But the ipad. Without its case. It's it's better without its case for sure, and you just I just wanna set it down. And I just want it to be perfectly scaring, I'm gonna scratch me to like if you don't have a cover on it, which I usually do you're either gonna put it screen side down. Oh god. Please don't hurt my beautiful screen or you're gonna put it like backside down in which case. You're incredible camera. Mike it broken or scratched right? Yeah. It's it's weird. It is weird. And it I don't know what the right answer of it is because to me it would be the ideal device. It's just just set it right down and flat on the on the desk. But you re are fishers are pretty good. They're not they I mean, it's fashionable to say oh gosh. It's like only moms it museums that use ipads cameras, but it is really nice to have around and having it around. It's nice that it takes good photos. It needs a good camera on the front because that's how you're doing your face ID. And I I want to double down kill me. I want to reinforce of. That I've said over the last week or two which is that. I do I feel like I don't have proof of this. I don't have benchmarks. I don't have a geek bench. I definitely feel like face. I feel feels way faster and more capable on the ipad. I don't know why maybe the different angles. I don't know what. But I this is much closer to quote, unquote, not noticing unlocking in my experience. Yeah. It is. It is very fast. I love it. I'm frustrated though by it because the fact that I can hold it upside down, I can hold it at any angle that I want and it works infuriates me because I can't do that with my phone. And so the fact is guess what they can make it work because my ipad does it. So why does my phone do it? What's the difference? Is it really? And if anything if anything the phone because it's smaller the camera is actually going to be closer to proper alignment than it is on the ipad. Because if anything I Pat it's like way off to the side. Side. And if you're holding your phone in front of your face, there's a much closer to the center of your face than the ipad camera. Isn't yet. It still works perfect. Yeah. I mean, technical reasons or business reasons, and they're both pretty sensible. I mean, the technical reason might be there's just not enough room to do whatever improvement. That thing had. I don't know a business reason is up circumspect about what decide to put into a product. And I do sometimes stagger. The release of things that we feel like they could put in right now. But it is funny that you're seeing it might be a conscious decision on their part. They actually said we're not going to do this. Absolutely. I mean, I guess someone is a combination of that like, you know, with the with such ide- you're not with three touch like an ipad screen is not going to accommodate that. But then they ended up going. Oh, well, this is interesting. We can actually accomplish a lot with just using change in that too along press. There's all kinds of ways where the business say where? Like, it feels like the devices kind of communicate with each other over time about like what a good answer to something is. And I think they are pretty good at catching up on that stuff and making the improvements. I don't know why. But but yeah, about also say that the tennis does feel faster than ten. It's good for them. Did you wanna tell me about one more thing you like square space? We would like to say, thank you very much squarespace. You can do so much with it. Like, turn your cool idea into new website. You can showcase your work, you can blog or publish content. You can sell products and services of all kinds and promote your physical or online business. You can announce an event you get the idea you can do pretty much anything you want with your squarespace website. They have beautiful templates created by world class designers. They've got built in e commerce. You can sell anything online physical digital you name. It you can totally tweak in customize, look and feel for all your settings all your products, which just a few clicks. It's all optimized for mobile. So it's gonna look good on an ipad iphone as well as a course on your computer screen as well. And now, they also sell domains there's over two hundred domain extensions. You can pick and choose from. They've got analytics that help you grow. They've got a built in search engine SEO programs. You all you have to do. Like like, put your content in and it helps you with SEO twenty four seven award winning customer support. It's all their everything you need to make your new business or your project stand out, and you can do that with squarespace. They have a special URL squarespace dot com slash it's your show. It's your show that will give you a free trial. And when you're ready to launch the offer code. It's your show, and you will save ten percent off your first purchase of a website. Oh, wait a minute. You just came there for the domain name use the code again. It's your show. Ten percent off your first domain name to you, get a website antidote main. You can get a ton of domains all if that's all your first purchase. You get ten percent off promo code is at your show. Support us by going to score space com slash it's your show. And we appreciate squarespace and all they have done for us over the years. Thanks so much s to scrape. Thank you for real to squarespace and Bush do like them they do such good things for me. What a time to be alive. Got some little quick odds and sods let's see just several kind of general things. I just started finally tagging all the things where people have written us about how they're using the ipad for work. I swear to God, I'm gonna get to that. We haven't gotten to it yet. General things people have said, yes, thank you for the people who were kind enough to tweet or Email to say that. Yes, they did not know about the space bar trick. And thank you for making me feel not crazy. And I'm glad you know about that. Now just want to say generally, thanks to whatever a little bit of a log roll. But thank you. Everybody who's written a little nose to say, congratulations, four hundred episodes. I don't track stuff. I don't care, but I do very much. Appreciate the kind words you're here to work. You're you're here to put in the time. So people just get so at their ass about this stuff. I'm glad you guys like it. I'm so glad I think it's very easy to go up one's own ass about arbitrary numbers. But I am extremely grateful for. The people who set high and thanks. We've just gotten some real nice emails from people about that. With kind words everybody time for too much more. Convenient for whom I like bodyguard on TV finish that last night. Oh, you did did. Yeah. She liked it. Good. It's it. I think it's people are gonna have verily really visit feelings on the show. But I was all in. I really enjoyed it too. I like that co at homecoming is what is he starts out as kind of Rami Malik I actually to spoil this. But it kind of has a Harry Potter thing. Going on twenty end that I really like hold on. Nobody ever believe. Harry got something right here. I got something right here. Day Christmas ornament. No, it's a little music box. Just got it. Oh, that's disturbing. Boop. Kind of chilling. Could you don't do that anymore? Chill clown turning and smiling. You're calling me clown. When I hear us you hit box. Did you did you recommend homecoming to me? I don't remember who recommended what to yet? Probably. I mean, I'm watching him one episode from the end, I love it. All my love it. We're imagine. If show starters the podcast. Yeah. I didn't I watching anyway. Yeah. Me to reason. This. All right can kill AVI. Toomer, man.

Twitter Dan Turkey Roger Ebert producer Airdrie Ron Egypt ding Ling Barack Obama Comcast Ryan Sunday Peter goodfellas Doug
Charlie Kaufman - 'I'm Thinking of Ending Things'

Awards Chatter

00:00 sec | Last month

Charlie Kaufman - 'I'm Thinking of Ending Things'

"Hi Ever to thank you for tuning into the one hundred, fifty second episode of awards. Chatter Hollywood. Reporter's awards podcast I'm the host Scott Feinberg, and my guest today was described by the late Roger Ebert as. The most creative screenwriter of generation close quote and by the New Yorker as quote probably the most critically acclaimed screenwriter of his era. Close quote. And he is known according to The New York Times magazine quote for Film. So rich with Sir. Reality. And Self Referential Lunacy that they feel as if they might be spun apart by the force of their strangeness yet Miraculously Cohere Close Quote. Three of his scripts one, thousand, nine, hundred, nine, being John. Malkovich. Two thousand, two's adaptation and two thousand and Four Eternal Sunshine of the spotless mind brought him. Oscar nominations he won for eternal sunshine. And also appear on the writers. Guild, of America's list of the one hundred one greatest movie screenplays ever written. And he has also ventured into directing films from scripts that he has written starting with two thousand eight connector keene New York which Ebert. Called quote the best film of the decade close quote. and. Continuing with two thousand fifteen anomalies a stop motion animated film which he co directed with to Johnson. And most recently with I'm thinking of ending things which debuted on. Netflix on September fourth less than two months after the publication of his acclaimed debut novel at kind. Charlie Kaufman. Over the course of our conversation sixty, one year old and I discussed what led him to abandon his passion for acting to pursue writing and directing. What his writing process is and how each of his scripts evolved. It was twelve years between the first live action film that he directed Neck Deke and the second I'm thinking of ending things. Plus much more, and so without further ado, let's go to that conversation. Charlie. Thank you so much for doing this. I was looking back at my notes. I think the first time I interview was two thousand, eight time to around select key then most recently, Carlo. Vivari in two, thousand, sixteen, which was where you were being honored. And now it's a treat to get speaking you again. So just to begin with, we always ask our guests here where they were born and raised than what they're folks did for a living I was raised until I was about eleven in Massapequa New York my father was an engineer. My mother had been social worker but gave that up when. She got married. and. I have read that as a kid, you actually were very into. I read about high school in community plays an Improv group to the extent that you ended up receiving a I guess a a I. Don't know if it was a partial or full scholarship from your high school for achievement in dramatic arts, and so I just wonder why after starting at B. U. I believe on a kind of acting track. Why did you then? Transferred to Nyu and focus more on writing director just to be clear. The award that I got was was a very small monetary award from my high school. It was a memorial award. So it wasn't a scholarship, it didn't pay for my education or anything. I just I don't know I kind of started to feel harassed about being an actor I guess I started to feel very self conscious and. Now I for very long time I questioned whether or not I had made the right decision and giving it up and I think that I've come to the conclusion now that I did but I did it was a long time coming because I didn't have any career for until my early thirties in anything related to film. So is thinking you know I. Really loved this acting thing and maybe if I stayed with something that I was so passionate about I would have had a different outcome but. And do you ever miss? Acting I don't know I. I've come to the conclusion that I don't think I'd be good at it anymore I love actors and I love what they do and I in awe of their ability to be vulnerable when they're good. But yeah, I'm not sure I think I. Think about it sometimes that for a while there I thought maybe I could do a play or something but I don't know at this point I think not do you think that the so's it was not until you were already some way into college that you made the kind of a change. was there something that you think maybe happened that made you more self conscious than you'd been because obviously you've been, you've been doing a lot of it up to that point. Yeah It's odd I do remember being embarrassed. I went to Boston University which is a big school and has a lot of different obviously different schools within it. I remember being embarrassed when people ask me what I was studying to say I was studying acting I. said I was studying theater because that's how seem less awful. But Yeah. I don't I don't know I remember. We we had this movement class and. It was it the the the school of the arts or the theater school was in this big old building, and it was like like it seemed like it had been a warehouse at one point and the movement studio was on an upper floor and there was a giant window like giant loft industrial looking window overlooking the highway, and there were a lot of construction workers out there doing some kind of work all the time when we were in the class dancing around and it in tights and. Laughing and they would laugh at us and I I was so embarrassed by that at that point in my life. So. I don't know if that's why but that didn't help. So now. At the time? That class by the way. I really like it. I enjoyed it. So it wasn't like I didn't have the I didn't have the confidence in myself to sort of be where I wanted to be right well. So at the time that you switch colleges, how much writing had you done up to that point? Was it something you did for pleasure on on the site or or what sort of writing even if you had I been involved in my childhood in theater writing, theater in writing and directing movies I did super eight movies with my friends. It was always something I did and it was always in the service of something theatrical I did some stand up when I was in high school I did Improv. So it was always sort of like that was always an aspect of what I did and At the time you started at Nyu was it something? You immediately? Were you pleased with that decision where you enjoying the the focus on I? Guess I guess part of this question actually should be did you really go there to focus on writing or was it just also? Would you have been where you just excited to dabble in learning about directing I wanted to director I pictured myself being a writer and director, and maybe somewhere down the road at that point in my life I would also be in movies I remember there was a big difference between acting classes and film classes I I have very, very clear distinct. Kind of colorful memories of acting classes and I don't have that for film classes. I mean people I mean it was like crazy I mean actors are crazy and. Enacting students are times ten and you know people would be disrobing in class and. You know I've never seen anything like this before and It was kind of cool and then it was like then it wasn't anything like that in Philip School and barely like I, mean there are people was friends with their but I don't have the sense of them that I had. The acting students and I still have those people in my head to this day will it seems like the? Certainly a primary relationship that did come out of nyu was and I don't know if it's if it's Paul or pop rock I'm not I'm not. Kids Paul Approach. Paul Roach. So. Can you share how you guys started? Working together because it seems like you. Both while you at Nyu and then for years after really collaborated on a Lotta stuff together. Yeah. I knew Paul from school. I worked on a movie that he wrote that somebody else directed. I worked as a production designer on that and then I shot one of Paul's movies which which I did a terrible job on and I feel badly about it to this day not. Focus is not my strong point. So after after we graduate and then Paul graduated a year ahead of me after I graduated I approached him no pun intended about collaborating on something and we started to write together than and. We had a lot. For National Lampoon. Eventually that happened initially wrote a screenplay and then we wrote another screenplay. Then we did some small things lampooned like. They had these letters to the editor which were all fictionally started out doing those than we wrote these fictional news items and eventually we wrote. Several fiction longer fiction pieces and we wrote A play together which I actually got produced I had moved to Madison Wisconsin and we had written a play call the fat zip which got produced there at a place called the Broom Street theater and we we wrote some TV pilots together to not pilots spec scripts that we we tried to sell. Didn't have any luck getting an agent or had no idea how to do that and eventually just stopped riding together. I did come across one thing which I found interesting, which was you were saying, you know when you don't have an agent, how do you get how do you get your material before people who might WanNa make it well, you just send it around and it sounded like the one guy who actually engaged with you in a nice way was Alan Arkin. That's correct. Nobody ever responded. I i. worked at. The Metropolitan. Opera in their ticket department and I worked at the roundabout theatre. So I had to access to famous people's addresses from Rolodexes at the time and I would just copy them out and send thanks send the my scripts I sent descript. Spielberg. Ripped too Jessica Lang. Other people. I don't recall now but yeah, we sat one to Alan Arkin and he responded and he wrote a really nice letter and. I'm so grateful for that. You know it's like little things like that. That happened along the way when you're struggling for. So long just kind of keep you kind of motivated a little bit absolutely. So at some point I guess you wind up in Minneapolis I know you were talking about. Wisconsin then you wind up in Minneapolis Warden newspaper and I guess continuing to write SPEC scripts and then it seems like for the a key turning point would have been pilots season of ninety one what what led you out to La and what almost lead you away from L. A. Before finally started getting some traction there. Well, I avoided going to La for a long time and Paul and I palled canal to kind of live in Minneapolis for a while and we Decided, we were going to go to L. A. and I bought a a car with all my money, which was a very bad used car and. and. We had like seven hundred and fifty dollars between us and it it died in rapid city, South Dakota and we got stuck there while they needed to replace the transmission, which coincidentally cost exactly as much money as we had. So you're waited there for like two days while I got the parts and then we drove back to Minneapolis with our tail between our legs and that's when Paul and I were still writing together. Then I then I was riding by myself and a friend of mine. Had An agent he was working in Hollywood and? And he his agent said, he would read my materials. So I wrote some SPEC scripts and He. Did I sent them Dan. He didn't read them for a very long time but eventually did read them and told me I should come out to la during hiring season. For TV, which I did I lived in like a someone's spare room in north Hollywood and waited and nothing happened finally oddly I got a job offer in. Minneapolis writing for a Fred. Willard. Cable Show, which was going to be like a candid camera show and I was ready to leave. I was packed and I got a call from get life David. Murky and get a life who asked me to come in and I did and he met with me and he'd read my scripts and he said I said I'm leaving. You know I said, are you offering me job? He said I'm not offering you a job yet but don't leave. So I I trusted him and turned down. The job in. Minneapolis in Luckily. He wasn't lying to me. I. Got a job as A. Staff writer on get a life. The second season of the second lasted a half season I think. I got my door not my not my fault. Maybe. It was a just kind of a Fox Sitcom just to give people a sense if they don't remember Chris Elliott and then but then okay. So now then come something I think fairly soon after that has come up in a lotta different episodes of this podcast because so many talented people came you know were associated with this project that also didn't last very long. What was that? What was your experience as a writer with the Dana Carvey show that was a few years later I think probably around ninety six might experience was that met with Roberts Michael and Louis C. K. Robert was the Creator of the show and Louis was the head writer and I met with them at Brill Stein Gray in Los Angeles and they were shooting in New York and they me. They really wanted me to do with the Shell. I'd have to move to New York and they said it's going to be dark show. It's going to be you know it's worth it. It's GonNa be worth it. So I moved out there and. was a very difficult job for a lot of reasons It was very difficult for people to get their stuff on the show. There are certain people who were favored and the rest of us kind of just got very little on. So I think it was sort of. It was depressing in that way but you know I met a lot of Nice people there I had I have friends from that show to this day and So but the actual like show itself was I didn't feel included. and then having moved your life across the country. It got the plug pulled pretty early. What was your game plan at that point? It was just definitely back to L. A. or were there some second guessing? No, there wasn't much going on New York you know. So I didn't like in terms of work. So I didn't really feel like I could stay there I I did well, I was at Dana Carvey I met with. Michael Types Company about being John Malkovich, they had read the script and they were interested in producing it. So that was sort of like something that started to be in the works I went back to L. A. I got a job on a show I think the next show I worked on last show I worked on this called Ned and Stacey and I worked on that show and find the time I was done with Ned and stacey over the time then Stacey was done. Canceled I. Tend I worked only on shows that were cancelled. That was my specialty. I feel like spike. Yes. In fact, spike had already contacted me by the While I was still in New York because I remember I flew to La to meet with him about being John Malkovich and while I was still working on coffey. So that was already sort of in the works and and. and. Then after that, that was my last show I. Just I made the decision to just try to make movies after that. Yeah and one question about being John Malkovich and then I want to pause and ask you a little bit about just you're writing process but in terms of so being John, Malkovich was the script you wrote in the midst of going between a bunch of TV shows and writing pilots and trying to make it work as a TV writer. It was just something you sign the way it worked for me in the way it works for everybody to a certain extent is that when the season is over, it's different. Now I think TV but at that time, the seasons were kind of like regimented and. I had the advantage of having my shows be cancelled. So sometimes, I was I was there was a period of time between when the show was cancelled when hiring season started and. So I was trying to write screenplays is what I wanted to do. I didn't want to be a TV writer I decided to try to be a TV writer because there seemed to be a path to get to be a TV writer that wasn't clearly marked to become a screenwriter in in my. In my understanding of things. So I wrote Malkovich probably I don't know probably after the edge which was the second show that I worked on. Another sketch comedy show and. And then it kind of kicked around Hollywood for a while and It was the idea was that it was going to be a sample and that may be would get me assignment work, and so that's what I was counting on happening and it it didn't. So you never actually thought that Malkovich would. Be made itself. No. I wasn't even a screenwriter at that point I mean, no one knew who I was outside of TV and even TV I wasn't a big deal. So you know the idea of picking a person out of thin air and writing a screenplay about being and expecting them to be in it. Seemed likely to me I mean I guess I guess I hoped but I wasn't counting on I was it was it was something to write and I think because I was writing it as a sample I didn't really care about making it like fit to any formula. which probably was a mistake because I think they want to see that you can do that but I didn't end up getting an east. I'm at workfront even though people like it. Well. So let's before going further with with Malkovich. Let me just ask you you know these are just some general questions, but I'm curious about just how you go about your writing maybe it's changed over the years maybe not but is there a place where ideas tend to come to you for your scripts? I know you know we did up. So while back with with Sorkin for instance and he says it's in a shower or in long car rides you get all kinds of answers. This question from from different writers I wonder what it is for you oddly enough for me it's in the shower with Aaron Sorkin. So. I don't have a lot of ideas because it's a rare occurrence but. But. They are good when they happen. I would say that I think a lot when I'm walking and and I work a lot when I'm walking probably I have ideas when I'm walking to. Say, that that's where it is mostly and you walk a lot like you like to go walk along. Very long walks where do you actually like to right do you need to be in a coffee shop or something around other people or do you like to have total silence in your own home or something like that I, like coffee shops I mean I can't do that anymore obvious right. But yeah, I like it a lot and I do I did a lot of writing there I also work at home you know but But yeah, it's nice to have things to look and see and people in listen eavesdrop conversations and stuff is always fun. Do you tend to. Where you're going to end a story when obviously when it's an original screenplay, do you tend to know where you're GonNa end when you start or do you outline how do what? What's the structure that or lack of structure that you prefer? My idea about that is that there's no way that I can know where something is going when I'm starting out, you know it's like an exploration of of a thought or an idea. So therefore for me to restrict myself to some sort of predetermined ending feels counterproductive. So I don't outline when I can help it and and I don't know the ending. On what do you right I mean there are people that are still using typewriters just as a I don't know superstitious or computer handwriting. Or? I mean just regular penmanship. What's your? What's your go to? Since I walk a lot I always carry a pat with me. I write on a pocket sized notepad but I also write on the computer I ride on Napkins. On chopstick paper chops to containers I'm I'm looking around the table now what you can't really but the there actually are things like you know like notes all over everything. And then what are you just throw them in a drawer in comeback? Yeah. It's really bad I. Lose a lot of things but on. The notebooks are the are the best in that regard. Because, I have lost them and that's very upsetting when they fall in my pocket I don't hear it. When I'm walking but but mostly I don't lose them. I have boxes of note of those little notebooks. So, when you actually, you know take these fragments of ideas and sit down to turn it into something. How long might you write for on a given day? You kind of restrict make yourself sit down for a certain amount of time or do you just do what feels right? I think it depends on how panicked I am about a deadline or miss deadline I can force myself to write when I was trying to finish this novel I just wrote at it was very very Years in the process of I I would get up and go to a coffee shop every morning when it opened at six thirty and sit there for four hours and right which astounded me and I'd be home by ten thirty having written fifteen twenty pages. So that's good but it's very difficult. I get distracted allied is very difficult for me. The the Internet is a very, very bad invention as far as I'm concerned, it causes me. A lot of problems in that regard, I've spent some time at Lake on you know a art retreats a over the years and they've been very helpful because you're kind of removed and a more productive there. But when I'm home is hard, is writer's block a real thing and if so how do you combat it well I don't know if it's a real thing it's a real thing for me but you know what does that mean I mean? It's an idea. It's not real. I have found. Over the years that relaxing into it and accepting it as part of the process is for me the best solution to it because I have discovered through experience that even when I'm blocked I'll come up with something maybe a week or a month later, which suggests to me that my brain is kind of processing stuff even though I don't know it and often those are things that I'm very pleased with so I, so I allow it to be part of the process. One last process question whose opinion if anyone's do you trust enough to let them read your working give you feedback before you're ready to sort of be done with it. Is there anyone who? Who would those people be if anyone now have people in my life who I show thanks to Yoga they're not they're not in the business. Okay. So let's come back to being John Malkovich of we can I guess three of the first original screenplays being John Malkovich adaptation and confessions of dangerous nine dealt with real people and fictional situations just purely coincidental I don't know I like it. I mean I like stuff like that. I am attracted to stuff like that. So I, I don't know if it's Zanele I was offered the job to write confessions of a dangerous mind. So I wasn't something I saw it out, but I was attracted to it. I was attracted partially to the notion that this is a real person who felt. Compelled to lie in a book about who they were I like that about it interest that that's the aspect of it that interested me an adaptation I do feel like when I came to write adaptation the way I ended up writing it not the way I had originally intended I did think about being John Malkovich and the fact that I was willing and able to do that to John Malkovich and should be willing and able to do it to myself. So it was a thought but I do see that idea like you know I do I do like mixing. Real things and fake things in in my fiction you know. In in. This book I wrote there's real people, but there's fake people. There's real movies and their spate movies and it's never. Explained, which which and I think it tickles me because would tickle me. To read it. Somebody else's work. If I you know if I read about a movie. and. Then that seemed interesting to me and then I looked up and saw that it didn't. Exist that would please me and conversely I've read that people there movies within this book that people can't believe actually do exist that do exist. So I like both of those right and as you say I guess it all kind of started with with Malkovich getting on board with the script of being John Malkovich I guess can you share how that process worked you you just at a certain point? Sent him the script and said, what do you think or did? How did the know how we got it his partner? His business partner miss at Mr mud think that's the name of their company Russ Smith got hold of it. I didn't I didn't send it to them. He got a hold of it and he showed it to John this way before spike was involved and John Rented and then rushed wanted to meet with me. You know that it just kind of went away and then spike involved and Spike went to France to meet with John to try to convince them to do it. John was worried about doing it because. You know there seemed to be problems to him whether it was successful or whether it was a bomb, you know that you know to in inherit sort of integrate into his future. So hidden apparently had a good meeting with spike and then. He was in New, York, and Spike, and I met with him in. New York and I guess he wanted to see who I was and and then he decided to do it, which is interesting because it's not exactly the same thing but. Meryl Streep wanted to meet with me to for adaptation like after she'd met with Spike I. Think they they wanted to see if I was like like an asshole or something I don't know what my energy was right and my energy at the time and probably still but more. So at the time was. Absolute panic I was I was so nervous meeting these people I was so scared. Even after being, John, Malkovich was so successful. Odd. Spike and I, had a meeting with Jack Nicholson about movie idea that we had and. We were meeting him in his house and we got lost couldn't find it and I. think that was it was before cellphones or at least before we had them and I was so thrilled that we weren't going to be able to find his house I mean I absolutely did not want to go there. But we eventually found it. So I had to and what happened to that project you know it's interesting thing this project because it was a an idea I had to do movie about the joker as an old man in a very sort of naturalistic. Sad. Think it was going to be called the joker evening and it was going to be about him. Living this very sad life, and then sort of having the making the decision to go back and do one more thing that it was going to be a character study. It was not gonNa feel like any of those movies and So we went talked him and he liked the idea. This was when he was the joker. So it was a long ago. And he liked the idea and then I I kind of like and then we didn't know if they're going to let us even have the rights to it and I kind of dropped the ball because I just I don't know why I just didn't I never wrote it. To you got to meet Jack Nicholson that's good. So obviously being on which. Worked out very well, and you in spike seemed to have kind of clicked How was it immediately clear? You guys wanted to do another thing together and just added that thing end up being adaptation now I think it was clear that we wanted to work together again, but I took this job. Adapting the orchid thief for Jonathan Demme and and he was at that point I think. It was something that he was gonna direct presumably or at least was considered directing and I I wrote and I turned it in and and then I met with Demi and at Saxon people at his company a few times and I somewhere in that process Jonathan decided didn't want to direct it anymore and I mentioned a despite spike that he wanted to direct any asked if he could. He asked any and they allowed him. So that's how it happened and went along the line. I mean it sounds like it was sort of A. For you a torturous process of adapting something there. For the first time maybe why was the architects something you wanted to adapt in the first place and then how did it evolve into incorporating yourself as a solution out of some form of a of a writer's block there. Yeah I mean I think that? I really loved the book. I don't know if I think it was sent to me I'm not even sure if it was sent to me read it and then I approached them but I love the bug and I loved it. I didn't know how to make it like I didn't know how to write it. I mean that appealed to me I wanted to be like the book not plot driven and somehow I I. Somehow flowers the conversation I had it as played by Nicholas Cage in the movie talking to Valerie Thomas who was really an executive who worked for Jonathan's company is very close to the conversation. I had, and for some reason, they decided to allow me to go off and try to do this thing and when I couldn't I struggled with it for very long time and I was very anxious. And very depressed and very worried because it was early in my screenwriting career and I took this thing on and I took their money I was afraid that was going to be of very public humiliation for me and I started to sort of think about okay. What am I thinking about now? What am I thinking about and what I was thinking about was that I couldn't figure to write It and then I just had this really stupid idea that what if I write about that and when I started to think that stuff started to connect you know but I still wasn't sure and I remember talking to spike and mentioning this to him and he said you have to do it and that was I think the thing that kind of sent me over the edge into it was that. Like this other person who I respected was sort of saying it seemed like a good idea as opposed to an insane stupid idea, which is what I thought it was but but it's funny when you when you hit on something whether it's the right thing the wrong thing. But when you hit on something that Stirs you. The World Opens Up, you know and it did for me with that and this thing that I was struggling with probably for a year and a half I was suddenly able to write. So that's how it happened. Yeah. Few weeks ago we have Brian Cox on this podcast. Were chatting about Robert McKee and just the I got a huge kick out of that aspect of the whole thing and I just wanted to ask you actually Robert, McKee once years ago we had on the podcasts himself It sounds like there was some sort of a an understanding that had to be reached in order to use him as a character in the film. What was what was that he wanted to? He wanted to meet with us and they wanted us to listen to his thoughts about the script which we're happy to do, and the one thing that he said that I think was a sort of a note that we happily addressed. But that was his like dealbreaker note was that it's okay to make fun of him, but it's not okay to make fun of his students and that seemed reasonable to me and. I don't remember if there was stuff in the script that did but I'm assuming there must have been. But if there was took it out I'm guessing there was but the other thing that that McKee said and he was very nice he was he was very generous and very nice and and the other thing that he said that he said he said Brian Cox should plan. Neither Spike nor I don't know if he told you this but it was his suggestion neither spike who Brian Cox wasn't the time and you know it was kind of like we approached this. Okay. Well, McKee wants Brian Cox to play in, and then we started to watch Brian Cox in the Holy Fuck. This is amazing this. Great. And just McKee says that he has a card in his records for a Charles Kaufman course three years before the film came out was that you and was that sort of research for the for the film was that just just out of interest in. Research is research for the film when I decided that he was going to take that you Charlie was going to go to McCain course I went to McKee's scores Yeah tell me about Donald Kaufman, the creation of Donald Kaufman because as one of the great I'm a kind of interested student of Academy Awards history, and here we've got a situation I believe where a fictional person is nominated for an academy award along side you. So just the whole idea of Donald Kaufman when did that come along? Do you ever believe it would go as far as it went? It's interesting. When I started to think about putting myself in the script and realizing the problems of having a writer as a character is that is that they're all alone all the time. I was trying to have somebody that that Charlie could interact with Charlie could talk to and I had the idea of an identical twin sort of narrow dwell brother because I thought it was funny and I I like the joke of I concede of these identical twins with act one actor playing people is is so silly to me that I thought it would be funny but then as I started to work with that, then the idea that Donald would you know studying with Mickey and would become want to become a screen rattle like his brother developed and that changed the whole course of the screenplay so screenplay Ended up being about the screenplay really and because Donald helped. With the end of the screen playing in the transformation of it, I thought that the that concept should extend outside of the script. So I put his name on the script. First of all, I didn't tell Demi or Demis company that I was even including myself as a concept and this thing was they were expecting the orchid thief and I certainly didn't tell them that I was going to put my brother's name on the script. So I had Saxon. Apparently was really outraged when he got the script because he thought we hired this guy like he's. He's hired his brother right with them and that's not right. You know without telling us but So. Yeah. So it was just kind of like this thing that you know when I was a kid. My parents went to the theater to see sleuth at you know that movie yeah model. Yeah, well in the right and in the play right, which was which was before the movie. Brought home, the playbill, and there's three characters in the in the play. There's the you know the the older rich guy. There's the guy having the fair and then there's the detective who comes to interrogate the older guy. And the interior and for people who don't know the detective is really the younger guy in a disguise but the audience doesn't know that there and so they put a fake biography and a fake photograph in the playbill. and. That was the most extraordinary thing to me when I was a kid I don't know why. But I just like this is the most amazing thing I've ever seen. And I think that kind of thing stayed with me I liked it. It's a good. I don't know what it is it just it just throws me. So I think I'm sure that's sort of like somewhere in the back of my head when I put Donald on the on the this and. Who Got Donald Oscar ticket, he didn't get an expert you. Know. He did get. He did get a nomination now oddly. In real life and I think that was the cabinet decided they were gonNA play along. which was great. It's awesome. So obviously at coming on after that two years later as eternal sunshine and you have said that while you were writing it. You were constantly kind of hoping to do away with the sci-fi element of it. So why was that what? How would that how would that have even worked? I don't think I was trying to do away with it I mean I I I recognize that that was the pitch that we sold I felt like it was getting in the way of the thing that I was more interested in at the time which was the relationship and and the idea of showing a relationship. Like romantic comedy that actually shows a relationship after they get together at the end you know what? What a human relationship romantic relationship might look like is something that seemed to be rare movies at the time. So I was more interested in that and setting that. So with that one, I don't know how involved you get with with the casting of your with film that you that. You were not directing as well. But in this case you is you guys ended up with Jim Carey, who is somebody who is sort of famous for improvising and his ability to do things quickly on his feet I wonder how you feel about actors varying from the ridden where there are some people I think Mamat is maybe the most famous example where it's like you better not missing. But for you you you you guys hired Jim Carey. So how did that work was he was he bouncing off of your script or did he was he faithful to it? Entirely I think that you know Michelle and I talked about him. Before he came on and and the things that we wanted from him and we didn't want goofy Jim Carey and. Michelle had the conversation with with him going in and he was amenable to it and I i. think he was he was. He was fine. He you know there was an occasional improv moment with him. Some of them are in the fill, you know some of them are good. Some of them were not in the tone we wanted but but I think Jim. Jim. was very good about keeping to the character for this. And on movies like that before you started directing yourself, was it important to you to be on the set like is that something that I know not all writers? Are, can be was that something that you worked out so that you were there in case things came up or how did that? How does that work wasn't mostly an issue of being there because I was needed? I would go occasionally because it was enjoyable for me to see it being made and. Are being that them being made a there are occasions where I did some work while I. was there I think the biggest example of that is the end of eternal sunshine and I don't remember if I was there at night because we had concerns about the ending the very last scene or. I happened to be there and we had concerns about it, but it was rewritten on the set, but I think mostly scripts have been pretty okay in terms of not having problems. So Four Eternal Sunshine having previously been. Nominated for those Oscars for being John, Malkovich inadaptation you one and I wonder did that mean a lot to you? Did it change anything a what is what is your relationship with the Oscar? I don't know I mean it didn't change anything for me as far as I can tell, I think it's Kinda cool to have won an Oscar. I mean that was sort of cool. But I don't you know. I don't know the whole that whole thing is a little uncomfortable for me that whole aspect of everything you know. So I mean I think the first two times because it was Malkovich in than adaptation that I was nominated for I was. So I was so glad I didn't win for Malkovich I was so. Panicked, about the idea of having to go up on stage that point in my life at that point in my career so I was glad about that And I, I kind of probably felt the same at a patient although I don't remember that one is clearly and. Do you just a quick follow up out of curiosity. Where do you keep the Oscar is that an office or where? Like where do you like to keep it? mitten storage right now. Yeah. Because I'm I'm sort of between places on the. New York and so it's in storage in a box somewhere Garza ably on stolen. Okay so that I leads for years later to one of my absolute I loved all your movies but this one, particularly, the key New York and I was interested. I remember at the time to read that this is a case where I believe you and spike were approached by any Pascal to make a a horror film just kind of with with not much more specificity than that If that's correct, why did she think of you as somebody to make a horror film you you hadn't that's not something that I would have guessed you would want to do, and then how did that evolve into? What I don't think can be labeled any specific. Of. Of. Movie. That is yeah. Defies labeling. Amy. You know thought of us for that We had come off of adaptation there. She was very happy with that movie. She was very proud of that movie and it was a different kind of thing than they normally did and Sony and I think she she like that. So I think she was looking for something for something else for us to do and. This idea came up and. I was just thinking about things that are really scary in the world to me so. I can't ride genre movie I mean I. I don't want to I find that I find that when I get close to a sort of thinking in that way that nothing feels true to me I'm making decisions that aren't true to to sort of like having an effect which I which I choose not to do so. But you know these these were ideas that I felt were sort of horrifying ideas that were in this movie so i. That's where that's sort of the motivation for the for the project she coast you guys and says, can you make a horror film or did she say, can you pitch me on a horror film at what point did she realize what she had signed up for? I don't remember I. Honestly don't remember what point I remember that we did pitch something I remember I went off and wrote it I remember that spike wanted to make. Wild Things I. And I was not happy about that because I felt at that time that it had been such a long time and I, didn't WanNa be I. wanted a movie in the works and Yeah 'cause you're working with spike I know that it's a very long process you know the the movie making and then the editing and in all of it is a long process and it could have been like three or four years. So I said I asked if it would be okay if I directed it and I think that he said, yes. But I think that gave Sony called feet like I think they might have made the movie of Spike was directing it I. Think they were happy enough with the script. But But they just put it in turn around at that point. Now, why do you think you at that point? Not even yet fifty years old why were you? Why are those things that you were? Already, worried about in terms of aging death illness isolation loneliness regret I think you were. Not yet fifty. Married. I believe already with a kid it's not like your life was itself. So bleak, why do you think those things were so much on your mind I think those things have always been on my mind. I mean from much younger than fifty I mean I've always thought about those things I have a tendency to worry. Yeah. And now you're you know you do get the chance to direct a film for the first time. Did you enjoy that process? You had an unbelievable cast of actors that you assembled for that as you as you often do. But I mean from Philip Seymour Hoffman right down the line What was your experience for the first time directing? It's a very big project for first film but oddly or surprisingly I. I didn't panic and I'm not sure why but I felt like. It was doable maybe because I didn't know. Because I was inexperienced, I didn't know how difficult it was going to be and it was very difficult. But by that point you're in it and you're doing it in it's it's what it is. What was the most difficult I mean just the scale of what you had. Rally on so many different locations we had so many different actors. We had these giants sets that had to be built just sort of. Practical issues like the fact that Phil Hoffman had to be in the makeup chair for probably six hours a day on days that he was in Perspex and he was in every scene. So there's no way to shoot around him. You know. So are are shooting days where limited because of that, we had a lot to do. It was just a very overwhelming process I know that you felt that one of the things about snack too key that you were. Kind of happy about I believe was that it does not have what the prior scripts that you had done. have, which would you described as a quote unquote clever reveal where everything suddenly sort of make sense. This one is much more open to. The interpretation of the. Of, the viewer. Say about that I'd be curious if. That was a deliberate decision from the from the outset. Let's just see if we can see if I can get away with doing this without wrapping it up in a bow for the audience. I think that the the big thing I was trying to do there was to make movie that was interior. That was from a subjective point of view but that didn't have voiceover and so what I decided I would do would be to sort of project out into the exterior world the stuff that represented very much like in. A dream you would have to have experience, but I didn't want this to be a dream I didn't want it to be revealed to be a dream. I wanted it to be this person's life in this form. That was very subjective. subjectively told like it was a decision that they would be no establishing shots in this movie, which gives it a very sort of maybe uncomfortable or claustrophobic field but that was a conscious decision because it's from this point person's point of view. So this guy that Philip Seymour opens playing Kagan. Like the like. One of the main characters in your novel is someone who bites off a massive project that kind of goes on. Forever not that it was planned to do that in some ways. I mean I guess. I wonder why that's a character that you might tap into I. Don't know it just seemed like a really interesting idea and I like the I like this sort of the idea that while cadence artwork is getting bigger and bigger his wife's artwork is getting smaller and smaller and I guess raising the question of how you represent the world. You know how can you represent the world and coming comes down to the title of the movie? Really. And You know you can't, and if you try to is just going to become this unwieldy impossible thing it, you can't do a one to one representations of the world. It just you know like. Interests me kind of because they're interesting like I'm attracted to certain things and attracted to scale. You know what you pointed out in in in the book. There's this impossibly long movie I just I like stuff like that and I don't. I don't necessarily even intellectualize why it just interesting to me. Well. Okay. So now secondly, I remember very well the moment when it came out was basically as the. Economy was going off a cliff and so as I. Did not get terrific distribution and did not get seen by many people as I'm sure you would have liked how tough was that for you having poured yourself into this is your first time as a director I imagine you didn't want it to be your last time as director and yet also you've said that the script itself was very personally there was one point I saw where quote for better or worse the key was me close quote. So the fact that it did not, you know there were people who saw it and loved it like myself and then more important people Roger Ebert burden. Of that but was the was the reception for the movie? Had How did that affect? You? Will I mean there's two different sort of answers to that question. one has to do with me as a person with an ego you know who gets his feelings hurt or feels misunderstood. Misrepresented. Person and then there was the person who couldn't get another movie mate. So as a business problem for me, I don't know which was a larger issue for me. They were both kind of like. Sort of maybe equally weighted. I think the the business aspect of it. Followed me for a long time. You know I did I, did appreciate the people who liked the movie and that was an it wasn't. It helped me a lot you know to feel like. There were people who responded or or that it moved, but I couldn't get anything made after that and I wanted to continue directing and and I was that was frustrating for what were you being told that you just you know I mean I think in retrospect people say things like directors jail but I don't think anyone ever tells you that you're directors jail just couldn't get anything done. When I had stuff that I, wanted to get made and I think that had I sort of agree to let somebody else direct the things I had written that they probably could have gotten made and granted. You know you mentioned this the two thousand and eight everything changed not just for me became the the the business became just generally more conservative and so you know part of that was just the reality the Times but had the script. Called Franker Francis that you know I couldn't get financing for and I had this sort of an extraordinary cast in terms of names because I was told I had to have names. So I got one hundred and fifty big name actors to agree to be in it and I still couldn't get the money that was necessary to make the movie and it wasn't like I was asking for ninety million dollars or something. You know we're we're trying to get under twenty Then we you know we couldn't. So and that one was musical rate and that was a musical. Yeah it's odd and it's quirky but it's not an funny. I think it's certainly funnier on the surface. Then it's an active gate which I think is also funny but it's a drier movie. This was jokes and silliness. What's what's interesting to me is that all those you know let's just say there was seven years I believe between Selecta key Annalisa. In your next film that you directed, which was very different obviously stop motion animation if it was a matter of needing to pay rent or whatever if you had to if you had to do it. Could you have written a movie that is more? Conforming to what? Is An easier sell in in Hollywood as opposed to a key or even I'm thinking of ending things which are inherently from before you ever start directing them just on the page even just not made for everyone like or for necessarily for a broader. You know if you try to appeal to a mass audience, that's not what you would do. So if you had had to do that, do you feel that you could write that script just as well that kind of broader appeal script I don't know I've never I've never done it. I've I've written for television. I've written for conventional sitcoms seemed to have done. Okay at it. I've done like polishing on conventional movies. On occasion and I mean. I. Think I could I wrote a I wrote a the first draft of this chaos walking script. That was a job that was an assignment that was me taking a job to sort of like try to get. A job that I thought was somewhat mainstream. A novel I think I did fine. They seem to like it. That's why I met Robert Zemeckis. The script he was interested in directing and we talked, and then I decided not to stay involved with it and at which point I kinda think it went through I mean some laughed as a director and I think it went through will I know it went through a lot of different writers so But Yeah I think I I think I can write conventional stuff but you just understandably don't want to your. I did that and I really like I did You know I wrote. Polish on some dreamworks stuff and Yeah I mean I like doing that stuff I like doing the polar stuff more I think because it's quicker. And there's something kind of fun about not being attached. Like you go in and because it's a short term thing you go in, they tell you what they want. US to it they say no. I say, okay. Well, what can I do to change it I like I don't argue for it because it's there really and I'm trying they paying me. I'm trying to do the job but if it's my own stuff where I put my heart into it and my worries and trying to do something that's close to who I am than I wanted to be real. And so during those seven years between snacks anomaly. So worth was that. Were you seeing those years trying to get anomaly the made or was it more a matter of doing those kinds of unaccredited polishes and things until you came upon something that you could sell? No I. Well, first of all I I did a pilot for affects which I. wrote an which I directed and they decided not to make I mean pick up but it exists an anomaly. So it was a was a stage play that I had written and was performed by the same cast at Royce Hall in La in two thousand and five and. My friend Dino. Stanford. Coppola's who I know from Dana. Carvey has an animation studio called starbucks and he had seen that and he approached me it wasn't something I was trying to get made. He said, can we you know I'd like to make this into a stop motion. Animated, film and I like well, that's not going to happen. But if you can if you can raise the money sure you know and they were able to kind of raise a bit through funding things go fund me think, fund me whatever this kicks. Kicks, thank you. And so in terms of I remember seeing models and things that I moderate a few of the QNA's for you guys back in two thousand fifteen and I remember just it was unbelievable to see the painstaking it's almost like Caitlin Qatar level. Detail that goes into doing stop motion stuff for you was the pro like I. Imagine that was totally new to you was that fun was that a pain in the ass to deal with like what was your experience with the novel Lisa? My experience was great and you know and so much of that has to do with the person I directed it with do Johnson and Rosa Tran who produced at and we became like a team and you know as you said I, didn't know anything about this world. So Duke being there was essential. You know. For me and and for the production and yeah, I I love. I love stuff like that. I love. Fake reality I love little sets. I love big sets I love the little puppets and. It's it's exciting. It was it was excruciating production because we didn't have the money to make it and it was always a struggle and we didn't know if we're GONNA be able to finish it in all of that stuff. So But yeah it was exciting to see it as it came together. So it's very cool movie. So over the five years since then you I think did most of the work on this seven hundred page novel aunt kind which people really enjoyed and I just want to mention because I think it. It shows you have a good self deprecating sense of humor that the protagonist is a film critic who among other things Hey Charlie Kaufman? Movies. Including syntactical which he calls an irredeemable torturous. Tortuous. Yon. Because Why why? And he doesn't stop with the Nike goes after your other stuff is. What's I mean I got a kick out of the whole thing but I just am curious why go after yourself like that? Well, I mean there's a couple of reasons. One is that you know my motivation to start thinking about film critics is that I have this relationship with film critic so I have one you know but the but the larger issue and I wondered if I was if it was a mistake to put me in, but there is a larger plot point that is revealed in the course of the book that explains why. What's going on in the book and it has something to do with that and I don't WanNa reveal what that is. If anybody wants to read the book, it's but it's in there and I and it felt like it was addressing something that I really I found interesting so. And I'll leave it at that. But yeah, that's what's in there and did you enjoy the process of writing a novel? How how would you compare and contrast that to writing scrip? Well I. Mean It took me five and a half years. So it took a long time and I, was doing all this other work in between I was you know as I told you I was. Getting. Jobs. To pay my rent. I was really scared when I started I felt I'm going to embarrass myself. I'm not going to be able to do this. It's GONNA be obvious to anyone who eventually reads this book that I don't know how to do this. So that paralyzed for a year once I got past that I enjoyed it, I mean I i. Wanted to finish it a lot more quickly than I did and. And that was always hanging over my head that needed to finish So that was a bit stressful but yeah I I'm I'm planning on doing it again I'm going to write an another one you. Okay. So then also obviously in the last five years you I don't know if the must have been overlapping. You started work on I'm thinking of ending things and I guess for people who who may not know this is inspired by A. Novel that came out in two thousand, sixteen, I believe. But that like adaptation the movie, it's a very different script than the novel itself and I guess with a lot of the kind of surreal stuff added by you as as people might imagine from prior work that was your you know of new contribution to everything else what made you want to adapt though a novel by someone else as opposed to Doing what you do so well when you write your own material I, think that you know. I had the sense that somebody else pre existing work was an easier thing to sow and something within a John Laura was an easier to sell. So I was actively looking for something that I could maybe get financed and I came upon in reads book and I really liked it and it was very small. It takes place in a car in a farmhouse in up And High School and that's pretty much it. You know a couple of other places but four characters more or less that, and it was popular a popular book. So there was kind of a reason that somebody would wanNA make So that's why and I told my producer Anthony Bregman about it and he turns out he has a deal with Netflix and he brought it to them and they they were interested. So that's what happened. So a lot less painful of process of just getting it made than the one prior. Live Action Directing experience twelve years earlier fair to say it was a lot less angst riddled. Yeah there was there was it was completely smooth. Process. To get to the point of pre production I would say once we were in pre production, it wasn't as smooth anymore it was a struggle could be for budgetary reasons which you know it was it was hard but I had such great people that I was working with. That we were able to make it. And people as always are are looking label movies. In this case, they seem to be the feeling that this is the the closest to a out and out horror movie that you have done although I know that you're saying snack Turkey was not a the opposite of that. But in this case, just revisiting some of those things that we talked about earlier with snacked key aging loneliness questioning one sanity physically you know ailing as we see what the parents are those things that. As you kind of if you were to dissect your own you know what drew you to the novel in the first place you think it comes back to to those things or or was it something else? The primarily made you want to tell the story? Well. I think that those are aspect to the book I think that they might be. More focused on in my. In in my version of it, But they're definitely there I what I, what attracted me to the book is dreaming of IT I. Felt Like I like worlds that exist irrationally and ends spoke to that and I I, felt like there was something exciting. And cinematic about that to me. So I think that was probably the thing that most drew me to this as a project. So when people I've, I've been reading a lot of other people's takes on the movie because I question. My own a little bit and I just wanted to see what other people say and it seems like everyone has their own opinion about it. There are some people who are a little confused or frustrated by other people think they can. They've seen the light when they in terms of walking away from it I just wonder to in order to make sure that your team, your actors, your you know production designer and everybody else was on, did you do anything to make sure they were on the same page as you in terms of your own what you were driving at saying here like do you sit down and kind of? Make sure that everyone's on the same page or do you are you? Okay with everyone being on sort of a different wavelength as long as it works for you? I remember with When we had our first production meeting with all the department heads how surprised I was how different Lee everybody read the script I couldn't believe it. It seemed very clear to me. This is what it looked like but I learned then that it's not clear and that people have their own thing and I think that's where. You kind of unify your at least in terms of production unify the vision you kind of. Want. People understand through conversation what you're thinking been there in the same lane as you are and I think that that happens always and that that's a fairly simple process it terms of the actors and stuff I talked about ideas with them but mostly I wanted to make sure they had stuff that they could play in terms of actual human interaction and human emotions because otherwise it flies off into some ether of nonsense and and so I gave them that and they gave themselves that and that's how we proceeded. And you know I couldn't help but think that. It in some ways could as easily have been a a excellent play in the sense that you don't have many locations. You have very long exchanges between just a couple of or at some points for actors. Why was important to you to do such long uninterrupted takes I think there's some there as long as twenty five minutes that itself seems like an interesting challenge the kind of impose on yourself I, I feel like there's a continuity in terms of like dynamic between characters when they get to play a scene and the scenes happen to belong I mean we didn't use any twenty. Five minute on interrupted take. But we allowed it to play out many times from the different camera angles and that was the idea behind it. It was the same thing in the novel Lisa where I didn't isolate the three actors from each other in a booth having them do their performance separately recorded them altogether because actors play off each other you know. So allow that it seems to be the right idea to me I. Know that you're very much not about you know specifying anyone what you hope they take away from a script that you've written or film directed, but and in fact. I believe is your production company. So why is it so called protective testing services. Service similar service and why is that? What does that mean? Well, protective tests are psychological tests. Were Shack is the most well known example they're kind of ambiguous. Images that are shown to people, and their reaction is the thing that tells you who they are. tells you what the issues are or something like that. So I thought it was kind of an interesting because I. that's sort of my philosophy about when I, when about any kind of art is that when you create. Something it exists as as a conversation between the person who created in the person who's interacting with it, and so that's what I try to do with my movies, which is why I don't WanNa talk about talk about what they're about to me because. It's Irrelevant what it's about to me, well, that I think is as good a place as any to leave this I. Thank you so much for. Time, it's always great to chat with you and thank you so much a pleasure. Thanks. Thanks very much for tuning into awards chatter. We really appreciate you taking the time to do that and would really appreciate you taking a minute more to subscribe to our podcast on Itunes or your podcasts out and to leave us a rating as well. If you have any questions, comments or concerns, you can reach me via twitter at twitter dot com slash stop fiber, and you can follow all of my coverage between episodes at T. H., R. dot com slash the race until next time. Thanks for joining us.

writer John Malkovich the Times spike New York Hollywood John director Nyu Roger Ebert Paul Alan Arkin Brian Cox New York Los Angeles Robert McKee Charlie Kaufman Oscar Minneapolis Netflix
353: Scott McKain, Make Your Organization Iconic

Crack the Customer Code

32:14 min | 1 year ago

353: Scott McKain, Make Your Organization Iconic

"Get ready for crack the customer code your audio guidebook for creating incredible customer journeys. Jeannie. Yes, sir. Which could sit our podcast icon. Yes. I would. Now, we need your Matic cinematic music coming up in the background. Yeah. Exactly. All. Well, you know, that's one of the interesting things about today's customer experience landscape is one how do you distinguish yourself and to how do you truly become iconic right there? We talk about I Connie brands things like apple Amazon, all all these kind of more key names that everyone knows and that everyone has their own brand proposition for so to speak, but they still have one right? Our guest today is truly the master of this concept of distinction has been talking about it for years. Scott McCain, and he has a new book called icon IQ were really Dell's into this intersection with customer experience. Yes. I think this is one of my this is like if we had an Alleluia choir in the background. They would have said. A lot during this interview. In fact, we might need that for next time. That sounds like a good investment for our podcast, doesn't it? Yes. So it has to be live. It can't just be like if we're going to have a choir at your house, ain't that mine. Why not? This would this will go over well with this. It's not enough to be like you have to be quiet for the next three hours. I'm core. Exactly. By the way, there's going to be choir deliver grim. Okay. I think we've officially veered also. Yes. But I my point. Of course, is that a lot of what Scott covers here. And a lot of what he talks about in his book icon ick is about this idea of how we there is kind of a formula two things, but it still takes creativity. It still takes these kind of special magic things to happen as well in order to be iconic. But there really is a way to do it. Right. And that's what I love about. What he talks about how intersects with customer experience one hundred percent. And speaking of distinction Scott's bio is actually pretty distinctive in we tend to cut our via zone pretty short. But Scott had so many cool unique things that this one's going to be a little bit longer because he's done so much and accomplished so much and some of it's really cool. So what do you say to now, I'm ready, but nobody tune out for this bio because it is really fascinating listen up. So so the. Occasion was that. If somebody had to listen to me speak for a long time they were to now, which Scott McCain has one of the best voices in the business. He's got like a true radio fantastic. Okay. I do not. But I'm going to do my best of muddle through. This Scott McCain is a globally recognized authority on how iconic organizations and professionals create the distinction required to attract and retain customers, and employees. He's and to stand out in a hyper competitive marketplace. His latest book icon Akao, organizations and leaders attain. Sustain and regain the highest level of distinction was recently released to rave reviews. Scott's expertise has been quoted multiple times in USA today. The New York Times, Wall Street Journal and International Herald Tribune Arnold Schwarzenegger. The governor I'll be back book ten for presentation at the White House with the president in the audience. And this is where it gets really fun. Scott played the villain in a movie named by the esteemed critic, Roger Ebert as one of the fifty greatest movies in. The history of cinema. The funny part is when you meet Scott he is the furthest thing from a villain. You will ever. Nicest guy, and you know, who knows that the companies who's worked with because he has a client list that represents the world's most distinctive companies, apple SAP Merrill. Lynch BMW, Cisco CDW fidelity, John Deere, and hundreds more Scott was honored with induction along with zig Ziglar, Seth Godin, Dale Carnegie and just twenty more in the sales and marketing hall of fame. And of course, he is a CPA e that is a professional speaking hall of fame. Scott is broadly recognized as one of the most iconic platform presenters in the world moving his hometown of others. Ville Indiana to recently announced that they are renaming the community's main street as Scott McCain way, welcome Scott. We're so thrilled that you could join us today. Thanks for being here. I'm honored. Dude. As jeannie. Thank you. It's great to be with unanimous today. Thanks so much Scott. So awesome to have you on the show. I am excited. You've got a new book out all kinds of great stuff. And I wanna. Jump right in because one of the things about your message. You've been talking about distinction for years, how organizations individuals can use the sanction to separate themselves from the pack and your new book icon, it you seem to be making this case that and forgive me, if I'm putting words in your mouth, but that organizations are sort of tending towards uniformity that they there's these three destroyers differentiation that we all have to guard against or it's going to happen to us. So how is this true for organizations, and how's it also true for individuals within organizations? That's a great question him. I appreciate you picking up on that. Because one of the things I think we typically do in any business is to benchmark ourselves against our specific competition. You know, if I have a dry cleaners. I'm checking out with the dry cleaners down the streets doing if I got a car dealership. I wanna see what the dealership down the road is doing in. The fact is the customers don't valuate us in that manner customers evaluate us against the totality of experiences that they have. And in. So it means our competition, regardless of what we do is Ritz Carlton, or it's Lexus, or it's any place that a customer has a chance to receive this extraordinary type of customer experience. So what happens is when we just comparison to our competition, and they're comparing themselves to us we kind of regress to the mean so to speak. In other words, we end up being fairly similar in fairly average. And I think we do the same in our personal professionalize, you know. We kind of benchmark ourselves against who else is at our level in the organization rather than saying what what can we really do to to make a difference? What could we do stand out and move up because it's it's just so challenging now that you know, it's a it's a cliche, but it's more challenging it's ever been. And that's why we have to find the strategies that fight these destroyers differentiation. And really help us stand out in the marketplace. That's interesting. There's been a lot of research in social psychology sort of outside of the business sphere where people's happiness as often paid to where they fall in their neighborhood. Yeah. Right. So it doesn't matter. How much they make it matters. How much they make relative to all the people around them. And obviously, we're not just talking about financial success or anything like that. But I think that's really interesting your point about progressing to the mean. But. It is interesting. Isn't it how I noticed this? I had a long drive yesterday. And I noticed how even on on an interstate highway. We kind of associate with a pack, right? We gotta get this little pack cars, and we can't with Saint people keep passing us, and we keep passing the same people in. It's all about what's happening right there at our our little group. And if we really look at the individuals and organizations who have been able to set themselves apart. It's it's not because they're constantly trying to be like the competition is because they're finding a way to make a difference. I mean in in recorded history, no customers ever said I love doing business with those guys because they're exactly like everybody else. Gallinson differentiate and I loved us, and I might be paraphrasing now, but you said something about like, the destroyers of distinction and first of all that's the next avengers movie. I think so just put that out there. That's a great subtitle for event. Great. Hang up. So but the destroyers of distinction. It's so interesting a turn of phrase because when you think about it like being distinct is actually stepping out and being separate. But at the same time, like the sameness of it all can be soul, crushing, you know. And I think when we talk to leaders and all three of us have had this experience where you talk to leaders about this idea of you know, what it's not that. You are really it's not that you are really out there in a way that is bad. It's just that. You're not really doing anything to. To differentiate to make yourself instinct, all of these things. And so why is it so hard for them to see that? Why do you think business leaders do not recognize this problem overall because we've all heard that? I think there are several factors that play the let's let's talk about two one is that we we failed to realize that familiarity at my mom owes us to say familiarity, breeds contempt. It was the Oakland shea and with all due respect, a mom. It's not true. Familiarity. Doesn't breed contempt. You know, the more. I do business with you. That may not hold you in scorn. Familiarity, breeds complacency. I take you for granted. And and the the, you know, the opposite is true as well. It seems like the places where I'm the best customer. They start taking my business for granted. Right. I take their level of service for granted. They take an end. So then than something that has some type of meaningful differentiation becomes that shiny new object, and I become attracted to it. So we we we failed to keep it fresh. We think will it's always worked. Why would we change? But the second thing is that I think if we also think about it in terms of how many leaders are. Compensated in on what have you done for me lately, you know, many state ios or compensated based upon what the stock price is for this quarter. Not in terms of long term thinking about enhancing, the customer experience. We compensate salespeople on commission based on closing the deal rather than establishing relationships that will bring that customer back over and over and over again. So that the companies that that break out of that, you know, they're able to think long term in terms of how we serve our customers. How do we compensate people in reward people based on ongoing relationships more than just you know, one time purchases? Those are the things that I'm seeing with with organizations, then the develop the culture, and the mindset that it takes to create the kind of meaningful distinction that has traction with customers, and we're really I mean a really talking about that difference between a transactional approach on a relational approach. But that with arrow. Oh, exactly. Yeah. Yeah. And I mean, even if you look at what's happening so much. I do one of my great clients is is Porsche in there, even developing a subscription model where you pay per month, and you can pick up a different car periodically. Right. So it's not like you're going to buy. That is any incredible. Hey this month, we're going to need a wholesome stuff. So we're going to you know, we're going to get the Cayenne this month. Oh well next month. We're taking the kids to DisneyWorld. So we're gonna get a pan-american next month. And then the month after that, hey, you know, my my partner, and I are going to go for this. Great drives we're gonna get a nine eleven. I mean, it's unheard of. But that's that is a model that we're moving towards, and it's it's not just a it's not just in terms of software. That's kind of where it got started. But, but we're finding ways to create subscription models in everything that we do. So that means our product not only has to be continually interesting. But the experience that we deliver has to be continually interesting compelling an intriguing to customers, and and we're not we're not set up to do that. I mean, a MoMA soapbox here. But I have a doctor friend who has talked to me about the fact that many medical schools, you can graduate. You can become a physician you're gonna come a doctor and have never. Taken a course on bedside manner, you graduate and get an NBA and have never taken a course on creating a compelling customer experience. So what we've done is to train in. I don't want to say exactly the wrong things. But but without looking at what really matters for today's economy, and and and for the model of business for the future. I find that totally true. And in fact, if you look at most business plan templates, they don't mention customers, they mentioned, they meant acquisition and sales and revenue and all these things, but they don't actually mention that. And you know, what one of the things that you mentioned about doctors one of the things I've said is that we train them as scientists. And then we wonder why they don't have empathy because we don't include that as part of the equation of of succeeding in that environment. So I and some really amazing places are doing things. About that. So I don't wanna throw the entire healthcare industry over the fence there. But I think that it's such a great point to kind of underlying because we often don't see the forest for the trees when we're talking about these things. And that's why what you're talking about. What you're writing about is so important, and I hope everybody just takes it all in because it's it's a message. They need to hear in my humble opinion. I will now get out my soap box follow up questions based on this. You've really got me thinking about the psychology of this of one of the things about distinction in the way, I'm sort of viewing it I guess you can help clarify. It is is more risky, right? I mean, it's always safe to be part of the pack. Right. Nobody nobody ever got fired for hiring IBM was the old saying, right? So, but a lot of people didn't do well by hiring the wrong company to do their consulting or do their infrastructure, or whatever it might be. So is there a organizational a, psychological resist? Since to some of these principles because you've been talking about this for years. Yeah. And that's a great point him at you know, I looked at the newspaper on on the day that we're recording. This in headlines are about, you know, the failure of Sears in the decline of GE, and in these companies that we always thought of as being, you know, truly iconic in it. I think a lot of this goes back to the the research that Clayton christianson did at Harvard on the innovators dilemma right once we innovate. Then what happens is the systems kick in to protect in enhance and exploit in Nepal, nuisance that innovation in it. It's part of what prevents us from from doing something really different than really intriguing. I mean it as crazy as it sounds. Isn't it interesting that Nokia and Motorola were working on mobile phones? Twenty four seven three sixty five. And then apple comes along with the iphone. You know, the the innovator many times the disruptor. I mean, what why didn't yellow cab come up with Uber. There's no reason for ESPN Sports Illustrated already had a reporter at the game, you know, but but how they define their world was we are a magazine. But what we really wanted was sports information and commentary and in so it enemy opponent. I think you're exactly right. The mindset, and and the approach that is institutionalized in most organizations really don't change until something happens along the way that that blows them up or or challenges them, you know, I grew up in a little grocery store in southern Indiana. My folks owned the one grocery store in Cruthers, Indiana. And the funny thing is the things that my dad did in that store that ensured its long-term survival didn't really happen until we had big box competition in the first competitor. In our town. In. So I think unfortunately, sometimes we we need something to shake his up to move us to where we need to be. Wow. That's a powerful insight of about your dad because I bet a lot of what happened was you know, for years. Everything was fine. And then all of a sudden. Yeah. Yeah. Is it real quick? I was just saying not only why change, but why make less money to invest in a problem. We don't even say it, right? That's absolutely. Yeah. And you know, I I would love for you to share with our listeners. The what you talk about in your book, your new book icon ick, which is these four cornerstones of distinction. And I know you have a whole book on it. So we can't get into everything. But if you could give them a preview of kind of what those are. I thought that was such an interesting way to break it down. So can you help us clarify that? As I was researching this I found that there were four things that companies did in even a divisionals in their own career. It was a pathway that seemed to unify regardless of the industry, regardless of the profession of of what you need to do to stand out in the first cornerstone, and there's a reason it's I is clarity. You can't differentiate what you can't define. And if I am not clear about what I'm doing that makes me superior in some manner to the competition. Then there's no way in the world. My customers are gonna get it. You know, if I if I don't get it on the world or customers or team members gonna get it in part of what I was realizing was that the the distinctive organizations, you know, that even have great competitors. Find find a way to to differentiate themselves based on the clarity statement. I mean, you know, Domino's for many years was your pizza in thirty minutes. But they. Don't use that anymore. But we still think of dominoes that. That's embedded. It's clear if you wanna pizza that's hot and fast. The now, that's who you call. But Papa John's came along and said better ingredients better pizza in it's perceived in the marketplace is having a superior product. Now Papa John's delivers and Domino's works at having better pizza, but by putting their flag in the ground and being clear that this is what's most important with Domino's delivery with Papa John's quality that separated them from the myriad of competitors out there in their specific marketplace, it made them stand out to customers will what made apple stand out to two great degree. It was ease of use. You know, how many people said it just works. Every I remember, you know, people coming back to our little rural town in Indiana that had been to DisneyWorld before others in gotten ago, and they said, oh, it's so clean. I mean, everybody's so clean. And so the clarity of purpose. The clarity of. What we are that that makes us stand out has to be the first principle. That's the first cornerstone if you're not clear about what separates you from the competition. That's where you begin. Then the second one is is creativity. So now, how do we how do we take twist on on what's happening in the marketplace? In one of the interesting things to offend on the research was it we tend to think of creativity. Oh, we're gonna blow it up, and we're gonna you know, start all over we're gonna make it. It's not that way at all in business. The example, I used the book is enterprise rental car. You know, when they started that company in the basement of the old Saint Louis airport. They were just looking for a way to be creative because they were competing against the big players like Hertz and Avis. So what they did is make a list of every single point of contact that they had whether customers in thirteen all in the book, and they said, let's just take one and do it differently than everybody else. And as we know they pick you up right ready? The make the customer come to us to get the car. What have we brought the card and the customer? Now, there's zero product variation in the rental car business, the Ford I get from hurts is identical to the Ford. I get from Avis. So they found a creative way that just put it twist on on what they were doing it. Only takes one thing if you can find one thing unique in compelling customers or respond to that thirties communication. There's a lot involved there. But the most important aspect of it is the power of narrative telling our story having a compelling narrative in and we hear so much about in a generational change in the workforce more generations now than ever before that are working for us that are buying from us. And in one of the interesting aspects to me is that every bit of research that I've seen says that a compelling narrative works equally. Well with all the generations. It's really the only tool, you know, whether you're a baby boomer millennial wherever you are on that scale, which we all love a compelling story. And but but we haven't educated in help organizations or. Individuals. Learn how to use the incredible communicating power of story and in the fourth and final one is a customer experience, focus. We have to be obsessed over what it feels like to to do business with us. And you know, those who quote crack the customer code, unquote. Nice ground, sir. Jay Bilas blood. You know, what you guys you're talking about is really what it's all about. I mean that experience transcends transaction. And and it is the key earlier Janney. You mentioned, you know, in a business plan one of things they wanna know is growth will what is growth it is. It is the mixture the combination of retention and acquisition. I can. I mean, we if we keep losing customers faster than we can acquire them. We can't grow. If we don't acquire new ones, we can't grow. What will what is the surest way to retain acquire customers? It's it's a compelling experience that your current customers are not only willing to repeat, but they're also willing to refer in. And so when we create that kind of of just amazing. I mean, our our little business owns the trademark the federally registered trademark on the term ultimate customer experience. And so when you create that ultimate customer experience. Now you. You're giving customers reason not only to come back and buy more. But also to be your advocates in the marketplace that help ensure your growth, those are the four clarity creativity communication and customer experience, folks. Yeah. Yeah. Those are fantastic. And we talk about a sort of a compelling narrative, cutting across generations at that was actually sort of a question I wanted to get to earlier, but we were sort of moving past it, which is when you look at the different generations when you look at sort of how to segment customers, whether it be generation Lee or by interest group or by just interest. How does that how do you work on being icon EQ, you know, to multiple different sort of strata or breaks of your customers? 'cause I was thinking about the Porsche thing you're talking about. And like my dad would love that. And that would not be for me. Right. The car month thing. So how do you this Porsche, stay iconic and still satisfy the people who want to own their car for five years or ten years and the people who want a new car every month? Great question in the one. One thread that I see running through this. But yet that most organizations in individuals are are woefully under equipped to deliver is to let the customer define what's important here. It's it's simple at sounds. I mean, for example, we know that some generations like face to face better than anything. Some wanna get you know information via the snail mail others want texts others want phone calls. Why are we not asking customers at the onset of the relationship? Hey, how how would you like for us to communicate with you? What what is what is your preferred method, and then constructing the communication with that customer just just based on what they want? What why do they have to fit into our box? And and that is what we've woefully fallen short. With customers is to allow them to define experience enemy of the other. Got you triggered is one of the phrases. I hate I hate is is when people say we exceed customer expectations in and then you say, okay. So so what's your customer expect? Well, we think what they expect. They haven't even asked her Custer. They don't know. Exceed expectation that you're not what customers think you're gonna suck. Right. We're going to exceed that. While sitting tomorrow high. They're just parking. In Burs of the kinds of things cliche patterns that we fall into of we're going to exceed customer expectations. I there was a financial services company that asked me to work with their top professionals. And and then work with kind of the a minus B plus professionals because what they wanted to do was to isolate what separated the plus performers from the be plus performance in one of the qualities that we found was the be plus performer said what makes us different is our experience our customer experience where the a+ performer was very precise about what it was about the experience the separated that they didn't say what separates is our experienced. Our client experience what they said is what separates us is how we do this for you. Or how we customize the relationship based upon what your needs are. And it was really revealing. Effect cliche. Oh, our people. Our greatest asset. We'll have come in. You treat them like an expense. Yeah. Yeah. It's so true into the inadvertently take us down the wrong path. Well, get your groans ready because I'm going to say that was fantastic distinction. You can say. You know, our expectations were pretty high. But you still exceeded that I'm going to say that too. This was great. And I really do recommend your book to everybody who's listening. It's really well done well researched everything else. And if they want to know more about you or where to find you and some resources what's the best way for our listeners to find you appreciate the genie. Thanks for asking the information about the book is that I conduct business book dot com, I of business dot com. And if you'd like more information about me in the speeches and everything else there. It's just Scott McCain dot com, but it's spelled M C K A N a little bit different spelling. So it Scott McCain himse K A, N dot com has has all the information about our business and the programs that I do for organizations, and how individuals can subscribe to our program on the sanction. Excellent. Excellent. While an as always we will make sure all of that is available in the show notes for everybody to find it there as well. So Scott, thank you so much. This was just. A delight. And thank you for sharing all your wisdom with us news, real privilege. Thank you guys. Really? Appreciate it. Thank you. Thanks so much Scott. I'm still thinking about everything Scott talked about. Yeah. That was a lot right? We really got a lot of great value and Scott Scotsman working with some of the best companies. And I think when you do that yet such incredible real world insight, which you know, is my thing. I like that real world kind of approach you really get that from any. And it just comes across in everything he says and how he approaches every different topic. Yeah, I agree. And I also think that. I think he trusts that people are going to do the right thing if they know what to do. And so the way that he approaches this whole subject is really about giving people the tools to do it. Well, and you know, we do live in a different world, and we have to keep up in these different ways. And so that's why it's so important to keep really examining. What's working today? What what's working today that won't work tomorrow? What do we need to do to stand out in this incredible marketplace that we all live in now that lives everywhere? It's on our phone. It's on, you know, the traditional channels, it's everywhere. And so what can you do as a brand really stand out in both who you are? But also how you treat your customers. And that's something I think everybody can really sink their teeth into and think about what are you doing today that, you know, won't really serve your customers tomorrow. And what can you do right now to be more icon IQ to really? Focus on those cornerstones that he talked about be more, creative focus on customer experience all of those things because if you can answer that question, you're already ahead of some of your competition. Absolutely. And the thing is you don't have to do it everywhere. I love the rain we gave about enterprise about. They had thirteen things. They picked one was nothing. You're gonna remember us for. So don't get overwhelmed by it. You can find that one thing. What's that one point of differentiation? That's gonna make us stand out. Just like dominoes. Just like Papa John's as he pointed out, they both do the other the other companies thing, right, right? They're known for the one thing that was a great message to take away. So I'm going to challenge Eugenie. Can you create a distinctive out tro to take us away, which had Scott's voice right about now. What about all the time? Thank you so much for listening to crack the customer code if you haven't subscribed. What are you waiting for our subscribers get newly released episodes immediately and our undying gratitude, and that's distinctive. I think what do you think? Adam. Jamie. Crack the customer code is a proud member of C, suite radio. So be sure to check out all the great business content at C, suite radio dot com and C suite TV dot com. I'm Jeannie Walters, and you can learn more about me and our trademarked customer experience investigation process and more at experience investigators dot com. And take care of your customers.

Scott Scott McCain apple Papa John Indiana Jeannie Walters Porsche DisneyWorld Domino Dell Scott Scotsman apple NBA ESPN Roger Ebert USA IBM Lexus Akao
NPR News: 04-08-2020 6PM ET

NPR News Now

00:00 sec | 7 months ago

NPR News: 04-08-2020 6PM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Windsor Johnston. The death toll from Corona virus in New York stands at more than six thousand speaking at his daily briefing governor. Andrew Cuomo says there have been seven hundred. Seventy nine corona virus related deaths within the last twenty four hours. The highest daily number of casualties is a face right Many of them frontline workers many of them. Healthcare workers men. They were putting themselves at risk and they knew they were. The Governor says the state's dramatic shutdown and social distancing efforts are starting to pay off. He says hospitalization figures continued to show the curve of infection infection. Flattening CUOMO has directed all flags in New York state to be flown at half-staff the World Health Organization is strongly defending. It's handling of the corona virus outbreak amid criticism from president trump. Npr's Jason Bobi and reports the head of the agency says it's working around the clock to fight the global pandemic after president trump lashed out as the W. H. O. Director General. Tao's add Gabrielle. Cities Agency has been working tirelessly to provide technical guidance research logistical support to countries around the world trump on Tuesday threatened to cut off funding to the. Who saying the WHO's response to? The outbreak was slow in China. Centric tae drew said personal attacks. Don't bother him and added that throughout this crisis he's been subject to racist slurs and even death threats. He said what is important right now. Is that nations come together to fight this pandemic unity's the only option to defeat this virus. If you don't believe in unity and don't do unity. Please prepare for the worst to come Jason bobbie-ann NPR news. All of the major indices rose sharply today on Wall Street with the Dow Jones Industrial Average. Seven hundred seventy nine points. Npr's Scott horsely reports investors are eagerly eyeing signs of a possible slowdown in new corona virus cases. Deaths from the corona virus. Hit A new daily high. In New York state but new hospitalizations there have slowed assigned that aggressive. Social distancing measures may be working investors welcomed any hopeful news both the Dow and the S&P five hundred index jumped more than three point four percent. The Nasdaq rose about two and a half percent. Oil prices also climbed as major producing countries. Continue to way possible. Production cuts in an effort to reduce the glut on the market. Demand for oil has dropped sharply as a result of the pandemic the benchmark price in the. Us is well below. What many drillers here need to turn a profit Scott horsely? Npr News Washington. New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy says. The state's primary election will be postponed until July seventh amid the spread of Corona virus. It was originally scheduled to be held on June second. You're listening to. Npr News in Washington. Gile van one of America's greatest singer songwriters has died John. Prime whose career spanned fifty years died of complications. From the corona virus on Tuesday at the age of seventy three. Npr's net willoughby has this remembrance. John Prime Songs Angel from Montgomery the Vietnam Protests Him Sam stone and his ballot far from home all were heart in your mouth odes to human experience in its fragility and beauty black still winning a prime working the mailman in Chicago would film critic. Roger Ebert spotted him playing in a club in nineteen seventy and brought him to prominence with a glowing review. Brian would record more than a dozen albums. When a couple of Grammy's started own label and survive cancer. John Prion was seventy three years old. Netto Ulaby. Npr News Allen Garfield a veteran character actor who starred in one thousand nine hundred seventy s films including the conversation and Nashville has died of complications from the corona virus. Garfield is being remembered throughout Hollywood James Woods who co starred with him in Citizen. Cohn called him. A superb actor Garfield died at a retirement facility. Were several staffers. And residents tested positive for Cova nineteen. He was eight years old recapping stocks on Wall Street. The Dow was up seven. Hundred Seventy nine points today. Snp UP Ninety. The Nasdaq up two or three. This is NPR news in Washington.

Npr Npr NPR Washington Allen Garfield New York Corona Andrew Cuomo trump World Health Organization Scott horsely Roger Ebert Windsor Johnston New Jersey China Sam stone
307: I'll Make Hug to You Edition

The Scathing Atheist

1:00:30 hr | 1 year ago

307: I'll Make Hug to You Edition

"I'm Jay Farner, CEO of Quicken Loans, America's premier home purchase lender. We've created a new way to protect you from unpredictable interest rates are exclusive rate shield approval. I we lock your interest rate for up to ninety days. Then if rates go up your rate stays locked. But if rates go down your rate drops either way you win. Call us today at eight hundred quicken or go to rocketmortgage dot com, racial approval. Only valid on certain thirty year fixed rate loans. Call for cost information and conditions. Equal housing lender. Licensed in all fifty states and MLS number thirty thirty additional conditions are exclusions may apply. Winning. None of the resolutions involved cleaning up Arledge this year. This week's episode of the scathing atheist is brought to you by puzzle in a thunderstorm freelance governments for higher. I'm just saying if you don't want to open up, we'll do it. And now the scathing avian, Hello everyone. This is Bob from central Illinois. And right now, I'm sitting on my front porch staring at my neighbors confederate flag curtains and thinking to myself that this absurd display is a perfect example of why we did in fact. Evolve from filthy monkey men. I mean, come on people just by some fucking curtains. It's thursday. It's January third. That's my and. And my New Year's resolution is to book less mailboxes. My New Year's resolution is also for ally to fuck less mailboxes. I vote that he fucks fewer. Anyway, I'm allusion Bosnich. He's done. Right. And from we still go to the city all the time. Seriously, New Jersey Cincinnati swing state and good husband, Georgia. This is scathing. First this week's episode fucked the shit out of a mailbox that was actually a soda machine. Switched it out. You flat nut your dick on the corner. Like a dollar Bill. I'll spend the rest of the episode trying to purge that mental image. But I the diatribe. When I was growing up there were a handful of movie reviewers that could really make or break a movie, I don't feel like we have that anymore. But back then there were a couple. So like naturally when one of those influential reviewers would say something good about a movie the marketeers would swoop into action and add that complement to the movies promotional material. So it just kinda got used to see in quotes on movie posters from Roger Ebert, and gene Shalit or if they didn't get a good blurb from them, it would be from like some respected publication. You know, it'd be like this movie is awesome. The New York Times or whatever. But of course, not every movie has good reviews from respected critics eventually movie. Poster started looking kind of naked without those blurbs. So the market would go on it two ways either. They would scour the movie review universe, and quote, the morning radio guy from W K O P, the moins or something or they would shave one of the more respected reviewer's comments down until they sounded good ride, gene. Cisco would say the director exhibits a stunning lack of competence, and the movie poster would just say stunning, gene. Michael and naive little optimists that I was I kind of thought that represented a low point for movie review blurb promotions. But it got so much worse. And I realized this the first time I ever saw movie blurb attributed to somebody like at smack doggy forty four but even quoting random Twitter mentions apparently didn't represent rock bottom because the other day I saw an advertisement for a TV show where in the middle of the ad. They just stuck in phrases like gripping and amazing television in quotation marks, no attribution mind. You just quotation marks. Who are they quoting doesn't fucking matter the promotional material for this show. This is a real time quote, apparently. And I know this sounds like a random thing to be bitching about but holy shit. Is there anything else that you can think of that more aptly describes the America of twenty eighteen right? Like, we're once we had trusted experts vetted through our collective experience. We now just. Have quotation marks? But I mean is like movies or the only place where we lost objective respected principled commentators. I mean, they're still there if you're willing to look, but when it comes to convincing Americans, a something the good ones are interchangeable with the bad ones. They all come with quotation marks bullshit website with only the thinnest veneer of legitimacy making patently ridiculous. Claim goes toe-to-toe with the Washington fuck and post, and it's goddamn toss up in this country. Of course Harley the first person to bemoan, the death of expertise people have been writing books about this for years with urgent warnings. If we don't do something soon, we might wind up with twenty eighteen you know, the dystopia in hell skateboard opinion gains. The force of fact by the simple merit of appearing with quotation marks on either side of it. You have a peer reviewed study from JAMA there. Well, this Prager you video also has quotes around it. You have the findings of a U N panel of PHD's. Well, this bright part article. Also as quotes around you. You have double blind placebo tests. Well, this proverb also has quote surrounded and like most of you. I've spent a lot of time around these people who reject that very concept of expertise, right? People were suspicious of anybody who went to one of them ivory towers to learn what the man wanted him to know. You know, what I'm gonna just talking about the fucking rednecks on the right? It happens on the left. They spent years hanging out with hippies that would eye doctor was suspicion if he said he'd take two of these pills a day after meals put if some unwashed vagrant in the parking lot outside a widespread panic show told him. Hey, eat this algae three times a day and you'll live forever. They trade off to hits ecstasy nugget for that shit, and choke it down. Religiously because when you reject expertise, it's not like, you also rejected vice you know, it's not like everything gets through. Now, you can't believe all the claims to many of them contradict. So you need something to separate the, quote, you're going to accept from the ones you're going to reject. And once you rule out expertise is a metric you've really only got your. Gut left to work with right? I mean, she sure theoretically, you could just fed all the stuff before you decide what to believe. But if you don't accept expertise where but your gut can you vet it? So you left accepting the things that feel true to you the things that reinforced a worldview, you already have the things that allow you to further insulate yourself in your uninformed fucking opinion, and the things that doom society to make the same stupid fuck and mistakes over and over again because we won't listen to the experts that already made them. Now, the good news. If there's good news is that there is a way around this shit. It's not inevitable and for a template on how to fix it. We need to look no further than the film criticism industry. I started this diatribe on. I mean, sure we don't have movie critics with the same stature as we once did but websites like rotten tomatoes. Do afford us. The ability to collate all those lesser known. Critics and arrive at a consensus, even without specific experts that we know right? The modern consumer of snow puts a hell of a lot more stock in the rotten tomatoes score. For them, whatever complimentary. Blurb that marketing department guy managed to dig up it took a while for the field of film criticism to catch up with the technology. Once it did it actually created a system far more useful than the old one where we waited to see which way siskel and Ebert we're going to orient their thumbs. So the only thing we're waiting for. Now, I guess is for Americans to take governing their nation and protecting their planet as seriously as they take their movies. So yeah, we're fucking doomed. Talking. It was special news bulletin joining me for headlines tonight on the bad and the ugly heath end right knee lie. Bosnich fellas law garden, we still have a bit of Garrity for charity to catch up on. So how about offering up an insult to acting? AG Matthew Whitaker on behalf of Matt. All right. Good pick. Matt Matthew Whitaker. Looks like a bobble head of that. Matthew whitaker. Looks like Tommy pickles from Rugrats became a Nazi super villains bodyguard. My god. He does he really does Matt Whitaker. Looks like the thing is gonna get you money. If you've been injured in a sling. He got kicked out of the bald evil guy club by lex Luther for raping up the clubs. In our lead story tonight. Illinois state attorney general Lisa Madigan is given law enforcement around the nation of fresh new reason to question the efficacy of bringing the Catholic church to Justice by just calling up one diocese at a time and say Joe how many kid rapists, Joel got because as it turns out much too. Our collective national surprise apparently the institution at the heart of the international child rape Cobol came into existence by splitting the lion maintained. Power by burning. Anyone that publicly question alive for centuries can't be trusted on the honor system. Yeah, Catholic parents have just been like leaving that bucket a Halloween candy on their front porch. It says take one and the Catholic church just breaks into the house, and rapes all the kids. We're now only raped one. That's a misunderstanding say that sign. All right. So ever since the bombshell grand jury report out of Pennsylvania last August. We've had this awkward follow up where the states all over the country are calling up Catholic diocese going. Okay. So Shari we didn't ask earlier kind of Sumed. You just volunteer this information. But do you have been to have a list of budget child? Rapist state you're harboring or have harbored in the recent past to which the answer has been. Yes, every single fucking time every single time just asking the bed. Stay. Yeah. Just like, okay. This is a bad system. Guys is bad system here. We're just which it up hands up. If you're not hiding, rapists, this it'd be easier. Nobody Larry really you work for us. All right, man. We'll talk that we're doing the Catholics now. But we're gonna talk to Dr. Okay. That's too late. Now, you can't just put it. Of course, some clever attorneys general consider the possibility that the people whose chief salable asset is their proprietary ability to turn crackers in chunks of magical dead. Cracker flavored Jew might not be entirely forthcoming. So in addition to asking the diocese to voluntarily name, all their, rapists. The state of Illinois also set up a hotline for victims to call in and name, the priests that raped them. And it turns out they got way more names from the latter than the former like like five hundred and five more names somebody's lying on clearly. Clearly, someone's lying, so okay. The diocese official list included the name of one hundred eighty five clergy the list, the AG's office put together from the victims reports had six hundred ninety names. Okay. Wait, I remember this from last year, they put a list of names together. And then they asked the Catholic church to say how many people are raving. That's then they'll beyond we'll train into it. Yeah. But look as bad as this already sounds. It's actually worse. Okay. So I just have to have this the list of one hundred eighty five names that the church offered up only included people that had already been reported to the authorities or were dead, but forty five of those hundred eighty five nearly a one in four got reported since the Pennsylvania grand jury report like like when they realized that all the states, we're going to go in and ask for the list. They suddenly remembered nearly four dozen names of credibly accused child rapist that they've been mean into follow up on. On and at the same time continued to forget to report forty two dozen more on others. There's a there's a posted on the side of the monitor. I hadn't ended it. And in alpha omega state news after being voted most likely to make Jim crow. Great again in the state congress yearbook. GOP lawmakers in Arizona decided to improve their reputation and pivot their focus to something more positive. And of course, that would be making sure they're public schools aren't skewing the curriculum towards things that are true. Yeah. Can't have that. Instead, they wanna be teaching the controversy and presenting equal amounts of things that are false. I guess she brags ample white people aren't racist. That's an example, they'll they'll give we'll get there. So I guess it's not a big pivot. But it's. They're doing Sarah Zona YouTube comments the state to. Yeah. So I guess the final solution for Latinos is firmly in place now, and it's time to make sure the younger generation doesn't fuck up that plan derail the train. And that's why state Representative Mark Finchem filed a new Bill last week that would prohibit teachers from engaging in political ideological or religious advocacy in the classroom, which which actually sounds reasonable. Almost sounds like a rule we already have for the entire country. And by almost I mean. Yes, it absolutely absolutely is. Yup. But the Bill wouldn't stop there. It basically says first amendment, but not the fucking atheist part no-bid amendment. Plus, no talking about any real world issues that arise from academe. Ick. Like seriously. That's what it says. No, no, no. This is actually super smart because think about it guys. What's the only thing you can study? But learn nothing about the real world religion. Checkmate. Yeah. So here's a few of the exact words from this Bill. The law would forbid quote any controversial issue that is not germane to the subject matter. And that sentence fragment is apparently the size of the attention span of GOP lawmakers in Arizona because the very next item. After no controversial tangents says teach the controversy. Here's some more of the exact wording from the Bill quote to ensure that students have the resources to make independent decisions on these issues. A teacher must provide students with materials supporting both sides of the controversy and present those views in a fair minded and nonpartisan manner and quote. Yeah. I mean when your political position is imaginary stuff is real education as partisan by definition, the real hang up. Yeah. So basically, no cheating and telling the kids which side is true. You can't skew it like that are bananas designed just like a Rolex, you decide fifty fifty. I don't know. I don't know. Yeah. They're going with the fair and balanced education style, the the Fox News pedagogical methods, exciting and speaking of Fox News. There's also a rule that says teachers wouldn't be allowed to quote, single out one racial group of students as being responsible for the suffering or inequities experienced by another racial group of students one vote. Okay. We're not going to say who started all the wars. But Avram Moshi Rebecca Yehuda. It was yield. The thought of history. Teachers trying to navigate this one. Right. How do you get all the? People who couldn't dance this good had all the people who catch cab is good. And then and then the Mexican American war started itself. Fucking guys. I'm going home. The had a swimming race. I want to say. You're racist. Just to make sure there's a tangible penalty for sneaking nuance, or you know, reality propaganda into the schools. There's a second Bill that basically says triple stamp are double stamped from before. And you're allowed to sue any teacher you want. If you think they're being to scienc-, so great what could possibly go wrong and can't see this being abused at all should be fine girl on we'll beat them to it. I got a plan we enroll some kids in Arizona schools, and we just start suing the shit out of everyone the moment, they say anything true. Do we get this thing crashed? All right quick before ally offers up any thoughts on where we'd get those kids in the first place. We're gonna take a quick break and hand things over to my lovely wife, loosen. The horse. What's if it's a legitimate rape? Cooking can be fine. This week in Mississauga. I thought for this week was to do a year in review thing, but I decided against it. Because just looking at the sexism stories from any single week of the year was depressing enough. So instead, I thought I'd focus on the transition brought to stories this week one from two thousand eighteen and a somewhat more hopeful one from two thousand nineteen so representing two thousand eighteen this week will be a recent story out of sixteen thirty one a number of listeners sent me links to this video out of Egypt that shows what passes for judicial system among nomadic bedouin tribes. And it's the build a bridge out of her scene from the holy grail. Without the sardonic wit the video shows a woman who has been accused of being unfaithful to her husband and to determine her innocence or guilt rather than fuck around. With the whole big court thing with witnesses and evidence, they use a trial by fire. Literally. No, they don't set her on fire that would be bar Barrick, and it would smell horrible. And they don't want it to smell horrible. So instead, they lay an iron and a fire and wait for it to get red hot. Then they forced the woman to lick it three times and. According to the guys judging her trial if she's innocent the rod won't black on her blister her tongue. I should note here, by the way that the low in Egypt expressly forbids this practice, which is mostly just depressing because it means that happens so often that they had to make a law. But also, the people in the video aren't exactly hiding their faces from the camera asking the filmmakers to obscure their faces. They sure don't seem to be worried about getting punished for this. Because let's face it. Religious people in Egypt have to follow the law, even less than the ones in America. But let's move beyond that story. That's so two thousand eighteen instead I wanna focus on some good news or what passes as good news when you do a segment called this week and misogyny, so as it turns out Mormon so working hard to shed their label of being backward. Sexist and antiquated by announcing a rule change, the well, allow female missionaries to wear pants. Can you believe that shit, ladies and pants? Of course, they're not just letting in any old pans, they have to be long baggy slacks, and they can't be showing her to it as ankle. They also have to be. -servative -ly colored so Caucasian also women missionaries can't just wear pants any old where they still have to wear skirts at Sunday, worship, baptism moles conferences or other official Mormon functions. Mostly actually just when trekking through malarial jungles looking for humans who haven't heard about Joseph Smith's criminal record yet. Now, if you'll excuse me, the fifty one percent of the country that are women now control miss twenty five percent of the congress and apparently were still celebrating that. So I'll rush off to grab my party hat in Bong hand things back over to know, a heath and Eli thank you Lucinda and in Christian freakout news tonight, while children all over the world eagerly-awaited, their PlayStations toy trains and dental dams this holiday season, we hear the easiest were awaiting a very special gift of our own twenty teens Christian Christmas freakout, Anna. Talking about the greatest crispy. Christmas, a those christmasy. All right, Jen. So before we REVEAL OUR big winner any guesses for twenty eight teens Christian Christmas freak out the fact that you're still doing Christmas themed shit and twenty nineteen. Pretty good answer. I'm gonna guess Sarah Huckabee Sanders, finally got one of those White House Christmas trees inside herself all hurt and fantastic respectively. But no it was twenty eighteen and it was news. Which means we found out that everyone with a penis that isn't heathen Noah is a rapist and the biggest rapist of the mall. God. Call forward. Who's now? This all started when associate professor at Minnesota state Eric sprinkle tweeted, quote, the virgin birth story is about an all knowing all powerful deity impregnating a human team. There is no definition of consent. That would include that scenario. Good holidays. Well, and also your name is Eric's prankul. I just wanted to his name is Frank. Gotta do any kind. You just like Noah said, of course, he's right? I mean, even if we assume that Mary's testimony in Luke qualifies as consent. I I don't think it does. The nature of Nippons means that God made Mary do everything. Well, yeah. And also you and me well what I'm saying is technically got raped everybody ever if he's on nip it in a mission. So, you know, yeah. What God likes beer he likes to drink. But as you can see how this calendar says don't rape married today. Another don't rape Mary day. And it's worth noting that the that the most that any of the apologists are even trying to do is like plead God down to statutory rape on a technicality. Right exa-. They're pulling an are Kelly for their exactly. So the fact that this conversation is only less silly than how could superman fuck Lois lane because millions of people don't believe superman, Israel, didn't stop media, darling. Tucker Carlson from getting Mark Stein on his show to lose their goddamn minds about a tweet. Now, there's a lot of things to love about this interview. But my favorite moment is when Tucker Carlson thinks he's adding something when Stein is ranting about people not liking this tweet or liking this tweet and Tucker add something when he says quote, and it's not even brave. They know. Never say this kind of thing about Jeff Bezos. They suck up one in power. No, no. It's a common common mistake. Jeff Bezos, omniscient is e. Also as it raped at zero century tweens that we know us. We don't know that he's got a lot of money. No, there's one more thing. I want to point out about this story because I know a lot of you saw it Carlson almost certainly learned about this tweet from the organization turning points USA, which is a literal cya up funded by the coke brothers that pays students to inform on their liberal professors. So I'm just saying next time, your uncle points out crazy, the sun university campuses are remind him that we aren't the ones with literal dark money funded child. This by pointing to the right wing media. Or don't go to that Christmas or thanksgiving anymore. Just skip that and speaking of Christian freak outs next up. We have another story about almost anything. Reality happened again, Anna one more time. The greatest. It's pretty universal and this fits for a lot. So Christian snowflakes are having a meltdown again. And this latest example is all thanks to the Mattel toy company, the creators of the Barbie doll who announced their plan last week to create a set of dolls with a same sex wedding theme game. I mean heat there are only two same sex wedding themes, tasteless or political come at me Twitter. You know, I'm right? You know, I'm right to be fair. They all have to get their cakes from the same guy. I just do. He just does penises and flags. Congrats to Nick capsule and magic OB helping make this happen there. A couple who wanted to get a same sex doll couple as a gift for Jacoby little niece, but weren't able to find anything on the mass market. So they contacted Mattel and asked the company to consider ending their weird policy of producing hetero. Only doll couples because it's fucking 2019 grow up and it worked supply reached out to meet demand. It's amazing. But for some reason, the Christian community of self professed, Milton Friedman, Chicago school, libertarian economists. I don't know what any of those words. I just said me. They didn't enjoy this very very elegant market solution. I mean, it seems that way but to be fair, I'm pretty sure the ven diagram of, you know, shrill women offended by gay marriage and people who still buy Barbies for their kids is a circle he's out market share. So here's the reaction. We got from the Christian media hub life site news, quote, homosexual celebrations celebrations, they're going to be they're going to be coming to toils nationwide and Belise somebody do that. Hey is parties you could possibly put together and some toy isles that would be amazing heath. I I gotta tell you. I think you are underestimating how Gaya party, I can imagine. I don't think I am. I really don't. I am challenge accepted. See you at target. Wink, got it. Continuing homosexual celebrations are coming. If Mattel accepts a proposal to produce sets of same sex wedding dolls, and by the way, wedding was in quotes, this despite that whole thing with the supreme court ruling, I guess it's like, you know, Friedman blacks would be in quotes when they described the African. Well, it's okay here. We have a grown man who's rages calculated to say no uncertain terms that when he plays with Barbie dolls. He plays with them. Heterosexually david. What is the points? And continuing the quote, one more time lefty types seem to have an obsession with molding the kiddos to do their bidding way to make the gift all about yourself chief it literally says chief somebody. Maybe I'll follow suit and give everyone a stocking full of guitar strings handgun, ammo and beef jerky. What you know things. I like I would have been my guesses of things that I'm I'm biased to be the lifting. Article. I right. Is choices of gifts that he would like are very intentionally screaming? I'm angry about boy does kissing in a manly way a manly way with him. Beef. Yeah. So bottom line if Christian people are this offended by a depiction of the mere existence of gay people. I think we need to get some aggressively sexual gay dolls into the toy stores to hospital blanket party party doesn't matter. What we're talking about that always he's conclusion. That's that's the bottom line. Just engender. That's my pin tweet. Yeah. Top line too. And finally tonight we have a story about music for Christians to play during Christian sects. And if you're anything like me your first thought when you heard that was oh good. Maybe it's a meditation mantra compilation that you're says get consent get concerned. Over and over grownups, only grownups. But sadly, no, it's neither of those things. It's an album of bible friendly Christian. Fuck songs by gospel, artists Tamla men and her husband, David Mann. And apparently, it's meant for Christian couples who want intimacy without tasteless lyrics. I can see the title now girl, I'm going to you know, it'll be fun. I. I'm sorry. But this is the kind of product you could only think the world needs. If you've never fucked to the mighty mouse theme that is a fuck and wholesome song and the rhythms just right in here. I do now. So the men's are African Americans who don't seem to be aware of the biblical stance on their existence. They also seem unaware that. They look like a geriatric version of the Barbie dolls that never sell in whatever redneck town in Texas. They live in they're beautiful people is what I'm saying. They know they look like ceelo green is starring in a retirement homes production of the bodyguard. Beautiful people. Exactly. But their new album entitled us against the world is not beautiful. It's it's rough the they sound like jasmine and Aladdin singing be ballot duets about Philippian tubes in like scienc- baby making. It's like like boys to men lyrics got redacted by none right before the church, karaoke nights. Well, isn't that could be fucking phenomenal. Like, I was thinking it was just going to be like bowdlerized existing be Lear IX at but. No, it was way less for that. I mean that would have been great, right? Singing about finding you in the Alps constantly awesome. Now, they all through the nut procreate. Yeah. That'd be good. Anyway, we'll we'll work on it. Or we're going to now. And by the way, here's how they described the inspiration for the album, according to David, quote, we wanted to make music that people can have those intimate moments with and not listen and be like girl. Lemme slap. You bump you pop. You all of that stuff on green, you know, right before I dropped my R&_B album of the exact same title getting on the phone. Right now. Okay. Frame slap. You bump you those or not R&_B lyrics? Those are your book signatures from supreme court Justice. Brad kavanagh. Also, if you're slapping and popping her that's extra Christian isn't enough. That's and book, and it's in the book and you got like a forty eight hour rule. If it's these two exact. Papa m a little too hard. Yeah. So apparently, this is a big problem for Chris couples. I guess they're fully clothed and weeping with guilt try to jam penis out through one zipper in through another. I mean, that's a lot of attention. You're paying to that already. Music has a naughty word. God direction immediately because that crazy naughty word, but then Tamla man walks in and says there must be a better. Talk music. And speaking of which I think we're going to need ten seconds on the clock. That's about enough time to procreate right ideas for the Christian sects mix tape go. Let's make hug by berry, white and delights. I can't stop loving you. Because our religion rejects the concept of marital rape by rape. Charles. Let me smell your dick Clark New Year's rocking eve memorial. Popa read. Marvin straight and that we would of course, be heterosexual. He'll. All right. And now that Christians have something to fuck to. I guess our work is done heathy lie. Thanks as always to money. And when we come back Lee Strobel still won't give up on us. Everybody ally here with some exciting news, as you know, our very own no allusions doesn't really do debates. I mean. I mean, unless you count that time at Wendy's. That was serious. Sir, sir. You need, sir. Up pack, Brian. Okay agent and other, sir. And so other does Brevard properties are. Should should've given him the catch Beckett's when he asked them either way, we are pleased to announce that on January thirteenth he will be on the atheist experience, and we want you to tune in. But more than that, we want your stupid Christian oncological to tune in his well, we do or that Astle from your hometown. Who always comments on your Facebook posts or your dad because we've been looking forward to this almost as long as you have. Hey, no, no. I know the exit is deceptively far from from the stuff that said on the side. But I think it's still a felony to fuck with the signs. And I know they almost got it almost done. Okay. Okay. So tune in to watch Noah on the eight Theus experience. Live January thirteenth at five thirty PM eastern time and invite your shitty uncle to call to you know, you want to which what are you mother fuckers move by pop filter was noted. In the movie popular. It's hard to say which religious figure is the most full of shit. And I suppose any answer would be subject to interpretation. So I'm not going to say Lee Strobel is definitively more full of shit than Joseph Smith or Mohammed. But I will point out that we were able to fit all the stupid from their books into single calendar years, and that is not the case clearly as we now apparently have some tort type, dang glare. So here's yet. Another chapter of the goddamn case for fucking Christ. And rejoining us for yet. More of this shit is my lovely wife, Lucinda, loosen to welcome back. Come meet the new year the same as the old year though? All right. So this week we're going to be digging into chapter thirteen the evidence of appearances was Jesus seen alive after his death on the cross. Nope. So many easy answers that he has so many extra words it takes the next the kale. Holy. We learned right away that leaves equal opportunity here. This time are opening barter is of a black girl. There you go. It's so fucking random. So. Okay. So the point he's trying to make is Jesus had a lot more informed than just an empty tomb yell, but to make that point he starts with the infamous Alabama church bombing of nineteen sixty three. His literal example is all right. So you around the KKK kill those little girls. And then her body was lost. Well, nobody she was the same year. Funnier case for. How how do I explain that empty casket is not equal to savior of the universe? Are as tricky concept to I would need a good example. Okay. So the Jews were ruining the Germany. Is there loss World War One too? If you think about okay. So now, it's time for the twelfth interview. This is what I've been looking forward to this is going to be Gary Habermas who Lee bills as the guy with quote, the most sophisticated defense of the resurrection to date and quote. Yeah. And it's important assure will that we know that Gary Habermas could kick some ass if it came down to. Yeah, he tries. He's like this dude's a fighter in the marketplace of ideas, he has a sharp wit. Please. Don't google. Which is good advice. Actually because he looks like poverties come double. He also tells us about how it happened whipped up on Antony flew in a debate. And if you've never heard of Anthony flu that really on your he has after all, quote, one of the leading philosophical atheist in the world in quote is right there on the leaderboard. It's hard to follow those rankings. Like, we eat a playoff system. Complicated. No. But if the guy credited with naming the Notre Scotsman fallacy, the end, he became a Christian in two thousand four so, you know, one of those famous atheists to became Christian cable to fucking Di did than the Christians were like see Christian is a completed eighth you. There you go. He says I met him at his office at liberty university where he's a distinguished and I'm like bullshit. Doesn't matter. How that's bullshit. But just for the record. It ends with director of the master's program in politics. They have a master's degree in like g. Gee. The a master's degree in being wrong, extra smartest. Astor's to create motivated reasoning though. Right. Well, we also get tease for some gay sex. It never pays off in this injury. He says he also has a tender side, which I would discover quite unexpectedly before our interview is over right? Oh, so hope her gay sex. Playing. Tender lover. Or so we opens up the interview strong. He says isn't it true that nobody was actually looking at dead Jesus when he turned back into a live Jesus. He's it gets into this by saying, you know, we know dinosaurs are real because the fossils, and you can just feel the talk come on. You know, who I'm writing for? Sorry. Sorry. Bad example. We know Jesus God resurrected because of the lack of fossils. Show me Jesus fossil Emma fucking atheist right now. You say that as a joke, but they actually say that they actually say well, while nobody could show us the bones of Christ. He was visit format of an argument. They're making up. Yeah. It is. And the first place Domestos Corinthians. Which is to say right after Saul fell off his horse and had a nervous breakdown. He had a damn vivid dream that he not. League gets it. I'm tripping on troops. I see Garfield the cat with a nine foot penis history. Show me account with an eight-foot penis directly ten. Ten. Can you? Exactly Christ got Q eating. And then we slide into a bizarre tangent. Where leat demands proof that the passage from Corinthians. Gary have messes referring to is really an early Christian creed and not just shit that Paul said, but but since unless you accept Lee's argument, Paul created the fucking religion. I'm not sure how you draw a line with two things and his response apparently is to say, dude, even jus think it secretes fuck from years. Julia agrees with me. Yeah. And apparently, there's a verb in ancient Greek that means received a creed delivered a creed. This is definitely a fucking. And least drove us an amazing journalists the verb data. All that and Paul hook and used it. They're not for like time going in. I didn't understand what his point was. But this sexually this feels like the Christian version of me joking about things that happened before we started recording. We'll right though, after a pager two it occurs to lead that Paul quoting an early creed is actually way less convincing than Paul talking about something. He knew to be true. So you hastily addresses that eventually. Yeah. And don't worry it. Looks like pulse. Fat check the creek. That's what he said. Never miss is. Pretty sure that that's way, he was doing with Peter and James and relations. He was checking early Christian cre-. Well, I mean, he's positive about it. There's another very important word at play here. Paul wasn't just doing a casual slopes check at this. This was a fuck and historial, and that's an ancient Greek word for this is definitely true. And no luge should stop being a dick. It was a great journalist. Wait before the next subheading lid midst of the argument, he's presenting in this book is pretty convincing again. Four. I'm doing a great job. Okay. But if you're familiar with the Creighton question, you'll note that it also says that Jesus appeared before five hundred people at some point, which is never mentioned anywhere else in the gospel. So lead digs into that in a net flicks. In title, subheading, the mystery of the five hundred point so this discrepancy. He notes that his interviewees seems offended that he's even bring it up. Right, which happens a lot with the people that he interviews and also diminishes the ever living hell out of their credibility to view is really angry that I asked this than academic rebuttals, very rarely contained phrases like quote. I mean, give me a break. But they should. Your voice just go up at the end was that a fuck fucking question. How fucking dairy not a good sign when your expert says the fan. Yeah. Yeah. I do. I have their argument right here. They're saying sure nobody else mentioned five hundred witnesses. But Paul was first. So, you know, no point in repeating it all late assholes after harbormasters tiring Lee sheepishly interjects long enough to say, we'll still like it that guy appear before five hundred people in public seems like somebody would have written that down and how to Ramez response to why didn't any of those five hundred people or any of the people that they talked to later about it think the resurrection of a debt breeder was worthy of recording for posterity. His answer is literally, quote, how long the local stories circulate before they day out, really. And. We asked that question every week on scathing not fast enough. Come on. I mean, I still talk about the time in middle school. When I rolled an all sport bottle end over end down the table like five times and it landed straight up. It was fucking amazing. I retell that story about once a week. I hold a webinar about friends get get together with meeting. This is twenty five years ago that up right? Right. We moved from the pistols to the gospels were dead. Jesus was just popping up all over the place when I was little gophers with the hammer. Yeah. And is it just me? Or does the opening of carryover? Mrs answer have a real Dr Seuss field to it. Right. He starts talking about Jesus appeared did individuals appeared to groups he appeared outdoorsy appeared indoors. I guess what? Could he do it with a FOX? And once again, we retreat to the argument from well, if these people were lying, they must have been lying right away. Yeah. Who who does this convince all I start off as live? How that works a big meeting among the apostles? Okay. Guys who saw the risen Christ among his followers. Okay. All of you. Are you lying because you are going to have to stick to them? Okay. All right. You guys wanted to you want to do do over on that with the eyes closed. And turn off the light or and let's be clear because the list of all the appearances of Jesus in the bible, which is presented right here. Pales in comparison to the number of Elvis sightings in the eighties, right, which all happened within a few years of his death. And up of nothing. I have a notebook from high school with very very clear evidence about a long series of vaginal orgasms that. I call. Without ever seeing a vagina. It was amazing magical to story and when Lee for more accounts, however, mess goes to acts like anything else that can cooperate the New Testament how about more of the new test do. This written by the same guy. The les Paul equals, Paul. Yeah. He uses a lot of big words, but they're just there to distract you from the fat. His entire argument seems to be even the earliest Christians believed in Christianity about Jesus and then lease like Hough the entire New Testament seems to agree on the chief assertion of the New Testament that's pretty darn convincing. Maybe the most convincing thing ever. But I still had one more trick up my eighth Theus sleeve. So we get a subheading on Mark's missing conclusion. Right. Kind of hard not to at least address this part because every biblical scholar seems to agree that Marx was the earliest gospel in it never mentions the part where Jesus comes back to life that appears to people I want. Yeah. Right. We'll be clear. It does mention that in the modern versions, but all that ending shows added later doesn't mention that in the old ones modern versions Jesus skateboards past Mark jamming on his. Zoom. Did it say he was searching on Bing. Okay. Yes. Complicated. So big is actually an ancient Greek word. That's the search engine that doesn't make us. Look stupid. We're doing, and, but but hammer masses like Mark wasn't focused on every little detail. So obviously, unimportant stuff like the founder of the religion empowering, a ministry and physical form after having died publicly would get left out now. And again, even implies that Mark with savings. Some good stuff for the sequel. Mazing Lee weird wink of like, maybe you and I will find out when gut soups everyone to heaven. I'm like the grandpa from Princess bride. Do little excited just one last question. Columba? We got. Yeah. Or so he opens up the next section by saying quote without question, the amount of testimony and corroboration of Jesus post resurrection. Appearances is staggering and quote, and I feel like staggering would generally suggest at the very least appearing in multiple sources put apparently no the bible seems to generally agree with itself on this is enough to stagger Lee Strobel. There's one thing I've learned from this book is that I want to tell Lee Strobel a ghost story. Sweater from though. And if we ever meet him, I think you gotta tell them to go story. Absolutely. But the game will be how many famous hate crimes we can get them to mention. Right. So Lee Strobel Jesus never resisted arrest by the Romans. Did he Rodney King was a an employee? Ten points. Rodney king. But but staggered or not Lee is gonna toss out a few alternate theories. So that he can see Habur messed Harum treads, and we're gonna start with possibility one v appearances are legendary, and that's a pretty strong argument, especially when the evidence by their own admission are stories, they get increasingly grandiose over time. Right. How one might even skip over calling that evidence. And just look at the definition of legendary. Yup. Exactly. And holy shit. Is however masses rebuttal week. He says, okay. Even if it was exaggerated through legend, those something had to happen to start the legend. Dick Clark is real. So and of proof. Jesus. Thanks. Therefore, he am that. Yeah. And then he concludes that since something must have started the legend. It must also have been a dead guy starting back up again after being unplugged and plugged back in for thirty seconds, or whatever which would be like concluding that the kernel of truth at the heart of the odyssey is that way back in the day animals could talk all right. Playing oddball, you're planning, but let's let's compromise. Jesus rose from the dead and appeared to two hundred and fifty. You see that we just doubled. The odds of the record. How you could argue with math. He also tries to argue is way out of the legend hypothesis by citing the Lech. It's literally one of the best they have to. Yeah. So with that one debunked. I guess we move onto possibility. Number two, the appearances were hallucination. Okay. Jerry, eating your tail buddy. When you move on. And look this is a straw, man. In the sense that it's a stupid argument that nobody's making. We really don't need additional possibilities beyond the story where the guys sucks demons out of a crazy guy and puts them into suicidal. Pigs is alleged rights that pretty much doesn't but Strom it or not it's till the better argument than the actual assertion. They're making. So sure, let's hash. This one out even says at one point that Thomas was a skeptic skipping stone hallucinate and first of all yes, we do two of us. Don't even need drugs to to it. We don't have Thomas testimony. We have what other people say Thomas, Saul? Yeah. We have another middle school story, right leg. Yes. Mark had said that Matthew had said that Luke had said that he saw Thomas beaten up ten cops. So so another quick bit of bafflingly bad logic from the PHD here. He says, quote, if we establish the gospel accounts as being reliable, how do you account for the disciples eating with Jesus and touching him and quote, but but establishing the gospels as reliable is what you're trying to do. That's what you're tasked with the ultimate argument. Here is literally if I'm right? I'm right. Who makes up a lunch? I mean, besides the president, bad example. She's okay. But then Lee backs off a bit and later these very powerful arguments, and he says, okay, one if it wasn't a hallucination per se, but more like that thing that can hippies do after ritual has no result whatsoever. And then everybody starts going. Hey, did anybody else feel that? Oh, yeah. I'm sorry. But was having his first argument here, I know eighth you star. But what am I love that? Okay. Okay. Tell me if I'm wrong about this is his argument. Sure. Maybe they all lied because their entire religion was based on it. But atheists might also be lying about all the things. They don't believe. I. Yeah. That's it. And then he closes his interview with our mass with one more of his notorious heart balls, he says, so does this resurrection thing matter much, you think oh issues and lease like, and to be honest. I wasn't expecting to get a full page and a half off of this. But he started bawling like a baby and shit. So I figured I might as well pad my word count. Now what he does. Yes. So at a fucking nowhere. I have a message telling us the story of his wife dying of stomach cancer. 'cause k yeah. Those were this. This felt like Lee Strobel didn't have something to start the next chapter one of his ridiculous. Terrifying. Stores is like, oh, Gary. So just last thing any chance you have a good story about somebody dying black person. Maybe. Is she black whatever it's fine. As long as somebody tries. We're we're we're good. Can you pretend? She's black look and this is yet. Another example of the interview subject undercutting, the fuck out of his own credibility and Lee being too dumb to notice. Right. Why would you keep this? He basically says look I have to cling to this Christianity thing, or I'll be forced to deal with the fact that I've never gonna see my dead wife against. So of course, I'm being perfectly objective might as well end. This by being like, look, like allies, mom everytime. Religion comes up at Christmas. I'm just gonna stare at you. And till you start talking about something else. Okay. So you're. Of course, we've never get out of the lease. Trouble chapter that easy. One death. Never does it. So then we get the deliberation questions. We have four of them again. So starting with question one harbor mass reduced the issue of the resurrection down to two questions did Jesus die. And was he later seen alive based on the so far? How would you answer those questions and why he seemed to be dying to answer this excited about this one? Okay. I'm I'd ask whoever asked me those two questions and them to lean in really close leading really close cool. And then I'd whisper I'm holding a gun in my pocket. Get me on on. We are both taking this seriously, equal amounts. Yeah. I'd answer them nimbly. I love did. You says dies questioned one. So pretty much. No matter what they're half. Right. Yeah. He is not still alive. We can all agree on that. All right. All right question to how influential is the first Corinthians. Fifteen creed in Urus assessment of whether Jesus was seen alive. What are your reasons for concluding that it's significant or insignificant in your investigation? Not at all. And for the same reasons. I don't believe women who say they think metoo has gone to. Well when trying to determine if the bible is correct. The fact that the bible says so is insignificant. I feel like this was meant to be a trick question. It was supposed to be harder. Not sure homes pistons, you know, I it was pretty darn influential especially the part where it doesn't match up to the goddamn gospels later you find out. All right. Two more questions three ship into few minutes to look up some of the gospel appearances cited by Habur mass. No, yeah. Usually. Absolutely not do. They have the ring of Jesus. Do they have the ring of truth, you and? Wait them as evidence for the resurrection. I love that. Even this question has built in bullshit, right? Really thirteen chapters of the best he can even hope for us. But it sounds like a true thing might sound like though, right? And the ring of truth that sounds like an item you'd need to make it past a fourth castle or Roth. All right. So finally question for hammer. Mass book about how the resurrection had a personal meaning for him. Have you? So awful have you faced a loss in your life. He li- how would believe in the resurrection of the way, you view it. He li-. I mean, I look I lost all fucking ear on this book that. Yeah. I mean, I I know some people who who turned out to be not immortal. But none of them was Jesus Christ. Belief in his resurrection doesn't really come into play. Let's get to the underlying manipulation here. Yes. I guess I would feel better to know that my dad is just ignoring me. Accurately burning in hell. We got resurrected as some shitty thing that can't talk. Right. Right. Well possibilities. Okay. So on that note, we're going to bid leeann not so fun to do for the night. But we still got another chapter and a goddamn conclusion. So we'll be back soon with even still more case for Christ. Before we raise the drawbridge tonight. I wanted to encourage you one more time to tune in to see me on the eighth easiest experience. Next Sunday, I'll have links on how to watch live on the show does for this episode. And if you missed that, we'll have links on how to watch it in archives on our Facebook page anyway, that's all the blast move. We've got for you tonight. But we back in ten thousand twenty two minutes with more. If you can't wait that long be on the lookout for brand new episode of our sisters show, the scepter cry debuted at seven AM eastern time on Monday, uneven episode of our sisters shows hot friend godawful movies debut at seven eastern on Tuesday. And then even newer ups over half sister. She'll citation needed. They being at noon eastern on Wednesday. Obviously this episode would ring hollow if I neglected to thank Keith Enron for being the light to my darkness. I didn't think loosened delusions for being the yen to my Yang. I need to. Thank you light positive for being the oil to my vinegar also wanna think Bobby from central Illinois for providing this week's Farnsworth boat that been there. It's shitty. My parents live there, actually, but they're not the ones with the confederate curtains. I promise. But most all of course, I want to thank this week's best bipeds Thailand. Chris Benjamin Cherie Thomas Russ. Just David nNcholas Dustin. I think therefore, I can Emily g and Nadia max. Psomas Thailand, Chris Benjamin, Cherie and Thomas who are so bright. They're not allowed in dark sky reserves. Russ just David nNcholas who's Cox are so legendary they renamed that dog breed Russ, Justin, David, nNcholas or spaniels and Dustin. I think therefore I gave Emily Nagin naughtiest where so sexy the MPAA race, their I d photos together, these fourteen formidable forward thinking, folks, formerly afforded our form the fortune to foretell the forthcoming forfeiture of force foreclosure a four skits from fuckers that forbid four play and fornication forevermore by giving us money, not everybody has the money. It takes to give us money. But if you have money, you can make a purpose of donation patriot dot com slash giving atheist whereby you'll early access to an extended ad free version of every episode or you can make a one time donation but going on the donate button on the right side of the homepage is scathing ADS dot com, and if you'd like to help in more of like an afterthought kind of way, you can also help but time, but like in our Facebook page leaving us a five star review on I two ten telling a friend about the show legal services for this podcast provided by the law offices of Andrew Torres, Tim Robertson handles our social media and our audio engineers Morten, Clark Wilson world, all the music that was used in this episode was was used with permission. If you have questions coming. Desperate to find all the villain the contact page at scathing dot com. That's teachers spending half the lesson on non Euclidean geometry. Plus, you could also be five to could also be seven. The preceding podcast was production of puzzling. Thunderstorm, LLC copyright, twenty nineteen all rights reserved. Hi, it's Jamie, progressive's employee of the month two months in a row. Leave a message at the. Hi, jamie. It's me, Jamie. I just had a new idea for our song about the name your price tool. So when it's like tell us what you want to pay. Hey trombone goes, blah, blah, blah. And you say we'll help you find coverage options to fit your budget. Then we just all do finger snaps while a choir goes, savings coming at ya. Savings coming at ya. Yes. No. Maybe. Anyway, see you practice tonight. I got new lyrics for the rap break. Progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates. Price and coverage match limited by state law.

Lee Strobel rape Gary Habermas Jesus Paul hook Illinois Twitter Mattel Egypt America America Noah Roger Ebert Dick Clark PHD director Mark
FFR 141: Blade

Feminist Frequency Radio

59:46 min | Last week

FFR 141: Blade

"Friends, did you know that feminist frequency recently launched the Games and online harassment hotline while we sure did it is a confidential text based emotional sport resource for folks who make play Games you can learn more at games, hotline, Dot Org and please please help us spread the word. So we can reach the people who need it the most. This film does not traffic in any subtleties whatsoever. You wonder if something means what you think it means it does they're going to underline and they're gonNA put a pin in it. Welcome to feminist frequency radio. This is the show that asked you to be critical of the media you love. I'm Asia Sarkisian and I'm joined today by two women who would really rather stay home than follow your Super Secret Dance Club deep in the heart Los Angeles Caroline it hell to the no help. And every atoms even if there is no bloodbath that's going to make its way into that club as still I'm not interested. Yeah Yeah. Yeah cool. This week we're going to be talking about the nine hundred ninety, eight Wesley. Snipes. Hit the laid which Oliver Patriarch backers had an opportunity to vote on. So this episode is courtesy of olive you stay tuned. Friends hey hello. Yeah. So let's bring it. Do what they're doing life I need more of that Halloween energy. Let's ramp it up. Come on ladies. I mean. See Before Ya. So I will say I'm in this weird place right now like emotionally and psychologically and everything where it's like I know that that I have absolutely no reason to to not be as depressed anxious and terrified and angry and everything as I have been for months. and. Yet, and knock I'm knocking on wood here like for whatever reason and there is no reason like there's literally no reason I'm feeling a little bit better like just a little bit less like terrified a little bit less miserable a little bit less like constantly on edge about everything. So you know whatever I'm just GONNA try to like not question it too much. You know just Detroit and I think maybe part of part of part of it is that I have been. I mean kind of forcing myself most days to go on. Risk long walks which I think have the you know they have the benefit of like. Getting me into out of my head and into my body for a while they are part of my problem has always been that I'm. Because of childhood trauma and stuff I'm very hyper vigilant I'm always on edge. I'm very and so my nervous system is always like it never shifts into the it's always in fight flight flea mode or whatever. It never basically shifts into the kind of just like low key, whatever's standard operating that most of us are supposed to spend most of our lives in I, don't experience that most of the time I feel like. The daily walks at least for now are helping me get a little bit closer to that Then I usually am so that's you know whatever it's. It's a nice. I. Still Feel I don't feel great by any means I just feel mar marginally less terrible and I'm grateful for it. And that's all you can do is you know, hey, I'll take marginally less tear wellness. Yes A win. I also just want kind of add to that a little bit of like that is awesome that you recognize that in yourself in let you'll just like appreciate this while it lasts Kinda thing. Yeah. because I found that during this isolation times that my ups and downs are just so much more frequent and I just have to keep reminding myself that my downs happen that there will be ups again like it's not linear and so you know really acknowledging in and feeling good. Feeling a little bit better than terrible is something to celebrate for sure. Yeah, and that it'll come again right? Exactly. You know there say I on youtube a a YouTube Channel It's not a huge youtube channels pre small youtube channel, but it's this he self his name is Douglas. Block and he's like an older dude he's like in his seventies and he bills himself as depression recovery. Expert or something like that, and one of his mantras is this too shall pass just like the way when you are depressed, it's very easy to to get into the mindset of like this is going to last forever. I'm never going to get better I'm going to be miserable forever and you know t to tap those reminders and often we need them to it when we're at our lowest we need. Them to come from outside of ourselves but because we can't, we can tell ourselves it. This too shall pass, but we won't believe it. But nonetheless, like like hold that idea that like or that facts really that you know that that the states of deep depression are like impermanent right and So anyway, like little nuggets of wisdom like that to are are kind of providing me some solace and comfort in. In these difficult times. Awesome. Thank you for sharing macaroni. have. What we talk about some fucking vampires now. All right well, this year. No the year was nineteen, Ninety, eight, nine years after Tim Burton's Batman had ushered in Agreem- New Era for Superhero films ten years before the Marvel cinematic universe would kick off with two thousand, eight iron and twenty years before Black Panther would give us another film centered on a black superhero from the pages of marvel comics. The time was right for blade film that tap into audiences, appetites, both for grim dark superhero films and for violent supernatural action. Star. Wesley. Snipes was perfectly cast as the STOIC, day Walker Blade who uses the tools created by his grizzled mentor whistler in his battle against the secret world vampires blade and whistler spend their spare time trying to out masculinity. The Of Start, Deacon Frost Rhythms, the established hierarchy of power among empires and aims to usher in a new era of global vampire dominance. I would like to start. I would like to start, with Roger Ebert if I may. Tokay So I read Roger Everts Review of blade just out of curiosity. and. The opening paragraph is really interesting and I kinda just wanted to share it as a framing for the film maybe like in retrospect I guess he says at a time when too many movies are built from Flat TV style visuals of people standing around talking movies based on Comic Books Represent One of the last best hope for visionary filmmaking. It's ironic that the comics which borrowed their early visual style for movies should now be returning the favor. And I was like what the fuck? Did you watch the review of late is is pretty glowing. Yeah I saw that he liked it. But but I mean we have to remember that too that that was. Before the MC you and really. And really before it's like now, superhero films feel to me anyway kind of blase. So but here's the one thing that I really liked about blade and is was it is its visual style and sensibility and when I mean by that is not just not just that the action scenes I think are like you know stylishly presented and whatnot and well-choreographed and kind of fun to watch which I think they are but more than that. There's real thought given to the production like the look of the film. Specifically it's the way that blade and Whistler. I'll I'll. Blades world. In Los Angeles is a world of like. Old Cars old buildings. You see when you see the city as blade inhabits it it it's it's you know the contemporary Los Angeles obviously the film you know Nineteen Ninety Eight, but it feels like a it feels kind of like. Like. Sort of the city from seven or the city like. Just sort of like a a kind of. An. American. City that's not rooted in any specific time, but certainly isn't like of the now it's it's this and meanwhile you can contrast that with the world of the Vampires who are all sleep architecture skyscrapers is. Obviously, techno music computers, you know high tech like. Modern. There's really an interesting like and very deliberate contrast going on in the film visually between those two things and what this film made me realize is part of my problem with the MC you part of my boredom with the MC you. Is that because all of those films half to exist in in the same universe? Not just literally but kind of totally, and so they all share a similar look and feel right for consistency like they're all episodes of the same TV show. Essentially, there isn't room in the M. C. You really for filmmaking for for there to be individual films that feel. Distinctly Different Tone and do really interesting things with their production and look you know in the way that I think blade does. So it's very interesting that you point that out because I you're you're absolutely right but I think one of the things that the Marvel TV shows or rather the Netflix shows did was absolutely offer these difference that x Ray I mean at least like if you think about the first season of daredevil versus Jessica Jones versus Luke Cage Watch Iron Fist fuck off but. Deliberately, presenting three different kinds and styles and places in New York right? You know it's very interesting to the series were allowed to construct those like very vibrant world I have nothing smart say about blade like this movie. This movie y'All. I. Tapped out about forty seven. Because it was stuff going on that I was like I cannot take any of the seriously not that the movie demands that that we take it seriously like they're they're movies were moments where the movie is like having tremendous fun with it self and encourages you to do the same thing but I just. Dislike hocus-pocus y'all I wished I had seen this in nineteen ninety eight so that I would have had a nine, hundred, Ninety, eight frame of Reference Says Anyone Watch movie before yeah, I watched it around the time it came out and and you know as a an uncritical certainly consumer at that time I. Like I, you know I kind of liked it. I mean I enjoyed it as a stylish like exercise I certainly enjoyed. Donna Logan as. You know cocky You Know Assistant to to Deacon Frost or whatever the right hand man me. That's a bad. Choice, of words given the focus on his hands and excited. And it's like and I do think like I. Think. I hit that time. I didn't have any any perception whatsoever of how shitty this films like. Gender politics are shitty. It's like reinforcement of of very very. Repressive Matt kind of masculinity is I didn't have any that rattling around in my head. So I was just like, wow, you know bracelets slips Wesley Snipes. Is really great in this role he looks rat as hell. Yeah. It was like it was just fun to watch. It was just a fun movie and I and I still think to this day that opening scene is extremely effective like the the club. The secrecy of the club, and then like that the the build up and then the blithe coming from the sprinklers like it it it really works like it's a very effective kind of opening for this film very important question about that scene. If you were in a club and some liquid dropped from the ceiling to you would you taste it? Oh No. White. I was like. So I had never seen this movie before I kind of wanted to I was curious about it but I I've now seen it twice in the same amount of months like I watched this on lockdown and so I was not really very excited to watch it again but like felt like I had to be You know to have anything to say, right? I didn't remember the details of it and I I. Was Kinda reading a little bit about it while I was watching it. Kind. Of You know in the background or whatever, and Roger Ebert Review really like helped me look at it a little bit differently just because I again wasn't so taken with it the first time, and so just reminding me are having someone remind me that this is a superhero movie that's very rooted in superhero life of like and again before the MC you before like superhero movies were such a huge thing it made me look at it differently and I don't I don't. It didn't make me look at it differently and be like that's a great movie but let me it it. Let me. All of the things that I want to be annoyed about in terms of not in terms of like gender politics or masculinity and all that but in terms of like. The cartoonish nature of it, I just kind of let that all go and I was able to enjoy the movie in a different way. I guess if that makes sense right where I was like that dialogue is stupid that's overacting. This is whatever Blah Blah Blah like all of that shit I was like whatever it's fucking. It's supposed to be like this. Yeah, and that helped me. Barrel through it again a little bit. Yeah I mean, it's so when I say that I have nothing smart to say about this movie that's absolutely accurate I apologize to anybody listening to this episode. and trying to figure out what my point is. One. But I will say that one of the reasons why I never watched it when it came out. was because I just have never been particularly interested in Van Pires. As like a supernatural species you know, and there's a whole host of reasons why that is but you know the ones that most pertinent to my consumption of this movie. Is that. Our our vampire stories, certainly, the most famous and mainstream ones are really about class in ways that don't get unpacked enough and so like the vampires often you know an Avatar of like old world elegance luxury aristocracy, and then the folks sort of allied against the vampire There's often questions about like you know like their their race or their ethnicity, they tend to be from the working class or the middle classes. And so there's this allure that's built into. The figure of the vampire there just as tiresome to me in a lot of ways you know. Some, whatever you love. Ebony, over here being like I have nothing smart. I don't. Like this is why you know took so long to see this movie but what I found interesting about this movie, one of the few things is that it's not set in Europe, right? Like. So many of our, you know famous back or tales are set understandably near, but this is set in America it's set in this alternative universe. La. When the bloodbath club with like secret clubs where you enter them through fridges which I did find. Very cool. But I think there's something very interesting when you pull like the vampire meath oss out of old world Europe and then map it somewhere else and so like I was just I was really interested in how you have like all of these different like the Vampire, Council for instance, and you have all these different dudes on the Vampire Council I think maybe one woman but they're all ostensibly from somewhere else I'm like, why do you meet here? Like what is it about like la? What I'm saying like I'm not trying to pick the part a the movie for this I'm not saying this is the plotter, but I'm just like. Why here? Why is it that you wouldn't be like in? Paris or you know Johannesburg or wherever well I. I like I think it is. Interesting that clearly vampires here with that high. Council are very much associated with like wealth and power. And we can imagine that maybe there in la I mean, I mean, they're they're I think they're they're a global outfit, right the the idea with with them being such a diverse group is like representatives from probably from enclaves like all over the globe right or something like that. But probably they have their their hands in the entertainment business or you know whatever like we can speculate about that doesn't spell any of it out. But clearly like the vampires are very much like they are elite like they are elite near are wealthy, they're powerful you know you have do care as. Always. And like interesting to burn casting for me as the head of the council because he is an actor who I sort of I think of him kind of to me. Anyway, he is the closest thing we have to A. Modern Day. Peter Laurie and Julia. There's something a little queer coded about a lot about is you know his performances his affect to ev everything? But what's also interesting to me is then you have Deacon Frost right this young upstart or whatever Dorf even worse. Yes. Makes me laugh, and like I guess what's interesting to me about the that dynamic is is it almost sort of ends up there ends up being this thing where? It almost seems like if if Deacon Frost hadn't come along and like destabilize things You know things wouldn't be as bad as they are and therefore to me it's like the analogy in my head for the that whole dynamic is that like Oh Deacon, frost is like the trump is trump figure and the council is like the the. The quote unquote the. Cancer whatever like if he would have been fine if he had come and stay like they're the Lincoln project right or whatever likes like. Had to come in and when no? Like they're absolutely terrible to right and we shouldn't like. Whatever like I dunno, there was just something about that dynamic words like the destabilizing force that comes along that. You know that to thwart the the also evolve deeply fucked up like fourth that already exists in is like deeply entrenched or whatever. Yeah. Yeah, you know it it definitely brings like a minor. What am I trying to say a little minor depth to the To the narrative it's not just like good versus bad. It's like good versus two phases of bad right like the the the tension between whether you're a pure blooded or you are turned, which is interesting like I don't. I don't see a lot of vampire mythology that has like pure blood vs turned like it's usually just age like you have to be turned at some point So I, thought I thought that was like I don't know interesting in quotes like I didn't really give a shit about any of it. Just like the movie would have been. Shorter of you taken all that out what I found interesting that I didn't really take in on the first viewing was how deeply Asian? Representation and culture is the backdrop of this film. and. I don't. I like I. Actually googled to be like, did anyone write about this? Is there any discussion of this and everything came up about bladerunner because you type blade? Yeah. So I don't really know what it is, but there is a little bit of the fighting scenes are definitely influenced by like you know Asian Fighting like Kung Fu movie films, right? There's that but it also like the there seems in Chinatown in Los Angeles when they're when they are in. When there's the outside confrontation between Blade and frost that is in Chinatown in l., A. and when they're talking about humans like in general, they're showing shots of people in Chinatown right or in that area. And then you have the Asian nightclub with the businessmen and the like the sort of quote unquote schoolgirls it just I couldn't really make sense of that choice. I don't think it's necessarily bad but it feels very intentional because you don't usually have a background or backdrop of people who aren't white as without thinking about it. Right Yeah that was one of the things that I liked going back to carol was saying about the creation of lades world is that I loved how? Effortlessly, multicultural and diverse the world was so as. Is Accurate about an urban environment. There are people of all different backgrounds there. So like you know he would be in one scene he be standing in front of like you know some Bodega data's and you know like you said, you know there are scenes in Chinatown and nothing is made of that as if it's something startling, it's just this is the city these are the people who populate. The the city but it speaking of you know how important like Asian Culture Asian people are but in the background for this phone so I watch. Movies with. If they're available and I was so frustrated because in that scene in the nightclub. The, there's you know like these businessmen talking and the schoolgirl group wrapping. Say asian-language oh, I saw that I don't. Fuck Lake seriously. That's all you can do, and of course, later in the film like at the very end blades in Moscow and Russian language and You could provide more information. It's just clearly the information is you don't feel the need to be specific. You know when we're talking about certain groups of people it was so irritating 'em fucked up. Yeah I mean I I, like that. I like that this. Isn't a world of white people right. This isn't a Los Angeles of just white people but it's it's a Los Angeles like some black people and some Asian people like that's not like L. La General it was just I. I don't know if anyone like has background on like the comics or on the film making of this like I'd be really curious about that specific choice just just because it was clearly very intentional. And I also wanted to know like speaking of that La Maga. that. Vampire God. So much like you know the the speech in the rituals and stuff are in some Slavic language, but the vampire God that they're trying to rouse is called the Maga and I was like, okay where's this God from? Are you trying to suggest that this is like a Mexican God which would make sense there in la right I just wanted more of that. Touch every hole, but I just need some answers. Yeah. So yeah totally I. I. Think they're like a bunch of things to unpack here around like gender and fat shaming. You know there's a lot of stuff. So like wild, there are well, it is a film that is like you know there are lots of people of Color in it which at the time I guess is like something to celebrate ish like it stars a Black Superhero which you know was never You don't get a lot of mainstream black superheroes in general especially then we still don't the. We're like one wine. Mc You film centered on a Black Superhero comes out and it's like the biggest deal ever. Actually by now be pretty standard right I mean I mean yes. So yeah, totally. So Okay Kris Kristofferson Place Whistler. which is hilarious and wonderful. And Whistler is like buddies with blade like they work together whistlers family was murdered by Vampires, and so now he's been his life dedicated to like building gadgets to fight them or whatever. They'll like Carolyn. You brought up the masculinity a little bit earlier like maybe we can dive into that because their relationship is so frustrated. I mean. It's so frustrating and and all. But also I was watching this film. It was like this this reminder of like Oh. This is a literally like exactly. Mean exactly the same like kind of masculinity. Sort of depiction of masculinity and like a details around masculinity and that were like, absolutely you big witness in say video games of like the early two thousands. Aries from God of War Dante, whatever you know. Whatever and all those dudes that are went on those vengeance quests because their families got murdered and everything but. Yes. So this film like. The. Home I. got it. It's so it's so frustrating. There's that scene where. The. Where We haven't even mentioned Karen yet. Yeah, I figure we'RE GONNA. Get. into. Messy complicated. So he in of this movie. Yeah. So Like the masculinity stuff like just for example, when you find spoilers that whistler dies. Earth dying. He like literally, the these two people clearly care about each other and love each other and have like. He whistles like a father to blanche right like that is they've they reiterated that verbally many times and the last thing that whistler says to him is walk away you stupid son of a bitch. Yeah and and he stoically walks away. You know the music swells right? It's like this kind of slow motion like serious walkaway shot or whatever, and the music swells to suggest like the depth of feeling in blades heart but he doesn't like betray any of it as Whistler Hasta like. Ultra manly thing of killing himself but. The when I was going to say about with Karen, is that earlier she has a little conversation with blade where she tries to like get a little bit of human. Emotion out of him with Roger Whistler and she says, like you care about him a lot. You know basically and he says something like we have a good arrangement, he makes the weapons I use them. And she says. She says my mother used to say a cold a cold heart is dead heart and it's this line that you know us unsteadily it's like it's sort of. She's like critiquing played for being so unfeeling but the film absolutely like. Like his his lack of emotional affect is absolutely crucial to this films like glorifying of him and presenting him as this incredible bad, ass right like it's not quite there is no critique happening here it is pure like. Absolute likes Revelry of the in that kind of that STOIC Standard that of of masculinity and of course, it's laced with. Misogyny I, mean, there's there's a moment where. Blade says to Frost WHO's wearing like SPF fifty thousand sunblock he says your mass, your Mascara is running. Later when Frost Knox Blade down for a minute he says like you're a little bitch. So it's always like reinforced by. By obviously that that like how do we define ourselves as men well by hating women for one thing and by not showing like actual human emotion. Yeah and in fact, showing human nation is. The the one soft spot that blade has, which is his memories of his mother like. The vengeance he carries in honor of his mother is ultimately used against him right? Like it turns out surprise if you don't know what happened to this. Who Cares it's movies twenty years old at this point. But so his turns out his mom is still alive. His mom is now at with Deacon. Frost Aka Chris Angel Aka. Scott STAPP from creed and like you know. Like it is blades one pot and she is able to exploit that Degan is able to exploit that is it to suggest like no blade is effective only insofar as he is completely divorced himself from. Feeling anything for anyone. So okay, look. One he his mom died in childbirth. So those memories like where we keep seeing the mom what the fuck you wouldn't actually vampire not just let and then also the facts of. The fact that the mom was like Erik like as if she would recognize her child that she's never signed right like I. Like he's blaming he's famous right. So she's probably been checking in on them like you know reading the newsletter. Almost, turned out people have really heralded like Wesley Snipes at like playing this role and you know he he was like the desired actor to play this role when they were casting it and I think when we get into this masculinity stuff that we're like the caroline was just talking about you know I, it shows. Like I can't really celebrate his acting in this like there isn't there isn't a lot of new like the ideas that he's this tortured figure indata. So boring whatever But even if I take away the like I'm bored of that in general in terms of like. The only reason that we know that he is tortured is because the movie fucking tells us like it's not because he has like some nuanced performance he's just this fucking stoic violent dude and you know not to disparage him completely in this. But like I really like the scene that you talked about caroline where he just walks away in the music swells like it's not like there was like A. Twitch on his face or zoning that would convey like any kind of emotion here. You know right? I think he I think he. I mean I think I still think he's perfectly cast because he looks like He. I just can't imagine anyone looking. As. Cool and this. Even like another example is when blade I cease Karen she's bit and dying and You know he probably would have killed her that was insinuated he would have killed her so she didn't turn into a vampire. You get a flash of his mom the scene that he would never have actually remembered. But you get a flash of his MOM and so he sees those black woman around his mom's age like you know he wants to save her, and so it's not that you saw him. Like feeling emotion, they just showed a flashback and you put two and two together. Yeah, you know what I mean like it just like little things like that that I'm just like. You know whatever, and again, like I said at the top of the show, I like forgave. Stuff in the second watch through because I was like superhero movies in the nineties but at the same time like. You. Know it's still oh no, it's troubling. I mean I. I feel like because it's now if this movie came out today, I will be tweeting so much anger about like. Everything because it's like twenty two years old you know not say that it's culturally like inert at this point, but I can regard it more as like a cultural artifact of the time and like not that these ideas by any means have been. Dispersed dismantled at all but. I. Don't feel like this film is. I. Don't feel like the some would've been made quite this way today, right? Now. either. Like. I mean there's also the that to me like super fascinating and troubling but fascinating way in which like you know right before the big final battle right blade is he's weakened right? He's he's boy and so what happens to enable him to confront to confront? He. Oh. He has to drink Karen's blood from the open wound on her from when she was bitten previously and is. So it is. Then it is clearly a stand in symbolic sex act right in which he. So he consumes the woman right? The man consumes the woman essentially to, and thus his power is like unleashed or restored. You know can can we talk about the enthusiastic consent that happened in the scene and I'm using that? CAST here I like she is yelling don't stop over and over and over again when you're like I kept. Because I had the captions on and I was like issue saying don't stop or start like this feels really fucking weird. It's obviously as you know if you WANNA get into like the mythology of vampire lore and stuff like sex and like drinking blood is all interconnected and the you know the The What sort I'm looking for like you're not supposed to do it kind of thing. Right the fact that she's screaming don't stop for like fucking ten hours while he's drinking her blood, it was very disturbing. That's part of Vampire Lore that you know. Part of what makes Vampires so attractive is that They infuse everything, sensuality, right and so in addition to the access that they give you to like a mortality or excuse me, you know super strength or whatever. It's this way of living carnally that infuses absolutely everything about you saw like hate the fact that his drinking from her was essentially a sex scene I found it hilarious. How much of a sex scene it was in? You know moaning don't stop don't stop don't stop it was just it was. So this this film does not traffic in any subtleties whatsoever. You wonder if they mean if something means what you think, it means it does they're going to underline it and they're going to put a pin in it fucking the sexy mom times. Is that it's just a little eyes lips coupon like the movie I feel like the movie was kind of like, okay. Whatever fine and then then as soon as they get into like Karen gets kidnapped and they go to the temple thing, it just goes bat shit from there. That's when it when I'm like Oh, do I have to watch this again like I just that all everything that happens after that point I'm just like a massive. I roll. This phone went full tilt Boogie. Did Not, go back you know. Read. Our through. I read that they made changes to the end because Originally Frost turned into this big like blood blob and the CGI was so bad that audiences didn't like it. So that's why they kept him in his human form. I was like they really were going for it at the end. Okay. Listen I wrote a list of things that cracked me up in this movie starting with like defrost tech coffin To me up. But the end of the movie like I writing down seeing after seeing when blade I don't know who he's fighting in that moment when they're doing like. Alternating roundhouse kicks in. Gary me lose my shit. Blade. Blade takes out. Quinn and grabs the sunglasses from the air. Had my or fourth heart attack of the night Mercury the vampire. With. Straight out of you know like an extra from the Matrix with the the white baby doll dress and the kind of chunky hair and whatever. When Karen takes her out with Vampire Mace and it looks like she's just taking a of Benakka and Lost My. Head explodes. But the thing that really I don't know why I was crying when Luke here is. About to be executed. By sunlight at the beach and the Sun comes up and I'm like Oh wait the other vampires they are aren't they going to die to it turns out there head until motorcycle leathers. down. Before that, there's a scene in the car where you're like what the fuck is this scene where she's putting sunblock on. Face and then you go out and you're I. thought it was makeup at first but they reference it being sunblock later and I was like y'all. So you just put on some funky conceal good to go like what's your problem? Why would you just outside all the time? League why is this such a? Day Walker is so easy to circumvent like the so called Liberal, you got pretty easy. Then you get the next scene or whatever a couple of scenes later where there in the park and he's just standing there in the middle of date like foster staying there and it'll daylight and like they've got sunblock on and you're like, you're like. Like blade is like. Like how is he out here in the Oh shits vampires have discovered city grid. Lock. This brings up something interesting though like you know. So if we can transition into our discussion of race, which this film destroyed does not have the range for some of the conversations as China half, but it is kind of interesting to think you know if you know UV light is the problem. There is something very interesting about blade as a black man being the hero of this film right and being. Served. Like this beacon of. I don't know I. Don't WanNa say justice really. But surely this kind of. Divine arm takes out evil. There's something very interesting about. Having that embody in a black man but this foam simply has no idea. What's Leon Outrageous. and. So when like when Frost says something okay. The whole like idea about being pure blood and being born a vampire versus being turned into one I wasn't quite sure how that happens like how are pure blood vampires? Born whatever that's not the point. The point is the film tries to suggest something about race and so when Deacon talks to blade, he's like you need to be honest with your blood. You know these people will never accept. You don't be an uncle Tom out here I was like. No. No you'll get the range to have this conversation like the ball is always suspect when white person caused a black person uncle Tom but also. You can't map something as complex as like our current attitudes towards race onto this fictional species like it. It does not work that way. Yeah. There's definitely like some images in the film that I found like potent and interesting like I. Think part of what makes the the the opening dance club scene interesting to me is laid as this is a black man standing against a sea of what looked to me like. Like wealthy white people like elites like they looked to me like trust fund kids or like people right now like who whatever they borrow the dad's Mercedes. And whatever like. Like and and you you have like the guy who gives them the serum is, is like a black man and there seems. Like solidarity there but it's not explored at all. Yeah, like it's. You know, and then there's like the the few run INS with the with security or or law enforcement i. mean there's the security guards that come into the hospital and shoot blade right and he turns around. Like he's surprised raise. Like. You. Must be kidding me whatever right right exactly. Hilarious, that he would be surprised at. The? But that's a little short while later in Los Angeles. The figure WHO's the he's not a vampire, but he's the I forget what the term is for him but you know he's a familiar what do they calm ethanol for me? Yes and like blade kind of drags him out onto the street and like draws a huge gun on him like a black man drawing a gun on a in the middle of the street in the middle of. Los Angeles on a cop like and there's no you know there's like that that moment should have been something more than it is yeah. Yeah. Yeah. No. This show like this, the like both of you are saying this movie doesn't acknowledge race. In ways that it could have. Yes. Right. It. Doesn't acknowledge it when it should but then tries to introduce it in other ways in which it's not quite. Yeah Yeah you know and it's not quite as sure footed yeah is. One thing before we wrap up this conversation as I do WanNa talk a little bit more about Karen and not that there's like a ton to talk about with her but I'm interested in Karen for what she could have been more. So than what she actually was because you have she's a hematologist like she is a smart like professional woman who gets Pulled into this underworld and is like GonNa, find a cure guinnes figure that shit out and I'm like. Go like do that's cool. Man like a good for you for like not taking shit and just being like, yeah, I'm freaked out. But also like I'm GonNa Roll with the punches and come in and Change Shit and like I want it like I don't know of the other blade movies like. I imagined she's in them. I don't see is I I never saw them. But when I looked this up on appeal indicated that she was only in this spell really see that's such a shame because I feel like she could have just been this like she could've taken over like Whistler's Roy or something like that like you know be made me a better serum. She's GonNa. Move into some kind of like. Partner you know type role or whatever but I don't know I guess that didn't happen. Yeah so yeah. I. Don't know I just thought like I I. When I watched it I was like Oh God. She's GonNa be this horrible like I thought he was going to be worse than she was and because we got that little bit I wanted more. So you know as Blade said, some motherfuckers are always trying to ice skate uphill. US. I wanted there to be one kind of like quickey aphorism. I can take from this movie on par with Wesley Snipes. Famous always bet on black, but there was nothing for me. nope. Ra L. we'll be right back with our freak outs. You do today you can head over to patriots, dot com slash FEM freak, and become one of our patrons. That's right. If you back this podcast not only are you helping us keep it on the air and keep feminist critical media criticism alive but you also get loads of fun perks like early access to podcast episodes very special bonus episodes, merch discounts what else you got Oh, we even let her patrons help us decide on new episodes and upcoming topics. So go ahead and check that out patriots dot com slash FEM freak. Now. It's time to talk about what's been thrilling US moving of setting s or infuriating s this past week I wanNA thank Oliver Patrons who had a really lovely conversation and show their thoughts based on our freak out last week about language and gender use of language, and so thank you for. Thank you. It was lovely to read those comments in here thoughts on it. If you want to be a patron and participate in this conversations again at Patriot dot com slash freak would you probably just heard me say but I don't remember exactly because that was recorded another time anyways caroline. freaking out about I WANNA talk about it's been a long time I feel like since I talked about a video game on this podcast. So I WANNA talk about video game that I've been playing an awful lot of lately and This will come as no surprise to people who follow game discourse or whatever. A lot of people are talking about this game Really loving this game right now but. So the latest game from supergiant have previously made bastion and transistor and higher higher in particular. I was a huge fan of their new game is called. Haiti's and Haiti's has been in it was in early access for like two years but it only recently had. It's like full one point Oh like official release where the game is now basically complete though they're still patching it and tweaking it and whatnot. On. This game is a really really. Impressive For For. So it's a game in which you know you. You play through the same areas and the same content like over and over again. Right? So it's it's broadly termed. It's what's often categorized as as a rogue rogue like where you know rogue like Sir are games usually you play through the same content again and again you die and then you have to start over. From. You know from the beginning and it has that aspect to it. I guess I should say rogue light technically. Not Rogue like sorry Gamers but Like. What makes Haiti's? And you know the the combat, the action, the game play is excellent, right? But makes Haiti's. What elevates Haiti's beyond just being like Oh. You know a a game, another game with great like really compulsive, compulsively playable action. Is the writing and the characters and the way the concept of the game ties in so is so seamlessly tied to the action. So you play as a character named Zach Thomas who was the son of? Haiti's the the. Ruler of the God of the of the dead or the God of the realm of the dead and you. For reasons that are entirely clear when you start playing the game, you want to escape from the realm of the dead your father's realm and So as you do that, you progressively like form deeper and deeper relationships with with. So many characters and they're all so wonderfully written and so distinctive and the art for them is so fantastic. And you know they have such such vibrant personalities and the voice acting is so incredible and everything that. You you know what? What really keeps me coming back in a lot of people coming back to this game is just the development of those relationships and those dynamics and and the unfolding of plotlines that occur the concern of their relationships with each other and and things like that, and it's all very much rooted in. Greek mythology but it it's but it feels very very fresh and modern and current I mean it's It's Very, you know some some of described the game as having a queer gays to the art and and you know maybe you could say to to the writing as well. There are questions that push back or or others who kind of push back against that and say, well, you know there there are there isn't really like are any like fat characters except for like a fat enemy type and that's very valid criticism but. But like it's also a conversation that I think even you know ten ten years ago we wouldn't have even been having because we wouldn't have had a game that was as. Kind of. Queer. Friendly in its gays and in his art in its tone and everything as as this game is at least not at this level of like mainstream. Acceptance and popularity and whatnot So yeah like the wonderful thing about the game is that is to me is that failure is sort of built in to the design of the game in the sense that dying doesn't feel. Like it's not it doesn't feel like punishing really it doesn't feel You know it's not like to disheartening. There's almost something rewarding in a way like even if you die. It there's there's a uc you it just it feel like it almost. Oh well, that's Kinda supposed to happen, and now I'm now that that to advance the story and and you know and so you get you get these sort of tangible the gameplay rewards like, Oh, I'm making my character more powerful, etc. But but that have itself doesn't interest me right it's it's what makes the what makes the game rewarding what makes continuing to play it rewarding for me is the deepening relationships that that I your character develops with the other characters in the game. So hats off to. supergiant games for another really great game and for the fans ing writing in particular and voice acting in just the the the craft, the art, the craft that. Goes in that went into Haiti's. It's really impressive. Nice I have seen the game and I have heard a lot of people really enjoy it. So it was nice to hear you talk about it. I want to freak out about a book that I really enjoyed. it's called the first fifteen lives of Harry August by Clare North. I'm sure I've talked about Clare North on this podcast before she wrote a book called. Eighty four K. that I just like thought was absolutely brilliant and then I've probably also talked about the end of the day. So this is the third book of Hers that I'm reading and I just she's so creative and visionary in her storytelling and this one did not fail me did not do what's the Point. Thank you the book did not fail me So the story is about Harry August and he is a human who when he dies at the end of his life, he just gets reborn again. And, he gets reborn in exact same way same conditions, same time, same period every time. So you know same like he grows up with the same family and he dies at the end of his life again, and then you know it goes on and on and on. So this is the story of the first fifteen of his lives and it's told in this way that is just like it it maps through. Like all of his different lives at different times. So it's not like it's like one store one life, and then in the next and the next and then the next and it is. I, think if like lovely and wonderful on its own, but it just gets you really thinking about like what would you do if you had many lives right like and you see him do that right? You see him like decide to take different careers or learn different things. You learned like having relationships can be difficult because you can't share this thing about you and if you do then you'll get locked up into a like up at the time I think he's born in the twenty s get locked up as as like as if he's crazy and be put on all these drugs and and stuff like that. So it's just it was really really interesting and then the story as you're like getting a handle on like cool he lives all these lives oh? Shit there are other people like him. Right and then there's this whole like time. Society. The they call themselves the Kronos club and may share. Communication through time right like literally right on stones to share things back from previous times or from the future, and then you like reset and so it really it makes you think about time differently because you might have to wait you know your entire lifetime. to learn something to. Born again, right and then also it it's interesting because like you have to go through puberty again and again but you have all your memories as if you were an adult and so like. It's just fascinating right and you watch these people make the same mistakes in their life again and again it's just I loved it. the story. It's not just sat though the story then develops into like An actual adventure. Through, time and through this relationship with another person who is doing things to the timeline that you don't agree with that, he doesn't agree with and trying to confront that and it's just Just so good y'all like I. Really really loved it. So I highly recommend it I. Honestly I've never read three books of hers and I just I clearly recommend her in general. So the first fifteen lives of Harry August by Clare North. Yeah. You can submit your own freak out at feminist frequency DOT, com? Slash. Breakout. Thank you so much for listening to feminist frequency. Radio. News updates is that star trek discovery is back and you know what that means the star. Trek. Feminist frequency podcast. Was the order of words but it's fine anyways. The episode for so our Star Trek episode is out now as you're listening to this for the first episode of discovery and we are releasing episodes every two weeks with awesome guests. So if you're into that tune in, if you are a patron, it will appear in your feed without you even doing anything. Yeah. So if you're a star trek fan check it. Out. Oh Yeah, and you know you've missed Evans hair reports I know you have a little boy. You're going with that people have been asking me on twitter. report be returning of course, my people, of course, it real quick quick shot out. Yeah. I just need to shut Tony Marino an angel good on you for being flexible with me while I needed to reschedule you ask and payment for a shoutout. Here it is. Okay. There you go. I can bought is the message for the audience great I don't know of the context for that but that's okay. I was on it was legit. Doesn't matter me we can. We could be criminal enterprise. It's fine. Okay. Tell anyone. Already. So hey yeah. ooh. True. It's fine Ebony and caroline, and I are going to start our secret time traveling club. And we're going to. Play with the the time way we have to go through puberty over and over again, no I a we don't have to you. We're going to create our own club and we can determine the rules of the club. Okay cool. That's definitely a rule. No going through puberty more. Could you imagine having to do you imagine going through puberty right now with everything that you know? Like the fascinating thing about the the book to is that like as a part of the club, there are people and members who will get you out of your living situation. So like you know sending letters and being like they have been accepted on full scholarship to this boarding school so that you get away from your family and shit like that because it's just too much you know, right? Ending I should be clear if not puberty from its Childhood in general like I don't WanNa relive the first twenty years of my life you know. You. Go through the same shit over and over again you WANNA be a four year old that has full memory of everything that you experience in your previous life but being talked to like a four year old. Sounds uprootal. anyways, stay tuned for the frigging after party. It'll be like this. This is basically what the bonus is like and it's only available to backers at this podcast. So head over to Patriot dot com slash February to learn more. This show is engineered by rob. Para carries them. Some provides techno sport artwork by Jamie various and our music is by full circus. Join US next week for the witches of Eastwick as we continue our Halloween month, which is vampires theme so Later. I.

Los Angeles Wesley Snipes Karen Deacon Frost whistler Haiti Blade Roger Ebert YouTube Harry August caroline Chinatown Tim Burton la Europe harassment Luke Cage Oliver Patriarch Asian Culture
Techstuff Throws Rotten Tomatoes

TechStuff

44:33 min | 1 year ago

Techstuff Throws Rotten Tomatoes

"I wanna thank the Microsoft surface team for sponsoring this show. Now, you might remember from a few episodes ago when I talked about the surface go well now, you can meet the newest member of the Microsoft surface family, the brand new surface pro six, and this sucker has got more of everything you want. It has more power and has more speed and a ton more fun. You can get a peripheral keyboard, and it will snap right on to the Microsoft surface. Pro six and you can type on it. Like, it's a laptop you can could detach. It just as easily and then draw on your Microsoft surface. Pro six as a new eighth generation Intel core processor powering the thing that's incredibly powerful. It gives you up to thirteen and a half hours of battery life on a single charge. You can work where you want. How you want for as long as you want? So check it out the Microsoft surface. Pro six. Get in touch with technology with tech stuff from how stuff works dot com. He's welcome to tech stuff. I'm your host Jonathan Strickland. I'm an executive producer with how stuff works in iheartradio. And I love all things tech. And today, we're gonna get a Little Rock. I would like to talk to you about a website. That means a lot to me rotten tomatoes. Now as I sit down to record this episode that site is in the news, and for those who aren't familiar with the website, rotten tomatoes is a site dedicated to film and television it hosts entertainment news and previews but its best known as an aggregate or for movie reviews. Lots of folks, including myself use the site to get a quick feel for the quality of a film movies have the fresh designation. Those would be interesting and entertaining films things that you would probably want to see. Then you have movies that have the rotten designation. They might still be entertaining. But not necessarily in the way, the creators had intended it to be anyway in February two thousand nineteen rotten tomatoes made some headlines because some people were abusing the sites features in order to give an early negative review to the film, captain marvel weeks before it was meant to come out when groups of people coordinate this effort, it's called a review bomb, and it's usually meant to send a message or negatively affect a particular film or TV show or video games commercial performance, regardless of the actual quality of the media itself. In response, run tomatoes has adjusted how they do things more on that a bit later. But I thought it was time to dive into the history of the site where did it come from? And what do those ratings actually mean the rotten tomatoes? Story starts way back in nineteen ninety eight the up the site is more than twenty years old. And it was the brainchild of a guy named send doin a creative design director, and he worked for a web design company called design reactor in San Francisco, California. Besides being a web designer doin was a big action film fan. He loved watching movies starring icons of the genera, like Arnold Schwarzenegger or Sylvester Stallone and Bruce Willis, but he was also a really big fan of Asian stars like jet Li and Jackie Chan who at that time had not yet managed to get much mainstream attention in the states, then in nineteen Ninety-six Jackie Chan's film rumble in the Bronx got a US release. That's a phenomenal film, by the way. If you have not seen it highly recommended I certify that one fresh awareness of Jack. Chen was on the rise and doin was curious about how American audiences at large would feel about the film. So he found himself checking reviews and box office results for the movie, he also became a big fan of siskel and Ebert and their movie review show at the movies now for those youngsters out there, gene siskel, and Roger Ebert were two famous film. Critics who worked at different newspapers in Chicago. And they hosted a few different television shows over the years in which they would discuss and review films, and they were famous for giving a movie either a thumbs up recommendation or a thumbs down. Skip it Duong decided he wanted to create a website dedicated to film reviews, and he originally thought about naming it thumbs up, but before long he changed his mind, which was likely a good idea due to intellectual property reasons. He instead decided to see if rotten tomatoes was available, and it was so he went with that. Now, according to an oral history of rotten tomatoes, which is hosted on the rotten tomatoes blog at the rotten tomatoes site. A film inspired doin to use that name. And I quote the name rotten tomatoes came to Centene while watching the fantasy film. Leo, low about a boy who imagines themself to be the offspring of an Italian peasant and a giant tomato into quote. And maybe that's right. I mean, I'm sure the story came from dwelling himself, but it seems to me far more likely that the name rotten tomatoes is really just a reference to the old trope of an agitated audience hurling rotten vegetables at performers up on stage. Why anyone would bring? Rutten tomatoes in the first place is beyond me, perhaps they were just hoping for a bad performance. Or maybe it was just a way to deal with food waste, or maybe it was just a trope that never had any real basis in reality. Anyway, to me just seems far more likely that the name was inspired by that idea instead of a fantasy film. And in fact, if you visit the rotten tomatoes site today, and you look at hell they aggregate their scores. You would see that? They also reference this particular idea, anyway, whatever the inspiration really was for the name doin launched the site on August eighteenth nineteen ninety eight. Now, the earliest snapshot I could find on the internet archive was for November twenty eighth nineteen ninety nine the layout. At that time was pretty simple down the middle of the page where news items about upcoming and newly released. Films down the left side or along the left rail as you might say in web design, you would find films that were recently released either in theaters or on home video they were grouped together. And you would get the ones that were from that weak the previous week and then two weeks and then three weeks before a small red dot would designate a title as having the fresh rating the overall positive reviews score the right rail had upcoming films listed both for cinemas, and for home theater and would also include trailers for upcoming films on the bottom right rail was a breakdown of the top ten films by bucks office in the United States. And I know what you're all thinking you're thinking Jonathan you looked at the rotten tomatoes website for November twenty eighth nineteen ninety nine. What was the top performing film that week? Well, that would be the world is not enough JAMES BOND. The number ten villain that week was being John Malkovich. And I would argue the film number ten was superior to film, number one. But that's just my own opinion. Now from the beginning the tomato meter was an important tool. This is the rating that tells visitors if a movie has been deemed good or bad or fresh versus rotten though, the percentage wasn't regularly shown against movie titles until a little bit later. So how does this formula actually work is a film that scores? Ninety percent twice as good as a film that scores. Forty five percent are the films that have the dubious distinction of a zero percent score truly the worst movies ever made will according to the founders the formula for the tomato meter has remained pretty much constant since the site started. It's based on the percentage of. Positive reviews any given film or these days a television show will receive so if you have one hundred critics and half of those critics give a film oposite review and the other half trash the movie the tomato meter score should be fifty percent. But it gets a bit more nuanced when you take a closer, look, which we will do after this short break. I want to thank the Microsoft surface team for sponsoring this show. Now, you might remember from a few episodes ago when I talked about the surface go well now, you can meet the newest member of the Microsoft surface family, the brand new surface pro six, and this sucker has got more of everything you want. It has more power and has more speed and a ton more fun. You can get a peripheral keyboard, and it will snap right on to the Microsoft surface. Pro six and you can type on it like, it's a laptop you can detach. It just as easily and then draw on your Microsoft surface. Pro six as a new eighth generation Intel core processor powering the thing that's incredibly powerful. It gives you up to thirteen and a half hours of battery life on a single charge. You can work where you want. How you want for as long as you want? So check it out the Microsoft surface. Pro. Six. So how does the tomato meter really work? Well. The type of positive review doesn't really matter when factoring the tomato meter score. If as a critic, you use some sort of five star system, and you give a film three stars. You're essentially saying the movie is unremarkable. It's not terrible. But it's not great either. It's more good than bad. But maybe not overwhelmingly. So however in the end that counts as a positive review in the tomato meter standing it's either fresh or run their new degrees of freshness within a single review. It's only collectively that you look at them. So if you see a movie, and you give the ten an icy a movie, and I give it a seven both of those are considered positives. It doesn't matter that one is greater than the other. So using this formula, it's actually possible for an average film that isn't particularly interesting or. Or entertaining to receive a one hundred percent score on rotten tomatoes. This doesn't mean that the film is a paragon of cinema. Instead immunes. None of the critics that rotten tomatoes relies upon gave the film a bad review. They might have all just said. It's okay. But if they all said that if every single critic said, it's okay, that's still counts as a one hundred percent fresh score. Likewise. If more critic said this movie, tried hard, but ultimately failed. It might end up with a zero percent score. That doesn't mean it could go toe to toe with a movie like plan nine from outer space or some other famously awful film to take the title of worst movie ever, the percentage only tells you about the critical consensus surrounding the film, not whether or not the response was overwhelmingly positive or mediocre or overwhelmingly negative. You just don't know without reading the actual reviews. You could have a case where there are two films that are both more or less the same quality. However, you would define that term. But one of those two movies had more critics say. It was all right. And the other one had more critics say this isn't worth your time, and the tomato meter score might have you think that movie a which gets say a seventy percent score is somehow twice as good as movie be which has a thirty five percent score. But if you sat and watched both movies, you might walk away saying they were both pretty unremarkable they weren't terrible. But they weren't great either. That's the limitation of the tomato meter formula. It's meant to give you a quick critical. Snapshot of a movie, not a detailed diagnosis of the film's actual quality. So a thirty percent film is not necessarily worse than a forty five percent. You have to look at the details. I should add that rotten tomatoes doesn't use every single movie review site or blog as a resource the site has criteria to select critics. And the reviews to factor into the tomato meter ratings the site also designates certain reviewers as top critics people who have a built up history of film, reviews and have received wide publication. They're also options for reviewers to upload their work directly into the tomato meter, they can give their films a score perhaps a score out of ten or even a letter grade like in school, like an A B or C or so on to get a tomato meter rating, a film or television show must receive at least five reviews, if at least sixty percent of the reviews are positive the reviewed content is considered fresh if the tomato meter is at fifty nine percent or lower than the respective media is rotten. In addition. If a film has at least five reviews from top critics, and at least forty review. If it's a film that's in limited release or eighty reviews of it's a film in wide release, and it has tomato meter score of seventy five percent or higher is certified fresh, or at least it qualifies for that designation in actuality a team of rotten tomatoes staffers have to look at those reviews and determine the likelihood that the movie or television show is going to remain at or above seventy five percent approval. And if they come to that conclusion that the title is pretty safe that it's got a solid standing. It gets the certified fresh rating run tomatoes added the certified fresh designation around two thousand three so I'm getting a little ahead of myself here. But I figured it. Just made more sense to group all the formulas stuff together. In addition to the critics scores rotten tomatoes, also calculates an audience score based off user submitted ratings more on that a bit later as it's related to the problem that. Rotten tomatoes recently had to address now, according to Dwan he promoted his brand new site by going onto Usenet groups and sharing the link there any managed to attract one hundred whole visitors that first day not long after the first day yahu promoted the site as site of the day, and as someone who has had work promoted on Yahoo back in the day. This was a big deal at boosted his visitor count considerably. Then the site was covered by USA today and Netscape featured it on a landing page, and that really pushed the numbers. Roger Ebert himself mentioned the site. And then it really was off to the races doin at the time was still working at design reactor, but he was finding it exhausting to do his job during the day and then work on rotten tomatoes every night. So he made a really big leap. He decided to quit his steady gig. And. Concentrate full-time on running the site. He also hired on two of his friends in nineteen ninety nine to help him one became the editor in chief for the site. And another became the marketing director, at least initially and their headquarters was dwellings apartment. Now at this point. He had moved from San Francisco back to set criminal California where rent was a little cheaper. Meanwhile, back at design reactor, Stephen wall and Patrick Lee were interested in their former colleagues work, so they reached out to Wong and suggested that they actually joined forces again and merge, rotten tomatoes into design reactor directly and take up a new headquarters in Emeryville, caliF and Wong. Agreed. So they collectively hired on an outside company to do some design work for the site. So that they weren't doing all of that work themselves. Stephen Wong started to head up efforts to incorporate dynamic elements in the site designed. So that it wasn't just a static webpage. Every time someone visited it for those of you who don't remember the web in the old web one point zero days that was pretty common. You would go to a website, and it was like a magazine page. There was no expectation that the content was going to change day to day. This was an effort to move more to a web two point oh philosophy where you have these dynamic elements that can change over time and give reason for people to come back to a site again. And again, the new design also supported something that the old site had lacked ad space until that happened. There was really no revenue model for the website. There's no way to make money. Now. One thing the team had to deal with was the reaction from fans once the site began to feature advertising on it. Lots of people didn't like the site redesign, and they really hated that adds were starting to appear on the web pages. I've. Experienced this myself, and it is a bit tricky after all on less. There is a way to make money from my work. I can't really devote time to that work because I still have to pay bills and stuff and the alternatives to advertising tend to be ones that people don't like very much like putting your stuff up behind a paywall these days a related model in which fans directly support the creators of the stuff. They love has emerged and some people can make a living off of that through platforms like patriotic. But that model doesn't work for everyone. Particularly a full blown company that needs to have a more predictable revenue stream, Patrick Lee structured, the company and he began to seek out investment capital. He also took it upon himself to respond to people who were mad about the advertising that was appearing on the site. He said he found most people were much more reasonable once a Hugh. Human being reached out to them to acknowledge their concerns and complaints that it helps smooth things over he said people who had been flaming you earlier on with terrible language would apologize to you. And then have a logical and calm conversation. They just need to know that a human being was actually there to listen. Now, this was back in the pre dot com crash days. And at that time, lots of investors were eager to get in on the action, rotten tomatoes didn't have much trouble. Securing investments Patrick lease. Initial efforts raised a million dollars in funding at this point the rotten tomatoes staff numbered about twenty people a couple of months later, it was up to twenty five people and the site was doing well by January two thousand it was receiving a quarter of a million unique visitors per day the company hired Lilly Chee to serve as the chief. Financial officer. And then the bottom fell out by the bottom falling out. I don't mean that the CFO caused any problems. What I mean is the dot com. Crash happened. Now, I've done episodes of tech stuff about this era and about the dot com. Crash, and I go into it in great detail. But obviously, I don't wanna do that here. I'll give a quick overview in just a moment. So what was the dot com? Crash Cliff's notes. This was when the dot com industry the internet market suffered a massive market crash. And there were a lot of reasons for that market crash. It's a complicated subject. One of those reasons was that you had a lot of investors pouring millions of dollars in some cases, hundreds of millions of dollars into various startup inch. Internet companies in a sort of virtual gold rush. Everyone was trying to stake a claim on the incredible potential of the internet. No, one was really sure how it was going to pay off. But everyone was convinced. It would pay off. However, many of those companies had no means of generating revenue some of them had no business plan at all just an idea. Others had a business plan, but they grew so fast. Any poured so much money into stuff. Like cool office space that they spread themselves way too thin way too quickly and they encountered trouble. Investors began to lose confidence people began to pull their money out of the market and companies were disappearing left, and right, and it wasn't just the investment money that was slowing down and revenue became scarce as well advertisers, pulled back from the internet. Now, they weren't sure. Sure, if the money they were spending would be a sound investment, if a website were to go out of business, then no one would see your advertising that would just be money thrown away rotten tomatoes was affected like many other companies the twenty five staff members, gut reduced down to eight and then down again to seven and even those seven people saw their salaries go down by a third and then later on another cut. So that they were essentially making half of what they started with Patrick Lee would reduce his own salary to nothing at all. As did. Paulie? Who at that point was the director of marketing and Patrick Louis. Tried to keep the business afloat his goal was to ride out the storm and to return to profitability in order to provide investors a return on their investment. He was determined not to fail the people who had provided the company with funding. And according to Lee, he. Even at one point decided to move into the rotten tomatoes office because his biggest expense every month was rent. So why not cut out the rent and just move into the the company offices? He used a a club that was in the same building and use their shower facilities, and he was known as being something of a neat freak. So he figured it wouldn't be that big a deal. Just another interesting footnote in the rotten tomatoes history. Go the company was actually able to survive because largely of its investors. The funding round that raised one million dollars had closed just a couple of months before the market crash. So the timing was about as good as it possibly could be with the crash right around the corner. The company was flush with cash rotten tomatoes had a little bit of a safety net in the form of that money. And the investors didn't come. Pounding the company's doors or demand changes and how the company was operating and just let them go about their business which really helped them as well. The team was convinced that online was going to be the future for movie reviews that more and more people were going to use the internet to look review scores. They were going to transition from relying on things like the newspaper and besides run tomatoes would include links out to full reviews giving movie goers the option to read numerous critical analyses of different films in the theaters all from a centralized location. Everyone was sure the market would eventually come around the company just had to be able to survive until that actually happened the small team tried to keep things light as the office was dealing with the stress of operating under these difficult circumstances. They would play video games they held different parties their Halloween party. Apparently something of a famous annual event. And there were a lot of stories about how most of the team was pretty awful at showing up in the morning. Most people would filter in at eleven AM or even noon, they even tried to create a financial incentive for people to show up on time to take regular business hours. They instituted the pig. Piggy bank. The people would have to contribute to whenever they showed up after ten AM at the end of each month the money in the pig would pay for a company meal, and apparently they had some pretty nice meals because people still didn't find a way to come in during normal office hours, though, they would stay long enough to get all their work done. It wasn't that they were shirking their duties they just weren't in the office at normal hours, the two thousand crash had a long lasting effect even in two thousand three which is when Patrick Lee temporarily. Moved into the office. The company was still in a precarious position. Revenues had not been growing super fast. And the coffers were reduced a bit the investment money was down to around half of what it had been. But these seven people on the team still believed in what they were doing and their work was having an impact on the entertainment industry. Even the run tomatoes is an aggregate or not a company that does its own movie reviews. It was seen as a huge marketing boost if a film had a high tomato meter score films that hit one hundred percent and stayed there for a while could find some pretty good box office performance and films that had lower scores would see fewer ticket sales so filmmakers starting to develop a sort of love hate relationship with the company, and then another company would come knocking this company was I g n entertainment, which as the name suggests was an entertainment website that was founded back in nineteen ninety six and it was. Mostly known for video game coverage, I g n issued a press release on June twenty-ninth two thousand four to announce the plan to acquire rotten tomatoes for a rumored ten million dollars though. The amount was never formally announced if so that ten million dollars represented a nice payoff for the one million dollar investment had been made back in two thousand the team that had stuck by the site. Even as things were rough were vindicated. Patrick Lee later said that the team had probably accepted an amount that was too low. But considering how hard they had worked and how challenging it was to generate revenue. They felt it was the best choice at the time. Several of the core team members would leave the company over the course of the following year Patrick Leigh and Stephen Wong left in August two thousand four to create a new site called alive, not dead. Several former rotten tomatoes employees would later go to join them lily CI left. In two thousand five to become CFO of lithium technologies which had an office space in the same building as the Emoryville rotten tomatoes office. Sin Wong, the founder stuck with rotten tomatoes a little longer leaving in two thousand seven he went on to found a couple of other companies like movies with butter dot com. That's a movie news site where you can follow films in various stages of development, and whoa peeler. A news aggregation site really big on the aggregating there. But our story doesn't end here. We've got a bit more to tell to get up to present day. And this is a story I can really sympathize with I g an entertainment takes the reins at rotten tomatoes in the summer of two thousand four and then stuff changes pretty quickly over just a few years. I would introduce new features to the site including a forum in which members could discuss. Films and reviews, they could talk about films within their own communities. So you could go to specific location based parts of the forum, and it made the site much more interactive than before that's another element of that web two point of philosophy since its introduction. The site had had several redesigns in that continued as well over time the site, consolidated information about the film's box office standing the total amount of money. It had earned since its release. And how long it had been in theaters? And of course, it's tomato meter score all of that gut kind of consolidated into a single view. All right now, it's time to talk a little bit about some corporate maneuvers and trust me as someone who has been through the process of acquisitions numerous times, these things can matter a lot in two thousand five news corps, Rupert Murdoch's media company purchased. I g in entertainment. So. So at that point rotten tomatoes had a new corporate overlord. This would be just the beginning of some pretty massive changes. And I imagine each time it happened. There was another cultural shift within the company. This always happens with mergers and acquisitions, but as I said, it was just the beginning. More after this short break. This episode of tech stuff is sponsored by ADT. This is real protection on this show. I talk a lot about smart, technology, and home automation. Those advances have really transformed home security and real protection from ADT provides the tools and services to make the most out of that tech. And to make sure your home is secure. Real protection means having access to tools like video doorbells. Surveillance cameras smart locks lights smoke and carbon monoxide detectors in a customized system for your home. You can control your smart home with the ADT app, or even with the sound of your voice, and it includes professionals who can monitor your home security. So you don't have to eighteen thousand employees safeguarding you that's real protection. Visit ADT dot com slash podcast to learn more about how ADT can design and install a secure smart home. Just for you. Let's consider the secret life of the INA most nesting dole. Living most of her life in the dock inside the other nesting Dole's. He has plenty of time to think if we could Saturday, she has no brain, however, when in a most nesting dole, his gyco not only saves people money, but also has been providing great service for over seventy five years. She thinks it's obvious. You should switch because. Yes. Switching to gyco is a no brainer pity in most nesting Dollond her lot in life. Going to flash forward now to twenty ten so they sites been operating under news corps. And I since two thousand five twenty ten the social networking site flick Stor which catered to movie fans would swoop in an offer to buy rotten tomatoes from Aegean news core, I John was looking to refocus on the video game industry. And so the two sides reached an undisclosed agreement and flick stir became the new parent company for rotten tomatoes. We're still not done yet though, so rotten tomatoes goes from independent website to part of Iggy entertainment to being under new score to now being under flick. Stor just a year later in two thousand eleven Warner Brothers home entertainment group announced it would acquire flick. Stor and rotten tomatoes would go along for the ride. The financial details of this acquisition. Were also undisclosed however contemporary reports valued flick Stor at between sixty million and ninety million dollars. So now, rotten tomatoes has a new new overlord, the acquisition raised some eyebrows. In the online journalism community. It seemed a pretty strong candidate for a conflict of interest because we're brothers makes films and television programmes owning a site for hosting reviews meant that the company would need to tread carefully to avoid charges that it was fixing the game. And honestly, it seemed like stuff was on the up and up this became pretty darn clear when Batman versus superman dawn of Justice came out, the film did not get a very good score. Currently the score is at twenty seven percent. Meaning it is designated as being well and truly rotten though. Again, remember that just means the number of negative reviews. It doesn't tell you. How negative those reviews were some d. See fans got angry at rotten tomatoes and petitioned to have it shut down though. I don't know who in the world would have done that. Here's the thing. Batman versus superman was a Warner Brothers pictures film. I the time of its release rotten tomatoes was still owned in part by Warner Brothers entertainment. So clearly there wasn't some sort of shell game going on here. Not to mention that rotten tomatoes is an aggregate or while the site uses its formula to determine if a film is fresh or rotten. It doesn't actually review the film's itself. It's not the site's fault. If movie critics don't like film, and likewise, it's not the sites credit if critics love of film, but angry fans didn't care very much about the facts. They wanted the film's. They liked to get good reviews, even with those films weren't, you know, good. And this wouldn't be the last time that fans and rotten. Mehta's would clash lots of foreshadowing in this episode. Also Brett Ratner the filmmaker and one of the financiers behind. Batman versus superman criticize rotten tomatoes, calling it, quote, the worst thing that we have in today's movie culture in quote now, I would argue there are far worse things in movie culture, like the rampant cases of sexual harassment. But hey, I'm not Brett Ratner. However, his real point is one I actually agree with and that was that the rotten tomatoes score was being misused it was being used as a measure of overall, film quality. And as I've already said on this episode. That's not really accurate. So while I do not agree with Mr. rattener that rotten tomatoes. The worst thing in Hollywood. I do agree that a lot of people rely on rotten tomatoes without fully understanding, it it really just tells you if more critics thought the film was good or if they thought it was bad not. The relative, goodness or badness of it. Now. Maybe that's splitting hairs, but I think it's an important designation. Not long after the Batman versus superman debacle run tomatoes changed hands yet. Again, the ticketing company fandango acquired flick, Stor and rotten tomatoes. With Warner Brothers receiving a thirty percent stake in fandango the other seventy percent of the company belongs defend dangles parent company. NBC universal media which in turn is owned by Comcast. Once again, a media company owns rotten tomatoes. Now, like, I said at the top of this episode recently, there was another audience brouhaha that brought rotten tomatoes back into the news. This time it was about captain marvel and review bombing campaign and a seemingly weird interpretation of what the film's star rehearsing had said in at about press tours that she was going on. Larsen had said, she hadn't noticed her press tours had her meeting with journalists who are nearly always white men. So she wanted to make sure her press tours had a greater diversity represented at them. Now. Some people interpreted this to mean, she did not want white men at her press tours. But Larsen herself dismissed that. She said she wasn't arguing that people should be taken off the tour that she would not meet with certain journalists because they happen to be white men. Instead, she said more people needed to be added into the tour. So that there was greater representation. She wanted to see greater diversity, but not at the cost of those who are already there. However, some fans took this to mean, breezy Larson hates white men. And I'm a white, man. So I hate captain marvel even though the movie isn't out yet. And then the review bombing began run tomatoes has now decided that users will not be able to post comments on. Films that aren't out yet. And you might think well that makes sense. Why were they doing it before? And it's because rotten tomatoes was allowing for anticipation scores. This idea how anticipated is this film are people looking forward to seeing it. But it's been misused according to the official blog, quote, we are disabling the comment function prior to a movie's release date. Unfortunately, we have seen an uptick in non-constructive input. Sometimes bordering on trolling, which we believe is a disservice to our general readership. We have decided that turning off this feature for now is the best course of action end quote. Personally, I think this is a good move. I think it's unfair to judge any film before you've actually seen it Colmey crazy that way. Now, it may turn out that captain marvel is an absolute stinker of a movie, and it deserves bad reviews, but we should at least watch the film. I before we come to that conclusion. And maybe have a better reason for disliking the movie than misinterpreting deliberately or otherwise and actors comment about press tours. There are other examples of people misusing rotten tomatoes in various ways. And it's not always a method of review bombing a movie to give it a negative review. There's also an example of potential review bombing to try an improve of films score. There was the famous case of the film Godley starring John Trevor. Volta a movie that had near universal critical negative reviews, but a group of positive reviews hitting suspiciously close together suggested that there might have been a concentrated coordinated campaign to change the score with people who had been either involved with the movie or connected to the movie in some way, or perhaps even paid off mafia style by the film, which if you're asking me gets a little meta with the subject matter, and then I kind of respect, but it's still gaming the system. So it's good to see the rotten tomatoes is responding to that in this way. Other big changes may be following soon. And by the time you hear this. They may even be in place. There's a rumor that pretty soon if you wish to leave a move. Review as a user, you will have to I often Tecate that you purchased a ticket to that movie presumably through fandango. I don't know if you'll be able to leave a review if you bought your ticket through some other service, but you have to prove that you've actually seen the film, or at least bought a ticket to the film. And honestly, if people buy tickets to movies, that's what the executives really care about. It's nice. If people like your movie, if you're an executive, it means that more people might go and see the film, but ultimately the ticket sales are what matters if I have footed the Bill for a movie to be made, I'm going to be happy. If a lot of people go and buy tickets that film. Well, that wraps up this episode about rotten tomatoes and its history as well as hell the tomato meter works. I hope you guys have a greater understanding of what rotten tomatoes is. And how it impacts the industry. It actually tends to have a pretty. Big impact these days to the point where you hear some movie executives really complain about. How a score can dramatically affect the performance of a film personally. I think film quality dramatically impacts the performance, but I could see how a really bad or really good score could sway an audience. I've certainly skipped movies because of the low scores if you guys have suggestions for future topics of tech stuff. Hey, why not let me know about them one way? You can do. So is to write me the address for the show is tech stuff at how stuff works dot com or you can pop on over to our website. That's tech stuff podcast dot com. That's where you're gonna find links to our social media presence where we present things on social media. You also find a link to our merchandise store. Remember? Every purchase you make goes to help the show, and we greatly. Appreciate it. And I will talk to you again, really soon. For more on this and bathrooms of other topics. Visit how stuff works out com. Hey, guys. It's Jonathan the host of Tex stuff, you know, the show. You're listening to well. I got a big favorite ask of you. We need to find out more about you. Now, this is because our show it's free. You're welcome but ads help us pay the bills, and we want to make sure that we're matching the right kinds of adds to our listeners and find out we have made a special survey. Just go to tech stuff podcast dot com to find the survey should take five minutes. And we really appreciate it.

Microsoft Patrick Lee US Jonathan Strickland Intel Warner Brothers Roger Ebert California Stephen Wong San Francisco Chicago CFO ADT founder Jackie Chan gene siskel Duong Chen web designer
A CHAT with YOUR MOVIE SUCKS - Movie Podcast

Filmhaus

36:57 min | 2 years ago

A CHAT with YOUR MOVIE SUCKS - Movie Podcast

"Hey, everyone. Welcome to this week's film house, which is brought to you by Leesa mattress. You can get a fun little discount from them which will be hearing more about in the middle of the show. But I want to give you a little heads up that this week's episode. It's a little different as you may recall Vancouver. A couple of weeks back, and there we got to interview our friend, Adam from your movie sucks dot org, who is one of my favorite online, creators. So it was real blast sit down and just sort of have an interview a little one on one and ask them questions about stuff. Like, I'm personally interested in so good. Enjoy it. And thank you. Lisa for sponsoring this show. You know, the. But burps are part of the personality. Hey, guys. Welcome to a very special episode of film house where it's only two atoms. Joined by Adam Johnston. Hello from your movie sucks dot org. You got it. Right. I did some people say Johnson, I actually know. Well, because we how did we get in contact? It was your fan rooster teeth. And and I would drop your name channel. Because I was like, I'm I'm just a general fan of this guy. And then you I forgot how we tweeted each other or something. Yeah. It's a people posted my sub read it like, hey, funhouse knows Adam. And then I forget, I think I followed you on Twitter something where you following me already know who knows either. Yeah. Yeah. That. That. Hi, hi. And then you become friends, but you were actually in our content before we even started this show that we do now film house. We had realized we started doing so many podcasts where we would just talk about movies that we said why don't we just do this once a week, and you actually kind of being very much an inspiring force behind that. Because I found out. Oh, there are people there who are willing to talk snarky about films, and there are people willing to watch it. Surprisingly. Well, what you do. I guess has been called a film essay. On the video. Yeah. So let you so you do have a different you have different types of series. Where you you do make fun of bad movies? Would you say, that's your most popular content? Yes. See why MS reviews, the your movie sucks reviews, where I go through the film, sometimes frame by frame, depending on the scene to how many times do you watch a film? So I mean, I have to watch at once before I decide if I'm going to review it for something like that. Then I watch it twice the second time taking notes, and then as I'm going through it editing-wise sometimes during that process there will be points where I'm noticing things about the film like in amusement. That's where I found that like weird extra frame like there's no way you can notice that while watching it was misleading sometimes going through editing. Yeah. Well, I I discovered you I want to say it was the main east gone missing or dismiss and Megan is miss him. Michael Goi joint. Yeah. Who I see his name pop up? Sometimes they'll from time to time where he's still mentioned or he was like, a DP made this horrible film. And I guess you were doing I guess other people have been doing like red letter media things, but I felt like your your reviews spoke more to the internet age, especially with the mania Megan's gone missing. Where one of the things that stuck with me was you point out how kids don't talk that way. Or you're making fun of the way people are trying to do drugs or drug portrayals done in video. Whereas a lot of other film essays it's more about people getting to the feelings of lamb like the what's the who's that wonderful capping Christian? I very much enjoyed. Yeah. I, but I would definitely call you guys like almost polar opposites. Yeah. Well, his are more like short and sweet love letters that. You know, talk about experiences and giving context to how each of what he's each of the subjects. He's talking about was created its cultural impact. And although there are films that I cover where I'm able to talk about those if I'm just tearing apart some crappy movie Megan is missing it's really difficult to talk about the cultural impact of that film more like the themes, even though it's like sure there are themes that exist, but they're not they're not properly illustrated. Right. So I feel like also to a lot of your early notoriety came from things like cool cat, and the you finding these sort of like gems on the internet as much hate using. That term the gems lead in Jim. Yeah. I it seems like read it is like your best friend and sworn enemy. At the same time. It's it's this giant force that could work for you or against. I mean, that's honestly, how I discover your stuff was making gone missing was on the front page of read it, and I just checked it out. And that's how I found you. But you've been working for much longer before that. Right. So that was in. I think that review was posted twenty twelve twenty thirteen maybe. Wow. The film came out in twenty eleven I know that and I've had the film review channel since twenty ten and Megan is missing the success of that video was just enough. At revenue for me to get like an extra month's rent. And that was the jumping off point for me creating a patriot. And being like, I quit my job. So if you guys want to help out I've got one month before I have to get another job. And then that was in September two thousand thirteen and I've been doing it fulltime since then so what were you doing before? So you're working fulltime job doing what I was actually working several part time jobs because they weren't giving me enough hours at best buy. I was also working at a place called frog box, which I'm not even going to try to attempt to explain what that is. Look it up. They were on they were on dragons den a few times. Okay, Vancouver business. But anyway, so you were working two jobs and running a YouTube channel and your own website. And yet all doing a lot of stuff at once. But that's kind of how you have to do it. Yeah. It's like you can't you have to treat something as your job before. It's your job. Otherwise, you're not going to be able to monetize it. You're not gonna find success doing it. But in that kind of work, and that's something that I'm not sure everybody understands. Yeah. You know, you have made it a fulltime work from home job, y'all. Do you ever get those moments where you think it's too much or? With you do do you love to hate. It is that the sort of thing or do you? I consider it to be an investment. Just like I considered it to be an investment before. I was making money off of it. It's like, okay. This is you know, I I have my goal set in mind. And I think like, okay. Even if I'm only getting like ten more subscribers every week, that's something. And then you know, kind of snowballs and builds especially after being able to do it fulltime and focus on that. Then it's like, okay. Well, now, I'm making more content. Things are growing faster. But in terms of it becoming too much like, I just keep piling on different projects at this point. And I don't know what I'm going to stop like now, I'm doing the podcast, and I'm editing that and I'm working on my album, I do music, and you know, as it's coming closer to the end of my album being finished. It's just like. Okay. Well, you know, I can't I can't half ass. This. I got a, you know, spend a lot of time on it. So right now, I'm like super. Incredibly overwhelmed, but at the same time, I do see value in what I do, you know? And I think that that it can help me get to better places so to speak. Yeah. So that that's an interesting part two. We've talked about this before where people have asked us for advice or whatever in their life. And we've always said don't put all your eggs in one basket. Don't invest in one thing. I feel like that's something you've done with us on a website. You do music. You also have the let's play channel has been updated. I haven't kept up on that the let's by channel. It's riposting two videos a week on the main channel where different editors will like, you know, make a consumable shortens throw in some editing jokes kind of versions of the games that I stream and then from the twitch stream there's a secondary channel for my gaming stuff. Which is just like our long clips of the full playthrough. And those are updated pretty much daily. There's right. Now, it's like there's three weeks worth of of streams that I could be publishing, but I'm just doing them once a day. So there's always content, and if I go to a film festival, and I can't do my stream, then it's like, okay. We have stuff that we can put out while I'm on gone. That's one of the more interesting things that I found about your content and sort of your your tone in your voice does come from sort of. I did have that vibe that you had a gaming background. I feel like a lot of the other film review channels that I've seen I'm not saying this in a bad way or anything, but you know, don't have much of a gaming background where you seem to definitely come from that seemed like some of your early but Israel's like a halo three poster in or something like that. And do you ever? Do you have a part of your brain? That's able to separate like the two types of mediums. You are you're a lot of people try to compare film to gaming are you able to just go. This is a video game. I understand what I'm getting or do you constantly feel like you're making comparisons? Yeah. In a way. But I mean, like, I don't really review games on my gaming channel. I just like I play them and. I have fun playing them. And sometimes people get upset when I'm you know, if I'm doing like a choosier on adventure like David cage game, and I'm constantly making choices that are. I know we're going going to impact the character negativity. Sometimes people get upset you're not playing the game. Right. It's like, I it's it's a choice. Of course. I'm playing the game right now, the choices there, and I'd like to kind of like to to try testing the limits of the game. If I think like, oh, you're not gonna seriously allow me to do that. And I try it. It's like, oh, wow. The choice wasn't real right? You know, like so I do try to like deconstruct them at the same time. But I'm not making any kind of like SA or take down. I'm just kind of like common commenting over top of it as I play it. I'm only making the comparison because on one hand it's sort of it's sort of like growing up with a pager and then getting a smartphone. I was raised on things. Like, Roger Ebert who just could not wrap his head around a video, of course. But his reviews, I, yeah, I always felt as reviews we're very. Fair and while written and the understood it, but poetic. Yeah. And when it came to video games was just completely lost. Whereas you as someone from a younger generation actually have a grass on both worlds because sometimes you're. Once again me don't call film essays. But when you do your best of of the year, I was always kind of blown away of actually how our ticket and how well you've written out your love for film. And I felt like that translated into while. I will check it the zone because I trust this person's opinion at the same time. You know, how to play first person shooter wiz. Roger Ebert probably just couldn't ever wrap his poor head around them. I'm not great at video games and not like a pro gamer or anything. Yeah. I don't think you have to be to enjoy video game. I guess it's true. Yeah. If you're doing it for the love of it, right, especially it's in art form. Yeah. And I think that's like smart distinction that you made is that you said you don't want to be a video game reviewer. We've already seen time and time again other reviewers getting shit for not being good at video games. So, but I I guess on that note, what would you say qualifies you to make a review or have a make a to be a film critic? Well, you know, it's really I mean. I don't have any qualifications on paper. I'm just the person who's opinionated in passionate about what I talk about. And, you know, the free market of YouTube people are going to gravitate towards either opinions that they agree with or opinions that they find interesting or in my case, some of it is because of the editing or the humor the commentary, but in terms of like actual qualifications. I I mean like. The internet is full of so much information that you could learn anything you could learn at a school. You're not going to get the same experience. But like if you're seriously interested in passionate about something. And, you know, you're constantly searching for things that you're interested in you're going to come out with pretty much the same information and aside from that, you know, I'm I'm fairly young. I'm still learning. A lot of things, you know, I'm not like gonna call myself an expert at pretty much anything. But you know, I it's sometimes it's just a matter of perspective. And and if you can offer something that people find is an interesting or unique or even reliable perspective than they're going to want to come back to it. So you can you can be a person that talks about how the film is made. You can talk about seems or you can be a person that just gives your opinion on it. You know, there's YouTube reviewers at their with more subscribers than me. That don't really offer any kind of insight to the film at all in his is basically just a see it or or or don't see it kind of channel. And that's perfectly legitimate for sure I'm a giant ocean. I guess you can't pick your fish, whatever you want. Do you ever feel like you're painted in a corner or that? Do you ever feel obligated to be more negative towards something? Because maybe that's why people discovered you or video do that. Or do you just kind of do what you want? Yeah. I mean, like, I there's people that think that I am such a contrarian that all fabricate my opinions and be like, oh, I'm only hating this because it's popular sort of thing. But that's not. That's not what I do like Niamh a tough crowd to please. In a sense. You know, and I I have my own opinions. But if I really love something I'm going to praise it if I really don't like it. I'm going to criticize it, and even you know, there's middle ground where I can say like I didn't enjoy this movie. But I'm giving it credit for this. And sometimes people still get mad mission impossible out. I don't understand what I said wrong in that review people. I'll I'll be honest. I haven't seen it. I've actually got to a point where I won't watch your views until after I see the move. That's fine. Only because I. I do find myself winding my opinion up with what you say. Usually in even if I don't entirely agree or I think like, oh, I really enjoyed this moment. Then you come out and say, I don't really like it. I guess maybe because we have a personal relationship. We've been friends for a while. I can go. Well, let's totally fine. I'm okay. With a friend of mine, not liking something that I like, and I feel like maybe that goes both ways as well. Where I think people often forget this. You don't have a problem with someone who enjoys something. Right. Not at all. Yeah. I it's it is an opinion. I know you have said before you refuse to turn your brain off feeling that's been misinterpreted because people. Well, there's people that you know, they they see my comments when I when I said. These things stuck out to me in a film, and I would like to forgive the movie, but I can't because I have a brain sort of thing. And there's people that interpreted that as me saying, I'm so smart that. The reason why I had these issues with the movie is because I'm so smart. But that's not what I'm saying. It's it's an art. It's a counter argument towards people who refuse to accept that Pinon can be different. And before I even before I make some of my reviews people will be like on my ratings. They'll be like, oh, he's just not liking it because he's contrarian sort of thing. And I'm kind of trying to argue against that like, you know, like, I I would love to give the movie credit, but these are the things that stuck out to me. And you know, everybody's brain is different. Everybody's going to value certain aspects of film over others, and to some people you can completely ignore all aspects of the film making as long as it's a story or theme that connects with you personally, you know, and that's everybody's going to have a different experience sort of things. I feel like there is a an overwhelming commonality it's been happening. Maybe there's more in the states then here, but there's something I've have just dubbed to now. Culture, where if a movie is not hitting everyone of your senses people whip their phones out now is that a is that a common thing out here or people theater or heater? I feel like it comes from being at home. Yeah. I feel like people are training themselves to sort of during the downtime, but I'm guilty of this. If I watch a show that I'm not really into I'll be on my phone. I'll have in the background. But if it's a movie that I really want to watch like most recently, Mandy that was one that came out recently digitally. I it it wasn't any theaters near me. But even in being in the setting that I was in I had to put my phone away and stare, but I feel like, you know, people can't even do that. So when people say things like we'll just turn your brain off that prime means check Facebook until things explode. I think what people mean by that is oftentimes I'll be I'll be criticizing a film like I dunno edge of tomorrow, and I'll be going into like the time travel mechanics and pointing. How the rules that it set up for the film are ones that they don't follow. And I think that a lot of people see something like that. And they go like well. Yeah. But it's a dumb action movie. So you're not, you know, like, the what the film is trying to market itself as he shouldn't be mentioning those things you're supposed to not think about it sort of thing. But it's like, I can't not think about it. And to me in my opinion. Like, if you're a fan of something like if you're the biggest fan of edge of tomorrow, you should be thinking about the mechanics of the universe. Everything that I'm a huge fan of I want to understand it to like the fullest degree. You know, even if it's something that I find in a movie that I love that. You know, it makes it make less sense. Like, why weren't there any security cameras in Gatica that you know, kind of ruins the blood damage. I'm sorry. It actually that's one of my favorite movies. I can still think it's a great movie. I love it. I'm gonna continue watching it. It's a great experience. Like, it a lot in filmmaking dramatically, and you know, there's the story is very poignant. But you know, I just I feel like there's no part of a movie that shouldn't be talked about. It's it's another conversation for someone to take small issues with the movie and then act like it ruins the whole thing. And a lot of people think that I do that. But. I would say that most of the time if I'm going on about like kind of nitpicky things for like a relatively well received movie. That's that's popular. It's not usually the nitpicky things that that prevent me from loving the movie like there's some plot. Holes are not weighed evenly. There's some things that like completely ruin the movie there's some that don't. But most of the time it's usually because I don't feel the movie achieved as much in what it set out to do. So like something like mission impossible fallout. I'm like, yeah. I really loved the action scenes, but the action scenes were half of the movie, not you know, I loved half of the movie in sure rest of it. You know, the the stereotypical cheesy dialogue scenes, and you know, I you can just watch my review if you want. But I mean, I can't I can't praise the full movie when half of it was something that that connected with me. Well, I guess the takeaway, and I've done this. I've I've learned to do this just with most of cultures that I will never begrudge someone for having an opinion, and because someone watches anything certain way, our opinions don't need a lineup in order for me to like something. It's the same way. Where just because it's sort of like, a buyer's remorse or the other can't remember it is a buyer's justification sorta. Like, I went on bought a PS four. And it's the number one selling console or I wince on Finnity war. And it's the number one movie. Therefore, I am right. And I I don't know what that phenomenon is. But I that's probably been going on human history for ever. Oh, some way where you know, you wanna be on some sort of team or some side. But it's a weird thing too people get very invested in the world's that they are watching our viewing. And if you don't like it they somehow feel personally attacked. Yeah. Now. Exactly. Yeah. This isn't that seems to be a constant uphill battle that you're dealing. I know you had a you had a big backlash with like the Black Panther review. You did where you got a certain opinion about something people said, well, how dare you and? Yeah, that's that seems like a constant fight that you're having probably every quarter. I think you you think depends. What's in theaters? You know, sometimes I see a movie that's like doing so. Well, that I know I'm probably not gonna like, and I have to have this thought in my head like should I even watch it like, I'm gonna make my review? It's like it's just gonna upset people. You know? Hi, it's me Adam in the present not in the past. So I'm going to give you a little ad raising. Thank Lisa for sponsoring this episode of film house. Do you by yourself distracted for getting things making mistakes at work? Well, quality night's sleep makes all the difference. The right mattress is the difference between resting and just laying down. The Leesa mattress is the product of more than thirty years of experience and mattress engineering and hundreds of hours of testing at leesamattress has over twelve thousand five star reviews in his love by more than three. Three hundred thousand happy sleepers the much love Leesa mattress is now. Even better new top layer foam is improved sleep cooler, which I love personally because I can't sleep when it's hot and has a perfect hug and bounce as improved pressure relief for all sleepers, but particularly improve for side. Sleepers leesamattress concerts that every curvier bodies feels like you're floating on air. So go ahead and order your Leesa mattress online at least dot com forward slash film house with promo code film house and try it risk free for one hundred nights. It ships direct to your door in a convenient box with free shipping and free returns. Get up to one hundred sixty dollars off the Leesa mattress or two hundred and thirty five dollars off the luxury. Superior mattress and free shipping on the Leesa mattress at Lisa dot com slash film house where you enter promo code film has the checkout. That's L E essay dot com slash film, house, promo code fill mouse back to the interview. Well, you you hit on a really interesting point to where you said, the if you watch them with any sort of scrutiny you will find problem. Gms most likely I like that with anything it could be the best film of all time. You will find a problem with it? I think even the most perfect person will not survive under a microscope, which is been very true of all human history. So you don't meet your heroes because you end up being disappointed because we're all very flawed people on I think films, especially are flawed because I don't know if you've ever been on a set or anything, but like it's a miracle. I think any sort of film gets made the way does a lot that goes into it. And I think it's one of the it's a passive viewing experience that I think at some point we forget that while watching it they're like, why didn't they just change X to Y when your eyes are forty five people on site, and they had to be out of there by two AM because they couldn't go over time because there'd be over budget and now the audit, and are those things you ever take into consideration. When watching a film, or do you just sorta try to take it in the final pack. I mean, I would say the majority of the time the issues that I'm criticizing can be explained by because money, right? And sometimes, you know, the justification for that is is. A lot more forgivable than others. So if you're talking about like a studio project where there's no reasonable excuse why they shouldn't have been able to do a day of re-shoots or. You know, there was the the twenty eleven thing remake. I'm not sure if you haven't seen a okay was it a remake? Well, all you can really boot prank kind of the same things happened. But it was to explain the team that they found sort of thing. Gotcha. And the filmmakers set out to have this very faithful adaptation of the original. They had like crap tons of practical effects that they use like the reason animatronic and everything and then the studio came in and was like, no this people don't want that they want G. And then they literally like all this work that people did they animated over top of it with worse effects, and the original cut is something we can never see I guess, but a lot of the times just like the people controlling the money behind the film, or the reason why it sucks, and which is why a lot of the films that I love in the year. Most of. The films. I love in a year or independent films created by people who you know, the writer is the same as the director, or you know, has a grasp on what the what the script is trying to be or they you know, it's a passion project. Not like, hey, we need to reboot this franchise or, hey, this is a popular idea who's somebody who we can attached to a Jon Favreau, go for it. You know, like, I feel like money is the biggest reason why things aren't as good as they could be those a really interesting article, I read about some Entertainment Weekly or something. But it was a Richard Linklater arguable that he had talked about the film Friday night lights, and how he had went to try to get that film eighties. That I want to adopt this book. It's really like I really enjoyed it. When I make it in the studio. No joke went to a computer and typed in like football summer film. Yeah. Link later and crunched out a number like, and they said doesn't look good like sorry. Can't do that. Not surprising. He defied all expectations made the film is very popular it made more money than they thought. It would it was just sort of a sleeper hit made it got made into a TV show that was very popular for many years. And now they want to readopt it into a movie based on the TV show. Yeah. The, but it it is just sort of amazing that I think in the studio system people want an easy answer. They wanna silver bullet they want to they want to go thing. Plus thing equals this. And it's easier for people to understand. That's what I can say Ghostbusters. But now female equal new film, which is literally an Email that was sent that they found in the league zone. Heels. Are so good that it's a true thing. And then, you know, there's there's I don't know if you've seen any of those leaked Sony emails, but I've heard there's some amazing things that are like we need a hit on this DM culture yet kid who's lo happy with that one. His love the DM. How do we how do we get someone hot like, man? Man, does that was that was one of the points. I brought up in my original amazing Spiderman to review, and then when I saw those leaks. Unlike I knew it literally confirmed exactly what's his electro was dub step something. Like, this is hip with the kids. Right. Like that was exactly what they did. But isn't that a strange thing though, that to be hit with the kids is not hip? Fellow kids. Yeah. You wanna you wanna do something that defies expectations or something? You want to see something that you're not expecting if you if you are a cool kid, I suppose. Yeah. The you know, the the people who control the money in blockbuster films. Really just have no idea what they're doing except, you know, Disney marvel who know what they're doing. And they're not making great movies. But they know exactly how to make money. Sure, you have to respect how much money making machine they are. But for the most part like Sony like slender, man. What was the what we need a slender man movie? Like whose idea was that it was a hot ticket in this in the same world. We're living in there is a current Minecraft movie being worked on at some point. Who knows where it is? I don't know. But I do you. Do you still feel like there are movies that could have somewhat of a budget and still be something that you would enjoy like where does like did you enjoy the film hereditary? Yeah. Where where does that? Fall on your scale of enjoyment and budget production guy. Well, I mean like it didn't have a super high budget. It was like eight twenty four which most of their films. I don't think I don't know if they've distributed a film that's been much higher than like ten million or something, which is like, you know, on the lower end. But I mean like that was a that was a really great movie for what it was. I it's not perfect. But I understand why people really loved it. And I bought it on Blu Ray. I wanna see it again. I it spooked me a lot the first time I saw. But then after after the movie and realize, oh, it's not a scary movie. It's a distressful movie. Yeah. Was it? It's very strange, which I really enjoyed that. I didn't even realize it had a lower budget. You're right. I forgot his eight twenty four. But is there is there a medium tier movie likes sub-genre anymore genre anymore? It seems to be everything's either ironman or blunt house. Yeah. Well, I mean like those are the ways to get movies made. Right. I guess order. Netflix Hulu or something like that. If you're like an established director, you can make like medium budget movies. I'm sure not every Coen brothers movies like super high budget. You know, that's good point. They're I think they're very good doing more than one person's job. Yeah. That's that. Was that was a two guys. You is strange might my films. Go is basically Coen brothers and John carpenter. That's what our end Robert Rodriguez. Yeah. I also went to community college. So that sort of explains a lot we mostly just watch making of DVD's. But he said they're like look elementary out. She's not a great movie. But if you watch it with the directors director's commentary, you might learn something. Yeah. You know, I've I to kind of touch back to like, my qualifications or the fact that I never went to film school. Like that's completely what I consumed like all the time. It's just like DVD commentaries feature reds. And that's how I learned a lot about movies is just hearing it from the directors themselves. You know, you don't need a middleman, they'll tell you exactly how their film was made what they had to do on each day of the set, you know, and described sometimes even like the themes behind the. Film in their commentary like you can learn so much by just viewing extra or special features on on DVD's or Blu rays, which is why I'm kind of upset that Netflix doesn't really offer any kind of thing like that. You would think that at this point. Yeah. I mean, like itunes does it sometimes, but it's kind of like a dying genre like feature reds and special features, which is kind of sad. Like, I that's part of the reason. Why by like a Blu Ray? I mean, there's a few reasons, but I really enjoy hearing the filmmakers themselves talk about you know, how they made the film. It's it's more valuable information than anything else when it comes to filmmaking. That's all I'm definitely a proponent of people. Go go. If you are interested in film, or you are interested in making a career out of something you want to do if you think going to school is going to help you. That's great. But I'm definitely a fan of learning on your own and being self taught. I feel like those are actually some of the best people in their fields on experience. Yeah. And I think you can always waive a fancy degree. But if you don't know how to do your job when you're at your job then. Who cares? What a piece of paper says also especially when you're talking about art degrees. Like, you can't talent. I mean, like, you can you can help talented people recognize their full potential in a way, I guess foster. Yeah. But you can't you can't take someone who's tone deaf. And put them in music course. And then all of a sudden, you know, they're the next Beethoven like you can't do that. In a lot of people will go to any kind of art school. Whether it's you know music or film school thinking that they'll be able to come out of it being like, I'm a director now, then you look at a lot of the stuff that film students make and you know, most film students and most non film students also make cramp most people are just making crappy movies and sure it can teach you how to use, you know, equipment. It can teach. You a lot about film history can teach you about like techniques. Unlike rule of thirds and all that stuff, but like. Hands on experience and being open to failure. You know, you gotta make something in suck at it. And then be self critical and be like what did I do wrong improve? That's the best experience. You can have. Yeah. Always like too perfect examples that are could not be more. Opposite would be PT Anderson and Brett Ratner to people who went through the system in a similar way, beating Anderson quit still got to make boogie nights. Because he had realized the teachers teach me everything I already now on not learning anything here to got to sue the Mon back use that money to actually just make a short film when ended up getting him a career. Whereas the other person's name is said who is Brett retina Brett Ratner went through USC made a terrible short film. Got it to see him Spielberg. Somehow. This guy is great one hundred years from now one of those directors will be remembered the other one will be forgotten, and that's one of the. One of them has a formal education the other one dropped out. So it doesn't make a break. Yeah. I guess I I wanna make it perfectly clear. You don't need you you, you don't need an education. What you need our tools into people to surround yourself with who will help you execute on your vision, which is an education, you do need education does not necessarily like formal. Sure, people skills are great. It will you so far and a lot of the times. It's like school is so expensive that you could have made a film with the money spent on film school. Yeah. I guess they're sort of is an expectation of I have given you money. Now, give me the thing. And it's you know, it's what you put into it is what you will get back. Yeah. I mean like with a degree. It's like what we're where are you going to show the degree? You're not just gonna walk up to a Hollywood producer and be like, hey knows in film school. You have to actually make a short film to show to somebody in most of the cases like you have to have something where you can prove your product before you'll get any kind of. Funding. That's a it's a big thing. We talk about just on our channel. And some who say, yeah. Yeah. You resume can say whatever you want to show me your YouTube channel show me the same. You've made show me show me examples of your work. So then exactly that's honestly what it's becoming. So I don't know. And that's on that note. I would say people want to check out your resume where can they go? Besides the links in the description, besides the links in the description does a willing to all your fun stuff. Is there anything else? So you actually mentioned you're working on a studio album. Yes. Your music was once in guitar hero in Ryan three Mike DLC rock band is still there. I guess if you I I mean, you can find the. I'm pretty sure if you like you can find them on the XBox website or the PlayStation network, they're just like ninety nine cents songs, but like you have to have a rock band three because they abandoned the rut band network in rock band for Brian. And also, they abandoned the keyboard controller, which most of my songs are like piano based. So I mean, yes, they're still there. But I mean, I wouldn't you probably can't find a way to play them. You legitimately has some good music on there. I will say I thank you. I was actually a fan of. I forget the exact name of the song. But I remember maintenance, maybe fragments you, remember you. It was always a restraining. Here's my review about cool cat, anyway, check my music on rock mouth who's this guy? So I you are you're a triple threat, my friend. And I definitely wish you luck in your future. Endeavors, and I want to thank you for coming on. Fuck. I thank you so much. Yeah. It's been great. All right. We'll see by say.

director YouTube Adam Johnston Megan Vancouver Leesa Lisa Brett Ratner Sony Netflix Blu Ray Twitter Leesa Roger Ebert Israel Johnson Michael Goi SA
Roma and What's Making Us Happy

Pop Culture Happy Hour

21:34 min | 1 year ago

Roma and What's Making Us Happy

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Newman's Own foundation, working to nourish the common good by donating all profits from Newman's Own food products to charitable organizations that seek to make the world a better place. More information is available at Newman's Own foundation dot org. Director Afonso Perron directed the word winning film, gravity in two thousand thirteen and won an Oscar for it. Now. He's back with the movie that's equally ambitious and much more personal Roma is inspired by offense Acquarone, childhood. The movie tells the story of Cleo a nanny and housekeeper in nineteen seventies Mexico City. I'm Stephen Thompson. And I'm Linda Holmes, and I'm this episode of pop culture happy hour. We're talking about the Oscar nominated Roma here with me. And Stephen in the studio is Glen Weldon of NPR's parts desk, Glenn through Linda and joining us from NPR in New York is a writer and film critic Monica castio, she's written for the Washington Post the New York Times. Roger Ebert dot com and hey, a little site called NPR dot org. Monica high. We are so excited to welcome to pop culture. Happy hour so excited to be here for people who aren't familiar with Roma? This is a film that was released on net flicks. And they did at the small theatrical release. But most people I think are probably. Wind up actually seeing it on Netflix. It is based on Korans young his own nanny. And the woman who took care of him when he was young involves kind of her relationship with the family and things that happened to her and her personal life. Glenn talked me about how Roma struck you. I can't remember a film that has made me so willing to just sit back and be led by the nose film is just masterful in that. He is displaying mastery with these long lateral Dali shots, he keeps. It keeps revealing things to you characters will be looking off screen. They see something they're reacting to something. And slowly it is revealed to us. He did a lot in children of men too. But this is just so beautifully. Composed the black and white photography kind of takes everything out of the realm of the familiar and just reminds you again, and again that you're watching this beautifully. Composed film, where these these buildings don't look like buildings anymore. They almost look like abstract shapes that are the arranged image. After image just lands with you like there's a scene of a family for lordly eating ice cream under the clause of this show crab or lobster while in the background as a big part of their family. Life is coming to a close. There was a wedding going on in the background. It's just I just ate this movie up. There's a lot of background action that partly involves the fact that this is set at a very eventful time in history of of Mexico in Mexico City, and it's there's a great deal of kind of political upheaval, which there's been some very good writing about that. If you want to read more about it Monica you wrote a little bit about this. And also directed us to a thread from gear mill del Toro, which gets into some of the same things that Glenn was talking about. Oh, certainly I also really enjoy the movie I've seen it now. Three times twice on the big screen and once on Netflix because I wanted to compare the two and see how that worked out in how that compared and it is still very affecting. Even the third time. Even you know, just watching it on my parents television. You know, the one of the reasons why I really gravitated towards the Gimmel del Toro thread is because he really tackles the symbolism in the movie in a way and really just breaks it down and makes it so interesting nyc hide and think about that. Or maybe I was kind of you know, I picked up on some things, and then he saw different interpretation of it. And I think those symbols are kind of left a little open. They don't always they're not always explained, you know, certain things happened in the movies, especially some of the events like people were kind of scratching their heads. And didn't quite understand. Why there is a big student protest all the sudden. But other people it represented something for them to be able to see that happen on screen. It hit them in a different way. I think he's very I think that threat is very good. And we'll linked to in the show notes. But I think that threat is very good at placing a lot of things in context, and he talks for example about those lateral shots that Glenn was mentioning and how they operate like frescoes. And it was I thought that was. Very interesting thing. How did it go with your parents? Well, my dad didn't watch it. My mom is more the movie by like cheese. She was the one who got me into movies. And I watched it with her and she loved it. And it was actually really interesting because I hadn't had this experience before I've seen it with friends and other critics, but for her she just kept geeking out a little bit because there were certain things in the house that she had in her childhood home in Cuba. And she had not seen that sense. You know, she left Cuba in the early eighties. So for her it was a different kind of nostalgia of being back in that kind of environment. And like just this little home things that you can't buy here in the United States. Steven, what did you think? Well, there was an enormous amount of cinematic empathy in this movie Alfonso Krohn wanted to make a movie about his own childhood. Right. The house where he grew up in one thousand seventy s Mexico, and among other things telling the story of his own parents traumatic divorce, and so he tells a story about the made. That looked after his family and really doesn't care very much about anything else. He focuses on her story and everything else is kind of the backdrop to to her making her way in the world and slices of her life and this performance by Ulitsa operato, which is nominated for an Oscar is so restrained and contained and you just see her as like this observer of everything going on in her world. But the movie is fascinated with her. It's not interested in the lives of these kids. It's only ten generally interested in the lives of these. Parents it does this beautiful job. This very very technically kind of showy job of capturing what life was like in early nineteen seventies Mexico. But it's also just clearly fascinated with the interior life of someone who doesn't get to have her story told very often, I think that's true. But at the same time the thing that I find so interesting about the film. Is that it's so kind of I don't want to affect it is the right word. But it's so appreciative of her when you when you know that that that he had a similar figure in his life. And he is making this movie kind of four her you can tell that he has great appreciation for her. Oh, absolutely. That's what I mean. But at the same time there is such a, you know, the way that this family interacts with Cleo is very limited in a certain way. Like, there's a del Toro. Actually makes a great point in that thread, when he says, you know, they go instantly from we love you. You mean so much to us to sort of like go, wait on me. And there's a there is a transactional nature of that relationship that is still an employment relationship, even when you see these flashes of closeness, they're very much in the context of the class divide between these people am I getting this. Right. Do you think? Yeah. No. That's one of the things that hit me, you know, the most when I saw this movie because anyone who's worked in. A service job or any sort of hospitality job or any, you know, just even done a stint of babysitting or house cleaning or anything like that. There's a way the way that people treat you is different the way that people look at you is a little different, you know. And I think he really captured a sense of that. But it's it's so empathetic he involved lebeau. The woman that helped raise him in the process, and he interviewed her multiple times. He talked about this in an article or very early on before. Yeah. Around the time that Rome came out around of the Toronto film festival. And you know, she was telling him stories that he had no idea about about how her and the other made her friend in the movie they would exercise by candlelight because quote John's grandmother didn't like for them to use electric city. You know, little things like that that, you know, a kid wouldn't know or have any idea about, you know, she filled in the blanks for him. And I think that makes much fuller portrait than what would would have been. Yeah. He doesn't cut himself any slack or much slack, which I think is one of the things that makes us film as compelling as as it is. We'll see the mom for example, express. Thanks to Cleo in a very kind of wrote automatic way. And there has been some criticism of this film. This isn't necessarily his story to tell that putting her front and center, and and having her be so as David mentioned interior means that we're getting a kind of suffering porn on her behalf like the stoic. You know, long-suffering character. I think that's kind of an ungenerous reading of what he's doing. But I I can kind of see where some of that would enter into your reading of it. I think I would feel that way about it. If it were less clear that the family is the mother at least that the wife in the family is well, meaning right. If if he had drawn the mother to be cruel and punishing and cold and not to care about Cleo sort of in an overt way. Then I would feel more like it was a sort of a cell. Flagellating, you know, to kind of oh, look how bad my family was to this woman who helped raise me, I think the insight in the film is the kids love her. The mother loves her and cares about her and wants to help her in an a couple of very difficult situations extents herself to to help her in a way, but it's all in the context of that employment relationship, and it never there's a way in which Cleo is is so alone. And yet never is alone. And she's kind of surrounded by this family that she's not in. And I think the ambiguity of that relationship. The the fact that it has different sides to it is what made it work well for me. And I was so glad that they establish that friendship between her, and as Monica mentioned her friend because I think the fact that they you know, they go off and talk about what it's like to work there gives her some relationship with somebody other than the family where you get. Different sense of who she is outside of that other than her boyfriend awful awful, awful boy boyfriends band. Hers is the worst. But that's a competition to know because. One of the after screening QNA's that I was attending somebody brought up. How this film is really anti men Inc. Quit on took. The question was just like, oh, that's what happened. I don't know. What else to say? One of the things I think is interesting too. Is that this is a film that I think it's really easy to get into the a very direct attempt to translate like there's a there's a huge water motif that I think the beginning of this film is so special and the first time I saw it when you don't know what that opening what those opening shots really are the beginning of it is so distinctive and beautiful, despite the fact that it turns out to be a very mundane scene and a lot of ways in terms of what's actually happening. But you can it's very easy. I think with this ability. Well, the water stands for x and the the car that is almost too big to fit into the the space that they have for their car about stands for XYZ and not the kind of like, you know, the family, can you know, is stretching the limits of their middle class. I mean struggle of the urban proletariat. Go that way. But I I agree with Glenn. I think the more rewarding to see it as just to kind of let it exist in your eyeballs and brain here to tell you it works if you're just seeing it on television. I mean, yeah. Of course, it would be a more immersive experience in the theater, but if you can only see it on that flex go ahead and see it on Netflix run do not walk because this film draws you in from the jump and I phone once do you know, what that means? Once during even though this film has very slow the language Hempel tiff scenes of we're just due to watching water flow, for example. And yet you still can't look away. This is as I said, it's masterful don't actually have to run you have to saunter over to your calories that it's something there is this beautiful. I I don't wanna go without mentioning this incredible scene. Wherein Cleo is shopping for cribs while the Corpus Christi massacre plays out outside the windows and just the technical mastery that goes into making that riveting terrifying scene happen. You are in the hands of a master watching this movie, and I think we should mention because we're taping this on the day that it received ten Oscar nominations in the morning, including best picture and practically everything else that could have dreamed of including a nomination for apprecia-, which I think is really amazing and so dominant for marina de Tavira as the among. Yeah. Yes. I was surprised for marina. Because she had not really gotten any accolades or wards and any other critics awards or anything before that. So it was just really nice to see that Yuliya was one of the people that's been in conversation for a while since Roma came out because it's such an incredible performance. So of course, I was super thrilled. And she she released a little video about the moment. She found out that she was nominated. And it's it's just so full of joy. I encourage everyone to go. See it. It's her first your first film. Yeah. It's a first film. Yes. She was working her way to becoming a teacher when she was cast. It's also not the kind of performance that always gets nominated things we talk all the time about best actor being most acting. Yes. And this is not a most acting kind of performance. He's doing a lot of quiet reaction. And it's it's not showy. But it's so good. Yeah. An addition to one of the great things that came out with all of these nominations was Gabriella Rodriguez who's one of the. Users of Roma now, she's in she's part of the team that's up for best picture. So he's the first Latina to be nominated in that category. Home cheese. I mean, that's great. And yet it a fall also. Yeah. It's like, oh, I think these these nominations were like that. There are a lot of things that it was great to see. And then a lot of things where it was like. Yeah. I think someone was looking into whether or not Lee elite Zia was the first indigenous nominee. She's definitely the first Mexican indigenous woman in this category. And no Latina. I believe has won in the best actress category. I think there's a good chance. I'll be rooting for her her night rolls around you can find Romo on Netflix. If you cannot find it in a theater, and it is a satisfying and beautiful film. Either way tell us what you think about it. Find us on Facebook at Facebook dot com slash P, C H or tweet us a PCH after a quick break. It's going to be time for our favorite segment of this week. And every week what is making us happy this week. So come. Right back. This message comes from NPR sponsor adult swim should women play video games does alleged murderer John McAfee deserve your vote. In twenty twenty is the extra syllable in news person too much of a hassle. Find out on soft focus with Jennifer Friedman, stand up comedian Jenna, Friedman, tackles, issues, like campus, rape, and sexual assault. The second installment of soft focus with Jenner Friedman premiers Friday, January twenty fifth at midnight eastern standard time only on a dull swim support for this podcast and the following message. Come from the Annie E Casey foundation developing solutions to support strong families and communities to help ensure a brighter future for America's children. More information is available at eighty CF dot org. Welcome back to pop culture. Happy hour. It is time for what is making us happy this week. Stephen Thompson, what is making you happy this week. We have not gotten a chance to talk about the poet Mary Oliver who died last week. She died on a Thursday for one day Twitter was sort of transformed at least for me in my feet transformed from seeping rage toilet that it continues to be to this, very humane and generous place where people were quoting a bunch of Mary Oliver's poems. Mary Oliver as as a poet was not necessarily viewed as like, a lofty read her work was very very acceptable and beautiful and as somebody who is a at best adapted. Learn poetry I have really come to love her work and love kind of thumbing through her books. Just to find these very spare and simple poems about forgiveness and nature, and spirituality and kind of keeping your. Is open in the world. She's probably among the poems for which he's best known wild geese. Is this incredible little piece that has been embraced by anyone who has ever struggled to find acceptance or forgiveness. If you've not had a chance to check out her her work. I guess this would be an ideal occasion with which to do. So you can start with, you know, wild geese selected poems, for example, which has some of her best known work in it. I really love her work was very very sad to to hear about her death. But happy to have an opportunity to relive some of her best work. Thank you very much. Steven glen. Well, then what is making you happy this week? I was happy to see the Swedish film border, get a hair and makeup nomination. It's the only thing that it got nominated for was on the shortlist for best foreign language film didn't make it. It's an odd. Little film about a woman named Tina played by Melander. It's great performance who works for Swedish border security, and she can smell when people are up to. No good. That's why she's so damn good at her job. It's based. On a short story that was written by the guy who wrote let the right one in. So it still works in that kind of world of world mythology and folklore about two minutes into this film. You're gonna figure out what her deal is it takes her forty five minutes to do. So, but the ride is really great. There is a sex scene that will make all the squares in the audience squirm. It's funny and dark, and I if it has to get attention just for hair and makeup. Sure. More people should see it border Swedish film that I like along. Thank you very much Glen. Well, then wanna castio what is making you happy this week. I had the opportunity to catch khloe sows the writer. I missed it. When it was in theaters. And I you know, it it had gotten some praise, but it was still it's so it was so small I didn't get it. You know, it was an on the top of my list of things to catch up with. And then I decided to take a break from prepping from Sundance in the nine checking out this film about a native American horse trainer who has a terrible accident. And then. Literally has to try to heal himself or figure out how to make things work in order to get back on his horse. And it's just it's so moving, and it's it's so involving and I mean, it's gorgeous. I I originally to put it on like in the background. And then I ended up leaving whatever I was doing and watching the whole movie. That's always a good sign his very good sign. So again, it's the writer the writer. Thank you very much. Monica. What is making me happy this week? I always like it when I get a chance to read a book, which sometimes happens because I am doing a book event. And so sometimes when I do a book event, I get to read a book that I probably otherwise would not have gotten to in that happened recently with the national book award winning novel in verse the poet X, which is by Elizabeth aggravate. Oh, and it's about an afro Latina teenage girl living in New York, and how she she deals with her family and her it is coming of age, and she. Learns how to be a slam poet, she becomes a slam poet. And her discovery of poetry, her discovery of writing her discovery of the importance of expressing herself is so lovely to follow. And I think that it struck me that both this book and Brown girl dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson are both written in verse. And there's an opportunity to really explore what books lamed at young audiences can look like, and I was thrilled to read this. It's so wonderful. It has won a bunch of awards again. It's called the poet exits by Elizabeth and that is what is making me happy this week. And that brings us to the end of our show, you can find all of us on Twitter because I me into homes you can find Stephen at. I dislike Stephen, and you can follow Monica at M C A S T I movies. You can follow our producer. Jessica reedy at Jessica underscore ridi our producer, Vincent Atkin vino at the ACA vino, and our producer, Merida's and music director. Mike cats, if it like cats at pay ATC, I f Mike spanned Hello, come in provides the music. You are bobbing your head to right now. So thanks to all of you for being here. Thank you for joining us Monica and thanks to all of you for listening. If you have a second, and you're so inclined do subscribe to our newsletter. That's an NPR dot org slash hop culture newsletter. We will see you. All right back here next. Hey, it's Peter sago from wait. Wait, don't tell me if you're a normal weight weight listener you shout out the answers to all the questions, and then you get frustrated that no one can tell how smart you are. Here's the solution. Wait, wait quiz available now on your smart speaker, just ask your smart speaker to open the wait, wait quiz. Finally, your genius shall be recognized. This message comes from NPR sponsor. Comcast business. Business has always been driven by innovators. That's why Comcast business is helping you with technology that provides better experiences. Comcast business beyond fast. Actual speeds. Vary and are not guaranteed.

Monica high Cleo Netflix Stephen Thompson NPR Glenn Roma Oscar Steven glen Mexico Mexico City writer Cleo New York Newman Twitter director John McAfee Mary Oliver Roger Ebert
No Filler: Thomas Bangalter - Irreversible Soundtrack

Rock N Roll Archaeology

00:00 sec | 8 months ago

No Filler: Thomas Bangalter - Irreversible Soundtrack

"And welcome to no filler. The music podcast dedicated to sharing the often overlooked hidden gyms that fill the space between the singles on our favorite records. My Name is Clinton. Cut My brother Travis with me as always and Because some news to share yeah sure. It's news so we realized something you know. What nudist is all about diving into the the non singles You know of albums from artists that we all know in love. Problem is for the last couple of years drivers and I've discounting been using this platform to share some of our favorite artists and albums. I mean you think about it. That's that's what the intro does say. We do say some of our favorite records very true. But let's think about. Let's focus on the first part of our intro. So you know part of our mantra here is that we talk about the songs that weren't singles the hidden gems but when we talk about bands that nobody's heard of a or B. Don't have any singles on the album to begin with strays away from the spirit of of the show right and so and I I. I feel like that's just hardwired into to US says music lovers. You know back when we had new dust our music blog that was the entire point of that blog was to share in music from from underground or bands. You know and that's what we live for dude so naturally we over time for the most part on this podcast. We've been kind of charon hidden gems hidden albums or yeah you could say we've been we've been. We've been sharing artists and albums that we love. But we're GONNA change gears and start covering some super popular artists some of the super popular albums the heavy hitters a-. And here's the thing we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA try to stay true at least two. You know these albums that we enjoy right but we're also going to try to challenge ourselves and in in listening to albums that you know. We may know the the singles that everybody else knows and we may actually not listen to the band on the regular. But we're going to challenge ourselves to listen to an album and try to find songs that are bad ass that that we literally have never heard because we only know the singles which is exactly the the the the point of the show. Right yeah is. Let's listen to great albums and hey maybe there's a a song overlooked or that I've overlooked for you know years because I I only know the ban because of the singles. We're we're only gonNA. We're only going to do an episode on it. If we think it warrants an episode right right like to give an example real quick I just. I think it'd be fun to cover. Abandoned DEF LEPPARD or something. There's gotta be at least one DEF LEPPARD album. That has some bad songs. You know hidden gyms that no one's ever heard before right if you're listening to this does episode in your Def Leppard Fan. You're probably screaming at your ipod into your car radio. I listen to podcasts. Seeing you gotta listen to this album and the song and This and that so anyway. Yeah but we are going to keep. We're are going to keep the format and that every other episode is going to be a sidetrack and that's where we're still going to continue to to really dig deep. You know what I mean and find find some stuff that has maybe unheard of her. You know dive until like a member of of a certain bands like side projects or something. Yeah in some of our earlier episodes that as what we tried to do like for example our very first episode was alison chains dirt. Which is obviously one of those records would fall under this category of hugely popular record And our sidetrack for that was Green River. I think the band was which is credited as being one of the first bands to get the grunge label attributed to them. So that's a perfect example of like what the sidetrack was intended to be about. And you know over the the years you know. We've it's it's not as easy or as a you know consistent findings sidetracked for some of this more obscure stuff that we've we've covered a lot of times. A sidetrack of have almost just turned into another episode entirely. That's really not even related to the band that we talked about previously. So we're GONNA stray away from that and get back on. Get back on track if you will and try to stick to the the spirit of of What we say the beginning of every episode you know and I'm excited pumped about this so next week. We're going to get the ball rolling. Spent some time in the nineties. We're GONNA cover smashing pumpkins and their album gish. From nineteen ninety one. That's going to be asked me funded and we'll yeah. We'll hang out in the nineties a little bit. But we'll we'll pick some of the more well known artists albums from that decade and add. You'd I'm excited so anyways let's let's move on. Yes let's move on a little side track today. So this is going to be our our last episode in this batch of electronic music that we've done the last few weeks and We figured a good sidetrack for last week's episode on Daft Punk Would be the soundtrack to a movie called irreversible which is a two thousand two. French experimental psychological thriller drama film every every single Genre yes crammed all crammed into one. There is according to a compete experimental psychological thriller Drama Film Psychological Thriller Drama. Come not accommodate you not a comedy now. It was done by Mr Tomas. Bang Tar which is one half of Death Punk. The mast duo and men. So I don't know how this album got on my radar because I remember finding it back. In the day of the days of Napster in lime wire and Kazaa right damsel doubt long ago. Oh yeah yeah so before spotify. So I don't know because I mean hang on now. Is this even spotify? No does the soundtrack is not on spotify. So I don't know how I came to her stumbled upon this album. But either way we've reference to this before we actually referenced it in the very first episode. Yeltsin chains episode. Oh yeah so we were talking about the track on dirt called rain when I die in. How the intro and like lanes dailies voice had sort of droning kind of like Uneasy feeling to it. Yeah and there's a guy a drenching. Yeah like just kind of makes you feel off off right. So there's a track on this soundtrack called rectum. And I haven't seen the movie because I've heard that it's it's got some pretty graphic brutal scenes in it one of which is a rape scene and the song is played during that scene. And here's a little known fact. People were left feeling nauseous and having feelings of Vertigo In the theater probably didn't help that. There was a rape scene out at the same time. But if you listen to this track independently of watching the film like does give you this sense of uneasiness. Apparently the reason that this this is because he used a noise. Frequency of Twenty eight hurts which apparently has a frequency known to? You know produce. Those those feelings like nauseous feelings is like that. So obviously he you know. From like a comp- composer Percy perspective. Like he's doing a scene. A rape scene nausea and Vertigo. Like that's he you know he did it on purpose right. I mean that's Oh total. That's smart on his part right in a way. Because it's like I'm going to try to make you feel the way that this this victim is feeling right anyway We're not GONNA play that. Song for you if you WANNA check it out though if you're curious like hey up we'll see about that. We'll see if I can ashes then. Yeah go go play it. Go look it up on Youtube. It's called Rectum But again it's not a pleasant song that listen to we're going to play a little bit more of the The more electric centric songs. That are a little bit more daft. Punk deft Punky all right so yeah Q. This is sidetracked. So we're gonNA keep it nice and sweet short and sweet is another way to see that and Yeah let's just play the first track that we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA talk about here so this one is called in. Its has a very appropriate title. It's called night beats and It's got some Nice Outrun Vibes. Yes definitely I sent wavy. I love it did. Yeah it's great man and like you know it's called night beats like that's the exact imagery you get in your in your mind or at least. I do dad driving around in the city at night. Yep We've talked about that before out. Certain songs give you that that that that vibe you know yeah especially on our aim and Tobin episode but yeah So he released some of the stuff from irreversible on some some singles he basically basically. There's some stuff on the soundtrack that is from his earlier work so he wasn't written for the movie But some of the stuff like like like I said rectum and then That's on we just played appeared on the film and then he released them as a single the following year on a twelve inch called outrage so Looks like this is. This is his first soundtrack. Work it is. He eat another movie called climax and that came out in two thousand eighteen. So relatively new I've listened to that too. I think it's it's got similar IOS in the same pocket of of atmosphere and whatnot. Not that I've seen it. But I'm saying the soundtrack matches the same vibes universal so anyway Let's play the next one here. Kim. So this is the very the very next track on the record. It's called stress. Kind of reminds me of Stranger things score a little bit. Yeah well so here I mean yes right and I think that's because it's to bring this full circle back to our our country's episode which I think was first episode in this series of electronic music that we've talked about. It's it's the outrun cynth- wave eighties soundtrack that that could be a song off of John Carpenter Film Yak especially with that that that that sign wave. Kinda got the right word queue. That's what it sounds like right ban that thing to on the ever present it. No not that one I got you. But what's funny is like the the one. That's that's that's ever present as you said kind of reminded me of I mean again. It's John Carpenter of the the Halloween theme Same Malady Kinda composition of the. You know it obviously wasn't a piano like the Halloween name. But I mean this is you know like we said this is a sit experimental psychological thriller drama film. So there's probably elements is there's there's rape scenes. There's there's a really violent and I've actually watched this scene on. Youtube is really violent. Beating scene where. The Sky Beats a homeless person to death with a fire extinguisher to the face. Good Yeah the reason I looked it up is because and this is read it for you. People were like I heard that they the film crew literally found a homeless person and gave him some beer and brought them into the the Stu- the set and he actually killed a homeless person in that bill. But the reason to be a snuff film right. Yeah but the reason they say that is because it looks really pretty realistic. That's because they used CGI apparently but anyway Do you got to the bottom of it. No no one was killed. I can't confirm that q but according to Wikipedia to CGI. Kay I'M GONNA. I'M GONNA choose to believe that okay so Anyway that that song could definitely be an Horsham as that sense of that you know. It's called stress. Song is called stress. Gives you that feeling of suspense And like we were saying earlier. It's got that eighties that eighty s movie. It's those minor minor minor courts many towns. Sure why not you anyway Watched the film at your own risk but at the very least you can find it on. Youtube. You can find the whole soundtrack on Youtube. It's not spotify. I'm sure it's there's other places you can listen to it. But look up the the reversible soundtrack. There's a playlist that has all the songs you could just put clan. Listen to it. Listen to the song. Rectum at your own risk as well because we said it really does make you feel uneasy when he listened to it and yeah it really does. Yeah so anyway Roger Ebert Cue. We all remember him. Recipe's he said Cue that this is a movie so violent and cruel that most people will find it unwatchable so anyway So yeah not a lot of the daft punk stuff. Sounds like this. There is a track on on the On the on the tron soundtrack that has a similar vibe to the first song that we played by you know much like a lot of musicians to me at least of the ones that I've listened to have branched off into their own soundtrack. Work like Jonny Greenwood they tend to use the soundtrack as a as a way to experiment right and like do things that they normally don't get to do with their their main project right. So that seems to be the case with Thomas. Obviously he's doing electronic music and DANCE MUSIC. In some instances but it is you know sort of a step aside from the. Daft PUNK staff which is which is cool and that also proves that the daft punk you know as a truly collaborative effort you know it. It's a they're definitely both contributing to the to to what you hear when you hear a daft punk song. It's not you know one. Not One sided or anything. Yeah there's there seems to be a lot of Electronic duos which is interesting because the you know like. Tyco not take a Tosca when we didn't have on them. That's two guys thievery. Corporation underworld is another ban so yeah Q. that's nice quick sidetrack and it's time for our beloved segment. What you heard but before we do that Q. Let's take a quick break and we're back all right Q. I'M GONNA go first because my pick isn't `electronic song from a US born UK based producer So I've been a fan of the sky. The funny thing is the very first song of this guy. He goes by dowd. D. A. U. WD. The very first time. I heard one of his tracks was actually on a playlist. That Mr Scott Hanson himself AKA TYCO put out on his his graphic design blog that he runs called. Iso fifty years ago He had like a year end playlist. And there's a song off the album heat division. There's actually called. He was named the track. And like I've been listening to the Guy Percents Anyway He just released a new single Called that's GonNa suck pushy. It's called the as as s age or dash zero zero one. So here's the here's thing He released a a new action. Say He released Allen type this up Pichet. She he started. A new label called that Ps Ridge fucking dominate. The why are you GonNa make you say this out loud pitch? That's like that's like a spoon album yet right anyway. They released a new a new label and then to sort of kick it off. He came out with this. This three track EP. Called Fish Pysche. H Zero zero once. Obviously because it's the first first release on the label so We're GONNA listen to a song track to called IDRESS and what's interesting about this rank its address or address. Like AEGIS ELBA SANDRA MEYER. Or is it. That is as good. So what's go out this? It has his typical sound which is Ambient House techno up. But this record in particular which I haven't heard him do before it's got these like Afro I'm GonNa I'm GonNa Quote Damn Afro Dia Spark Rhythms. And you'll hear like a a sample like a vocal sample which is really cool anyway. So here it is. This song's called Idris. Talk Talk turn owner. Could you turn was great? Yeah that's a. It's a really good example of A sample heavy electronic song. I really liked all the different progressive samples that he threw in there. Yeah and what's great about you know incorporating the the the Afro rhythms and stuff. That's kind of a callback too. Early early like Dub Music you know right that. The origins of thrown all started except Anyway so a little bit more about this guy. Just the thought that this was worth mentioning he has released records on ghostly international compact which is another really well known electronic label and yet a an album came out and it was actually featured on our top one hundred of the last decade playlist called theory of colors that was released on. Ninja tune which is another huge electronically will so this guy. I mean. That's like the WHO's who electron Record labels and he's he's been on all three of them So anyway Again the guy's name dowd. Her he goes by Dowd That's D. A. U. W. D. N. Yeah he just put out this this tractor. We just played Couple of days ago so I am about a week ago. That was the son was called address. It was by dowd. Sukey what you got for us so sung. I heard at a coffee shop few days ago. I was working on piecing together one of our codes here. Heard of a indie pop. Duo goes by Los Walters. Nope so they're apparently pretty well known in Puerto Rico. That's that's rather from kind of in the reminds me like cut copy or what was that like. Caribou that kind of stuff kind of a bit electronic. You know I think it's an it's an actual band. You know within instruments and I believe they tour with drummer and a few other people but Anyway I heard the song off of their latest. Ep came out in two thousand eighteen. It's called Carmelo and this the first track on the album. It's called Karma thanks you third. Hello Yeah I really liked the The the the music the instruments that the singing kind of reminded me of him GMT. A little bit. I thought that too. They're like the Puerto Rican GMT. Yeah Yeah maybe I'll check out more of what they get it. What's funny? It's like sometimes I. I look at your screen and I saw like a small thumbnail of the album art. Yeah I thought that you were bringing like a eighties and eighties hip hop group to the table. Just like a squint. That I was in and looking at the records. It looks like we're in jumpsuits which made me think like a tracksuit. You know. Yeah no that's not. I don't think that's not. I don't think that's them now. Interesting I don't know who that is So yeah so. They have a few few full length albums and this was their La- latest like handful of albums. Handful of songs that's been released. They released a few singles after this one. But anyways. Yeah that's ban called Las Walters and they're a Puerto Rican indie pop band. That song is called. Calma are Kalma. I don't know how to say what anyways that's that's going to do it for us to Damon this up. Yeah so I'm I'm excited to to change our format apple little bit here or I shouldn't say James Format formats can be the same change our our focus on what what kind of records we're GonNa talk about because in the past. I mean it's not like we haven't talked about hugely you now. Popular records in the past like done an episode on Metallica. We've done an episode on cold play back and looking back on those episodes. I feel like you know those are those are really fun and more interesting conversations typically ensue from from talking about records like that because there's just so much to talk about there's so much history with these bands or so much and one thing. I want to do more of which we were doing. A lot of when we first started this up. I WanNa find really good interview clips and maybe even concert Let's play more of and you know when we when we dive into these. Some of these more. You know uber successful popular bands. You a little bit easier to to find. Oh God yeah did. There's they're probably. There's probably no no interview clips out there of what Kim? Apparently those guys never right never show their faces. They try to stay anonymous Anyway that's not to say that we'RE NOT GONNA that we're not GonNa do obscure records ever again. That's what I was going to say. It's not the case right. You know just to to to keep things. Keep things interesting for the listeners. We're GONNA talk about More popular records that you may have listened to bands that you probably know and love and hopefully introduce you to some songs from them from record. You love that. Maybe you don't pay that much attention to your or you. Skip over to get to the singles spirit of the show and I feel like we've kind of gone off track a little bit just with our our Inquiry Chaba Thirst Q. Or sharing unheard music with people. It's Kinda what I I'd like to do one of my passions at sea. It's it's what we eat. Man is to be the music snob at the office. Who's like have you ever heard of these guys before? I know you've heard electric is have you heard? Ibm Yeah exactly. I remember before I thought I made that up right and thought it was like being a complete snob about it. I only listened to intelligent. Dance Music did you push up your your glasses frames for out from the Bridgier knows when As you said idea after pushing my glasses on my nose I only listened to intelligent dance music and I can you know. Hey that does sound Kinda. I didn't make that ship anyway. Ibm is probably my favorite electronic sub genres but whatever anyway So yeah that's that it So yeah next week. We're going to talk about smashing pumpkins first studio release for studio album fooling album. Gish came on one thousand. Nine hundred. Ninety s music is probably ninety. Rock in particular is probably my favorite my favorite decade of Music I think so too specifically rock. Yes I mean. Obviously we've talked about this a billion times like our wheelhouse like the music that we really came into music with was the stuff those happening when we were in high school which is the two thousands right right. But there's just something about grunge in particular man and the nineties rock sound that I keep going back to you over and over and over again so I'm excited to to spend some time with some beloved nineties records I think we talked about. We want to do an episode on no doubt at some point In one of their their property records. We could probably do. We've already done an episode but I we can do another. Rem Episode Man. We could we could. I did I did one of the more obscure ones. Anyway I think so That's house abilities are endless. Endless men were yeah. We were joking that we could almost go through and just talk about the rolling stones five hundred best albums ball time and just go through those. We want to be a little bit more I don't WanNa say picky but we WANNA you know. Let's not let rolling stone to do all the work force right right exactly. But that's that's the idea we're GonNa talk about iconic records a conic bands and I'm looking forward to it so we'll start that off next week again with the Pumpkins and it's going to be good times man netted so as always you can find us on the Pantheon podcast network along with a lot of other really great music heavy. Podcasts AS PANTHEON PODCASTS DOT COM. We also have our own website. No filler PODCAST DOT COM. There you can dive into our show notes. Check out the track lists from each show all that fun stuff. We are also on twitter. Now at no Filler podcasts and you can also send us an e mail directly. Ed's No filler podcast at gmail.com so be shouting edge again next week with with A L. listen to smashing pumpkins debut album gish. And that ought to do it. Thanks as always so much for listening. My name is Quentin. My name is Travis. Take Care Took Felt said that fit that body fat. The fat that that Bat Batman fat that both but the battled back thought thought that that matter report auto. We were on we. We we talk.

spotify Youtube rape dowd US Kim John Carpenter Travis Clinton Vertigo TYCO Ibm AEGIS Jonny Greenwood twitter Roger Ebert Mr Scott Hanson Mr Tomas Green River
The Bitcoin Podcast #290 - The Recap Of The Year 2019

The Bitcoin Podcast

00:00 sec | 10 months ago

The Bitcoin Podcast #290 - The Recap Of The Year 2019

"Now entering guy cast mandatory. Yeah online so yeah What's up mother fuckers? It's episode. I'm sorry wow so come on come art those also racist Local to the BITCOIN podcast This is episode two hundred nine hundred. WHOA ooh Shit? That's a lot of a lot of episodes zips two hundred ninety and since we're weekly show if you divide that by fifty two. You'll see how long we've been doing this for a while. We were doing like twice a week. I remember that like there's a strong couple months for at least twice a week. Yeah that's right. We were going twice a week. Man I wish we had twice a week time. Like like we do now Like then like we do now or don't Matt don't Nail so fill the people in on what's happening gory. We first started this podcast. Every we told ourselves every ten episodes. We're going to have a drunk episode. That's where we get heavily inebriated and we go from there We haven't done that since maybe the fourth worth or fifth drunken episode so we went like Ford or for the episodes. Did a few of those had fun. It was great guy a little more serious and and here we are now two hundred ninety episodes in for this one podcast and then it's the new year and we say hey let's You really want to do like a recap episode where we look back at past year at the past year and really like talk about about what we talked about and it has a fumble that in a process of saying. Let's do that. It was like fuck it. Let's do another drunk upset so here we are we. We indeed have been stiffen a good amount of the day. I am currently sitting on a large glass of Irish whiskey which I forgot. Got The name of after copious amounts of beers while peeling wallpaper in my house. And D- what what are you doing. Well I I started out the day with the Sonya blunk. 'cause I needed to make this fucking chowder. is curse a lot when I've been Dragan so be reality a lot I made this shout. Her it was dammed delicious. So good in then. I switched over over to Chardonnay because of reasons and then I jumped into Crown Royal. So why do they call. Chowder is it is is it. I remember like seafaring people say hey. Let's he's Chowder. Is that like proper chowder. Just saying Chowder for food. You'd the only reason I think they call it. Chowder is because you throw lots of media ingredients into it and then you just call chowder. What is chowder will mind is composed of corn sweet potato shrimp halibut salmon muscles? It's a lot of fish. It's so good dude. It's very ID Pepper Salts But then switch to crown royal and now because there's no more ground royal. I've switched to Crown Royal Apple. She'll it almost empty bottle of Crown Royal Apple. And because we've been doing this for so many years we've kind of improved a little bit in the process of doing it. I am now able to splice in audio into the theme that we can also listen to the process so so this episode we're going to We got see seven fifty seven clips from episodes of last year. They were going to listen to you. Together you're working with you and then we're gonNA just riff on it after that. Start off before we wait drink responsibly. Probably guys don't drink and drive and just and don't drink too much and don't and don't buy crypto. Oh based on our advice so they got done the quality disclaimers for this or do try to sue me bitch. I dare you to know. Didn't it now by the way. The Rodney Mullah's episode was outside of the scope of one year. And I really wanted to go into go fuck yourself but yeah go fuck yourself but that being said our first episode is outside of the one in year. I broke the rules a little bit over to break the rules. But because we fucking interviewed ager Yang we interviewed at A presidential candidate. So let's let's just go on that hot second. We play the inappropriate. Let's play the clip quick. And then we're GonNa talk about one like the clip clip that I played to the fact that fucking president's candidate here first. The first spot casts he went on with us. Yeah I don't even know if I ever go. Here's so so so you run for president and and not all running for president is over this and and your viewpoints on fiscal policy and most recently in my adult life weird notions in emotions have been in thrust upon me that I didn't see happening in my lifetime because of my upbringing in where I grew up so I just want to ask you a question. I think it's a very simple the answer for some reason people try to make it a difficult response and I just need to know. Are you racist so it should be some for some reason today. That's not a yes or no question so so I I would say the way conventionally understood no. I am not racist then easy to say but like my outlook and this is fueled ruled in part because I grew up in Asian Guy In a non Asian part of New York state so so it okay so that was that was di literally asking Andrew Yang a current presidential candidate. Are you racist. That's what I did and I just WanNa take a moment to say one. How awesome that this project that we created ended up to the point where you have the opportunity to fucking ask a presidential candidate for racists or not? How does that I mean that's pretty revoke an awesome leuwen? It's like take the moment for granted Because he is he's a four. I mean he's not a forerunner but he's on the stage he's he's talking that Shit and there's more than at least two thousand people that know what he wants to do. He became president so it is kind of like bowling that we've created something out of a women passion that we got to point where we can interview that guy the first of the first people to interview. Yeah that's pretty. Well the first podcast. That's not the first people. Yes clearly yes for the first. Sorry even I bic podcast interview. Let's let's it's narrow that down even before the first script but Man Oh man it. My heart was beating before I quit. visit really nervous event. I was really nervous. We know me I take my nervous shits before every interview so for that one I took a took a hefty nervous dump and I knew I was going to ask the question. And obviously we've been dealing with a pile of shit for president for the last three years four years so I was like well. Twelve years I guess they're always ship. This particularly has has emboldened a nasty vein that exists in American society. I don't know it's almost a history. We try to over rider. Ignore that exists and and some of the things that I've witnessed just being uniquely black fuck in the past four or years I'm just like man. I can't believe we're submitting to McCarthy in politics again. I can't believe that the nation is buying into this nonsense so I was was like well. You know. At least I'm going to get the chance to ask somebody who wants to be president if he's fucking racist and if you can answer it simply the right. I think that's all it's unprecedented in that. Yeah we get to hear the honest. Just answer a question that you know for Damn sure he did not see coming. Nope like hey we raised is like no no no. I'm good answer. Don't get me wrong. I keep pulling people out his age. Your background talked about a lot of stuff then talked about like you know the idea of racism episode. Also that is Episode Two hundred and twenty. It was aired in August two thousand eighteen eighteen. The current price bitcoin during that time was six thousand. Six hundred seventy and that's where literally asked at presidential candidate handed it if he was racist and then we have a tremendous amount of conversation around fat. But I was just like I just remember US having long awesome conversation about universal a basic income regulation on Crypto so on and so forth. And I gotTa talk about some real quick. Yes and he will one he actually. She has great ideas about universal basic income in his planned. This sound for you know. I don't know if he has the political currency. Pull it off. But it's a sound plan but yeah if you ever have the nuts to ask the president is simple question go for you can say that you can. I think you can take that to your kids like you know you're going to have those are stories storytelling worthy information. Like oh I once asked a president who was racists on air on the record on the records he one of my ear clips or is not telling me that. That was the one that was that broke the rules right. We wanted to make sure that all of these were recap of last year. That struck out to me and I wanted to. I wanted to continue. I WANNA I WANNA show people will that episode. Because it's it's ridiculous right like the fact that we were able to do that. That's that's well outside the realm of cryptocurrency currency yet. The thing that we built allowed us to be able to have that interview ask those questions yet. We still remained like who we are in the process of doing it right. wasn't like Hey I'm coming on these talking points. We're only going to talk about these things. It was like Heck Yank came on. He was like cool. Talk about whatever there were no so I also cursed in that interview and said something about like smoke. A DAB like it was interesting interesting candidate. He's interested interesting candidate though another begin use of yours Which one do you want We have fifty eight episodes to sixty nine percent to eighty nine. Let's go with episode. T fifty eight go. Yeah in. Rice was Seven thousand four hundred forty two dollars and it was may nineteenth may nineteenth of of last year prices seven thousand seven hundred seven thousand four hundred forty two dollars and this was a clip of episode two fifty eight of the podcast. It's kind of general ideas that if you if there's something that's important that you need to make sure that your that's required for your service you authenticate at that point. And most of the time the way the Internet works right now that flows through email so Mixture you locked down your email. Don't so then what if it didn't flow through email and it flow through a her say if if you will perhaps a token it can and so. That's what I think what's interesting about a lot of scripted. Stuff is that we're playing with new ways as of authentication. Jason Webb Tokens is thing. That actually happens on the back end of services when you log in so like say happens you log into. We'll say you logging goint base right and you close your window but you bring your window back up and eightieth couple of hours later. But you're still logged in. Does that work authentication. Jason Webb Tokens. So what happens in may be similar to that. But usually it's chasing tokens what happens. Is that the first time you log in you. Authenticate yourself you. You're to a fe your Google Google off indicator pushing the button whatever's on their whatever that shit is right and then you're leading once your let ed you're Granted a basically a time base token. It's only good for so long that gets stored inside your browser so instead of seeing rigo drop indication that just checks represents it's like oh you've been here before you have the right token you can come back and that only works for a specific amount of time. I'm always wondered how that worked. Thank you clear that up for me Dr. Dr Betty Crypto has some interesting things that it can do especially because the majority of the good things about Crypto is USABLE CRYPTOGRAPHY so like we've pushed the boundaries on making digital signatures digital signatures usable symbol. which can be used everywhere right? That's just the way you do. SSH over computer. That's done through public and private payers while you do a lot of authentication and computers. Don't do public payers It's just making it better. I think through making it useful for money so all right so that clip on me. It was a clip on you man. I wanted to show like a that. We can like walk the walk and talk the talk about US actually no one. Even though we offer time-to-time we saw the fuck. We're talking about about like I'm super comfortable like it's one of the thing the things that I've learned This year I take for granted how much I know her Versus how much other people no and I assume that people get like some of the basics of how the Internet works in like Authentication Password Management cryptography digital rights like what who owns what type stuff take it for. Granted that people understand stuff and they don't and I feel like this year I want to spend a lot of time trying to educate more on some of the it basic stuff that people need to understand so that when they start using the stuff they can appreciate appropriately. I think that's a good notion to go to you because you'd be surprised at how much people don't know and how much you know just because of your personal I'd call it to Compass Sousse Ethic Ethical Compass. How you feel they should know and that goes with any technology but especially the internet which is easiest lead? The newest massively adopted technology that we've had right. Well no not the newest right cellphones. I guess would be the newest smartphones. Those would be the newest but the Internet was right before that in so much of it is understood. Like for instance in on what the header. A show that you guys are hopefully hopefully excited to hear about we just went through what a digital signature is and in an how complicated process that is when it comes to Having a digital signature and then having that be a part of a transaction and it being unique to every transaction depending upon the actual data in the transaction I mean it just. It was a lot for me Jesse taken and so Like when you really dig down down deep into this technology There's last shake going on like that's one of the things that like. I guess the community has has to be privy toured understanding that in the in the wealth of layers that it takes to put together just bitcoin and then adding on top of that ethereal and dash and all these other like oh ex. All these other cryptocurrencies the with every single leap to a different currency is an opportunity for bullshit to go like some some scammer to to come in and say this or a comp- whole community like we recently learned about with one coin community to say take one little sound bite from what makes a technology a technology and just run with it and still people's money and still everything from people as they like. I wanted to play that clip to show. Oh that one yes we do know what the fuck we're talking about. Even though we are y no I personally am drunk so but to The stuff that we talk the CRYPTO is not easy. It's easy to fall into. It's it's one of those things that's a these. Learn incredibly difficult to master not. It's not one hundred percent not but it takes fix it takes time and effort right like anyone can do it. That's what I want. I don't want anyone to think they can't do it. You could do it do it. You can understand anyone could understand how this stuff works. I don't WANNA I don't WanNa create a society that similar to the current financial industry where it's artificially art artificially complex right the the way the financial industry works. It's not that hard. But they make up terms and do things and say things and operate in a certain way to make. It seem like it's very very difficult and it should be left to the professionals. That's not good and so like I don't want to recreate that with what we're doing now because it's not that hard so if you spend the time it is approachable there are people who care for people like me that will teach you if you have legitimate questions on what things things main how to think about them. We cannot go back to recreating that. It's not really worth recreating that. Even though I think naturally might be forced that way I talk about her all the time about like centralization of knowledge and things like that but I hope that you know there's enough content tint that exists now even outside of our show that people can just learn this stuff and understand what's happening because one of my biggest rebuttals is when people are like. Oh Oh bitcoin kritikers will never take all because nobody understands how it works on my okay. Cool question how does the Fed Work Fido. And I'm like. Yeah you're jack off the cash wallet shut the Fuck Up. Yeah shut up talking dumb shit an just understand that there's different things but anyways desolate is read at the beginning of the year. This is mine so we had a year talking about how how year before that went doesn't eighteen and how we think this year that just passed is going to go. nope right or wrong is we're GONNA listen to it and we're GonNa talk about that but let's see this was episode two hundred twenty. nope that's not right episode. Two hundred thirty nine on my list here. It was aired aired on January. The sixth the price of Bitcoin at that time was four thousand and twenty two dollars in this is what we put on our prognostic prognostication hats. It's a good word to love that word password biggest word all the words. Don't have anything on that word. You have all the best words I only cut up cello. I wanted I wanted to give cello a chance like us back and listen to what he said on January. Very sixth. About what this year's going to be we're GONNA talk about it after that right so I think my My negative views will extend through the year. I think her margin curmudgeon all year right. I mean I I show up to the podcast because obviously I believe in more than money but I did people the narrative is like over the next wave of cryptocurrency is GONNA come from price is gonNA come from content content creators who are being the Monetize d platform. So it's just going to appeal to extremists and anyone who could benefit from insensible money so we're adding there's GONNA attack like one party at a time of massive option You still have ripple out there. People saying it's a scam some people. It's not government still oppressive. The client base is still going to be the Crypto benefactor of listen Omar he. He's probably one of the one percent of journalism who don't have money to People in his pocket so hopefully the journalism continues The price I think will be not much better than it is now. Aw I say distract and I think it's good 'cause if you're still in the crypto like Matt. You're still here you you bought in turn like you didn't even tell me you lost money because you told me you bought in at that specific the time period. I knew but the fact that you're still here and if you continue to be here that's great so I encourage people to stay in space I agree with Corey. Were I think that this is the ground floor of the next big thing and just frustrated that it's taking so long and not not in terms of Oh it took forty years Internet like things take time It's a very of fickle community. It's very hot and cold. And it's based on on Cyclical patterns of the market. And not you know. People's individual interest were buying into technology or during the due diligence and in reading the White Paper Everything is surface level. Right now that's where my frustration comes from so It'll be a a A. I don't know that not an exciting sexy a year but I think it'll be unnecessary year so we have a great year in twenty twenty sexy like a print song or sexy like Celine Dion. Hello thank you for cutting off a so fucking nails it cello nails it. Oh yeah he literally the he nailed the entire year debt gets lucky nails it and I would say we were skeptical when he said it it was like oh those are all reasonable things to say but like it's it's been it's been a year it's been a while God would you like it's like everyone's been hard at work. The price hasn't done much. A lot of the like hype is gone. We've seen projects projects drop off. We've seen a lot of centralization. We've seen that. We seem like there's been some projects that come into production and grown drastically right but in the realm of finance varity have and so there's nothing really knew what what he says is fucking spot one of the things. I'm impressed with his in calling out the deep monetization of a lot of content creators due to the fact that they're they're making paper-thin content and then on top of that calling out one of the creators that is not making thank God in the in the same breath breath which is Omar from cryptos news. In if you don't listen to that guy then script zero yeah crib zero groups. He's a Makes good stuff if you not listening to him you do wrong. You're doing everything wrong. But that was a hell of a prediction Because as exactly how the year's gone she's been very it's been a marathon of a year we've had some price swings and in one Mike clips From where the price was high And we've had of Obviously the price back in January one thousand something and now it's only seven thousand something so I mean that's actually quite a significant swing if you think looking at the prices of all the clips we have they go from the C.. Four thousand and that was the one we just listened to during that episode that the Bitcoin is at four four thousand right so I mean that's that's beginning of the year and that was that was the drop Massive drop after all the shenanigans. Uh because if we go back a few months earlier on the first one where you asked Yang if he's racist bic already at six thousand six hundred seventy right so just from August January. We have a thirty percent drop more than that. I don't do reported numbers right now and then let's see let's do a nine hundred try. Let's let's do that. Are Present here. We got so one of yours. Yes do not a clip Zoo The zoo clip holy word. We put them up. Put them there. Say the episode number and all. I'll play it so own episode to eighty nine this last week I was last. Aren't doing that one. Okay Eh Silvery pertinent so this love yourself on son so now this is the gas. He's more guest of me. This was actually really good because it pointed out a lot of stuff that we could be doing better and the dark side of what we have have done. That's good right. This was episode two eighty nine aired like a week or two ago. Jimmy Bartlett price at this point was seven thousand. Four hundred twenty five so here. We go uh so cory Ali Sheldon my idea for to coin. The whole the whole plan of this was is to get you to say that but let me tell you. Data's already people out there. Doing very similar thing waited in Lebanon violated scams for awhile and then speaking out whenever I see them. But like it's one of those situations where I spend. I don't want to spend my day looking at fraudulent thinks. It's very training on on console and there's no whose career in productivity corey that on how to do that. Kim Boesak is definitely one of those people. That's going to do it but the problem is i. Some people aren't capable of differentiating. The differ differentiating between a scam and incompetence. Yes yeah I mean it's something I've talked to you corey and I mentioned engine in our community often as like at some point with cryptocurrency. There's gotta be a model where the incentive to just contribute to the working things is greater than the incentive to say. You know what Bitcoin to point out or you know what this is a theorem but green. It's not purple. People like you guys like this is green a theory or I think that already exist rides in classic. But what I'm saying and I never really Gin articulate the how I just can articulate the what needs to happen and that's the difficult thing right now I guess there's a question in your somewhere. I mean the question has nothing to do with that statement. The question is like you're you do so much research on this topic. What was like the type of person that you saw? That was acceptable to the scheme. And is it something. That's just totally random or is it like a specific characteristic that like yeah you definitely someone could fall for this kind of scheme. Well It depends where in the pyramid tolkien in in in the Lung Coin Pyramid you had about. I would say around a million people towards the talk where Hun of world-class multilevel level marketers. That Hud spent previous is selling the vitamins and the tuck aware in the health supplements no the rest of it and then switched to one coin because they realized so much money was to be made on that commission and that Pyramid Down Line Commission if they switched from the Tupperware to the CRYPTO currency. And they didn't really understand the currency toll. They really didn't but they understood serving to people and they could tell you one thing one of the things in the twelve more complicated than blockchain technologies multi level marketing compensation structure plans. They're incredibly interesting. And there's a whole nother universe most people don't know but then the low it down you got to remember. Is that this side spreading through friends and family. This was word of mouth. This was someone in the local church or the local mosque saying to everyone. Hey of heard about the next big who wants to get rich and DOT DOT is. I don't think you can nail down a particular todd for us because everyone's interested in Everyone's has a fear of missing out on the next big thing thing and I was often asked. How could anybody believe that you could make such returns on one coin? 'cause they were offering you know. Make you money back hundred hundred. Fold and the obvious answer is what happened with Bitcoin so it didn't seem improbable to those people who didn't understand the technology that will not not one person who really understood. bitcoin would have invested in so few things here on. Start with the obvious every single time. You WanNa talk So do you. Do you go every single time. That's literally Mike. My cue personally to not talk anymore. Dude I moved by what someone says. It wants to move Outta bull no not run. You just say a- and then start talking and so whenever I just I wait for you to make the sound and now anyone who's listening to this episode. It's GONNA listen for that because everybody okay goes to these next and as it's my Is My tell them it. I've until yeah well no man. That's when I moved audible garage and that's what it is. I really enjoy that interview and fucking he nails it. He does the so it. It sucks because we're still not at the point that there's not more or incentive to just work on and build upon the protocols that exists to make them better and in you know what like looking back on it now are we ever at that point. I mean like the Internet. There's protocols now that exists that are probably better than what we use regularly occupied example of that doc I p version six yes is heaps better as an Australian term better than Ip version. Four the almost better hate sped up higher internet works on Ip version for running right. We're literally running out of the namespace space involved with before keep using it because as addressing other says it's ossified like everything depends on it so much that we can't replace it but but right now like coming to what you just said. There isn't something that exists right now in the cryptocurrency world. That's show ossified that can't be replaced. they're Kinda hits close to my home. Mm for me as a professional so what I do is is is my my Bruce Wayne gig is is consulting business consulting and I swear to you after doing this for as long as I've done it I honestly think that are you. What are you looking at in the video? You're looking after doing this for as long as I've done it I honestly feel like all of consulting is saying in three million different versions of stop being a bitch and do something different. And like that's a wholesome like lines are listening to this right now and you see me you or talk to me in the next coming weeks and you understand that. That's literally if you're going to grow and you're GONNA improve or you're gonNA GONNA change. You GotTa stop being a bitch and you've got to do something different and I don't mean bitch like in his the rapper conventional. I'm not referring to women. I'm just referring to weak people like you've got to be. You have to be yet to understand that there's going to be pros. There's going to be cons but the reason you put so much energy into buildings something better or coming up with a better plan is because at the end of the day it is is better and it's not just different and you just gotTa do it. And that's that's Kinda like where. I'm at with crypto especially the Bitcoin community like bitcoin communities the worst offender like this one. megabyte blocks is is fucking dumb. Like it's it's it's I think it's I think it's fucking Dow man. I think we can go. Oh up a little bit. We can go gradually at a bare bare minimum. We can have a roadmap that is concurrent with the current trajectory the of the the increase in bandwidth on average increase in hard drives based on average to increase the one megabyte block size so that we decrease the fees and get closer and closer to something that is easier to use or or At least ask cost effective for more people. That's what the Bitcoin cash community has it right. The bitcoin cash community has wrong because they let Roger Ebert Talk Too much to tell doc any time to shut the fuck up like he doesn't already talking about he posed graphs that don't make any mathematical sense and quite frankly he looks like someone I'd like to punch but he does know no Brazilians He would destroy go so I don't know I feel like I. At least get a coke. Blow you'd be destroyed. He's a black belt. You'd be destroyed. Ira Look I'm a puncher corey. I don't give a shit you try punch you'd be an asteroid. Roger kick the shit out of probably a ninety nine percent of the people in Crypto do you nominee martial arts. I know Bro Review Blanquita Zandi go. You know the COMBOS that are in my head you know how many compos I know I know Tint Combos all right Paul Bryan Fury. It's welcome all right. It's all coming back to me now. We're moving we're moving on. I'M GONNA play. Let's see guy only lasts. I would play last. We played yours reply next. That's a we're GONNA go obey Corey Dr. Oh I made a human cry dry with guile. One time we're going to go with episode to citizens in seventy nine this is released. Success is relatively recent and the other one the other one I have is even more recent than this and it's just a small clip. I think hilarious released in October seventeenth. The price of Bitcoin was eight thousand sixty five so ward onto Chela Cello. Oh for being spot on with the price of things going onto that year. We'll wait man. Is we put that in rural in relation because when you said that the cello could when you play the first shock the press four thousand something if the price is eight thousand something. That's one hundred percent injuries. Senator D'Amato says a an exit increase in it. So what we need right before that a thing about right before that it was seventeen thousand dollars I I give evatt. Nineteen almost twenty thousand dollars last year the year before it over it over twenty on some exchanges. The thing what I'm saying is I think twenty one eighty five is is yet but what I'm what I'm saying is like In the context of a year That is astronomical. Who Gain if you put in the ten thousand you come out with twenty? That's great but if for for the sake of Crypto what we've known for the better majority of this decade eight now which is crazy that Christos a decade old is that From four thousand eight thousand is not a big gain. Because that's that's an important important thing to realize and something that I've almost got grown a callous to is that like if if things are moving in the hundreds of percentages. I don't care and we have to change that. Of course what else that's going to change we don't have to change it. It eventually will change. We're not there yet. We're still so early. That were pick sheets. There is no fortune five hundred. There is no Nasdaq or whatever of the cryptocurrency communities. All pink sheets pretty pretty much. Yeah pretty much even Vicken they being sheet. But it's leading the way in terms of becoming that I quote unquote votes stable thing and so this episode Core Doctor Oh play it here and I think this is The this this this cast a good view of who people were when the early Internet was and how they reacted to things which you could draw analogies from into how we are today who fucking bait interpret censorship and routes around it. That's a that's a thing that people used to say all the time and some people think that what John Meant by that was that our technical systems are so robust that if you try to censor the Internet it will backfire on you because the technology will get around it but it wasn't it wasn't a technical statement at all. He was talking in the days of Usenet Right. He was talking where in the days in which what amounted to like Yeoman. Smallholders would would run individual computers that they would connect one to the other to build the Internet and where they laboured with every hour. God sent to keep this Janke key weird Internet all running where every day all day long things were breaking down and they were getting up in the middle of the night to fix them getting on conference calls helping one another throwing source go back and forth at one another brainstorming solutions to gnarly networking problems soon as primitive electronic equipment and so when he said the Internet interpret censorship as damage and routes around it. He meant we the Guardians of the Internet who built it and who nurse it along because because we believe in it and its mission already know what to do when there is damage because the damage occurs all the time because our system is frail and and Brittle and fragile and important enough to us that we work all the time to solve that image and when someone sensors are Internet Internet this Internet that we have built and maintained with our hands. We ourselves because we believe in the ethic of this Internet we will treat that censorship as damage and we will route around at using the techniques that we have developed and the norms that we have developed around so John was being norm. It sorry when we talk about how you make a robust the system in the incentives that matter there is no substitute for the intrinsic motivation of people. Who believe in the cause? You know the technology's is important right. If they didn't they hadn't figured out the technology at all wouldn't have worked but no amount of technology in the world can motivate people to do what those people people did and no matter. Money would have done it either right. They did it because they believed in their cause. How fucking awesome is that? So that's a really awesome Clinton. I wanted to take you to find Almaz on I. Don't you knew you wanted to get corey doctor. I knew there was a part of that interview that I wanted into to listen to it looking for something else that the clip at all my clip. Whatever whenever we play my next clip my last clip? What US looking for that one? I found this and I was like well. I gotta play this and it. It really gives a wonderful perspective of the human element of what's going on right now and the end like the ideals that push us yeah man and how like something that is because like what he's talking about in terms of how the Internet operated who maintained it. How was was built back then to what it is now is not the same thing so something happened right? because anyone who builds on in the blockchain ecosystem can relate to all the things he was just saying with how how we feel about our ideals when something happens we treat it as damage. It'd be rounded because we understand how things work and we'RE NOT GONNA put up with that. The the Internet felt that way at one point and became what it is today which is what most blockchain technology is trying to defeat no longer. The ideals of the blockchain's Bass don't appeal to the ideals of the Internet works but funny enough you're the ideals of the blockchain spacer fairy very very close to what the ideals of the early early Internet were. Yeah how do we not fuck that up as we try to do the same thing with the Internet did. There's one nuance difference between that. And between doing this is that the Internet was dealing in information and in data. That didn't have as much value. We haven't evolved a guest to the point where we are now now where we know now that certain data is expensive expensive to hold expensive to move and now we also know now that the data Atta that bitcoin in other cryptocurrencies are moving. Isn't just information. It's literally value. That data is value. So there's the nuance there and that. Yeah we're learning these techniques And were were very very. There's a lot of people that are very very emotionally invested into blockchain technology Damn near spiritually invested into blockchain technology and and The dislike difference. There's is not just tech it's also value And we just I don't I don't think he meant is ever juggled with eating like this before Maybe they have and maybe we just you know every it seems like every other month we asked to get a historian story in on the show. We never really go after it but well audience historian like come on the show cinema right. Yeah come on You know maybe humanity has tackled with technology disrupted before we just you know. We're just not ignorant into the. I think that clip though because it if you replace the word Internet what's like Bitcoin. Mine are like Syria or three in what he's talking about. It's the same fucking story. Yes the same exact story which is is kinda creepy because we know irony. Listen to that story. Yeah we've lifted that story. The irony of is like the thing that set set out to solve those problems. Turn to the problem that we're trying to solve which is the same story. That's that's that's what I'm trying to get. Get it right like he's telling a story about the Internet web three. The ideals that are trying to be pushed are trying to solve the problems of the Internet and the stories of their origin stories. Are The fucking same agree. That's something you should really think about. How and so one we need to figure out? We did understand the story of how the Internet turned into the problem. How those ideals somehow got lost somehow were abandoned the point where it became the thing that it is today yeah and to like? So how are we not going to do the same thing will the I can kind of see the root of the problem a little bit. Maybe it's just because the drink that the liquors spirits are speaking eakin to me. But it's the problem in and around routing round. Is that eventually run out of space in. You'RE GONNA atd figure out the quickest route to a to B and the cookies rat the to be is The core of the problem is censorship was just something net. Ed Technology doesn't fix and that's what we talked about in that sound. Clip Technology doesn't fix censorship and Technology doesn't fix human traits. And if you give one human hammer they'll make a house you give another human hammer any might just beat somebody over the head with it. Like technology doesn't fix humans it changes. Here's how they behave but it doesn't doesn't fix those things and that's that's the unfortunate reality is that if you eat crypto if we route around on problems with crypto then those routes easily become last boss level middlemen like oh I need to route around that problem. Okay well that route to take that route you gotta pay. The troll. Told to get into. That route doesn't work out as well. I know I wanted to say they wanted to go with it. Didn't have the same time but You know what I mean like if you route around problems with dealing with data that has has value you run into creating some very very very unsurmountable middlemen. Here's the solution. Which I think is the only reason why any of US exists? Like you're right if you do one thing. People take advantage of it too keen that like the underlying key. We'll get back to more clips of shows to all this and I think I've I've been espousing this for the entire year the whole key to all all of this is fucking options. Yeah there isn't one way to do something. There's multiple ways to do do things and you should be able to choose the ways which are appropriate for the type of communication. You're doing. Aw that's that's all we're trying. I think in my opinion that's where the future is going. We're no longer trying to fit all of human relationships communication and to one type of Internet for doing the opposite for trying to make multiple types of Internet that fit to the myriad of human communication at using the appropriate one for whatever we're trying to do unfortunately what we saw in the past couple of years of of a blockchain was her US figuring out what is even possible in the space We've we've made a lot of dead ends scratched disturbance on some stuff tokens is really unique is still think that art is breed. Able but fuck me. I'm all right and then we have some other things but when it gets down to just strictly fucking options like you. Talking about one of my favorite options is like Saturday afternoon. The Sun's coming through the the blinds. Just right doggystyle. That's the best fucking option for a Saturday. Don't sigh you know right. Don't you sign into that microphone. Microphone here the one that put the prays together without being. Put the phrase together you said You said fucking options in who's is not gonNA think about doggystyle whenever so if you didn't know I talked with a twelve year old and appease forever twelve. It'd never not twelve. I'll be I'll be thirteen one day. The next episode. We're going to go with yours. Someone I'm GONNA play okay. My last delirious this episode was two hundred and sixty nine To time and what I said to sixty nine episodes sound on my computer that made a weird noise This was aired August twelfth. The price of Bitcoin at this time eleven thousand one thousand nine hundred twenty five so we've just zinc we basically just been saying arbitrary numbers between four thousand and twelve thousand dollars over the past one year for which is re- The X.. Dude for a single asset won't even talk when we have A. We haven't talked about any of the other cryptocurrencies in the space. And they're ridiculous Lawson gains over the last year only bitcoin which is which is the most quote unquote stable of all of them. So hashtag investment advice. Keep that in mind. In terms of volatility de the most stable asset has gone from four thousand to almost twelve thousand and one year and back and forth and so on and so forth within years pass. Uh so that's able for us. Imagine making this your circle of competency like now like you make crypto digital assets you circle incompetency you become a very valuable human being and there is nothing more about. You're just a crazy motherfucker who plays Places Fire Yeah but we all saw how powerful PYRO was on the X.. Men So so here's the. Here's a clip. This clip has nothing dries though. It's actually shut up. Hey Hey everybody. Welcome back to the quick podcast network before we hop into the BITCOIN. PODCAST podcast as regularly programmed I WANNA take the time to give special recognition to cello. We've decided to part ways Because there's been disagreements for a very long time about the direction of the they quit podcast network can how we grow and how we continue to provide this content to you guys that listen weakened gout get better at it and What mostly what I WANNA do is say cello? We thank you very much for everything that you've done. There's no way no way in Hell we'd be in remotely as close to where we are now without your skills skills man without your help and without your foresight and everything you've done for the show You're always a friend of the podcast network and we hope that you continue to hang around and I hang out with all everyone in the slack and chime in from time to time But we just want to thank you verve the MSCI done and we would be without you so I wanted to give that very special recognition to my close friend and also been my partner for very long time and To to not be that sad We're GONNA dive right into the show now now outright years ago Yup so obviously. That was a huge moment in our year. Because there's no strings think about Aw It's We have the conversation before we had this episode of like. Hey why don't we bring telecom sometime to like hang out with us Because we miss him like I I played. I played a spot for him. It was really good. He fucking nailed with this year. was like we miss having him here but like it didn't work out right. It's one of the situations of like the way we operated. Did them workout together. So here we are. Yeah Yeah it's one of those things for those of you that haven't been listening. Pass this year. You know cello and I have known each other since you're seven years old so it was tough for for that to break off. I wish I could say we were still friends. But we're not but that's one of the lessons of like Building Project Ah with people you care about. Is that if you don't this is just a lesson to US listening. Use US guys guys. Are you sure you're us. I've I traveled a lot. Do you know they say young's young so I've heard it yearns. You'd that Shit I just WANNA stop every conversation like well yawns over there and I'm like that's not a fucking that's nothing you you don't talk anymore. Yeah that's not a word that's not anything that's not even a reference that's making shit up but Yeah for you guys wanted to go into concentration hell even making content That could be What's the word I'm looking for here distributed by the big win baucus network so they were syndicated gas network If you go into making that content can't with someone that you do or don't know have mutual expectations And foresight on the head. It's time to were youtube point where money is being made Because that changes everything and it's one of those things you hear a lot you know about like money changes things things in Blah Blah Blah. But it does an you've got to have as much of that clan out ahead of time so that when money does come into the picture. Sure everybody's on the same page and what I can say is that we didn't. We just wanted to make cool content about something we're passionate about and we lacked the foresight in wo- would Popular and money starts coming into the space is very ironic. Because it's literally space base about money value. The we didn't have the foresight for that so When that started happening of course not everyone's aim bauge and It leads it led to what happened and but that all being said For however long we've done this. It was fun as fuck. Almost the whole I until game down to those conversations. That's sure looking back at it like it's one of those situations situations where like if you look at. How how we've built this thing right and this is something that we've tried to spouse? I think the entire time between this podcast cast is Easter interested in a concept so the number one thing to do is just do it like we started this podcast literally not knowing how to do anything. There's not there wasn't a single thing in terms of the process of making a podcast. PODCAST that any of US understood but we were together. We started out on facebook group. We grew it. It became a process. It started getting started getting good at it because we understood the space and then we started making money and and then it became a business and we had to figure out. That's the whole process. Grew into what it is today which I would consider a glowing flowing success from a saying. Hey let's just go do something. Everyone coach just go do something. That's what I mean like. I want to go do stuff like you'll you'll you'll test relationships that's fine now it's reversed each other out. It's gotta be at least a dozen or to properly at a like we're never going to be whatever you're pretty much a brother to at this point. I'm typically getting cursed out the most. I know that that's that's very justified. So so I think people should just go do stuff jeff and then I would say a good portion of those things you go try and do aren't going to work but but but a few of them will this worked out for US and other people should try and go. Do something similar like who cares if you know how to do it. Just go do it. I think we have. Let's see I got. I got one more which actually Kinda plays into this quite nicely. Actually people don't I don't know everything right like I think. I think people like listening to us because we're real so we were knowledgeable right but we're also very comfortable with saying wrong. We're real people. We have fun. We interview interesting people but we do it in a way. That's not like sold. That's I think that's a a large play. A four who are audiences in upcoming media. Talent is authenticity. We've been authentic our entire lifestyle. I can play this. I got to play. This is To eighty four. This was the couple of weeks ago. Yeah this is aired November twenty fifth. The price of Bitcoin at the time was six thousand nine hundred sixty two. It was the end with unlocked. Protocol and Let's see like a fine Here we go so What what else do we fucking do? We listen listen to careless. Whisper about twenty times this week. Do we talked about careless. Whisper last week George Michael's I'll ever going to answer that. I can't get out of it because I've been watching a show called watchman on. HBO which yielded feed if gap APP. No rhythm yeah why was guilty feet still here guilty. ASTILL here to help. They can't I told Aaron about that because if and she's just lost ship because it makes sense row you're guilty of the things that you did wrong and the relationship that is now over so you can't even dance anymore and relationships are good dance. So that's why I thought that it made sense. It's in my head for all those years. anyways watchman has like Acoustic version of in one of his recent episodes and I was like all now I go listen to it over and over and over again What else do we do? We gotTA store shop dot the Big Win Cod podcast store on the background podcast. It is store door. That's that's a big mess up on my part so okay so we are wrong. That was the main point. I want to get across from this APP from from from that clip is we can project it the concept of being right about something and we will be wrong. I was fucking right. Grew right it is guilty feet. It's guilty feet and I still hill. I fucking still upset. I'm still upset about the fact that it's guilty feet because I was like i. I was so convinced that that was absurd. That was absurd translation of the lyrics. Were and I was like who who the fuck you think you are saying guilty feet. You're dumb and like let's let's look at this in the perspective of crypto right. Now like that like that mentality in the arrogance it to say I'm right is exactly what is the problem. What's going on in his fucking space right out exactly? Because you're right you fucking right and I made you and I made you feel like I made you change your mind and I was like dude. It's it it just makes sense though because the relationship is the dance. You like book you dumb Bitch No I mean like that's like I. They're perhaps there was a conversation before this. I couldn't find it. I spent a long time trying to find it. It may have been just like a personal conversation between you. Were you said the words you sang it and I was like I literally made. Funnier guilty feet dude. It was an episode of the beginning of an episode. Couldn't couldn't find it. It is I was like dude. Does fucking words guilty feet. Try if these two defeat you're like Oh and we went on a whole conversation on like. Oh these are the real words and it wasn't fucking the Ra- words you were right the first time these two feet does make sense. It's still still more Beckmann. It's way better way better translates to what's GONNA stopped fits guilty fees terrible terrible Eric. Either way with everybody is I liked that. You brought this up because I was gonNA say like in order to return I liked. The hype is gone. I liked that the price is is gone under the radar to appoint in this very eighty society. Bet a return to you what works and what does it can be found a lot easier Something that uses a lot during the crazy between seventeen is like. It's hard to even work when you can't. I can't help but look at your wallet every ten minutes to shoot at what point so when I worked at I have back this this concept up when harvesting right when I worked at booz-allen say this I can say this working. I spent a good amount on my time staring at my portfolio. Yeah because it's hard not to you. I was incredible I was I was incredibly productive while working with that company. Because in my opinion booz-allen it's not a very productive competent Lubar new Bern but like I spent a a good amount of time staring at my portfolio. Trying to figure out. What do I make next Greg? This is also during the peak of the ridiculousness business right. We're all just like Oh this renting never heard of it's up sixteen thousand percent like it was stupid right and yeah yeah. It was not known to this but fund delivered through nevertheless bought a house. So it's not it's it's like the the emotional like we return to point. That was one of the cool things about getting into bitcoin early enough to be a part of the community where it was like doc. Very wholesome very This is right because of these reasons is wrong. Because of these reasons is very logical Very rational There was there was hints of Stupidity. Liked going which is surprising. Still eating I want to say this if you've been listening to us the entire time so I don't feel like you've made a life altering investment. It's like one but if you look if you look at the pass when it was the boom boom we we were espousing selling because it was ridiculous and I remember saying like. Hey I'm I'm checking Out I'm by we. That's where we came up with the idea of hall plus was like Hey when things get out of hand because things are kind of out of hand you should should be rebalancing and making your life better and this entire timer like well if you're still in the space you've been listening to US beforehand an and you hadn't put in money needed. You're still attached to the ideals of what we're trying to do that. No point in the fucking four and a half five years. Have we been doing this where I'm uncomfortable with the things that we've said during our show to the people who've been listening to us and I I really really proud of that me too man. That's what I said earlier in the sips owed Try to sue him bitch like it just GonNa Waste Your money and then I'm GonNa countersue your ass and then we're GonNa then somebody else's getting your money so it's like look We we say Hashtag no investment advisor. Shit we're not retards. Oh Shit Fuck. I can't say sorry team I couldn't give has one episode. You can't say R. E. T.. ARD monodic it's bad because it's offensive these days. It's I don't care you yes. eight-man don't say at birth definition of do of retarded will. It means not where it should be. That's that's it is held back something average. Yeah that's the that's the dictionary definition l. back from the Okay so could say this and this will be in context. I have a hose that has fifty. Psi We're fuck it. Let's leave it your dinner anyway. I was going to what I was going to explain the word in the context of the word that it just letting you know just letting I got one more we're done we're done with clips we had It's been a fuck of a year man. It's been we personally remain and it's been a year we've all. I had the saint job to tell the audience. Your news like personally about secondhand baby. Fuck out that news. We talked about the POCO petty companies but not talking about that earlier. Yeah having a meeting like I'm going to be never talk to have a little me running around and we don't know if it's a girl we're not gonNA find out that's going to be cool Nothing else changes. I'm going to keep working for status. WE'RE GONNA keep making this podcast. That's about it. I I might move. Who knows I might move? Yeah that's up in the air. I'm definitely moving like within the month. So that'll be neat. let's see I had a rollercoaster view. Personally I like a dead man started like some weird weird reason. I gained a bunch of weight two years years ago. Some losing mad again which has been a fun. Ride against as fun as it was the first stop But this time different because your body changes I guess I like the first or somebody that had to run a lot into to the point where I was running like eight miles a day which was very. I don't know how did that but I was also in my twenties But now like lift a lot of weight so that's another story for another time. I mean Jesse talk about that more Of course cello and I are friends too much anymore Had A girl go south on me but that happens all the time though unlike wreck on a mobile APP but also my careers going in a great direction. I like that so I could personally say I am a good business consultant if you have a business and it's not doing as well as you'd like I will come in. I'll get all up in to quickbooks Shit in figure out exactly how you should probably making more money if you did. ABC You know. I was thinking about this right this past year. You've found out you're very good business zoltan like you're yeah I would say you're GonNa do it. You can just walk into you can walk into a company. Learn about their books and say all right. This is how you big money. Yeah Yeah I could probably do that with any any any company. Yeah I am comfortable reviewing most companies and saying okay. This is how you make your security. You better you're cryptography better. This is how you can or like an offer services while recovering Fuck I lost. That's my wallet. I don't remember passwords on and so forth. I can get that back. You literally do that like last week. I did how many people people have these skills that never solicit them right. That's thousands. Aw I could I could literally I would bet I could run my own personal business off solely Wallet Recovery Freon. Let's throw away everything else. I know yeah I mean you'd have to like You need volume will depend on the price that you set it up but that price. I mean we could find the price there. That's not hard to do Yeah you could You definitely could like it's very. There are so many people such as I guess the idea what I'm trying to get at. Is that if you take the entire cryptocurrency community you look at the message. I like a good portion of them. Throw throw away investors people who are just throwing money into it hoping things out right and you look at all the people who are building things in the space Their intuition UH is good enough to have a home business where they provide a service to people. Yes yes yes. So that's that's two things one every body that's in this space. Now is incredibly incredibly multidisciplinary understand what could be the foundation of our Internet incredibly well and broad which is rare renaissance renaissance men were defined as the understood a bunch of shit across the board and then like. Where do we go from here to? We're still so early that that's all we have because it's still you're still capable of understanding almost everything so I think that necessarily puts us at this point so so so so early that nothing's really going to work her. Take off so there's a lot it room for. You can jump in and learn everything but so let's start collecting some soft Atta this next year. Just mean can you personally and this is for the people listening to know that we're doing let's year. Deep into the Crypto community. Let's see let's try and get a good guestimation about how many people at is actively involved and then let's take one percent of that and let's cut that in half and let's say point five percent of those people are GonNa actually have an idea that works and they're going to actually funnel customers in that are willing to pay money day in day out for an idea. They had that works because if we are retelling the same story of the Internet is really early like tin companies that took advantage of the Internet Amazon Net flicks facebook like. There's not a lot of them. That's what we're trying to stop. We're trying to stop that as yes Italy goal that we're trying to do that. Everyone had an idea. It somehow coalesced into five companies. Why because of the way things work all of everything we're doing is to change the way things his work so that it doesn't coalesce the five people it coalescence to millions? So would you talking about it. Lessens is like with the reasonable reason. We got excited about the space to begin with his new epoch. Because the way we do things now how we like to coalesce things into these big buckets because it's easy to look at one book big bucket in not easy to look at thirty thousand small containers So we'RE GONNA have to change that fundamentally. I don't know how we do our we. Don't we've been talking about that for five years one Mondays and we're going to be the next thing we're going to keep talking about it. We're still GONNA try and figuring out that question over the next year. I hope a lightning bolt strikes in out the It's it's January fourth. I played a clip in January. Sixth where we try to prognosticate with this year's going to look like all right. Fuck me and you what is this your look for four was this year cryptocurrency One to two APPS are going to Take off in by. Take off. I mean not in the flappy bird since where all of a sudden three million people are tapping on their phone screens for no fucking reason at all. I'd say at least thirty thousand people a good small to medium sized city It's a small small a small cities amount of people find a reason to use a decentralised application That is beautiful in fluid and Very user centered in how it works. not not. Not clunky not not. You don't need a fucking computer science degree to operate it. You put it on your phone or I don't know we find loophole around phones because clearly the Google play and and the apple Apple APP store are flexing their centralized nuts right now on the world Maybe we find a different way but in some decentralized application that sneaks through the cracks and people start using it that had no reason before I think the price is going linked tee. We'll we'll go overton K.. For about three months out of the year on Bitcoin Going into twenty twenty to a theory is gonNA start to really go. GROM price. Hope theory community is ready for that. I don't think they are but the demand for a theory is going to grow quite significantly as the so-called difficulty bombs go off it's going to have the net effective of price increase increase. Wait what what am I waiting how I gotta I gotTa fix this. Think difficulty bomb on is Okay I'M GONNA use a d. -nology can you. Can you talk talk for a bit like we'll get some more alcohol alcohol do that. I understand that was elevator. Music brought to you by Korea's He's left to get a drink The way elegant is like this if Theorem is digital oil. It's taking a very long time. As humans to tap into the energy potential energy that exists in fossil fuels which was oil. So so I do believe that. In most theorems existence there was this uncapped creation of new ether And all of a sudden sudden as we search drop these difficulty bombs there is a cap on the new creation of ether Now I think subtly wrong long because we're not in essence T- decreasing me. The comes in like the how fast and loose so corey back is back back and start over audience. All right. Your bag is is rest started cory. I was going to say if the D. now is that ether is digital oil which is something that Abbas spouse for many many years now I would say that Just similar very very oil It's a very long time remaining to tap into all that potential energy and then out of the blue. Once we found fossil fuel petroleum. We found oil. We were like Oh shit. We knew all is cool shit with we make other shit. We could F- The filter it out and cook it a little bit and we get some other kind of fuel like we do all kinds of shift with this. This is fucking bananas all off of the backs of dead dinosaurs. This this shit is fucking crazy. We got all craziest energy. So ether is district oil. I'm just proposing that maybe this entire time has existed existed We've been building it up and then we're moving into a new stage of ether. Were kind. I guess we're capping it. But Not Cabinet UH Slow reducing the introduction of it so that it does have the effect of a quote unquote fossil fuel and and then out of the blue. We figure out. Oh there's only so much easier to program on top of all of the sudden it becomes a lot more valuable than when it was when we thought it was his is coming in all willy. Nilly you know it's possible that's true or like I mean it's a prognostication is the progress we've all been like but it's funny that we've been calling oil for so long. I mean as it takes a long time. Then people realize that oil is is is is valuable I mean how long was oil existed before we found it. It's been so long has also been Detroit's like like okay. That's true but by question is how long is either going to have existed something as running on the Internet that people figure out in thinking. I'm not I'm still comfortable with the idea that there is something that exists right now that that this technology turns in. I'm trying to say it. Let's say a and ten years but just just picture a weird world and ten years we have us like in a world in a world. Everyone knows Jose cryptocurrency is the use it in the cul something all this. I can't do it but you imagine it's like Oh shit all the things we've been talking about for the past decade become commonplace and everyone everyone uses them even if they don't know they're using them just like the Internet today basically right. Yeah I hear. Here's the key point that Ah if you want to understand who I am. I don't know what that's called. I'M NOT GONNA call a point I'm not going to call it a theorem. I'm not calling anything because you're in years is a cat walking drastic. Let me tell you the man what you too. Can you grab your nuts. Well I'll tell you this I have been full-time. You gotta nut up man because you got caught something like Oh yes you know listen to me. Listen lose forty. Get all excited in your band. Alana's listen somebody sees something that's different and they look at it and then they studied study at four fucking wile or maybe they don't and then they give it a fucking name and that's the name that it is in and everybody else has to adapt to that. That's just the way it goes. The first I mother fucker look at a tiger. It was like you know what I'm going to call that motherfucker right there. That strike motherfucker. Yeah we'RE GONNA call a Joe. I'M GONNA call that motherfucker tiger why I don't know that's what the fuck I'm calling you though all right Bro- we're just GONNA call it a fucking tiger all right. Let's roll with that Shit. Let's see what we can do. This Tiger Shit the tower. It goes like you got a nut up in name it and once you name it you gotta put your nut juice behind it and you got. Here's a link and it is. I'm not confident in it. So by said those words all right What did people call bitcoin between before? Two dozen nine money. Nothing 'cause then fucking exists will digital digital money exists. It got shut down. No bitcoin did not exist but other forms of digital currency exactly. That's my Gosh Ashley. That's my point I'm telling my point. Don't call it something. It isn't until it's ready to be called that. That's what I'm trying to say day. That's what I'm trying to say. I not willing to name it. Because it's not worth naming yet in this. The Year of our Lord Twenty twenty probably takes takes nuts and over his come takes over his two takes. It takes a combination of all men and women this to name it in. That is what we call it in. We treat it as such and then you get behind it. I was like revenue yet. I don't think we have any. We'll we'll figure it out. It's not going to be called. Bitcoin coin in ten years. Why don't you meet your out illustrate trick? Everybody else in thinking is what it is in the skin. History Books Wrap it up actually. Had A great idea for blockchain is crazy ad yesterday are in you. Tell me if it's possible because I know you'll shit on it immediately if it isn't so we'll play video games and I don't play a lot of them but when I do I just WanNa play them and one thing. I don't know Corey when the last time you've had a console was was which has probably been a very long time. But you can't just you can't the no longer exists the day where you can go to the store you can buy a game and then you can come home and you can plug the game in and you start playing the game. That doesn't exist anymore. You've got to buy the game. You Plug it in or you put the disk in. And then they're like twenty two gigabytes of data have to download and install before you can start playing a you bought a DVD that has a privacy audit. That tells us that you. You deserve to be able to download this game exactly right exactly so okay anew you'd get that part and that's the part that I get to so what I'm thinking is is like. What if using can block trained wizardry and parameters such that like unique identifiers between your playstation unit? And the game. Stop Hop account that you have. I Dunno whatever retailer that gets their nuts in the game that when you actually make the purchase of nother screen POPs up on the point of sale system that says would you like to begin the download immediately and then you say yes and because your account is also linked back to your play station. They can verify verify because he identifying information stored in the playstation. Then by the time you get home and you put the disk in you can just start playing the fucking game instead of having to wait two fucking hours sometimes four. Just play the fucking game that you went to go buy properties is there I mean. Of course there's a lot of problems I just WANNA see visited remotely possible to say like yeah. I'm at the point of sale system I have a game stop account. They know me I have a place. Yes in that knows who I am that can happen. That can happen for sure. You were the problems of giving up everything you know about you. Like how do you not give up is another episode. Because you're gone for awhile. It's been almost two at our. Wrap it up. Let's wrap it up. I thought it was good idea. I am also drunk right now. So that doesn't image right. We're not selling ourselves wounded podcasts. We just wrapped a bunch of a bunch of wonderful content. We've a book go find it. BITCOIN PODCAST HOT GAS DOT COM CA. Find the book. We're GONNA have a fucking great year this year. Yeah play he he wait shoutout. Zazi Beats. Get the fuck Outta here to lay a we. Do ooh ooh

Bitcoin US president corey Matt Andrew Yang Corey Mike Roger Ebert Crown Royal Jason Webb Sonya blunk Ford Dragan Rodney Mullah Google HBO
#780: Top 5 Movies That Educated Us About Racism

Filmspotting

00:00 sec | 5 months ago

#780: Top 5 Movies That Educated Us About Racism

"What kind of show you guys putting on here today? We're not interested in. Going to do this thing going to have a conversation. From Chicago this is film spotting. I'm Josh Larsen and I met him. Dr But you know when the Israelis guns or the polls. Show anyway in the world. says. Give me liberty or give me death. The entire wide world applauds. When, a black man says exactly the same thing. Is judged a criminal and treated like one and everything possible is done to make an example of this bad, so there won't be any more like him. That's James Baldwin in a clip from the two thousand sixteen documentary. I am not your Negro this week with protesters filling city streets across the US after another unarmed black man. George Floyd was killed by police. We consider what the movies have taught us about racism listeners help out. I've got a feeling. That's not the last. We'll hear from Baldwin all that ahead on film spotty. A! Locum to film spotting on May Twenty Fifth in Minneapolis George Floyd. A black man was killed when a white police officer kept his knee on Floyd's neck for over eight minutes. As we've all seen protests broke out in the twin cities the next day, and then in cities across the country in the days of the followed as we record this Adam, it's more than a week after they started and the protests do continue, and all of this during a pandemic, that has killed over one hundred thousand Americans a disproportionate number of whom are people of Color. Color. Josh, of course we're so privileged in so many ways, but also in having this platform that is film spotting and to be honest with everyone. We weren't sure the best way to use it this week. One thing we knew we could do was share with our listeners the ways they could support the protesters, and we will put a link to some of those resources in the notes for this show over at film spotting dot net. Ultimately we settled on this top five top five movies that educated us about racism and I think listeners at casting. A good perspective on why this may be a fruitful topic. He says films can teach us so much. The introspection I've gained in life through films is incalculable. I grew up in a small rural town films Roth in my only glimpse into a larger world outside of the news empathy, compassion and understanding can all be gained if you look at movies as an expression and take the time to consider the film's point of view and Zach did share some of the titles that have had the biggest impact on him I think you're gonNA. Hear all if not most of them come up over the course of this show Zach continues in all honesty I don't think I have grasped the scope of. Of Institutional. Racism in the systems that support until I watched the George. Floyd video the Eric Garner Video Floyd Video. These are wrenching documentaries of another type. They are unvarnished documents of the cause of fear, and so many of our communities like other powerful films. They can't be turned away from, nor should they be thank Zach I. I think that's that's well said and yeah. Just back to what you're saying at the top atom about trying to figure out what the show should look like this week I I think we've both been trying to do a lot of listening this week. More listening than speaking and in doing that I've heard people of color just encourage others to amplify black voices so. I think that's kind of one of the motivations behind this list, for us, obviously I'm going to be doing talking on this show as usual, but but what I hope to do is turn the focus on these great films, and the necessary voices behind them, so speaking to email you know to my shame I've only had two real ways into the African American experience in my life, I would say one of those is my church tradition. It's absolutely a white church tradition for sure, but it has included partnerships with black churches. That's helped me understand what Christianity looks like for folks with different experiences than minds, so that's one avenue. Another avenue has been. In an avenue into the black experience has been. Are you know it's been books? It's been music. It's been TV, and of course it's mostly been movies, so this list is a reflection of where things stand now. It's not a comprehensive list. I don't pretend that my education on this is even near complete. So that means this time. If we get emails from listeners saying, how could you forget this or you include this rat rather than kind of Bristle? I'm going to be grateful because they'll be providing ways for that education to continue so so that's kind of where I'm at with this list right now. The best thing I think we can do is listen and learn I've heard that. This past week as well we don't always as white people have to feel compelled to comment or to interject ourselves into someone else's struggle, and that raises the question then. Should we do a show at all right now? At the same time you understand that to be silent seems to be complicit, and then if you decide to do a show, you have to consider what the substance of it is, and certainly I think I speak for both of us when I say that our objective is not to try to tell anyone that these are the five movies that define your experience. But to try to express what we've learned from cinema. How movies have informed our worldview and informed our alignment with the notion that should be self, evident and indisputable that black lives matter, and when we announce this topic in our film spotting newsletter that went out, we got a response from a longtime listener Joshu shared the topic with his romantic partner who is a black woman and her response was. It must be nice to be privileged enough to learn about racism from the movies. And she's absolutely right there. That is the perspective that this top five is predicated on art. As you said Josh so well is how we expose ourselves to. And struggles outside of our day to day experiences and I'm undeniably fortunate to be in the position where I needed movies, and I needed other works of art to inform me and to educate me so undeniably privilege is implicit in this entire endeavor, and yet we hope that we can engage in a positive and ongoing dialogue with our listeners and anyone else. Who hears this show with that setup? Then Josh I am really eager to hear your number five. All right, my number five is killer of sheep I. Have talked about this nineteen seventy eight Charles Burnett film before on the show episode six seventy. I think that was after Burnett was given an honorary Oscar in two thousand seventeen killer of sheep is it's basically a slice of everyday life in Watson focuses on a slaughterhouse worker named Stan play by Henry Gale Sanders just follows his struggle to provide a good life for his wife and children. And I guess what this movie drove home for me was the bone-weary. Tion of trying to live the American dream when everything is stacked against you, you know. Maybe maybe your neighborhood was torn apart to make way for an expressly maybe redlining. May you're denied a mortgage to buy a home in a different neighborhood? Maybe at work discrimination meant you've been repeatedly passed over for promotions. These are all just you know sort of large and small scale acts of institutional racism that keeps someone like stand in his place, and so no matter how much effort he puts in. The system is against him now in killer of sheep he he keeps going to work, though he and even turns away from shadier characters who pop up here and they're offering him other options. Options in one scene that his wife played by Casey more is having none of. I mean animal has his teeth. And a man has his fist. That's the way I was brought up that Dami right on. Scotland this from dealing with some bitches for for natural life. Ain't nobody going with isn't. Just dry long so. Smoke if. We'd take an ice you. Can't, stand. You just wanted to be a man. STAND UP! Don't you know it's more than just which? Discards all. You don't have an animal. What do you think still in the Bush some damn where you'll hear you use your brain. That's what you love you. Nothing has got a lot of nerve coming over here doing. A Killer of sheep is potent, but it's also beautifully made. It's not just Burnett's camerawork which has has a hard bitten lyricism to the imagery. He captures here, but it's also the music. He uses Dinah Washington, Paul Robeson, Earth, wind and fire Rachmaninoff. Gershwin it's all put together in a way. That draws out the inner life of Stan who's this is really quiet guy who has valiantly fighting? Fighting off defeat in a system that is rigged so my number, five killer of sheep I'll just pair with that certainly a more conventional Hollywood type film, but a very good one onto the war and one of the easy rawlins mysteries that Walter Mosely wrote and was adapted by Director Carl Franklin Devil in a blue dress, starring Denzel Washington and Don cheadle and his breakout performance. Killer of sheep was released in seventy eight I think, but was primarily shot in seventy, two and seventy three, and then you look at double in blue dress came out ninety five, but his set back in nineteen, forty, eight and Josh every one of the struggles you articulated is what easy Rawlins is dealing within the community that he lives in is dealing with in that film, so a great potential, pairing their of killer of sheep and devil. Devil in a blue dress for my number five I'm going to rely on a couple listeners here as I, said we announce this topic and our film spotting newsletter which you subscribe to. If you haven't already spotting dot net, slash newsletter and the responses to the question, what movies taught you the most about? Racism came in pretty quickly and there was so much good stuff. Josh, we're going to get to a lot of it, but not nearly. Nearly enough of it, probably not all of it as we get through this top five, but Holly Mitchell is one of the listeners who wrote in and she said the movie. She really wants to flag up his blind spotting the fact that I've walked the same Oakland streets doubtless added to the pictures impact, but regardless of its proximity it is powerful and incisive I don't feel it gets mentioned as much as some other films released around the. The same time I e sorry to bother you and I love the. She mentioned blind spotting, and that didn't enough attention on our show. Certainly recommend that for people to see if they haven't but picked halley's email josh because she touched on something that I. think is really important this discussion. She writes as a child. Probably the first movie that I saw which touched on this subject was Alfonzo Korans, a little princess released when I was three. Over and over on VHS and I still watch it now, though on DVD. It is not about racism, and it doesn't delve into the issue of colonialism, either but the relationship between Sarah Crew Becky and the way that the other children reacted to their friendship made an impact on me. It definitely would not be anywhere near my top five movies on the subject, though it would probably be on my top five films, but I wanted to mention it because this is something that children learn very early in life, we are so impressionable and the movies that we watch as children's stay with us and shape us in one way or another so as good as the films on both of our lists are. And there are some truly great ones, if I'm being true to the spirit of the top five and I'm talking about Josh movies that had the biggest impact on me, not necessarily the five greatest movies on this subject. I do have to be willing to put on a movie. That definitely is not going to earn me any points as sinophile and when I was reminded of by another listener. Listener Laura Ellis in San Miguel de Landay, Mexico, she wrote in mentioning too long forgotten films about racism, but not the black white racism. We usually think about one of the film's Laura mentioned is a nineteen sixty eight John Boorman movie called Helen. The Pacific that I haven't seen the other is Laura says a not very good movie called enemy mine from Nineteen Eighty five by Wolfgang Petersen. Bein. It stars Dennis Quaid as a space fighter pilot crash landing on a planet with an enemy combatant played by Louis, Gossett junior they, of course have to work together to survive and learn to live on this foreign planet, and yet it's Wolfgang Petersen. This is a white filmmaker I certainly wanted to amplify black voices as well on this Josh, and I'm going to get to my other four picks. Picks that will do that, but I think. Halley's point is an essential one. The lessons we learn early in life do shape our perceptions of the world and how we relate to others, especially if you are and we'll get probably to a little bit more on your background as we get through these lists. If you're going a place like I, did in small town Iowa where you aren't encountering. Encountering people who look different than you or have dramatically different backgrounds than you. Then movies and other forms of Pop culture are going to be your guide and I was older than Halley. When she saw a little princess, I think maybe twelve or thirteen, and it was a few years after enemy. Mine came out, but I remember so josh and I have still only seen at one time I. I remember somehow on like a Sunday morning waking up at like five thirty am it never happened? But something just startled me awake, and I couldn't go back to sleep, and I had the remote control, and I flipped on the TV in my bedroom, and went to HBO or Cinemax, and this movie enemy. Mine is just beginning and I'm watching it thinking. It's space there. Pilots battling in space. And there's Dennis Quaid who was one of my favorite actors at the time, and I was in and I ended up staying up the rest of that morning, watching this entire film, and of course what ended up watching was a movie that until it does devolve into some action heroics near the end it's the story of this deep friendship that develops between these two enemies. They all look the same. They don't speak the same language. They don't eat the same foods. They don't have anywhere close to the same customs, but they are forced by the necessity of their isolation to depend on each other. Other and to trust each other and looking back on it, knowing that it was released in one, thousand, nine, hundred, five, I'm sure that it was intended to be a Cold War allegory that the the drax, the species, the alien species that Louis Gossett junior represents, and then Dennis Quaid as the American Gaza Juniors. The DRAC is the Russian probably and they've just always been at war. They don't even know why anymore at this point, but they hate each other. But I saw it removed from that context as I said a few years later and I did see it as this more universal statement. About the possibility of commonality and possibility for compassionate and most importantly the need to start from that place, a place of commonality and compassion whenever you encounter someone who is different than you. involve. The Lube Oil. Translate. If. One receives evil from another. Let one not. Do Evil in return. Rather. Let Him. Extend loves. To the enemy. that. Love might unite them. I've heard all this before. In the human element of course you have. True. Strength! Job Not yet. Learned is the way we threats express. The truth. Now if I watched this movie again in two thousand twenty, I would probably find it a little bit overwrought Josh, maybe a little bit, heavy handed, and Sappy I look back at Roger Ebert. Review only gave it two and a half stars, he praised Quaid and Louis Gaza junior said they're both very good, but saddled with a predictable and sentimental, and he closed his review by saying. Here's a movie that made no compromises in its direction. It's special effects, and it's performances, and then compromise everything else in sight, so everts not a fan of the story and the plot, and some of what he felt were cliches or gimmicks that it relied on and I. I can't tell you that enemy. Mine is a good movie or that. It's a movie. That's worth your time ahead of so many other movies that we're GONNA. Talk about and so many others that were not going to get to, but I can tell you. It was a formative important movie for me. Your a starting place I can totally see that it was it hit the Bullseye for me at what I was, maybe eleven twelve. It's exactly the sort of thing I was looking for. Then and I remember being surprised as well it sort of the allegorical things that were going on, and I do remember it as sort of a war allegory, but definitely. The other things you're talking about are there, too as you said I think I'll let it rest in my memory though I. Don't know if I want to see how that holds up today, either right or number four so you know as we've seen more and more protests over police killings of unarmed, African Americans really in the last ten years, or so had mostly confused understanding of those instances in the protests when chaos and violence would would break out I. was you know I'd wonder who's who? Who's doing what? What were the flash points and it always seemed to me that the news reports which usually obsessed about the looting and the property damage. That's usually what we got on our our TV's. That just didn't seem helpful to me. Well, then twenty seventeen. We got this documentary called who streets? And that's where Co. Directors Saba fully on and David Davis. They collect scores of mobile phone videos taken in the aftermath of the killing of Michael Brown by police officer Darren Wilson in two thousand, fourteen, most of the footage that that they use was taken during the ensuing days and nights of protests that took place in Ferguson Missouri. Now if you've seen whose streets in the last couple of years you're not surprised at all by the excessive level of force that is being used around the country. Weeks protesters at one point in the documentary. This is the defining footage that was captured for me. There are residents standing behind this chain link fence, and they're told by law enforcement proceeding down the street. via a loudspeaker return to their homes, and one of the residents shouts back. This is my backyard and they're fired upon with gas canisters. Elsewhere in the dock and activist describes what's happening as quote in unseen war, and considering all the dogs, the military trucks, the high grade weapons being used on neighborhood. Folks you. You understand that language. It's exactly what we're witnessing. And and of course we're seeing that warfare spreading across the country right now it sort of feels like whose streets has been playing each night on our screens, and so many of our cities and. Man We've got. We've got enough enraging footage of abuse of power at this point to fill a to fill a film festival. Never mind one documentary. It's just been a torrance that while it's maddening. I guess the hope is that the cumulative weight of all of that will move things beyond. Even, where they were when who streets came out in two thousand seventeen. Yeah, it's odd because I. don't have who streets logged on letterbox and yet I remember watching it and one of the reasons I remember watching. It is that you're so right everything that I've been seeing mostly on social media. The clips I've been seeing on twitter and facebook. They take me right back to the experience of watching that film I feel like I have seen it all before because of that film so as we're talking about getting educated on the topic of racism. You can do it through watching terrible horrific, deplorable behaviour that gives you the indicator of how you don't want to act in the world, and how you don't want to see other people being treated, or you can see examples as we ultimately see in Dennis Quaid, and Louis Gossett Junior in enemy mine how two people can come together and treat each other with love and compassion, sometimes though you can just get educated, ain't nobody from outside bringing down the property value. These folks. Shooting each other selling. Crack Rock and How you think the crack rock gets into the country. We don't own any planes. We don't own ships. We are not the people who were flying and floating next in here. I know every time you turn on the TV with you. See like people selling the rock pushing the Rock in Iraq. Yeah, I know. But. That wasn't a problem as long as it was. Here wasn't a problem until it was in. And it showed up on Wall Street where there are hardly any black people you wanNA talk about guns. Why is it that there's a gun shop on almost every corner in this community why? Tell you what? The same reason that is a liquor store on almost every corner in the black community why they want us to kill ourselves. you go out to Beverly Hills you don't see. What they want us to kill ourselves furious Laurence Fishburne in John. SINGLETON's boys in the hood and I did have to include that clip that part about my home state of Iowa because we've kind of touched on the reality is in Iowa in nineteen ninety one. When this movie came out I'm thinking about what my exposure to African Americans would have been, and I texted one of my best friends just yesterday to make sure that I was remembering this right. Up in a small town about nine thousand people I remember the one black family in that town then for high school i. move a few miles away, slightly bigger, fifteen thousand and I asked him. Am, I crazy, or was it really not any African American kids in our entire class and he reminded me that for a while I. Think before I moved there. There was one African American student who was in the class for a short time, didn't graduate with our group, and then he reminded me of two brothers who were in his sister's class, but that's it in the entire high school over a thousand kids so aptly on TV, the image of black people on TV that furious talking about there in that clip. was probably what I primarily saw it. Character like Ice Cubes Doboy. That was someone I knew only from mass media or probably from rap songs, there was nothing I understood about the struggle of black life in America at that time. If I even have any sense of it. Now I certainly didn't back in nineteen. ninety-one and it wasn't until I had a window. Into these characters based on Singleton's own life and relationships, and until I had someone with the wisdom and the experience of furious to to be a teacher to open my eyes to a much larger. More heinous system of institutional oppression at play, just as he's doing for his son and his friend, and then everyone else who gathered on the street corner there to hear him speak boys in the hood is available on Amazon Prime I think if you have a subscription and also out there on other vod platforms, but absolutely essential film for me and the first movie I. Thought of when we embarked on this topic. Yeah, huge movie for me an honorable mention, partly just because I was becoming such a huge film lover at that point and I just loved singleton story of kind of coming up. You know bringing something new to the Hollywood system, but what you're talking about Adam. was also a factor for me and we've talked about pop culture, being a a light for us, but in some ways it can also dim things sort things. If if the only images you're getting from you know certain musicians are certain films. A really stereotypical once. And that can distort your understanding of the African American experience and here with boys in the hood. Was something that countered not only those, but again countered news reports about gang violence, which focused on the danger and the fear, and instead you saw the families who lived in these neighborhoods who were struggling with this in so many ways and you realize. Oh, this this is! Not like some horrible place that I need to be afraid of this is like. If my family happened to live where something like this was going on what it might be like for us when you understand what these. These kids and their parents are going through so so yeah boys in the hood. Is it huge for me as well? You nailed it shattering stereotypes. That's really what that film did for me for you and so many people like us. Who couldn't otherwise understand that experience at the time number three pick is. Part of an education about racism, at least for me has been not only stories of oppression and suffering, but also just learning about black culture and fascinating corner of African. American culture unfolds in Julie, dashes daughters of the dust from nine hundred ninety. This takes place in one thousand, nine hundred to set on an island off the coast of Georgia where an african-american community has existed for generations, and so their isolation has allowed for a thriving and unique culture one. That's that's really tuned to their African ancestors one. That's blessedly free of whiteness. Now for under the show Aisha Harris wrote a great essay for the New York Times at the end of two thousand nineteen about the new Cultural Canon, and as part of that she discussed how beyond beyonce's short musical film lemonade, and that's an honorable mention for me for this list to by the way lemonade, but she talks about how that drew on the southern Tableau Aesthetic of dashes film. Film here's Isha. Daughters thus didn't need lemonade to assert its place in the Canon. The film was added in two thousand and four to the national film, Registry, a collection of films selected for preservation by the Library of Congress for being culturally historically or aesthetically significant, but beyond says is a quarter of a century, later reinforced its staying power and demonstrated just how influential the movie has been. So, that's us on daughters of the dust again. Just a chance for me Adam to. See something like that. That is free of I want to say free of white suppression, because this community is also haunted by the legacy of slavery. They've just managed to T to be from. It's literally to form their own community even though they're still living under under that trauma. But it's a little different in that again. Whiteness is out of the picture, and then you realize. That, racism suppresses such rich culture when when it tamp things down in such a way that. A community like this can't flour when you see them flower. You realize what's being lost. So I heartily recommend a daughters of the dust, and that is going to be part of an upcoming marathon on overlooked are tours that were hoping to get to write Adam. Yeah, absolutely still in the plans for this year and I was gonNA. Say a blind spot for me, but not going to be a blind spot for too much longer as we are definitely going to watch daughters of the dust, you'll have to see it again, but not disappointed about that at all and I'm eager to see it for the first time. As part of that overlooked a tourist marathon we'll have. Have more about that in the coming months, and you can always check out our past marathons film spotting dot net slash marathons. Might number three is Oj made in America? What I had is one of the best films of two thousand sixteen, and when we talked about it during that best of the year round table I touched down on one of the docs revelations that is certainly relevant to the events that prompted this top five, and do I think the documentary is so good and so essential to understanding race in America it as as we probably all have that Roger Ebert quote. Ringing around our heads these days and informing this list, even movies as empathy machines and them being maybe as close as we get to walking in someone else's shoes. Sometimes, it's simply a matter of getting information. It is getting context and perspective that you otherwise don't have or couldn't have so i. actually want to read. Indulge me for a second I'm GonNa read a couple of graphs from the L. A. Times June, eighteen, nineteen, ninety four. And massive manhunt involving scores of law enforcement officers ended in the cobblestone driveway of Simpson's Tudor style mansion as Los Angeles police. Department officers and bulletproof vests converged on the White Ford, Bronco, in which Simpson and cowlings had fled as the trucks parked hazard lights blinking silently in the Balmy June night. cowlings got out of the driver's seat and walked into the house then for nearly an hour. A distraught Simpson's sat inside the truck, reportedly cradling a blue steel. Steel revolver, and demanding to speak to his mother, hundreds of supporters gathered in the upscale neighborhood, channing free OJ and rocking police cars, meanwhile, the LAPD, Special Weapons and tactics, team and negotiators surrounded the house, eventually coaxing out of the vehicle by cellular telephone, he put the gun down and emerged about eight fifty PM carrying a framed family photo. So, what isn't said in that news report what I was oblivious to watching on TV in Iowa, the time and Surely everyone watching an Iowa at the time was oblivious to. It was the sense that we work just watching a standoff between a man in this case, the celebrity with a gun and lots of police with guns, and so yeah, it could end potentially in violence, but that we were about to watch OJ. Get Killed by police. Live on TV now. That didn't end up happening, but that's what people in La. especially black people in la thought they were watching play. Play out. They were sure that they were going to watch. Police kill Oj on camera and the answer to why is laid out in this as edleman documentary that aired over multiple nights on. ESPN is eight hours long I. Think in total he lays out the history over decades of mistreatment by the LAPD and the lack of trust that exists between them and the black community I'll just give you a few examples. The movie touches on. You love thirty nine. Nine year old widow, mother of three doesn't have the money to pay her sixty six dollar gas bill that the company came to collect she shot by two policemen, one black twelve times operation hammer all these raids that happened in nineteen eighty-seven, sending police officers in south central La to round up suspected gang members, the killing of latasha Harlan's. This happened right before Rodney King. Then help fuel as well. She's a fifteen year old girl shot in the back of. Of the head by a grocer over a bottle of juice that she was trying to pay for, and the woman was found guilty of voluntary manslaughter in the jury recommended the maximum sentence sixteen years, the White Judge gave her probation and four hundred hours of community service and a five hundred dollar fine, and as I said that was then followed later the same month by by Rodney King, so to truly understand the trial and understand the verdict and its fallout. You have to understand the time and the place, and the circumstances that that Oj came of agent and became a celebrity, and and in which this trial. Occurred and I remember being about sixteen or Seventeen, watching those rodney king riots, and like you when you're talking about your perspective before watching who streets? Not being able to process it, not being able to really process the violent response, the looting and the rioting, and the destruction of black neighborhoods by black residents, and if I am able at all to process it now in retrospect enabled the process what we've been watching unfold over the past week. It's because of this documentary, which obviously isn't just about Oj and it's not just an La Story. It is sadly an American story. Yeah it was the scope of that series that was so impressive in how well they handled every aspect of it and when you think about it, too. You know if that was proposed as a series you immediately, my immediate fear would be that. It's going to go for all the sensational aspects of the story, right? And instead while not you know avoiding ignoring those elements. It took a u-turn right into the the deep issues underneath the what we were seeing on our screens, and it was a really really impressive piece of work. If you haven't seen OJ made in America. I thought it was available on Hulu search today and I didn't see it there. It is available via watch ESPN. If you have a cable account I, think you could purchase the episodes on Youtube if not purchased the entire set. I did Josh want to highlight another documentary that came back to us a lot by listeners. When thinking about this topic, Jim Bernstein said I'm sure a lot of films. Swatting listeners will submit Eva boomer as thirteenth, but it's the one film that truly crystallized for me how racism is systematically and purposefully become a part of public policy in our country. Eric in Vancouver echoes that says one thing that movies about racism. Racism failed to do. Is They never focus on racism on an institutionalized level? Instead they tend to focus on racism on an individual level. Movies like crashing green book show a very limited scope of the subject matter pretty much saying hey, why don't we just be nice to each other? It's insulting that they were praised in its especially insulting that they both won best picture showing hot of touch. The academy is that's why I think. If a Dumont as documentary thirteenth was the most is opening, because actually dealt with racism. Truthfully, it showed the history of how racism is used as a political tool to shape America into what it is today. We'll hear from listeners and get to movies from Gordon. Parks junior and of course spike Lee up ahead. Stay with us. got. Resumes. Nothing Not Anymore. Case anymore we're to try today. We are a physical representation of. Having. Central. I. TRAYVON! Preschool Representation. Stephen Lawrence! Very important that we keep controlling these. Make this as As possible. We make this as peaceful as. Possible because you know what guys they want us to mess up. Day. I mean. To right hand love spinach. But hold stop the presses the right hand coming back. Got The. Votes now that strike. Yeah, ooh, the devastating Mike! Eleven Hey. Bill Nuns Radio Raheem in Spike Lee's do the right thing. There will be more to come from Spike Lee, and that film as we continue our top five, but spike the prolific filmmaker that he is has a new film coming out soon. The were both really excited about actually opening on Netflix's next weekend June twelfth. Defy blunts. It's about four African American Vietnam War. Vets who return to Vietnam to search for the. The remains of their squad leader, and for buried treasure movie stars, Delroy, Lindo Giancarlo esposito Clarke, Peters and Isiah whitlock junior along with Bozeman and Jonathan. Majors Majors of course Adam gave one of both of our favorite performances last year in the last black man in San Francisco can't wait to see him in another film I gotTa. Say though I might be most excited. I've kind of lost track of Delroy Lindo these. These last couple of years, and so can't wait to see him. ONSCREEN again also may be Giancarlo Esposito who was so good in so many spike Lee films and other films, maybe a decade or so ago I feel like I haven't seen him much on the big screen, so yeah can't wait for defy bloods, which we will say is up in the air right now. A little bit in terms of whether or Or not we'll talk about it next week, or we will get to the following week after everyone's had a chance to see it. There's a couple of different show. Topics were kicking around the new film spotting poll question asked You about Spike Lee. We WanNA. Know I can't believe we've never asked this before, and maybe we have. We just didn't do thorough enough search of the archive which would make even this question? A deeply flawed trademark film spotting poll question though I'm sure we're going to get feedback from lots of people telling us how flawed it is based on the fact that we will give three choices and has to do a lot of heavy lifting when it comes to spike Lee. We're asking you simply what is Spike Lee's best film? That isn't do the right thing. Malcolm X. From Nineteen ninety-two twenty-fifth fifth hour, which came out in two, thousand, two and the recent black KLANSMAN. That was twenty eighteen. Yes, we are going to give you the choice of other. Other and wow, I mean I heavy lifting indeed I might have to go that route for reasons you'll see as we get into our list. Though if I had to choose among those three I think for me, might be might be Malcolm X. Yeah I think even with other accounted for an every other film in his filmography. I'm pretty sure I have looked at it recently, but I'm pretty sure in my spike Lee ranking that Malcolm X. number two. I think it is so other than do the right thing, which is my number one and is. is in the film spotting Pantheon Malcolm. X. is where my vote is going to go. Though big fan, black clansmen had it on my top ten of the year had it in my top twenty of the decade and I love twenty fifth hour as well so this is a tough one, or maybe it's not maybe there are other people out there who just really adore one of those three films or one of the films that we didn't include. You can vote other and write it in. We love your comments. That Paul is over film spotting dot. Dot Net, and it's maybe worth pointing out as obvious as it is. That Spike Lee has been making movies for over thirty five years, thirtysomething Docs and narrative features along with a lot of shorts, and Sam and I were talking about this over the weekend. How many other directors are not only as prolific, is spike Lee, but have career high points in all four decades that he's been making movies. It's really astonishing. It is and and it puts them in the company of someone who were also going to be talking about soon. Right Steven Spielberg Spielberg Had A little bit longer of a career, but yeah he and spike continue to remain relevant each decade with different films, doing different types of things. Yeah, we will get to that Spielberg. Show that we planned for this week. Originally, the forty fifth anniversary, sacred cow review of jaws, and our power ranking of the five decades of Spielberg's filmography right now again, those two shows are just a little bit interchangeable. We may swap into five bloods, but I think our plan right now is to just push Spielberg back a week to next week and then we'll get to spike Lee on the nineteenth after everyone has hopefully seen, defy bloods over on Netflix. Every two weeks around our sister podcast the next picture show you'll find a new movie pairing recent release and a classic this week Josh. They kicked off a new movie pairing and it's I can't wait to listen to because I'm going to need their help I'm really looking to Tasha and Scott and Keith and genevieve to tell me what I missed here because they are pairing together. Together a couple Shirley Jackson related films. We have her new film Shirley from Madeleine's madeline. Director Josephine Decker that stars Elizabeth Moss as the writer Shirley Jackson the lottery, probably her most famous story, and then nineteen sixty, three's the haunting, which is based on the Jackson novel. The haunting of Hill House that directed by Robert Wise, SARS Julie Harris Claire Bloom and Russ Tamblyn and was. Reviewed on film spotting at least a decade ago Josh before your time may be a listener's choice. Pick as part of an after hours episode, but we did talk about that film as I recall I did like it. Quite a bit liked it more unfortunately than surely, which is a film that listeners may recall. I had pegged back in January I think during our preview looking ahead. All the years movies I had it pegged as the movie. I was pretty sure it was going to be my. My number one movie of the year at the end of the year, and it's not GonNa make the cut I'm guessing no, it's not gonNA. Make the cut, and it was a mixed bag for me. Just like Madeleine's madeline was so there's a disconnect for me when it comes to Josephine decker that I can't completely articulate as much as I love so much of the material, and even so much of the style of Shirley what I think decker is playing with and some of the different motifs. I'm. GonNa look to the next picture show to tell me what I got wrong. Well I'm definitely catching up with Shirley and hopefully I can pile on and explain that to you as well at some point Adam. New episodes of the X Picture Show Post every Tuesday you can find them wherever you get your podcasts, and you can get more information at next picture show dot net. WE DO HAVE A. A new goal that we have posted Josh over on the film spotting Patriae on page if we could get to nine hundred film spotting listeners, and we are just over eight hundred right now we can get to over nine hundred listeners who subscribe to be family members on Patriots. We're going to do one of those things that seems to be all the rage these days. All the kids are doing it. We're GONNA. Do a Virtual Watch party with me? You and our producer Sam family members will get to pick ultimately the movie that we watch together. It should be fun and all we gotta do is get to nine hundred. It will be fun Adam. I've been able to do a couple of these and yeah. It's kind of a weird experience because you're providing DVD. Commentary as it goes and. Got Nailed down exactly what our format will be. But hopefully some sort of participation with the film spotting family members on patriotic as well, but yeah, it's just a really. It's kind of amazing as people are finding I think this last two months. How community can be formed even over the zoom calls, and I know we're kind of all getting a little bit of zoom exhaustion, but this is different because you're. You're watching the film mostly just knowing that depending on how many people get you know dozens or maybe one hundred or so films spotting listeners? Are there with you at that time? And hopefully we won't say too much dumb stuff to spoil the experience well. I have approach to that I. Have My strategy already planned out I'm going to be the pretty face in you and Sam Cheryl the insights, okay. Deal this is why it works having three people on the Virtual Watch, so we will have that and there's a lot more you can get by supporting us on patriotic ad free episodes via a dedicated RSS feed. We have early downloads emerged discount, and we do offer a monthly bonus. Episode recently talked about the life. Aquatic with Steve Zoo turns out SAM was wrong once in disliking that movie, he now adores it and thinks it's one of the best was Anderson Films of all time. I obviously haven't evolved as a film viewer and critic because. Because I saw the movie I saw in two thousand four, but we had a really good in-depth discussion about release. Listeners seem to think it was Josh, so we're still trying to figure out exactly. What June's bonus show is going to be little bit different than what we've done before. Probably that it won't be just a dissection of one movie, but those options will be coming soon. Because family members get to select that content indeed so head over to Patriot dot com slash film spotting. If you WanNa vote on what that bonus show should be. I was loaned. Fifty or sixty of those things just. Standing there. Staring at. I I started to drive i. Just plowed right through them. They didn't move. It didn't run. Stood there, staring at me. Just crush! We get back to our top five now. The top five movies that educated us about racism with that clip from George Romero's classic night of the living dead, and it was already an honorable mention for me Josh for this list, and then we got this great email from Bruce. Bachelor glaister in Milford Ohio. He said I'd like to say a few words about two films that provoked me to think about racism when I was still a teenager, and yes, I'm old George Romero's night of the living dead provide us with Dwayne Jones Ben, one of the earliest depictions of a black hero that was a bit of a shock to the system. Sixty eight, then also becomes an innocent victim in one of. Of the most shocking endings of all time, Romero was making an incredibly incisive observation that in the midst of chaos when fighting a common foe, the most disparate personalities can find a way to work together as long as the little girl doesn't start munching on your arm. The other film I will briefly mention to Sidney lumet's nineteen sixty four film, the pawnbroker, a gut, punch of a movie that evoked layered despair, and the struggles of Saul neither men, a Holocaust survivor whose flashbacks to a tragic past connect painfully, but the suffering of the poor black and Latino clientele now living in his neighborhood movie offers no hope and no easy answers and a career best performance by Rod Steiger the pawnbroker for. For me. Josh is still obliged by no excuse for it really want and need to see that film, but as I said I living dead was really vivid in my mind, while I was thinking about this list in this topic talked about I. Think is a sacred cow review for Halloween, maybe three or four years ago, but right. We definitely did cover some of the same terrain that Bruce's. There are getting back to our list. At number two I have superfly, which is another film we have covered atom. It was part of our two thousand twelve blaxploitation marathon that we did superfly came out in nineteen. seventy-two directed by Gordon Parks Junior. The son of Shaft Director Gordon Parks. It Stars Ron O.`Neil. O.`Neil as priest New York City cocaine dealer who lives the high life, but he still walks around with heavy shoulders I. described it before it's as if outrageously patterned full length jackets way a thousand pounds. He just carries them around with a weight on his shoulders, and that really surprised me that this movie had mournful Senate Adam I. It wasn't guilt exactly. That's bothering priest, but this growing realization that no matter how much money he has doing this, he still can't buy his independence I. Think superfly is ultimately about how the criminal enterprise is really just another form of enslavement, and that there's a connection the movie made for me from you know modern contemporary black experience to the legacy of slavery. One, remarkable sequence demonstrates the systemic nature of this it's it's the stunning still photo sequence shot by parks, junior that traces the cocaine how cocaine moves through society so from how it's procured the packaging of it and it sale, and then it moves from the ghetto all the way to these upper class, white clients who really make up a significant part of priests customer base so even though preaches the pusher man. That's the title of one of the signature songs on the Curtis Mayfield composed soundtrack. He's essentially still being pushed around. Allow. Don't give a Goddamn Way headed. You're GonNa work for me until I tell you to quit, you don't own me Pagano. Mother tells me when I can split. The. Do you think you're talking to so superfly? Best Picture Adam for both of us when we add that marathon? Yeah, and getting a what you were speaking to I. Remember the key line for me in that movie comes maybe about halfway through, and he's talking about why it is. He's doing what he does why he's trying to pull off these scores and he says it's all about having a choice. It's just being able to decide what it is I want. Buy Me some time just to be free and hearing that and hearing it in that context and. In a movie that is extensively this crime movie in this drug movie, but really is as thoughtful as it is was really powerful, and I think it absolutely belongs on a list like this one might number three was the Oj dock from twenty sixteen that actually did win. The Best Documentary Feature Oscar at the Academy Awards in two thousand seventeen, and I mentioned a do Veronese thirteenth, which was also from that same year, came out in twenty sixteen, and I'm going with another one josh that got an Oscar nomination with those two films, and it's I. Am Not your Negro from director. Raoul, Peck, it's part biography and that it's about maybe the most. And incisive author and speaker on race the country's ever had James Baldwin and it explores his social activism and his commentary as a public intellectual in the fifties and sixties only and imagines the book he never finished called. Remember this House that was going to be a personal account of the lives and deaths of three of his friends Medgar. Evers Malcolm X. X Martin Luther King. So the movie does give you that historical perspective, the tragic legacies of those three men and their assassinations and their impact on the civil rights movement in addition to the biographical part, and then peck blends, those elements and the archival footage that he has and current footage of the time from black lives matters protests with Baldwin's own words. To examine race in America, and of course it's race in America past present, and and presently sadly now looking from twenty sixteen to twenty twenty, the future and Baldwin has a key line line that he wrote. That is said over the course of this movie and for me. It's the Gut Punch of the movie if you had to pick two quick lines that some up so devastatingly, the state that were in its this the story of the Negro. In is the story of America. It is not a pretty story. It's it's an ugly story. Obviously, and it's still unfolding and Baldwin famously said that he can't be a pessimist that he's an optimist because he's alive, he's forced to be an optimist because he says that he believes that we have to survive and we must. He emphasizes in. TV Clip that you can find on Youtube and I love that hope. Josh and yet it's so hard to watch in here clips like the one we played at the beginning of the show and I wanNA play a part of here again from the Dick Cavite show. It's so hard to hear it. And still be an optimist if we will white. Irish. If you were Jewish to oppose. If we had in fact. You're buying a frame of reference. To not turn. It would be a hero for you instead of a threat now comex might still be alive. And it. No everyone is very proud of Israel. Stated with against have nothing. Don't be misinterpreted I'm not anti semi. But you know when the Israelis guns or the polls? The Irish or any white man in the world. Says give me liberty or give me death. The entire wide world applauds. When a black man says exactly the same thing. Word for word. He is judge, a criminal and treated like one and everything possible is done to make an example of this bad, so they won't be any more like him. So when you hear that what's changed I? Mean I think. This was fifty years ago Josh fifty years ago and we are in the same position. We got an email from a listener named grace. WHO WENT WITH I? Am Not your Negro. As most informative film on racism, she said the contracting imagery from the fifties and sixties with Modern Day America truly highlights the horror of white families and prosperity, being built on the backs of our black brothers and sisters. I believe it's my duty and obligation as a white person to understand that and even feel the pain of it. It's my hope that doing so will bring us closer together and begin to unite us rather than divide us. Obviously I. Hope we can do more than just understand and feel the pain of it, but that probably is the first part of the process, and there really isn't a better guide than James Baldwin, and this movie no I mean I mean. It's not James Baldwin's job to be our teacher. But it's. It's our gift that he had. I don't even know if patients is the right word there. There's a I remember writing about this. There's a towel in the documentary and the footage where you see him where he will eloquently patiently lay things out, and then he sees that the person is speaking to just not getting it, and he'll he'll I think he puts his fingertips to his forehead, and he's just gathering himself. Because it couldn't be clearer what he is saying and the willful ignorance is just pushing back on that. So. Great Choice for this list and I'm sure you considered as well speaking of Baldwin. Adam, if beale street could talk. Barry Jenkins adaptation of Baldwin's novel. Is a direct address of police malpractice. And a really wonderful film as well. Yeah, we will get to some listener. Feedback on that great fell my number one film of the year it was released. If beale street could talk but I. do want to plug that if you haven't seen, am not your Negro, it's available as part of an Amazon prime subscription. It is out there on other vod platforms as well in that. Tell Josh that you mentioned. It's visible in. In the clip I was referencing when I talked about him, being an optimist at some point, maybe about twenty thirty seconds in he has that pause where the fingers go to the temple, and he looks down and closes his eyes, and he isn't talking there directly to someone else. He's not in confrontation. He's monologue ing, but it's as if it's as if he's still taking pause to consider all of those voices he's ever. That he's always been trying to refute over the course of his life on this matter and so many other, so we will link to that over on our top five page. If you go to film spotting Dot Net and Click on list, you'll see our picks for this top five and others and we will link to these clips if you wanna see them, so my number. One of course is a slot that was going to spike Lee I. I mean I I've grown up. I've had the great fortune to grow up on the films of Spike Lee, and and it's also incredibly fitting that he's had a bit of a resurgence or maybe a career ending up as we were discussing these last few years with for me, something like Iraq, but of course black clansmen, and and the upcoming defy bloods. You know it's happening just when we need his rabble rousing brand of cinema once again. I. Think it was just a couple of shows ago now our top five movie going experiences. I talked about how going to see jungle fever in high school was an education for me and really every spike film has been sorely needed. Education I think. Maybe that's why the ones that leave me. The most discombobulated ended up being my favorites when I look back on them. I couldn't pick one for this list, so I've got a triple feature for top spot I'm GonNa hit you with three here. Do the right thing of course. I'm not going to spend two time on it. It's in the Pantheon not much needs to be said. Though as we watch it if you watch it now and revisit it amidst similar scenarios and uprisings to what we see their. Remember how this movie ends are. Note how this movie ends because it's very. Surprising note of reconciliation between Mookie and sal, after pizzeria has burned down. We don't want to rush to that point especially, not right now. That's not what I'm saying. I don't mean to be some sort of easy bomb. But just hold onto it at least for now, and there's a little bit of hope there in what is otherwise a righteously angry film that people forget about. The other part of my triple feature is going to be Malcolm X. I knew very little about Malcolm. X.. When that film came out, and it not only taught me his story, but really it had my sense of American history reoriented, and maybe just for a sense of that. It's best represented by one of Denzel. Washington's most stirring speeches in the title role before there was any such thing as a Republican or a Democrat. We were black. Before there was any such thing as a mason or an elk. There was any such thing as a Jew or a Christian. We were black he. In fact before there was any such place as America, we were black. And American has long passed from the scene. There will still be black. The third film in my spike Lee triple feature is a documentary when the levees broke a requiem in four acts. This is lees four hour dock. It was released within a year of Hurricane Landfall, in two, thousand five, and it's a surprisingly sober effort for Lee. He really just allows the evidence of governmental indifference and incompetence to quietly pile up until it becomes cumulatively infuriating. And of course it also demonstrates how institutional racism results in minority communities, suffering the worst from the hurricane. Shockingly, what's happening now with the pandemic? The same exact thing, those are the folks who are suffering the most during the pandemic so. Had to give Spike Lee. Three just been hugely. Influential, educational for me you. Do the right thing Malcolm. X. When the levees broke. You'RE NOT GONNA. Get any argument from me. I was curious when I knew you were going to go with a triple feature. which three you were GonNa pick I mean I knew the right thing how to spot, but then there are so many other films that obviously deal with this topic in spikes catalog, but that are also. Great and essential and the most common title I saw come in from listeners actually isn't part of your triple bill. It was bamboozle which you also love I loved seeing that come up came up a lot from our listeners who thought it was the most essential film for them when it comes to this topic of race. I did just go with. Do the right thing as my number one and it is in the film spotting. Pantheon, so, if we cared about the rules this time and we don't, it would be ineligible. We're GONNA, make it eligible for this list and Sam included Spike Lee's tweet in our newsletter that went out announcing this topic. Spike tweeted three brothers Radio Raheem, Eric, Garner and George Floyd, and it was a mash up of those killings, and it's so chilling to see art and life collide so horribly, and you see the the repetition in the excessiveness of the use of force and the fear on the victim's faces, and just the the senselessness of it all, and if you forget everything else about what makes do the right thing so great, the writing the performances spike style and the use of color, and and the fault lines are racial divide that it exposes what I keep thinking about. About in relation to our current situation, Josh is the end, and it is the the moment of violence that precedes the reconciliation I'm glad you pointed that out. You know what I haven't seen. Do the right thing in a long time I. Had forgotten about that as soon as you said it, I could picture it in my head I. Remember that vividly, but it took you reminding me of it because all I remember is that divisive act throwing the garbage can through south window, and I do WanNa talk about that for a second because I I remember watching. During Ferguson White, people white, people with fundamentally good hearts, these are not people who are are filled with hate or prejudice. See that footage and kind of shake their heads at the TV they look at the footage of the unrest in the rage in the destruction, and they shake their heads, and they say things. Like what good is this doing i? Just don't get it. Why or maybe just why and that's it? And the question should be. How disenfranchised in powerless and angry must've black person feel to believe they're only course of action is to destroy their own neighborhood their own homes. What caused them to feel that way? But the why? Is just empty rhetoric right that allows the viewer to turn off the TV. Not have to confront the true injustice of it or confront, maybe even their own complicity, however, unintentional may be, there's just such a disconnect with what they're seeing that they then choose to dismiss it rather than actually acknowledged the disconnect, and because of it probe deeper and try to actually deal with the reality of a system that we are partly responsible for and I think that spike doesn't let you just shake your head and look away and say why like McKie's act is the shock. It's the jolt of complacency and the Jolt Out of denial. It was for me anyway, watching it not in. In eighty nine. I don't think I saw it I. Don't think it. It came to any theaters in my small town in Iowa in nineteen, eighty-nine and I might not have been turned onto cinema enough. Anyway, it would have been after something like my number. Four pick boys in the hood, and after really getting into film in the early nineties that I discovered that there's this genius named Spike Lee and I saw this movie, and it hit me with that kind of power. Yes, that's sequence. Is it really was a precursor to who streets as you describe it Adam in a lot of ways because it put you on the ground from a different angle where everything? If that had not been your experience ever before. Everything looked like it was a different universe, and that was the choice of having mookie throw the camp rather than any one else in that huge in sombor cast of characters, many of them had the motivation for that, but in choosing Mookie, who was probably the character. We most identified with as an audience. Or were meant to. At least that's where things got complicated and even though. It made it complicated for me in a way. That made me stop. Obviously as I said it took something like who streets decades later to to really start to cement it, but to say something else is going on here. There's more at work here than just the maybe news or media images. We've been given yeah I'll close with this thought from Matt White in indy I understand. Many responses will name do the right thing is the movie which influence? They're thinking about race. The most rightfully so I'm going to do the same, but I want to explain why. It was my second viewing film that mattered more I I do the right thing around the. The, year, two, thousand and two shortly after I finish college. I found it a moving fantastic film. It certainly helped develop my thinking about race, but not in a way that set itself apart from other films dealing with the same topic, however, when I watched it a second time in two thousand fifteen after the Michael Brown shooting in Ferguson, the film made a more significant impact as I watch. Radio Raheem Die Again at the hands of police I realized countless black men of died the same way, and despite spike Lee's film and rappers like Nwea trying to tell us nobody paid. Paid attention until there was a cell phone video. I know I should have paid attention sooner. We all should have thank you, Matt for that. So can we run through? A couple of honorable mentions here Adam Yeah it was it was there were a lot I wanted to get these these titles out here and you mentioned bamboozle that was so encouraging to see that one. Come up because I consider that a little bit of a loss spike Lee film, maybe not at least among our listeners. One of those who mentioned it was Rod Akatsuki. He's in Vancouver Canada the last few. Few minutes of Spike. Lee's bamboozled where he shows. A montage of racist images from pop culture was horrifying and educational for me leaving a long lasting imprint in my memory, the rest of the movie has some funny and thought provoking content, but that last montage says it all concisely and powerfully so bamboozled for those who haven't seen it. It is essentially about prejudice and discrimination in the media came out in two thousand, and in a lot of ways is an update of another film considered for this list Robert, Townsend's nineteen eighty-seven comedy Hollywood shuffle so both kind of tackle that topic. In funny, but also really bracing ways just a couple of others. I want throw out their fruitvale station dramatization of yet another police killing of an unarmed black man in this case Oscar Grant Michael Jordan plays grant in that film. It was Ryan Kugler. Direct Oriel debut barbershop is one that. It's a comedy that really for me just offers more cultural education. You know here. Here's a different slice of life I. Don't know, and I'm just going to sit in it for a couple of hours and in this case, enjoy it I. think that's part of this when we talk about. Education in this way and then I mentioned a when the levees broke the Spike Lee documentary. There's another documentary I. Really Hope People will check out called trouble the water it's a offers, offers a less journalistic, and I think more of a firsthand experience Katrina because it focuses almost entirely on Kimberly Roberts. She's a resident of New Orleans she lived in the doomed lower ninth ward. So you at you experience at right as she does, and it's incredibly powerful. Yeah there. There are so many I. think we have a list probably between us of twenty or thirty additional films that we would love to mention and a lot of them have come up certainly Malcolm X. Part of your troika there at number one was one of the first movies I thought about, and I will mention two other films by white filmmakers and one of them is by a white filmmaker who is wrestling directly with his own family's legacy in the south and. Potential role in the killing of a black man. It's called. Did you wonder who fired the gun? That was a golden brick recommendation of mine a few years ago and John. Sales Film Lonestar I think is another film that really gets at the notion of institutional racism over decades the different ways it plays out in the African American community in Hispanic community in this case as well and then if beale street could talk Josh, you mentioned that great adaptation of James Baldwin story by Berry Jenkins, and I do have one more bit of. of listener feedback from our friend in South Bend Indiana Nathaniel Mayer. He says given its unfortunately perennial relevance at this point, it'd be surprised if you SAM and Josh hadn't encountered the short poem by Ross, gay on the death of Eric Garner called a small needful fact, here's a link to the poem with the reading of it by gay. If you haven't read it, I can't recommend it strongly enough. My only regret as I say is that I felt the need to revisit it as often as I have over the past few years. Small neutral fat. Is that Eric. Garner worked for some time for the parks and REC the cultural department. Which means perhaps with his very large hand. Perhaps in all likelihood, he put gently into Earth. Implants which most likely. I'm of them in all likelihood. Continue to grow. Continue to do what such plants? Like House and feed small unnecessary creatures. Being pleasant to touch and smell. Like, converting sunlight into food. Like making it easier for us to breathe. For me, the cinematic equivalent of this poem is if Beale. Street could talk. They're certainly ways. Jenkins film was explicitly about systemic racism, social political and economic institutions, the stand in the way of the film Central Characters Titian Fani, but at the heart of the film is also a love story, kindly and generously, and lovingly portrayed by Jenkins, and therein lies for me the radical work of this film to show us. How indelibly marked the lives of these two characters are by systemic. Systemic racism while at the same time showing us how much life there is for the two of them outside of that mark the injustice of their circumstances, all the more heartbreaking, because we see how much lost unfairly by those institutions that exist entirely beyond them, even as those institutions inevitably determine the course of their lives, if as a white male, economically comfortable person I'm often blind to the privilege that shapes my world both gays, poem and Jenkins Film Not only show me. Me What I don't know, but helped me better. See what I don't know. I don't know and in that way. They remind me to judge carefully Eric Garner. It turns out perhaps most likely in all likelihood planted life-sustaining plants and I think what those words. That's probably where we should leave it. We think everyone who helped us out by submitting some great film suggestions and educating us on some other titles that we should seek out, and we do want to continue the. The dialogue. You can email us anytime. Feedback at film spotting dot that you could also find us on facebook and twitter Adams at film spotting I met Larson. UNFIL-. If you want to head over to spotting to the show archives, that's where you can find reviews, interviews and top five's going back to two thousand five. That's also the place you can vote in the current films spotting poll. We're asking you. What is Spike Lee's best film aside from? Do the right thing. To order show, t shirts or other merch visit film spotting dot net slash shop and to subscribe to our weekly newsletter. Go film spotting dot net slash newsletter next week. On the show. We are expecting to get to that jaws sacred cow review this month marks its forty fifth anniversary and going to power rank. The Spielberg decades I can't wait until Josh puts the two thousands at his number. One spoiler probably not gonNA. GonNa, happen thought about films. Body produced by Golden. Joe Disown Sam van Haugen Without Salmon Golden Joe. This show wouldn't go. Our production. Assistant is Cat Sullivan, thanks also to Kansas Griffiths and the listeners of the film Spotting Advisory Board and special thanks to everyone at Wbz Chicago more information is available at Wbz Dot. Org for film. Spotting I'm Josh Larsen. And I met him. Our thanks for listening this conversation. Conserve no purpose anymore.

Josh Adam America Spike Lee Dennis Quaid Iowa Dot Net josh James Baldwin officer director Josh Larsen Shirley Jackson George Floyd Oj Youtube US Roger Ebert Chicago