20 Burst results for "Roger Ebert"

"roger ebert" Discussed on Six Degrees of WTF

Six Degrees of WTF

05:08 min | Last month

"roger ebert" Discussed on Six Degrees of WTF

"I have not seen it probably since high school. Okay okay don't terrible. It is terrible. And i dragged my husband into all of these. There were a couple that he was like. Okay i am putting my foot. I'm like no. I'm watching that. This was not one of them. This was one that i think. It's probably going to be pretty bad but there might be some fun. Scares or something great to hell. I will never get that hour and a half back that i spent artist movie. And here's what shocking on rotten tomatoes sixty. Seven percent creeks our audience critics. Oh sixty seven percent as the score. Wow yeah that makes no sense to me at all because this was seriously so so bad. And i'm double checking just to make sure that i am right that it was movie. Seven percent forty five percent for the audience score erker. Luckily roger ebert to not like it so he said you know. A movie is in trouble when what is happening on. The screen inspires daydreams had lasted through the first real and nothing had happened now. I was somewhere in the middle of the third rail and still nothing happened. It was a really seriously slow. Yeah got it took forever like a one point. I was like how much time is left because nothing has happened. And i it was like we'd already been watching. Forty five fifty minutes. Can't remember any of the kills in the movie. The only memory. I have is her driving the car at the end. Yes with a monster. The looked like he was in a bad shave down. Where wolf suit from party city on the roof of the car. Yes that's certainly goes through him. Meals him Yeah and then she just like yes. Well if i didn't she like lay her head down on it and like the horns going and everything. And i'm like honey you're not unconscious damn horn and then she finally like gets out the next morning..

roger ebert
"roger ebert" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

The Next Picture Show

03:27 min | 2 months ago

"roger ebert" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

"I i remember like when i was a a young critic watching movies and reading his reviews how often We would run across something lake. His blue velvet fever. You saying that the it wasn't very sexual or violent enough or a nine and a half weeks is a movie that he kind of slobber over a way i thought was a little unseemly. I'm not surprised that he loved this. I mean you know it's it's barrier breaking and surprising in the story is great but it's it's also like a good movie for you know. Good old pervy. Roger ebert side while to provide a context. It opened in one theater. I believe on the sixth of october proper opening was the thirteenth a debuted at number eight but in terms of unsavory content. The number one movie that week and and for four weeks in a row was seven. The number five movie that we also a financial flop but also provides a little context. What people are watching was jade which was his A nasty film as this but not nearly as smart traced debuted effectively at number eight behind to die for its third week ahead of the big green in its third week it was it was not successful so i'm kind of wondering why i guess a good point compared to here's why would people goes feel comfortable going to see seven but not this. I'm honestly baffled by that question. Say that people had been weaned a bit on serial killer movies. I mean You know i think you know it sounds so lamb said had already happened when already been massive cultural phenomenon and seven a bear star sciences without leagues at that point bigger star So those those two factors alone are pretty significant. And there's kind of a pulpy feel to seven. I mean there's there's there is kind of a sense that fisher and company are trying to give us a oblique vision of modern rain drenched urban landscape. But like but. I think there's something more real about the future that strange as is trying to predict the chaos that we were all kind of feeling might becoming as the millennium turned. There's something weirdly even though it's not more disturbing film than seven there's elements of it that feel more real and maybe a little bit more disturbing on that in that sense. Yeah i remember thinking it was kind of funny at the time that it. Would you know this all happen next five years. But i think actually kinda works for. Obviously this is not the future we got but it is so close to the one thousand nine hundred ninety five ish version of america that feels a sharp critique because of that this is going out on a limb a little bit but i can't help but wonder if part of that dichotomy is that you seven is in a way a kind of they're kind of like overlay of misogyny to it. You know the. I'm thinking about things from the the big detail of how it ends to smaller things like Women getting freight to death. Which i mean if you're horrified by the rape and murder in strange days. I don't know how you can let the knife raping in seven go by..

Roger ebert lamb fisher america
Iconic Theaters in California to Close Over Pandemic Losses

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

01:53 min | 8 months ago

Iconic Theaters in California to Close Over Pandemic Losses

"The pandemic has cost us a lot, but the hope that someday post vaccine we would return to our favorite places that hope has carried us through the hardest parts of these last 13 months. Well. News came this week that the iconic Arclight cinema and 58 year old Cinerama Dome in Hollywood would not be reopening post pandemic. In fact, the owners of ArcLight Cinemas and Pacific Theater said none of their locations would be reopening. Post Cove it. That's right. No more ArcLight caramel corn or movie pore size glasses of wine. Joining me to remember these theaters, particularly the iconic Hollywood location is Christy Lemire. She writes for Roger ebert dot com and Who hosts the podcast breakfast all day, and she's our regular one of our regular and most beloved film critics on Fridays. Hi, Christie. Hello, my friend. What a sad day it is. I know, And we have all spent so many glorious hours at the arc lights, especially the one in Hollywood. Talk about many, and yeah, from your perspective. So it's funny when you're a film critic, especially if you're a freelancer like so many of us are like you don't have an office, right? You watch movies at your house or you right at your house, and so going to the Arc light on a Monday night to see a big studio release, and all your fellow critics were there, and there's a buzz in the audience as people who love film You know, it's It's like going to your favorite office but also your favorite watering hole and there's such a great energy the minute you walked into that lobby with just the job. Soaring feelings and the huge marquee with all the times and the big clock, and you felt like you were walking into a cathedral of swords. And yet there's also a very intimate sense of community because you could go and have a bye deep beforehand or have a glass of wine afterward and talking about what you have just seen

Arclight Cinema Cinerama Dome Arclight Cinemas Pacific Theater Hollywood Christy Lemire Roger Ebert Christie
"roger ebert" Discussed on Feast of Fun

Feast of Fun

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"roger ebert" Discussed on Feast of Fun

"I have done Beyond the valley of the dolls reunion event and at the time when we did it got it had been over ten years ago now i was able to get Three of the stars of the film. erica gavin marcia. Mcbroom and John lazar who played zemun at the time. There was a blu ray celebrating the anniversary and it was a big big deal that the guy who played harris had actually agreed to participate on. It was one of the things you know. He hadn't done anything for all those years Twenty something years probably at that point But i don't think he's done anything sense either so he's pretty much disappeared. I'm trying to find. And i've found on a message on a blog pop addicts Pop culture addicts. Somebody said that they were able to write. They left something on a message board a few years ago when a young woman responded and so the david. What's her father and he just you know. Thank you for your kind words and stuff like that. But he didn't want to be associated with the film wasn't interested in being in the limelight at all. But the thing about this movie to is value. The doll shares Starred sharon tate and they re released it after she was murdered And then of course beyond the valley of the dolls also deals with like these celebrities getting murdered two and so i think maybe with that whole helter skelter thing going on around that time too. And also you know spoiler alert. The movies very transphobic and that the the killer the murderer the bad person is a is a trans man now is that is that been verified by roger ebert in the script that it because we see the revelation is that the killer opens up his shirt and reveals that he has brass And a lot of people watching that film it was that he was a man who's transitioning to being a woman in the script..

sharon tate harris John lazar Mcbroom roger ebert
"roger ebert" Discussed on Feast of Fun

Feast of Fun

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"roger ebert" Discussed on Feast of Fun

"I have done Beyond the valley of the dolls reunion event and at the time when we did it got it had been over ten years ago now i was able to get Three of the stars of the film. erica gavin marcia. Mcbroom and John lazar who played zemun and at the time there was a blu ray celebrating the anniversary and it was a big big deal that the guy who played harris had actually agreed to participate on. It was one of the things you know. He hadn't done anything for all those years Twenty something years probably at that point But i don't think he's done anything sense either so he's pretty much disappeared. I'm trying to find. And i've found on a message on a blog pop addicts Pop culture addicts. Somebody said that they were able to write. They left something on a message board a few years ago when a young woman responded and so the david. What's her father and he just you know. Thank you for your kind words and stuff like that. But he didn't want to be associated with the film wasn't interested in being in the limelight at all. But the thing about this movie to is value the doll shares Start sharon tate and they re released it after she was murdered And then of course beyond the valley of the dolls also deals with like these celebrities getting murdered two and so i think maybe with that whole helter skelter thing going on around that time too. And also you know spoiler alert. The movies very transphobic and that the the killer the murderer the bad person is a is a trans man now is that is that been verified by roger ebert in the script that it because we see the revelation is that the killer opens up his shirt and reveals that he has brass And a lot of people watching that film it was that he was a man who's transitioning to being a woman in the script..

sharon tate harris John lazar roger ebert Mcbroom
"roger ebert" Discussed on Feast of Fun

Feast of Fun

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"roger ebert" Discussed on Feast of Fun

"I have done Beyond the valley of the dolls reunion event and at the time when we did it got it had been over ten years ago now i was able to get Three of the stars of the film. erica gavin marcia. Mcbroom and John lazar who played zemun and at the time there was a blu ray celebrating the anniversary and it was a big big deal that the guy who played harris had actually agreed to participate. Because it was one of the things you know he hadn't done anything for all those years Twenty something years probably at that point But i don't think he's done anything sense either so he's pretty much disappeared. I'm trying to find. And i've found on like a message on a blog pop addicts Pop culture addicts. Somebody said that they were able to write. They left something on a message board a few years ago when a young woman responded and so the david. What's her father and he just you know. Thank you for your kind words and stuff like that. But he didn't want to be associated with the film wasn't interested in being in the limelight at all. But the thing about this movie to is value the doll shares Start sharon tate and they re released it after she was murdered And then of course beyond the valley of the dolls also deals with like these celebrities getting murdered two and so i think maybe with that whole helter skelter thing going on around that time too. And also you know spoiler alert. The movies very transphobic and that the the killer the murderer the bad person is a is a trans man now is that is that been verified by roger ebert in the script that it because we see the revelation is that the killer opens up his shirt and reveals that he has brass And a lot of people watching that film it was that he was a man who's transitioning to being a woman in the script..

sharon tate harris John lazar roger ebert Mcbroom
"roger ebert" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"roger ebert" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"She's walking along and low. She's getting thiscause be the start of a beautiful friendship. This thing this was actually they accused this film. Of ripping off Casablanca because it's the same plot. Yeah, both Roger Ebert and another guy claimed that It's horrible. It's just it's It's not even it's it's like more than laughable. It's just and she is horrible. I mean, that's what ruins the movie because it's based, I guess on a comic book or something, but she She can't act. I mean, that's the thing in every this whole movie. I'm not joking is just a set up to show her body. I mean, everything every set up every scene. There. You're not really listening to the plot. It's like what camera angle. It's all. It's like a Michael Bay. What camera angle? Can we put Pamela Anderson in to show off her boobs? I mean, that's really what this move movie. It should just be called boobs. That's really what this movie should be called Dans boobs, silicone boobs and leather. That's all this movie is just moves in leather. That's better closer, Jase. I couldn't get through myself. So I'm really you did well, Good man. Thanks. Like such outages Bad, like some of the movies, like some of the movies that you've done aren't just aren't my company, but at least They're in CD. If I don't seal see the appeal for action movie people, this one is just horrible. Like just not even good. It's just not even laughably bad. It's just bad. Like bad, bad acting bad effects. It's like a movie that you Would see on Cinemax at about 4:30 A.m.. You know what I mean? There's nothing but mirvs and pervs watching it. You know, it's just awful. Awful awful. I know Rottentomatoes, based on 36 reviews, the consensus was stating that barbed wire could have been fun camp, but Pamela Anderson can't deliver her lines with any dramatic or comedic, no impact. You're absolutely right. This could have. They could have taken it and purposely made it campy, and it would've been great. Because it is they could've played up the fact that they that they were setting her up for every angle. You know, Every every shot was set up to just show her body. They could have had so much fun with that. It could have been like no, no, no. Over here. This is a better the lights over here, But she wasn't in on the joke. They were taking it seriously. They took this plot seriously. They took this movie seriously. And know that that person a rotten tomatoes is absolutely right. Never watched this movie. I like the $4. I can't believe I rented this. Again to pull tabs. This could have been I could have 11 big man. But instead I'm a big loser. Or to quote to quote the barbwire. Big fatso. Loser loser. Yes. So now you guys have to remember on Tuesday when McLane gets back,.

Pamela Anderson Roger Ebert Casablanca Cinemax Michael Bay McLane
The movie of the year is here: Boys State

The Big Picture

06:46 min | 1 year ago

The movie of the year is here: Boys State

"Sean Fantasy. And this is the big picture conversation show but the best movie I've seen in twenty twenty. That movie is called boy state. What is boy state? Well, it's a documentary. It is now available on Apple TV plus and I thought it would be appropriate for us to just talk about this film which I think is fascinating and incredible document of life in twenty twenty in many ways. Specifically, the way that we engage with our political system Amanda I wanted to talk to you about it because I know that you like the. Film as well. We're GONNA. Talk a bit about what boy state is the institution, and also what this movie isn't how it captures it but what did you make of it off the top see you saw this movie at Sundance as did our colleague Noam Away and you both raved about it and I didn't get to see that sundance so I caught up with it about six months later with all of the expectation that goes along with you guys being this is the best we've ever seen I was wrapped. This is A. Very documentary that is about each. Summer Camp Robert Graham, and we'll explain the program a bit more. It's Kinda complex. I still have some questions about how boy state the Summer Camp Program works but whatever. And I was just completely in Michigan. It's one of those documentaries where you're like I can't believe you got this on tape and also I can't believe that you've got this on tape and also it speaks so profoundly to the moment in which I'm watching it even though it was filmed during the summer of two, thousand and eighteen. Yell leader in this episode, and you can hear a conversation with me and Amanda mcbain and Jesse Moss the filmmakers behind the movie and they explained a bit about how they captured what you're describing, and there are several moments in this movie that will make you say this is must be scripted. This can't be real. I mean in many ways it seems. Like archetypal narrative, dramatic movie making, but it is very real and boy state. The institution is very real. So what is boy state? It's it is as you say, it's a sort of a summer camp. It's a, it's a summer leadership program I assume you as a as a high achieving young person. You must have been a part of some some programs. Like this I get sent to Arts Camp I. Never did the Politics Camp I did have to go to girl scout camp once even though it wasn't a girl Scout, but this is sponsored by the American Legion and I only really interacted with the American Legion. In that. Sometimes, we had our middle school dances at an American Legion clubhouse. Okay. So the American Legion does sponsor this program they nominate High. School Juniors and they come in the interview and they talk about their idea of the country and patriotism and the idea of public service that means to them, and it's essentially a training program for politicos aspiring Politicos, and that's a fascinating thing growing up I went to basketball camp. I was an aspiring. Professional Basketball player unfortunately I am incredibly slow and can't jump and can't shoot. So that's that was never going to happen for me, and for some people at boys anger, there is a girl state as well. We should say that you know in in most states in this country, they offer this program. There are a lot of people who aspire to kind of public service or at least to get a a sort of a sense of civic duty, which is not necessarily the same thing as public service. And this has been happening since nineteen, thirty seven. And the. There is a long list of famous and accomplished alumni in boys and girls stayed more specifically boy stated won't probably won't surprise people to hear. Just a shortlist of incredibly well known people who participated in this program includes Bill Clinton Dick Cheney. Justice Samuel Alito James Gandolfini my boy. Roger Ebert. Michael Jordan. Tom Cotton. Rush Limbaugh Cory Booker. So you know luminaries or lowlights depending on your point of view of the world. This is quite a quite a list of people there and the program itself is kind of interesting. So essentially, I, feel like we're talking around specifically what it does, but the programs vary by state but in Texas where this movie takes place participants are divided into two groups. The federal and the nationalist and what are the what are these two groups have to do and and how does that set up the Phil Do a lot of things but the film follows the political campaign aspect of boy state and boy state is a week long program in Texas and kind of the climactic event is an election for governor of the state, the boys state of Texas. So these two parties, the federalists in the nationalist, which by the way just already casts a quite a shadow over the whole. The. The documentary because they really they adopt these names as teams, and so they're yelling about being federalists and nationalists and anyway. At they elect. Party chairman's they they kind of do a platform that we should talk about the platform they have primaries and they each eventually select one nominee for the governor's race, and then at the end, there is election and one governor emerges. So you know approximately eleven hundred boys participate in this process, and that means that out of large groups. One two three people have to merge and the reason that this movie happened and the reason that Jesse and Amanda sought to identify a handful of people who'd be significant to the process in the given year that they were shooting is because in two thousand, seventeen Texas boys state legislature voted to secede from the Union and that if that doesn't some American politics in the trump era I don't I don't know what does the fact that it was your teenagers decided they needed to succeed from a program which is already imaginary. Is Perfect, we should note that two thousand seventeen was when the state legislature of Texas successfully voted to see from union. It is apparently a emotion that came up for several years but this time both bodies ratified this action, and of course, that is a an ongoing dialogue in the state of Texas. In the true American experience you know there are many Texans who would like to not be a part of this country maybe not many there but there are certainly some we know that that's the session is an ongoing conversation in some states. Around the country. So the point is, is that boy stayed in many ways reflect the political system or does it? It's I think the nature or nurture question here is essential to this movie and what makes it so fascinating and even when I talk to Amanda and Jesse I, think that they were unwilling to put their thumb on the scale to say what were they felt it lived or died but as I said, this movie is just exceptional and

Texas American Legion Amanda I Basketball Apple Sean Fantasy Robert Graham Amanda Mcbain Amanda Sundance Michigan Cory Booker Jesse Moss Justice Samuel Alito Roger Ebert Bill Clinton Dick Cheney Michael Jordan Tom Cotton Noam Away
"roger ebert" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"roger ebert" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Hang on okay okay all right as well Leon is with us we've got our Friday features and we're doing and we got more straight out of context coming up right here on WGR let me give you some whether it's gonna be a warm weekend let me just explain that today clouds and some some they'll be milder high of about seventy two but cooler near the lake tonight partly cloudy mild low of fifty seven Saturday cloudy spells warmer humid these creep up morning shower possible but there's a better chance of scattered thunderstorms in the afternoon high of seventy apical near the lake for Sunday the warmest and most humid day of two thousand twenty two date a mix of sun and clouds much warmer noticeably more humid a high of eighty six upper seventies on the immediate like short and then Monday was Memorial Day and Tuesday clouds in a bit of mixed sun warm and humid clusters of thunderstorms possible Monday high of eighty two Tuesday's high eighty four currently sixty degrees at o'hare at fifty nine at midway and a fifty three at the lake front right here on seven twenty WGN okay which is straight out of context continues after this Richard for box arrived on the Friday show jazz legend Ramsey Lewis joins us members of the great Roger Ebert plus we've got things to do in the Memorial Day weekend Friday morning on seven twenty refresh your home at Macy's Memorial Day sale with furniture and mattress supervise just in time for summer like in all weather seventies outdoor dining set only nine hundred ninety nine dollars and make even more room for the family with the rally five piece chaise sectional sofa now just one thousand eight hundred seventy nine dollars plus a big on close outs from Sealy serta and Beautyrest going on now at macys dot com and select stores see macys dot com slash stores for locations saving some sound clearance prices exclusions apply.

Leon WGN Richard Ramsey Lewis Roger Ebert Sealy
"roger ebert" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"roger ebert" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Will Saini interview that she met him when he was nine my check and also I think you told us well it gets too needed to tune in at nine thirty five you can hear Dionne Warwick it's gonna be great so now here's the bad this is fine we're just trying to lighten up here have a good time I loved as a kid Siskel and Ebert at the movies member gene Siskel and Roger Ebert thumbs up thumbs down guys lan well let's let's give the background of how this came up okay we're talking about Hempstead where I live there gonna have some drive in movies and the the first one's going to be in port Washington isn't it's Goonies which I don't ever remember seeing from the eighties but you went on online and saw the Siskel and Ebert both gave it three out of four stars right right and that's what brought up the name Cisco neighbors I'm just doing your set up of what why you were talking about him off Mike today well they're managing lands on top of something credible had nine o'clock that's the amazing thing he was taken to Joe Biden drug okay kids if they just get on with your Cisco the academy so Siskel and Ebert they and there is some outtakes okay when they would do promos you know and they have to say coming up at the movies is we do you know and sometimes the chatter you know in between our segments is funnier than some of the stuff we put on the air so I found a couple of these out take them Natalie has one I found another one too that we can use a little later in the program but here Siskel and Ebert and they're just yet they're taping promos for the show so that just kind of goofing off now I if you listen closely where they got right Genesys gene Siskel as drunk here he is totally drunk sounds like you yeah right here's the clip the forecast is for members of the movie is the science fiction adventure robocop.

Dionne Warwick gene Siskel Roger Ebert Hempstead Mike Natalie Saini port Washington Joe Biden Genesys
"roger ebert" Discussed on KTKR 760AM

KTKR 760AM

10:44 min | 2 years ago

"roger ebert" Discussed on KTKR 760AM

"Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. It had goal dust on it. When I read it because I did that little intake breath. Do you wanna have a catch? And of course, I, I myself, Kevin Costner here on the rich Eisen show. We see so many movies today are sequels. You once told Roger Ebert, you'd never do a sequel to remember that conversation that I never I never run into the sequel that I would do yet. Boy never wanna get caught in the never game. But the truth was, I, I love Durham, I didn't need to do a boulder to and I love ten Cup and bodyguard. And I love those I wasn't inclined to do them because usually sequels are commissioned after the first week in a box office. Right. They're not commissioned because somebody's thought what the story is going to be there commission because they know these movies are going to work, and I'm, I'm pretty anal, and how I think about things I like I, I need to see that the second Philip dreams as good as the first one, because that movie means something to me, and they don't like to work at that way. They wanna just put it in the canon go, so I wasn't inclined to do them, because I very rarely saw somebody, I will do a sequel, I thinking of directing one. But I know how it works. I don't it doesn't work because it made money. It works from the literary standpoint and you let me which one you thinking. Western that. I wanna do. Yeah. It's a western I wanted to cover thirty years, and I, I'm going to act direct it. And, and it's one of those things that just it it's kind of like a field of dreams for me, not the same type of movie because it's rough and tough. But I have a lot of moments when I read it where I go. I just find that. So it's something you've been in before the sequel, that's just no. I'm gonna I'm to want to go make it and, and it will it'll be one two three. Oh, you're gonna make something that has. So something original with sequel. That's right. That's just asking the sequel of something that you've gonna make a sequel of Mr. Brooks, because that story kept going, but, but, but I haven't been class if I said that to Roger, I'll take that back. I said, but when I'm you know, I've never been able to find one that I thought was better than the next. So let me flip it for before we moved to Yellowstone here. Kevin costner. Which story, would you be interested in the prequel of a character that you've played? So in advance, you're you could do a story or wondering about the story of a character that you've portrayed to just circle this again this western, I'm telling you about the, the original script was written twenty years ago, I haven't made it and started thinking about, what would be like, because a lot of times on westerns, you don't know who the character is coming off the landscape. Right. You don't know about the town. All, you know, really is the town's having trouble, this guy coming in actually probably has the tools to solve this. But what we believe is he's trying to leave his life behind. That's the architecture of the gunfighter leaving as life behind. But it comes into town that's in need of just that thing. And so if it's going to be great. This story is going to have to be great because that's the cliche, that's the formula you wanna give up this town needs you and so that. Film. I'm talking about twenty years ago had those elements but the longer began to think about it. I thought, what if the guy coming in, we know everything about what if the town he's coming into, you know, exactly how it came to be? And that's what resulted in this, this ongoing movie that I wanna do. Now, let's talk Yellowstone Kevin Costner here on the rich Eisen show. A tremendous first season, an average of five point one million total viewers per episode that's tops for a new show on cable. What do you think worked for Yellowstone? So well, last year that you are back for season. Two debuting next Wednesday. Found the channel might have doubled. It was the first show on paramount. You know, my dad kept saying people don't know how to find this, Kevin. And I get those phone calls a lot, and I don't like how you're behaving either. Your mother is not very happy with the language, most of the people here in assisted living, don't, don't wanna watch it. You know, I get those, those call, you know, so I have to deal with you're right at it's a little colorful, isn't it is it is. And so, you know, I gotta pass the mother tests all the time. Sure still, let's good. But it's you know, it's a it's a it's a, it's a world I only thought it was going to do one season. There was a couple of reasons why elected to play it out for them, but it's been it's been nice to there's a lot of movies that deal with the lawyering in the hospital and the inner streets. And sometimes when you put stories and they're set against the way the country, still exist. It can still go out there and see it working valley. The exact same valley, the exact same river that Lewis and Clark went down. The something beautiful, and special, and you see it every day. And I think when people say the imagery of horses set against these mountains, these valleys that are the same thing that they were thousands and thousands of years ago. Not since eighteen seventy three or not since nineteen Seventy-three, but thousands and thousands of years ago. It, it takes me back. I think people are enjoying that the visual just as much and then some of the politics and intrigue, I mean, this isn't like something set in eighteen seventy three and those. Right. You really write about that because those problems were arbitrated differently back, then there were no agents or no publicity. There was no lawyering, people arbitrated, and that, and that fabric is keeps it self still stab into western those western states to be honest. There's still that mentality although people know they can't put hands on each other. They're not supposed to. But that mentality is really alive. But when where Yellowstone picks up the family's incredibly just functional it's just as dysfunctional as can be. But he's dealing with those external pressures that you're talking native American issues urban is Asian environmental protection. Everything that this one guy who's really a CEO this land. He's the one guy that's maybe going to lose out of all because these pressures are not something he can deal with in the old fashioned way. It's at ten eastern and Pacific on paramount network. And if you need help finding it just ask Kevin's dad, he knows exactly how to find out about the easy to clean up that language fellow. Clean it up mother's watching and everybody here at, at the places watching next Wednesday at ten eastern and Pacific before I let you go. You've told some great stories here on the show, toll one about Hackman, no way out, you till one about Burt Lancaster, obviously from field of dreams. And from the untouchables, Sean Connery. Jeev deniro won a good Robert deniro story from the untouchables, which, by the way is one of those remote drop movies for me doesn't matter where I what I'm doing where I'm picking it up if it's just five minutes in with five minutes to go. I am dropping the room I had I had I had a hard time with with with deniro and not because of him but because of my character and, and I remember I didn't I was young actor. I didn't exactly know you know how how to deal with it. But I was I was a straight narrow guy on that, that dialogue was really precise. And we got into this big scene, where kept going. What, what, what, what caused me to repeat, but it's like I couldn't get off the page with the with the kind of street language. He could get in. And, and Connor goes just listened to Mr. national to get in it. Any any goes on. Don't try to compete, Mr. Nash and Mr. nest. Mr. Nash, and but he was helpful to me because because diploma it was right. You know is a gangster is going. And I, I had to deal with them with the language that Mamat had. And I, I really learned a lot also. He's also every time I've seen him. He's also treated me really great in that. That's nice and then his his scene with the baseball bat. It's a very different is not a sports movie, obviously, but in terms of soliloquies involving sports, it really handle that he really handled that seeing great because it's, it's I remember reading thinking, that's tough language to, to deal with. And he commanded he made that circle the palm digital circle thing. Oh, yeah. But she loves. And so, you know, that was a that was a that was a big moment for me that whole that whole thing. I mean, this one kind of embarassing moment there, I was I was actually talking with Sean and had yellow tape keeping people way back, and I was talking them in this very beautiful woman kept saying. And it was and I was thinking, I I'm talking to him. I I what it was like an and after, you know, a minute or so, I finally made way and I said, I said, yeah, she could you get mister Conroy autograph. And I thought. Yeah. Really? Was that? That's how big Sean, Sean was the biggest the biggest bond. I mean as far as I'm concerned that, that's where it all starts Nash mister. That's so funny. He would call you that off. Yes. Yeah. Tastic the with the deniro speech. I mean baseball when a man stands alone at the plate, it's time for individual chief. But when you're on the field you're now. Of eighteen team. You know. Team. There's a store that's worth knowing about, Sean, you'd want to know whether the cameras rolling or not. There was a moment time. He was really upset man. He was upset with the producer. He was upset that they had kept him too long. And for Sean money was very, very important, not that isn't for everybody. But he was going to lose money because the schedule was running, and he had to be out of the country in a certain amount of days in his mind he'd been promised. Okay. Gotta keep that in mind, his mind hit he'd been promised. And that started slipping away. And I'm telling you what he started to boil. And, and it was a really interesting moment. I happened to be walking through the hallway and he's, he's in the bar, and he goes, Mr. Nash. I heard it all the way out that he goes coming. I'm gonna talk and I go into talked him, and I'm thinking, what does he really want to talk to? He's got a yellow legal pad and has got a line down the minute. And he.

Kevin Costner Sean Connery Yellowstone Mr. Nash Roger Ebert baseball Jeev deniro Durham Philip deniro Mr. Brooks Robert deniro Burt Lancaster producer mister Conroy CEO Hackman Connor Mamat Lewis
"roger ebert" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"roger ebert" Discussed on WGN Radio

"In the where the dog cage where all the dogs are when the I I don't know what it is. But it's weird and pissed off whatever it is that whole that whole thing. I was like I don't even know what's going on right now. I this is unbelievable. And by the time, you know, the later paddle seen and the head crawling. I just was like, you know, what we're what is this? What what what planet is this? And I just think it's thought it was so great. And again said this thousand times on the year the damn thing bombed when it came out. I think that's one of Roger Ebert biggest missteps was his review of the thing. Oh, I think a lot of critics misstep. Yeah. Reviews of the thing. And I think the the public missed out. They know that now I mean, I love the fact that it's considered a masterpiece now, and that there's a huge following the people are passionate about it nine hundred eighty two it it. Nobody liked it. And nobody went to see it. And that's the beauty of home video. Yeah. Yeah. But that's a movie that you've got to see on the. Oh, yeah. I mean on the big screen. I went to the music box. I don't know how many months ago, it was they did a seventy millimeter. It was seventy million in seventy print with bad. Yeah. It was it was like, but it's one of the few surviving prints. Yeah. No. I mean, it was fantastic. Because when I first saw it I saw seventy millimeter state theater downtown. And God, you know, I saw seventy millimeter of in seven multiple times because you know, the movies. Great. And I went back and saw a bunch of times. So I've seen them seventy a bunch of times. But it was really cool to go back and see it even though the print was not in the best shape. So all right. We got a break here. But we're talking about monster movies. Obviously the thing one of the greatest and giant monster movies any of these monster movies in under if our friend Nessie. So what do you think? Three one two nine eight one seven two hundred all right? Okay. Let's break here.

Roger Ebert
"roger ebert" Discussed on The Talk Show

The Talk Show

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"roger ebert" Discussed on The Talk Show

"Mostly first time I ever watched it. I was by myself in college, I had a job interview in Virginia. And so the company flew me down and put me up in a hotel. And I had an interview the next day. And I had nothing to do. I was like nineteen had nothing to do put on HBO, and I looked at and it said like raging bull was coming up. I've never seen that I'll watch that. And I watched it all by myself lonesome. Very depressing. I was into it. I I would say I -joyed the movie, but I didn't enjoy the experience I really felt pretty low afterward. Yeah. Yeah. And then I've watched it a couple of times after that. In the intervening years in college. You know, it's just as pew says fan, but then one point in the mid nineties, I think it might have still been in college. But maybe later in the nineties Roger Ebert came to Philadelphia and was hosting. He he was hosting screening of raging bull might have been the twenty fifth anniversary or fifteen th anniversary or something. And he didn't do the thing that he sometimes did where he would allow people to stop and stop the movie, and then have a discussion about what's going on that we just watched it straight through. And then we had a discussion led by Roger Ebert after the movie, and it was packed. It's a really nice theater over Penn sort of a lecture hall style. Thing was great picture. Great sound. Here's the thing that blew me away. Raging. Bull is hilarious. It is. There are scenes that are so funny. I mean, just like but never like three or four times. I watched it before that never laughed once because I wasn't in theater full of. People right. Like one of the scenes where patchy Joe patchy haven't family, some kind of family meal, his kids screwing around with the spaghetti or something. It's. But you would never know it if you're not in a room full of people, it's the shared experience is different than the the the solo experience. Yeah. And I totally agree. And you know, these the, yeah, you get sort of different social cues just innovative right of young being in that type of experience, and I feel like all the Hollywood has issues and we can talk about them in relation to apple..

Roger Ebert Bull Virginia HBO pew Penn Hollywood apple Philadelphia Joe twenty fifth
"roger ebert" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"roger ebert" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"What would Ryan lock de do brand new on? Roger Ebert of the. Would news film critic. Roger Ebert dies at the age of seventy until then the balcony is closed on the radio. Reno Mars is number one with your man. Two thousand twelve two thousand thirteen or two thousand fourteen. All three choices two thousand twelve two thousand thirteen or two thousand fourteen. Thirteen. Mike thousand twelve or two thousand fourteen. Loretta that leaves you thousand fourteen. The Boston marathon bombed Ryan lock Dion TV. Roger Ebert gone. Bruno Mars number one the year two thousand thirteen congratulations Gonzala, you got that four pack of tickets to ESOL Elma heights night that is tomorrow night at Kearney word university Flassbeck party by Brown dodge, what's going on. After President Trump left town. Former mayor Hulu on Castro who wants his job fired up supporters last night. A body was found overnight in the parking lot of north side motel. The Spurs are seven seed, which means the playoffs began on the road. Everything else is on your phone. These days why not have a digital driver's license. More coming up at six o'clock w away. I news time five fifty now. Traffic and weather together from the WAI traffic center. Nice finally clearing that sixteen. Oh, four at ten construction. Completely shut down the westbound. I ten x ram open for business every. Things. Looking good around the city. We are accident free to Megan Bishop NewsRadio twelve hundred w this report is brought to you by service king collision repair centers at service king we run your side. So when Al turn this car around means not turning in time..

Roger Ebert Ryan lock Spurs Bruno Mars Hulu Kearney word university Flassb Loretta Boston Megan Bishop President Mike Brown dodge Trump Al Castro Gonzala Dion TV. twelve hundred w
"roger ebert" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"roger ebert" Discussed on WGN Radio

"On Chicago's best. If you want the best you gotta head out west. The all new Chicago's best burbs is on tonight at ten on WGN TV couple of texts coming in the Donald Trump. John McCain tweets that came out and Meghan McCain tweets, eight four seven area code says. Love Meghan McCain. She'll give it back to Trump in spades. Not a Republican, but she is someone to watch a lot like her father. Here's one from the two one nine area. Codeine? Why don't you stick with Hollywood stuff and not politics, which I never understood when when people say that he used to say that the Roger Ebert people used to say to change Cisco. Why don't you just stick to movies and not talk about politics? I don't know what this two one nine professionals, what their occupation has let's say this person is a plumber or an executive or who knows what why are you? Stick to plumbing, and not talk about politics doesn't make sense to me. We're all Americans. We're all allowed to have opinions. I don't know. I mean, I realize you probably don't like to hear what I have to say. But you know, we're in America. This is America. Sorry. We're allowed to have opinions here is the three one two area code. How did John McCain's action related to this matter change the fact that he's dead now and Trump continues to disparage him and his family? Here's another one that says. Dean love your show. I still get amazed. That people believe everything Trump says and does to be the truth must be a lot of people there with low self esteem. You know, I try to be respectful to everybody. You know, if you have a different opinion that I do I try to be respectful, let you express your opinion, which I think I did with the caller who was in support of the president. I'm not going to insult anybody. I think you're not everyone's entitled to their opinion. Mine is is that it's incredibly disrespectful to disparage an American hero. A patriot who is dead and cannot defend themselves can all feel. However, you want about it. Let's get a check of the latest news now sponsored by architect. Here is Dave Schwann in just about a half hour, the south side Irish parade gets underway on western avenue. Western is closed now between ninety ninth and one hundred nineteenth street. This is the forty first annual event on the south side, the north side Irish parade closing northwest highway between Nagle and Harlem today, New York Senator Kirsten gillibrand is now in the race. For president Xi is the fourteenth democrat to enter the race officially yesterday in a keynote speech at a dinner for the Delaware Democratic Party, former vice president Joe Biden said he has the most progressive record of anybody running thing is he hasn't Fisher. Announced that he is running just yet. He quickly corrected himself saying he meant to say anybody who would run one person was injured several displaced after a fire in the third floor apartment building early this morning this happening in the twenty four hundred block of east seventy seventh. Some people were knocking on doors to get residents out of that building is the fire spread no word on the cause..

Donald Trump Meghan McCain John McCain Chicago WGN America Senator Kirsten gillibrand Roger Ebert Codeine president Xi president vice president Joe Biden Delaware Democratic Party Dave Schwann New York executive Dean Cisco
"roger ebert" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

06:40 min | 3 years ago

"roger ebert" Discussed on WGN Radio

"From Roger Ebert dot com. And in the outlook dot com as well. I got the sign right? I get it. You get breakfast. I usually look at my notes. I did not I took a breath. I thought about it. Of course, Senator dick Taskey, I told you it'd be here for Academy Awards conversation is an honor. I'm excited. Great. I know we're all wrapped up to talk about this anyways. Well, you know, I heard the news on my way home last night listening to Gilio show. Yeah. He was ran out of the gate a fuming about this. Tell us what the academy has decided in order to shorten me length of time that the Academy Awards on our television. Yes. So the academy in their infinitely limited wisdom. I have to say thing spice slimming down the show at they need to do is they start cutting things. And when you look at the telecast, you can see many things that can be cut certain sketches certain segments certain endless montages that could just easily be lifted and just shave that up shaved it up. But what they've decided is to take certain awards out of the live part of the show and show them later in an edited format and we've seen that another award show where all of a sudden and this person one this, and here's one person they thanked and let's move on. And they don't give the person the time allotted to all the other people to have their moments and not just that but cutting the. Names of the nominees. I assume they probably won't be naming the other films nominated in that category. And I think they should do for everyone who's nominated is have that moment. Here's this person. Here's their name. Here's a little image or clip of their work to honor these people, but they've decided on a rotating basis four to six categories will be taken from the show and placed in this later in the show. This is what you didn't see and they'll be presented during the commercial breaks is what will happen when you say four to six that means going from now on. Yes. Be on a rotating basis. So whatever is is removed from the show and shown later in this abridged version that will be guaranteed alive slot next year. But then four other categories. We'll we'll get and it's not the acts. But it's still feels that way because it's abbreviated it's not it's not respectful really not respectful to what is being sacrificed here. I feel like you have some thoughts on you're like what just wondering which categories. Here we go here. It is. Okay. So I assumed okay. Well, if they're gonna be cutting stuff it'll be all the short films because most people haven't seen the short films. I obviously, I don't want anything cut. But I assume that's what it was going to be. Instead, there's only one of them the live action short. So we're going to get animated short documentary short in the show. But live action short is not so weird. Then make up and hairstyling. Okay. It's one of the I guess considered lesser even though it's not I mean, and that's what you love to see the behind the scenes of how they did the prosthetics and all of that and all that's going to be Christian bale attributes most of his performance. Absolutely. And so did Gary Oldman and alive salute Lewis, actor and actress categories, so. Yeah. Yes. So I think that's ridiculous. But here's the thing. Here's thing angering everyone, including Tom Tom left. He left the room because he's so angry, cinematography and editing. All right, cinematography, and editing. The two of the most crucial parts of the film making process will now just be in this abridged little version, you know, later on in the show and that just kills me. Bill. Left the room and ordered. Throw it on his face and go ready to have this conversation. So cinematography and editing, and in particular Thomas, telling me before the show know, particularly have you have to directors. I believe who are nominated in these categories as well, basically, they were crucial and how they are crucial in how the film ends up looking whether initial shots or later deciding how the story is told. Yes, Koran I think he's pretty much guaranteed the Oscar for Roma, and it is one of the most visually astonishing films. You've seen all year. You have to see it on a big screen and get the full impact of it. But I mean editing, especially actually even more so than tower. I don't want to say, it's more important, but editing determines what wins best picture in many cases. In many cases, it's usually Kay who's up for director who's up for editing that will usually help you determine what ends up getting the big prize. I'm just stunned that those two will not I live part of the show. Yes, tom. I just wanted to chime in with what I consider a good example of how much an editor can mean to a filmmaker one of the greatest filmmakers of the last twenty. To twenty five years. Quentin tarantino. Was really well known for working with an editor by the name of Sally monkey. Yes. And she edited everything she did. Pulp fiction. Jackie brown. Kill Bill glorious Regan say that. Yes. She did the secret weapon. She knew exactly how to massage the script. She knew exactly what to take out that you know, and just moved so well moved so well, and then, unfortunately, she passed away and his film after that Django unchained, which I still enjoyed. But you could tell there was something different is a little bit Messier. It felt a little bit too along gated at times. Yeah. So and it was a huge long patches that could have easily been trivia a lot of people really said that he she was instrumental to making Quentin Tarantino's vision. What it was he's a great artist in of himself. But behind every great director. There's a great editor. And sometimes those are the same people. Sometimes it's even their spouses, George Miller who did the Mad Max series his wife. Yes. Edited fury road, which was famously like literally hundreds of hours of footage. Oh my God. He just he just shot at he said, she really made that move. And he has stated that that is wife. She's like she basically made fury road a movie, he just shot all of it. And who got the the major BAFTA prize was Martin Scorsese's longtime editor fell. Yeah. Thumbs school maker. I believe she. She's an essential part of what makes Scorsese himself. He the Joe patchy seen goodfellas would not be what it is without her. Okay. So I'm gonna leave you with this for the break to ponder how you're going to answer this for listener. And Moi who asks when was the last time, you left the theatre saying, wow. That film was well edited. I think you kind of answered it. But Tom just headphones across the road. You guys. Go ahead. Take a moment to answer errands question. When was the last time you left the theatre thinking? Wow. That film was well edited more in a moment on seven twenty. They really have to. I was mentally. I know exactly what I'll say. All right. Then Senator.

editor Academy Awards Quentin tarantino Tom Tom director Senator dick Taskey Roger Ebert Martin Scorsese Gilio Gary Oldman Senator George Miller Oscar Jackie brown Kay Thomas Moi Bill Joe
"roger ebert" Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

Black Men Can't Jump

03:27 min | 3 years ago

"roger ebert" Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

"Louis Hassett at this point. Okay. I think personally, and now that's why I'm like, I I've read Roger Ebert review this moving dead on. I mean, he was basically like this movie is he was like he was like this movie is terrible. I don't understand why anybody made it any also was like, I think that. There's a fine line in comedy between like satirical and offensive. And this this movie goes past the line, and it doesn't give any humanities to its characters. Like, the it feels like mean-spirited in the way that characterizes these women in the beginning. And then it like glamorizes them in the end in like makes them look a little bit. It's like 'cause know at the end like Halliburton wearing a blonde like, wait. And like, I don't know if they have goal to in there. Oh, are they long gone even noticed that? I know she has a blonde week. But then the doctor the woman who wrote it now has one of those crazy hairstyles as she's walking next to him right today like transformed hers. Well, right, anyway, the thing is there are parts of movie. I really is enjoy. But there's something about the way. Honestly. And and apparently Troy a buyer the woman who wrote it didn't like the final product. And she felt like Robert Townsend changed it a lot. And like didn't didn't like that. That's what I read on Wikipedia. I don't know if that's true -pedia. But it's feels true to me because there was a party me. That was like, I think this movie was directed by a black woman. I think it would have been much better. And and that's not to say Robert towns, the bad director. But there was a party. That's like this. This wasn't as wheelhouse and like one like I feel like this was like older comedy. And this is like ninety seven. It's like dude like did not update his game his comedic like kinda sensibilities and then also like. There are subtle messages in this movie that I felt I wasn't connecting with with black women because. I don't know. It's it's a weird thing. But there was like a part of me that was like it was defending. And here's thing we should defend black men in terms of they shouldn't have the he had stereotypes for both black men and black women in the movie. But there was like this. There was this thing of like they have learned a lesson like the whim. I don't know. It was weird. I guess Blackman. Learn listen to I don't know. I got we to talk about it. You will go you'll million please. I hate this movie. Like, I think I saw this when I was younger, but I remember thought of before so like my family like we have mostly women in my family and. There are very well off. And I'm member. Ars? Remember them not letting my cousins watch I remember like older women not being like because I remember them not being allowed to watch it on the I was I'm not sure if I wanted to just know they couldn't see it and got wonder why? 'cause it's not like like really graphic is not a lot of cursing. I'm looking at my hair down. I'm thinking in my head. Now, they not want these two young black girls to watch these stereotypes of black women. I guess we always have a hard time with movies at the pick people color from the hood without any type of Moore's any type of like feelings type of personality. And I think this movie didn't give them like they did have any depth to them at all. And I think they had spurts of it..

Louis Hassett Robert Townsend Roger Ebert Robert towns Halliburton Troy Blackman Moore director
"roger ebert" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:30 min | 3 years ago

"roger ebert" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Close. It's not just by looking at the ad in the film looking at the title the title. Wow. Okay. Wow. Title. You a couple of examples snakes on a plane. Okay. Yeah. Or the mummy tomb of the dragon emperor, right? Roger Ebert points out. There's a mummy there's a tomb dragging. There's an emperor. And this derivation is that there were cans of film. Right. No. As a matter of fact, so the meaning is it's win the title of a work leaves virtually nothing to imagination. It comes from a long running British ad campaign or a particular quick drying would stain does exactly what it says on. Stains would and it draft plan the this. It's like buying a can of peas, right? Murray. Yes, sir, Inc. Suit actor Inc. I N K hyphen suit like what you wear actor Inc. Sued be would that be someone who's a writer or journalist? It's not about writing is. It's not about writing suit printing in animation. It's sometimes criticised as stunt casting. It's a squid. I was hoping you would say that. So when you get someone famous to play an animated character in an animated film. Yes, that's a big part of it. And so it's like I'm thinking of the famous people who call into right now. And so forth. Aren't we? Right. Right. You give them an ink suit because they don't have a regular cloth sued because they're not they're animated. So drawn in ink. You are super close. And what do you do with the face? You do the face. It looks kind of like them you give us their face. But they give them an ink suit. It's like Shrek, right? It's very much like Shrek. Right. Exactly. Right. And that's a classic example. It's an animated character who's been drawn to look exactly like the actor voicing him. As though the only originality the animators showed was in designing the costume. That was an excellent effort, eight points Delaney. Your trope is called just eat Gilligan. Oh. That they're not taking like they should have just eaten Gilligan. Hijinks, and then you wouldn't have to deal with these people stranded on an island for eighteen years. It can also things like let's don't go down in the basement. And there's a squid. You would have survived by eating the star of the show. There is a there is a there is a people. It is a film in which people find some fault in the plot. Because there is a proposition that is ridiculous because there's a solution to it. So obvious. It's like the nose on your face. What is the obvious solution in the case of Gilligan's island because he's also part of the problem? Yes, there's the bell. Thank you. Yes. It is when the characters in a show never quite realized that they could avert a string of recurring disasters by just eliminating the one incompetent in their midst. If not for the inept Gilligan the castaways on Gilligan's island could have made it back home in the first season. Nancy? Hi, you're trope is retire. Any R E T I R O N Y is this the so I thought it was gonna be tyranny and the tyranny of retirement, but it's retiring, it definitely has to do with retirements retirement, and is at like patrimony or so forth for that. I think just irony. Yeah. No better. It's like Kelsey grammer, his father, you know. It's like the old coot who makes funny comments about everybody know, retiring is usually something that makes the audience go. I've never heard an audience go..

Gilligan Kelsey grammer Roger Ebert writer Murray Nancy Delaney eighteen years
"roger ebert" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"roger ebert" Discussed on 710 WOR

"The time, but white big it was dying and the soul brother needed time to prove his innocence. I want to transplant my head done a healthy Bank. I like to donate my designs after all. So they transplanted the Whitehead onto the black buddy who would have suspected that. Neither would care, but the idea too much. Who would who would have thought that? Rosie Greer at his fight as big screen performance. Goodness. You never saw that. No. But the weird thing is we're looking at the clip you have two heads. Yeah. Riding in the car in the backseat. They got two heads. What's the white guy was the black guy? Yeah. It's it's it's brilliant with Raimo land. And it came out in nineteen seventy two. I would've thought it was be older than that nineteen seventy-two. And it got how many reviews a variety news. Brian was an Oscar nominee slickly imaginative. Really now. Roger Ebert gave it one star out of four right? Heads down. Tom shales of the Washington Post said, it isn't terrible isn't so there's a review. Terrible. Shut up the rest of you. We are joined together temporarily. Asp is our booby. It's really very straight. I just I it's a vivid memory. I have as a kid when it was on like the horror show on Saturday afternoons, Rosie Greer, the great actor just quickly about this shark video guy, we have this up on our website, a website, these divers, I'm interested that 'cause I'm a diver. These divers are just swimming around. There are some recharges and what I'm just goes right for the divers legs clamps down on it can't get the they can't get the shark off the divers like very unusual that shark attack you and you're diving. Happens to the guy. He lives. Allegra. No. I don't believe. He did another diver came does raccoons started beating on the sharks..

Rosie Greer sharks Tom shales Brian Roger Ebert Washington Post
Playboy art director Art Paul, 93, and photographer Art Shay, 96, have died

After Hours with Rick Kogan

01:28 min | 3 years ago

Playboy art director Art Paul, 93, and photographer Art Shay, 96, have died

"It would be hard to imagine fuller lies in those led by arch and art paul to giants of the art world who died within hours of each other saturday morning both of them had been ill archie was ninety six art paul was ninety three so they had had very fruitful lives and very influential lives art shay was a photographer who died in his home in deerfield surrounded by some of the two million or more photos he had taken through his life he was there for most of the prominent events of the twentieth century met many of the century's most important people john fitzgerald kennedy merlin brando martin luther king gwendolyn brooks ernest hemingway carl sandberg james baldwin ann landers and roger ebert was roger who once set of arts photography that it quote shakes you up up sets you down gently pats you on the head and then kicks you in the ass art paul was sitting in an office in the loop he was born on the south side raised in rogers park was incredibly talented at sullivan high school and received a scholarship to the art institute he then came back went to the institute of design was freelance illustrator and designer with a little tiny office.

Archie Paul Shay Deerfield Ann Landers Roger Ebert Rogers Park Art Institute John Fitzgerald Kennedy Ernest Hemingway Carl Sandberg Sullivan High School Institute Of Design