19 Burst results for "Roger Corman"

"roger corman" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

Sci-Fi Talk

05:50 min | 3 weeks ago

"roger corman" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

"Channel. We have had deals with other similar channels. I did thirty three films for showtime a few years ago. A three year period and they premiere on showtime justice these fixtures prayer on saifi. We've done similar deals with other other channels. Just recently came out was the roger corman collection on dvd. I did do commentary on a number of them. And sometimes i work with the actors on some of them ron howard. I did one bill shatner. And i am ron howard. Did grand theft auto. Bill shot night. Did the intruder which was which went to the venice film festival and went to a lot of festivals is built pointed out. He won more awards for best actor. I want as best director but between us. We really want a lot of awards with that picture. He was a very serious almost heart. And never and only cost about seventy five thousand. I in three weeks in the south. Racial integration and the picture never broke even and it was the first picture i ever made lost money and finally but we came very close to breaking even finally when we sent out the dvd. With bill and me doing the commentary. We finally broke even on that film. What's it like when one of the actors or directors of your films sits down with you and does the commentary. Actually it's interesting because in general. Neither one of us have seen the film for many years. And we're both surprised at what's happening in particularly in In the intruder. Bill of course wasn't so surprised. But i haven't forgotten how good he was. He's vastly underrated actor and And grand theft auto. In which ron starred in and it was his first picture as director. The jokes still worked and we were sort of laughing and talking about how. That's still worried. We made the film in one thousand nine hundred seventies black scorpion. Was your first television series. That you did. And the interesting thing was dark but also had some of that can't be elements of batman..

ron howard bill shatner roger corman Bill ron
"roger corman" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

04:14 min | 2 months ago

"roger corman" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

"He <Speech_Male> was the master <Speech_Male> of <SpeakerChange> that type <Speech_Male> of stunt <Speech_Male> joe. Dante's movie <Speech_Male> matinees <Speech_Male> John goodman playing <Speech_Male> a character. <SpeakerChange> Like <Silence> william castle <Speech_Male> joe. <Speech_Male> Dante <Speech_Male> always loved <Speech_Male> the stunts. <Speech_Male> That bill <Speech_Male> castle was <Speech_Male> doing so. <Speech_Male> He made his picture <Speech_Male> matinee <Speech_Male> about a bill <Speech_Male> castle. Like <Speech_Male> character comes <Speech_Male> to a small town <Speech_Male> in <Speech_Male> florida <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> in order to <Speech_Male> drum up publicity. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I don't remember exactly <Speech_Male> what it was. <Speech_Male> But <Speech_Male> he spreads <Speech_Male> the rumor <Speech_Male> that it might be <Speech_Male> communist <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> all the people <Speech_Male> who were against communism <Speech_Male> rose <Speech_Male> up and pick <Speech_Male> it. We're going to pick <Speech_Male> it the phil <Speech_Male> and again <Speech_Male> it was a great <Speech_Male> parody of <Speech_Male> what bill castle <Silence> was <SpeakerChange> doing <Speech_Male> had <Speech_Male> the audience's expectations <Speech_Male> of what they <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> want from a horror film <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> changed <SpeakerChange> over the years. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> The audience <Speech_Male> is expectation <Speech_Male> for a horror. <Speech_Male> Fell has <Speech_Male> changed <Speech_Male> over the years. <Speech_Male> They're looking <Speech_Male> for a bigger <Speech_Male> budget. More <Speech_Male> opulent <Speech_Male> produced <Speech_Male> hopefully a <Speech_Male> better filled. <Speech_Male> And they're also <Speech_Male> looking <Speech_Male> for more <Speech_Male> explicit horror. <Speech_Male> When <Speech_Male> i did the edgar <Speech_Male> allan poe films <Speech_Male> most <Speech_Male> of the horror <Speech_Male> or you might <Speech_Male> call it. Terror <Speech_Male> was psychological. <Speech_Male> It <Speech_Male> was in the mind. <Speech_Male> It was building <Speech_Male> up. <Speech_Male> This sense of har- <Speech_Male> today <Speech_Male> somebody. <Speech_Male> An <Speech_Male> actor's <Speech_Male> hand off at <Speech_Male> the wrist and <Speech_Male> the blood spurts <Speech_Male> across the screen <Speech_Male> which means <Speech_Male> the next director <Speech_Male> scott a <Speech_Male> cut <Speech_Male> off at <Speech_Male> the elbow <Speech_Male> and i <Speech_Male> may self and <Speech_Male> not so much in <Speech_Male> favor of <Speech_Male> this tremendous <Speech_Male> amount of <Speech_Male> really gruesome <Speech_Male> horror <Speech_Male> but the audience <Speech_Male> does seem <Speech_Male> to want <SpeakerChange> that. Today <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> you directed a whole <Speech_Male> lot of movies earlier <Speech_Male> in your career. <Speech_Male> Then you just stopped <Speech_Male> is directing more <Speech_Male> fun or <SpeakerChange> is producing <Silence> more fun for you. <Speech_Male> I've <Speech_Male> directed about <Speech_Male> sixty films <Speech_Male> and produced <Speech_Male> a couple of hundred <Speech_Male> films <Speech_Male> Simply age <Speech_Male> caught up with <Speech_Male> me and <Speech_Male> i felt <Speech_Male> It's easier <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> have the director. <Speech_Male> Go out there <Speech_Male> at six o'clock <Speech_Telephony_Male> in the morning and <Speech_Male> start shooting <Speech_Male> and as the producer. <Speech_Male> Come out at <Speech_Male> nine. Say what <Speech_Male> did you shoot that shot <Speech_Male> for. But <Speech_Male> i loved <Speech_Male> directing <Speech_Male> to me <Speech_Male> the most <Speech_Male> fun <Speech_Male> the most creative <Speech_Male> satisfaction <Speech_Male> dot was. <Speech_Male> When i was the director <Speech_Male> producer <Speech_Male> both <Speech_Male> for <Speech_Male> as i say <Speech_Male> that creative satisfaction <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> the fact that as <Speech_Male> both the director <Silence> and producer <Speech_Male> i <Speech_Male> had the control. <Speech_Male> I felt. <Speech_Male> I needed <Speech_Male> to make the films <Speech_Male> i <SpeakerChange> wanted <Speech_Music_Male> to make. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> that was the one. And <Speech_Male> only roger cormon <Speech_Male> join <Speech_Male> us next time for <Speech_Male> joel schumacher <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> be sure to subscribe <Speech_Male> on apple <Speech_Male> podcasts. Spotify <Speech_Male> or <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> wherever you listen <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> so you never miss an <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> episode. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> History <Speech_Male> of horror. Uncut <Speech_Male> is to shudder. <Speech_Male> Original podcast <Speech_Male> hosted by <Speech_Male> roth and kurt <Speech_Male> zanga produced <Speech_Male> by kurt sangha <Speech_Male> engineered <Speech_Male> by chris. Heckman <Speech_Male> with by <Speech_Male> maestro. Joseph <Speech_Male> the shara <Speech_Male> for auditory. <Speech_Male> Jessica the steelers <Speech_Male> heckman in lacey <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> or shutter. <Speech_Male> Craig angler <Speech_Male> nicholas lonzo <Speech_Male> and samuel zimmerman. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> The interviews in this program <Speech_Male> were originally <Speech_Male> conducted for the <Speech_Male> amc television <Speech_Male> series ally. <Speech_Male> Ross history of <Speech_Male> horror executive <Speech_Male> producers. <Speech_Male> Eli roth. Kurt <Speech_Male> sangha steven. <Speech_Male> Michaels alison <Speech_Male> berkley. Just <Speech_Male> freed jody. <Speech_Male> Flynn and james <Speech_Male> macnabb <Speech_Male> senior producer. <Speech_Male> Ben rafael <Speech_Male> sure. <Speech_Male> Thanks to kelly <Speech_Male> nash. Richard drew <Speech_Male> chris powers and <Speech_Male> most valuable <Speech_Male> player. Clara's verbal <Speech_Male> and an emcee. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> This <Speech_Male> is curtsying a <Speech_Male> for la roths. <Speech_Male> History of horror <Speech_Music_Male> uncut.

producer kurt sangha director william castle chris powers Dante Heckman John goodman Eli roth steelers allan poe la roths samuel zimmerman Spotify Ben rafael joel schumacher kelly Clara roger cormon berkley
"roger corman" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

04:47 min | 2 months ago

"roger corman" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

"I've always thought of as a friend and a competitor. I was making films for maybe fifty to a hundred thousand dollars. He was spending a little more. He was spending one hundred two hundred and fifty thousand dollars and we were because we had the market to ourselves after jaws after star wars. We didn't have the market to ourselves anymore and it's questionable if we had a market at all but we kept going. We did the best we can to clarify. What was the market. Would you call the exploitation films. Drive in movies movies for teenagers. Our films where sometimes called exploitation films which. I remember irritated bill. It didn't irritate me. I said they are exploitation films. We're exploiting the subject. Every film explains the subject but the genres seemed to be working. Were horror films. Science fiction films particularly also teenage films. Were doing very well. Because again the major studios were making films with a fifty year old leading man and a forty year old leading lady and the audience was fifteen to twenty five and we were using teenagers for that audience. We played all types of theaters but specifically we had a lock on the drive in market. The young kids came to the drive ins for various reasons and they like to see this type of film particularly when the actors were teenagers. How did video and vhs coming in change things for you. When video came in it cut into our market a cut into the market both for the independence and the majors but video itself providers with a new market so we continued pretty much as we did but knowing that we were going to making less money from the theaters than we had before but that was made up by the fact that we had this whole new market from video so we were in good shape. There was no problem there. Your company new world pictures distributed david. Cronenberg's the brood. How did that come to pass. New world was both production and distribution company. We had to have enough films to us. We used to say to feed the dinosaur enough films to have the distribution company working full time. The brood was david cronenberg's fell. It was an extremely well made film. I really liked the film so we took it on for distribution for two reasons. I thought it was a very very good film. And i was convinced that it would be successful at the box office and it was is. What were your impressions of kranenburg. David cullinan berg is a very intelligent and witty mad. He knows what he's doing he's talented. He can talk about it very seriously and then he can turn around and make a joke about is just a a very talented director. Who's a good guy to talk with kronenbourg. Early work had exploitation elements which you could always tell there is a guiding intelligence in an artistry behind it all. Could you tell me a little about the sensibility. Brings to his films. David kronenbourg is one of the few directors who is able to take an exploitation subjects such as a horror film but make it personal to him so the he is an autour he brings his own thoughts is own ideas to it and if it is possible. I think it is possible to make an art slash horror film. David kronenbourg is one of the few who can do it. I think the word art horror film is very seldom used but it should be used more because it's a variant imaginative john raya. It's one in which the director working with the writer producer the actors and so forth can do very good work working together to make a really fine film and i could say more but i'll end. That would statement a fine film..

David kronenbourg david cronenberg David cullinan berg new world pictures david director john raya producer writer
"roger corman" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

02:31 min | 2 months ago

"roger corman" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

"I don't know how many piranhas there have been and one of the keys to it. Was we brought humor into it. I've always liked the idea of bringing humor in to a horror. Ville my own film Little shop of horrors and bucket of blood both did that. They were really horror. Comedies and parana had a little bit of comedy but was primarily a horror film that that little bit of comedy did help. The fell a couple of people's commented that parana was a little bit like jaws. My answer was josh is a little bit like the first film. I ever made monster from the ocean floor. You can never say. Totally original. For instance i i once did that. In a lecture and somebody in the back of the room got up and said you're forgetting the nineteen twenty-three german expressionist film that had a similar theme and of course. I'd never even heard of the german phil but that taught me never to say i'm completely original. Because i think what we all do we work with. We assimilate the work. That's gone before. And then we bring what we can of originality to it will. Johnson is really the first summer blockbuster and had a big impact in the movie industry. How did that change your business. Jaws changed things for the business. Even more than the excesses are psycho. When i saw jaws i said to the guys in the office. This is possibly the beginning of trouble for us. The major studios have finally caught on to what we're doing and we may have some problems here and just shortly thereafter. I saw star wars. And i said this is a blow to all of us. It is clear the studios understand with the low budget independent Filmmakers have been doing and they're doing it and we're in trouble. 'cause we cannot compete. What were the low budget filmmakers doing that the studios finally picked up on there. Were a number of us making these films. Bill castle who is a good friend of mine..

parana Bill castle josh Johnson
"roger corman" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

03:37 min | 2 months ago

"roger corman" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

"I think the essence of horror films is fear. It's the fear of the child who's afraid of thunder lightning the monster under the bed. He's beginning to come to grips with the world. It's the world. He doesn't totally understand so he believes there are supernatural unnatural possibly repulsive things out there and he's afraid of them his parents tell them there's nothing to be afraid of but he knows there's something to be afraid of but as he grows older he realizes these were childhood fears and in his conscious mind he has put them away but in his unconscious mind. Those fears still remain. And i think it's the task of the filmmaker to break through the barrier of the conscious mind and strike directly at the remaining childhood fares. Your use of haunted houses in particular. Seems very freudian. Yes i do believe that. The house particularly the haunted house of traditional house does have a sexual meaning. The house represents to a certain extent a woman's body the door the windows. These are entrances to the woman's body and as we enter into the house we have again the fear of the unknown of the child but the desire of the teenager to go into that house and explore the woman's body. Tell me a little about the making of the tomb of jia. You don't say much about any near autobiography. but it's risen in esteem over the years and stylistically. It seems a lot different than your other films. The tomb of light. Gm was the last of the po- films. I felt that. I was beginning to repeat myself. And i wanted to vary it as much as possible for one thing again. I thought of the house as possibly a woman's body but also contained a situation. And i did not want to show the reality outside the house when i did. It was always night or if it was day was a foggy dark day. I didn't want to shoot in broad daylight and on the tomb of lijia. I said i'm tired of my own theory. We're gonna shoot this picture. We were shooting in england. We're going to shoot it in the beautiful english countryside in broad daylight and to hell with my theories i and actually the film turned out fairly well and over a period of time. It's sort of gained in critics. Opinion was very good script by bob. Town incidentally one of his first scripts and it was a rather complex story. Having to do with lijia may be coming back to life. Maybe not coming back to life sort.

lijia Gm bob po england
"roger corman" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

03:59 min | 2 months ago

"roger corman" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

"I was having coffee as they were setting up the first shot and beverly garland very hip. Young actress came up to the monster and she looked and she noticed that i was watching her and she leaned down and she kicked a monster and said so. You've come to conquer the earth. They take that and she kicked it again. And i realized what she was doing and i pulled over the prop man and said i plan to shoot the monster first thing but i'm going to hold until after lunch and i want that monster twelve feet tall by lunchtime dust by number one rule. The monster must always be taller than the leading lady said the monsters tallish but were they always evil. I tried to make the monsters complex in their psychology. And i tried to make them nut just totally evil that may be evil from our point of view but not from their point of view they were doing simply what was logical for them whether the audience understood that or not I'm not certain. But i felt that i was simply making the monsters. More interesting when you're making monster movies in the fifties. How did you compete with big studios like warner brothers. He could spend a fortune building the giant ants and them. Well i invented a theory. Which was that. The audience should not see the monster clearly until late in the picture that it would heighten the suspense. If you saw maybe the shadow of the monster or the monster in a position where the light is just striking the side so you never see it really clearly which i did think and i i do believe that heightens the suspense but it also hides the fact that you have a low budget monster. Great series of films based in the works of po. When did you become interested. In po- i read the fall of the house of usher in a middle school and loved the story. And i asked my parents for the complete works of edgar allen poe for christmas they were happy to give it to me. I could've asked for a shotgun or something. So at a very young age i read everything for had had ever written and when i started making various types of films particularly horror and terror films. I wanted eventually to do oppo film which i find finally did get the opportunity to do. With the fall of the house of usher the first of the post stories. I had read. And before the fall in the house of usher your horror films are all in black and white Ushers in deep rich color so shooting color films lot more expensive but why was it necessary to do it that way. It wasn't absolutely necessary that i shoot in color. Some of the best for films ever made were shot in black and white. There's something to be said. For gradations of the light on a black and white film. But i felt i wanted the richness of post stories and i felt i could do better simply with my own concept of lighting and with the set design and using colors for what i felt rightly or wrongly might have some psychological meaning speaking of psychology. Why do you think horror films appeal to people..

edgar allen poe beverly garland warner brothers
"roger corman" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

03:34 min | 2 months ago

"roger corman" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

"The word legendary is overused but in the case of roger corman. It's well deserved. Roger trained as an engineer at stanford but after four days on the job. He quit to make movies. He began producing and directing low budget. Independent films are getting the underserved teen market. What is films lacked in production value. They made up for imagination. And as roger famously declared he never lost a dime on a picture and he made a lot of them. From nineteen fifty. Five to nineteen seventy-one. He directed over fifty films. Everything from monster. Movies to biker. Pictures to his famous adaptations. The works of edgar allan poe. He focused on producing and film distribution launching the careers of some of the biggest names in hollywood including francis ford coppola jonathan demme joe dante and bringing films by autour like david cronenberg. Ingmar bergman federico fellini to america. Rogers sat down with history of harsh showrunner. Kurt sanga to talk about his remarkable career. You started off directing and producing low budget films in the nineteen fifties <hes>. How did you deal with the limitations. Faced the early films. I directed i was beginning to director with short schedule and i did what i could. I absorbed films saying. I use certain camera techniques that i've seen before and invented some myself. Now i'm not certain. I really invented them just that i had never seen them in other films. They may not have been as original as i thought. Nine fifty seven directed something like nine films <hes>. Including tack of the crab monsters personal favourite <hes>. Fm didn't have a lot of production values. But it was packed. Full of interesting ideas. A what are your memories of that film. Well i remember specifically said didn't have very much money and i remember exactly. The crab monster cost twelve hundred dollars and it was paper my shea but it was very big and it looked pretty good but we were shooting at on the rocks at cabrillo beach and the waves were hitting up against the monster and i could see the waves. Were destroying the back of the monster. So i had to shoot as fast as i possibly could and from only certain angles not to let the audience see that. The vaster was being destroyed. Well we shotted speaking monsters. Tell me about the monster from it. Conquered the world well. The monster from saturn was based upon my studies at the university where i studied physics and i tried within the fantastic world of science fiction to be as logical as possible and i realized a giant planet like saturn would have heavy gravity so therefore a giraffe could not exist but a turtle could because it was close to the ground and would be able to handle the gravity so i had the monster built all about the height of my hand here and thus say was physically correct for the planet saturn. I was having coffee as they were setting up the first shot and beverly garland very hip. Young actress came up to the monster and she looked and she noticed that i was watching her

roger corman stanford engineer s. h. u. d. e. r. p. o.
Interview With Roger Corman

Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

03:34 min | 2 months ago

Interview With Roger Corman

"The word legendary is overused but in the case of roger corman. It's well deserved. Roger trained as an engineer at stanford but after four days on the job. He quit to make movies. He began producing and directing low budget. Independent films are getting the underserved teen market. What is films lacked in production value. They made up for imagination. And as roger famously declared he never lost a dime on a picture and he made a lot of them. From nineteen fifty. Five to nineteen seventy-one. He directed over fifty films. Everything from monster. Movies to biker. Pictures to his famous adaptations. The works of edgar allan poe. He focused on producing and film distribution launching the careers of some of the biggest names in hollywood including francis ford coppola jonathan demme joe dante and bringing films by autour like david cronenberg. Ingmar bergman federico fellini to america. Rogers sat down with history of harsh showrunner. Kurt sanga to talk about his remarkable career. You started off directing and producing low budget films in the nineteen fifties How did you deal with the limitations. Faced the early films. I directed i was beginning to director with short schedule and i did what i could. I absorbed films saying. I use certain camera techniques that i've seen before and invented some myself. Now i'm not certain. I really invented them just that i had never seen them in other films. They may not have been as original as i thought. Nine fifty seven directed something like nine films Including tack of the crab monsters personal favourite Fm didn't have a lot of production values. But it was packed. Full of interesting ideas. A what are your memories of that film. Well i remember specifically said didn't have very much money and i remember exactly. The crab monster cost twelve hundred dollars and it was paper my shea but it was very big and it looked pretty good but we were shooting at on the rocks at cabrillo beach and the waves were hitting up against the monster and i could see the waves. Were destroying the back of the monster. So i had to shoot as fast as i possibly could and from only certain angles not to let the audience see that. The vaster was being destroyed. Well we shotted speaking monsters. Tell me about the monster from it. Conquered the world well. The monster from saturn was based upon my studies at the university where i studied physics and i tried within the fantastic world of science fiction to be as logical as possible and i realized a giant planet like saturn would have heavy gravity so therefore a giraffe could not exist but a turtle could because it was close to the ground and would be able to handle the gravity so i had the monster built all about the height of my hand here and thus say was physically correct for the planet saturn. I was having coffee as they were setting up the first shot and beverly garland very hip. Young actress came up to the monster and she looked and she noticed that i was watching her

Francis Ford Autour Kurt Sanga Roger Corman Joe Dante Jonathan Demme Federico Fellini Edgar Allan Poe Ingmar Bergman David Cronenberg Stanford Roger Cabrillo Beach Rogers Hollywood America Beverly Garland
"roger corman" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

03:33 min | 2 months ago

"roger corman" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

"That's promo code s. h. u. d. e. r. p. o. d. the word legendary is overused but in the case of roger corman. It's well deserved. Roger trained as an engineer at stanford but after four days on the job..

roger corman stanford engineer s. h. u. d. e. r. p. o.
"roger corman" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

01:37 min | 2 months ago

"roger corman" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

"I think the essence of horror films is fear. And i think it's the task of the filmmaker to break through the barrier of the conscious mind and strike directly at the remaining childhood..

Apple confirms Sept 15 event

The 3:59

01:52 min | 4 months ago

Apple confirms Sept 15 event

"Let's get the apple. I the event literally just dropped as we are setting up to record this thing what do we know? It's going to be on the fifteenth obviously, not going to be in person events all remote these days I've been to a couple of remote apple events so far compared to the other companies who's remote events I have attended. They have done the best job. They seem to be the best situated to not make you feel like you're missing out on too much by not being there. Yeah. W. WDC was all virtual event and that one felt very different from some of the other ones we've seen. Right there's a lot more production value. It looked it looked a lot more than things we've seen right it didn't have that Roger Corman low budget quality to it. We're like you know things are falling down in the background. Everyone's missing the accuse I've done a couple of actual briefings. With apple that one might normally done in person also, and those were just as professionally handled where it's frankly. Some of the other companies there there events have been have been served high school drama level of production quality, right, and we're expecting obviously the I twelve is the big one I were expecting to five G.. What are some of the other products and features were were expecting at this event as recently as this morning people were talking a lot about new ipads about new apple watches I actually don't think we're going to move into new product categories. We haven't seen before we refreshed or updated almost. All the MAC so far this year almost but that said apple has promised that before the end of the year, we'll see the first apple silicon product, which will be the first one. You'll see that does not an Intel power device and that that change over will happen over the next two years. If I had to guess I'd say it's probably a Mac mini because I believe that some developers already have apple silicon Mac Minis, which is basically just an armed chip in a

Apple Roger Corman Intel
"roger corman" Discussed on Blockbuster

Blockbuster

05:34 min | 7 months ago

"roger corman" Discussed on Blockbuster

"I had no way of knowing of course that he was going to rise to the heights he did, but it was clear just from that sample that was a very good young composer, and he was a music teacher I. Think teaching music classes, at least at Ucla at the time, so that was kind of his first experience moving in as a film, composer and Jim Cameron had a great story. I don't know if you'll recall this, but I wanted to make a note to ask you where he said. After battle beyond the stars you to talked about how the music for that movie made the production value seem so much higher and Jim said Oh. Yeah I think you could probably say this cost four five six million bucks. You're quite amused by that. Good good, that's a good thing. If you remember that conversational. Yes, I do you write that? That was a major part of the way we work? How do you take a low budget picture and make it look and sound and really emerge and the audience is eyes and ears there as a bigger picture there's. Almost irony there of. Your. Relatively small budget features that gave birth to James Cameron the guy who is the almost the furthest opposite of that as you can get, we'll be right back with some final questions with Roger Corman right after this. Match Raider here before we get back to the show, I want to tell you about HBO's next must. Watch series Perry Mason. It Stars Emmy winner. Matthew recent in origin story, American fictions, most legendary criminal defense lawyer catch up on the series. The Washington Post calls superb and vanity. Fair laws as engrossing and unpredictable set in Nineteen Thirties La. Mason finds that uncovering the truth means exposing a city full of corruption and everybody is guilty. co-starring fellow Emmy winners. Tatyana was Lonnie and John Lithgow Perry Mason Sundays at nine pm on HBO and streaming on Hbo Max now back to the show. And we're back with Roger, Corman for final questions here and out of your incubator of of small films at at new. World pictures came so many future talents, but interesting to me. Is that these smaller films birth James Cameron filmmaker who's made the most expensive and successful, but first things first is, it's expensive. Movies of all time and in my research..

Roger Corman Jim Cameron James Cameron HBO Perry Mason Ucla Hbo Emmy John Lithgow Perry Mason Washington Post La first things first Matthew Tatyana Lonnie
"roger corman" Discussed on Blockbuster

Blockbuster

03:54 min | 7 months ago

"roger corman" Discussed on Blockbuster

"We sent you now. Let's get back to it. And we're back with Roger Corman the man who launched so many careers, and still an inspiration to so many I wanted to ask you about a few people from James Cameron's early years, and actually one of them. A producer that gave him his first full on directing GIG a video assis for Piranha to and tell me a little bit about that. I remember Peron to he shot. I think in the Caribbean some more makeup for your in Jamaica for this Italian producer. And when he came back, he showed me the picture and I was really surprised. Because everything he had ever done was truly brilliant and Parana to. Very good and I didn't want to say Jim what happened, but he told he's. He saw I guess the look on my face. And he said what happened. I really only directed part of this film. And it turned out that the is Italian producers. Jim said to me. Used his name because people were already aware of what he'd been doing with me, used his name as director to get the financing, but once the picture started. He fired Jim and took over himself because that was what he always wanted to do to direct the picture and frankly. His work was not brilliant. John. And so therefore. Jim had to explain. Essentially though though you a credit somewhere as as director he, he didn't really direct the whole film. I didn't think of it as a death blow I. Thought of it really is disappointment. Everything he had done for me was so good, and this was not that good and I was really wondering why. It didn't make sense to me because I knew his talent and the talent was not there on the screen. And then. He explained what happened and I understood why okay? He connected with Gail and heard shortly after then they started working on the Terminator. She said when she interviewed with you. You asked her what she wanted to do. She said I want to be a producer, and then she thought Oh. No, now they'll never hire me. Women aren't supposed to say this I shouldn't shouldn't have been so bold. What stood out to you about gail? Simply her intelligence. She come down from Mild University, Stanford She had five Beta Kappa, key and recommendations from Various Faculty that she showed me and what she didn't know, was she had the job before the interview providing, she didn't hit me or slug me or something. During the interview, she was going get the job. She later told May that she was going to explain how fast she could type because she felt that was an important thing, and she was surprised whenever I never asked her any questions like that. That's great. Yeah, and I think. She graduated in the top one percent of her class, so she had quite a a reputation just out of out of college out of Stanford one other person I wanted to ask you about was Jamie Horner. The composer who did battle beyond the stars humanoids from the deep. Do you remember how you first came across him? He was recommended. My Matt Affect suggested Are By. John Davidson, who again was one of my top assistance and He John Played some music he had written and I said fine. I think he's really good..

Gail Jim producer John Davidson Roger Corman director James Cameron Parana Peron Piranha Caribbean Stanford Jamaica Jamie Horner Mild University
"roger corman" Discussed on Blockbuster

Blockbuster

05:13 min | 7 months ago

"roger corman" Discussed on Blockbuster

"Titanic. He made the most expensive film ever made. However, on galaxy of terror is I say he was production, designer and everything I was going over the set with them the afternoon before shooting and there was one wall of a spaceship, which was just a straight wall and I've said to him which is something I believe that there should be. Articulation of the surface. If you want to call it that x ray of wall texture is a good word. Can you do something tonight so it will look better tomorrow morning. He said no problem. Come in I'll show you. The set before we start shooting I came in before we started shooting the wall. Look great hit! All kinds of dials and instruments and everything gymnast looks wonderful. How did you do this overnight? He said. I knew we were in a problem with the budget. So what I did I went to a supermarket and I, but some cartons debt contain various things. I glued the cartons to the wall. Then I spray, painted them, and put on dials and various things, and I knew I had a problem with money, so the total cost was twelve dollars. Wow, and I always felt that the same mind who could solve on a comparatively low budget picture, a problem for twelve dollars was the same mind that could take a hundred million dollars and make it look like two hundred million dollars. Or Two hundred and make it look like. Three, hundred, four hundred. He came in. He interviewed now with you, but with with someone else when he first started I. Think Nineteen Seventy Eight, and at the time he brought in his short little student film Zena Genesis yet which you can see a lot of the things that ended up in a galaxy of terror were things that are kind of in in that Short student film that he did, but he showed it for some of your crew, and they were really impressed by him, and they thought this guy is something unique to him. When did you pick up that he was exceptional in some way? I I saw the short, which was really excellent. It was brilliant, Short made for very little money, so it was just that, and then really from gales report, and going down to the studio, and talking with him at that time coming up after this I want to ask you about Jim's ambitious style. He likes to challenge himself as well as those around him. Stay with us. We'll be right back with Roger Corman. Hey, guys match reader here and before we get back to blockbuster I. I want to tell you about a true crime story that takes place at the same time as ours. It's a must must-listen son of a Hitman may nineteen seventy-nine man named. John H. Wood is shot dead leaving his Texas home. He's the first federal judge ever assassinated, and it's a big deal. The hitman implicated in the murder. Is Charles V. Harrelson? Father of three boys, including future, oscar-nominated actor Woody Harrelson, but that's just the beginning. Son of a Hitman is a spotify original podcast and. And you can listen to it free only on spotify now back to the show and welcome back to our interview with the Roger. Corman were sitting here in your office surrounded by so many of the posters of films that you've made through the years just a fraction really of the films that you've made are the posters that we see around us, but so many of these are now iconic in in so many ways you see references to them in a lot of movies. Movies that are coming out now and I want to kind of go back to you know that nine hundred, seventy, nine nineteen eighty era, young James Cameron is working in the model shop and he's building things and sketching out ships and one of.

Roger Corman Jim spotify Woody Harrelson John H. Wood James Cameron Charles V. Harrelson murder Texas
"roger corman" Discussed on Blockbuster

Blockbuster

05:27 min | 7 months ago

"roger corman" Discussed on Blockbuster

"I match Raider in this is a special bonus interview episode of Blockbuster. We're here today in the office of Roger Corman one of the most influential producers to ever work in Hollywood responsible for so many films over four hundred of them, and forgiving, so many huge new Hollywood names their start. Jack Nicholson Martin Scorsese Francis. Ford Coppola Ron Howard and of course from our story, people like Gaylon, her Jamie and James, Cameron and in addition Rogers been presented by the Academy with an Honorary Oscar for his lifetime work inspiring, so many people including filmmakers. You never worked with that have grown up on your films, the One and only Roger Cormon. Thanks for doing this. Have you been here? So there's so many pieces about parts of your life and just re watched Korman's world the documentary from a years ago. Which tells much of your your early? Early life story, but I really wanted to ask you about the mid nineteen seventies and You know there's all this change happening jaws and Star Wars, the blockbuster era starting to take over. How did that trend effect films that you were making at the time I know? There was there was a threat. It was not only a threat. It was a reality I and my contemporaries were making low budget films on various subjects including. Including horror science fiction, and so for us, and we were doing rather well when jaws came out, Vince can be the lead critic of the new. York Times road. What is it jaws, but a big budget Roger Corman film? He was right, but he missed one thing. It was a big budget. Roger Corman films matter of fact, the first film I ever made was monster from the ocean floor, which was somewhat similar to judge. But he missed the point as it was bigger and better. And when I saw jaws, I felt this is a real problem for us. The major studios are catching on to what we were doing with low budgets. They're making more bigger budgets and this is going to damage us because it's the same subject matter, but on a level with which we cannot compete. After jaws came Star Wars. And once more said. This is a subject matter we've dealt with, but this picture is so big and so good..

Roger Corman Vince Blockbuster Roger Cormon Jack Nicholson Martin Scorsese Hollywood Ford Coppola Ron Howard Korman Gaylon Rogers Jamie Cameron James
"roger corman" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"roger corman" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"You know, I love the film biz and then I just started sort of coin my way up to things that actually paid or pay like more than five cents more than one hundred dollars a week. You know, I always loved the up copying credit. That's that's how that's how they say it now which means you're not getting paid, you'll get copy credit emeals via okay. What the meals on Roger Cormon like white bread, loaf of white bird. Yeah. And even on that Roger Corman movie, we round Palmdale and they put us four, two room hotel room. I didn't know anything that unions suddenly assigned to sleep insane dead with the script supervisor. I'd never met. Hey, man, awesome. That female on, they did segregate it rooms by genders. But you know, you're in the in the same bed with somebody like give literally never met the person. What's up. Yeah, right. I like to sleep on that side. Every interesting. Yeah, but you know, that made a lot of fun things and crazy things happen that movie so are kind of you'll never forget it. Of course, it's summer camp a summer camp experiences where if you look back at it, you go, I just spent seven thousand months doing something. Absolutely insane, and I loved it. I'm exhausted. I can't see straight, but I loved it and I did love it. Yeah, everything happened. If the I came investigated when somebody's stolen easy and this and that that when somebody's stolen easy. Yeah, I didn't know that it was a real z. they told me to watch all the weapons, which I know nothing about weapons, really. And I thought they said, oh, they're all rubber. Don't worry about it. So I put a blue tarp over at lunch. I took him away from the real motorcycle gang, which was a real much to save money, a real gang from the valley which had their real bikes and everything. So I'm like, can cannot take your guns and put them put them in a pile, put rocks. The thing I'm sitting out there in the middle of the desert. One hundred fifteen degrees out in Palmdale in the summer and a kid comes up on a PA all watch the weapons. You can go lunch and I go and my sandwich come back. The I was gone. The was gone and small plane was taking off in the distance. The kid had been in a mental hospital the week before we found out later. So yeah, it was fun. Well, traditionally the Corman the Cormon school, the call, it gives you real world education in filmmaking, and I actually loved every. And shared beds the FBI mentally welcome to Hollywood right people, so glamorous, right? So. Yes, that's peanut butter and jelly ever have. You design so many movies, and I wonder, what was your learning curve? Was it just do learning by doing or did anybody take you under their wing? I did not figure out the mentor thing. I. I just my first movie. I was basically thrown into this Cormon world. The next one just was in a skateboard maybe where they hit. You know, you have five thousand dollars the home movie. I'm like, wow, okay. Why skateboards for free? So you call up every skate. We're getting for free. Then you see that your assistant is selling skateboards Andro at the back of this. And so you'd see skateboard that was just a prop in the thing now it's really on the street or kick gave me money for it. We could use it for something else. I'm like, wow. Is that how it works? So I did. I did learn, you know. Trial and error and fire, which was really fun way to learn actually because I did stuff that you just wouldn't normally do. I wouldn't do now. Probably I would be, you know, I mean, I literally like went to Venice beach and knew nothing about it. Just moved here from Texas, and I was supposed to put a big repeating mural for the daggers has Cape or team, Tony Alba's team. And I.

Roger Corman Palmdale Roger Cormon Cormon school supervisor FBI Tony Alba Texas PA Hollywood One hundred fifteen degrees five thousand dollars seven thousand months one hundred dollars
"roger corman" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"roger corman" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"She gets her scoops i'm always looking through a tip eager anytime jeez hand and stuff out a little tip for with pro bowl she gets it jason award winning new york times reporter and her name is allie watkins her mom must be so proud you know allie she went to school and she got a job as a big reporter type and for the democrat party at news places then she got a couple of scoops the old fashioned way you know the harvey weinstein school of journalism then she decided she wanted a job at the new york times so she had to go sort of full stormy daniels you know the full story she how does she do it they wondered at the new york times and then they found out and you know what it reminds said it reminded me of a movie there's a fun roger corman movie i meant to look it up but i didn't fun roger corman movie because i was still reading about the capitated animal that was burned and charred and left on the front porch by democrats you know and they go round cohen everybody else nazis hither so there's an old roger corman movie called buckets of blood buckets of blood that's what it's called roger corman made sort of their cult classic b horror movies low budget at least but they had a certain flair certain panache roger corman movies and bucket of blood buck maybe it's just one bucket of blood bucket of blood is about a kind of a struggling failed sculpture right who wants to be a famous artist of famous sculptor and he's not very good so he i think i accidentally murders someone i think i see murders a cat he kills a cat in the wall and he's trying to cut it out of the wall with a knife and the cat so then he makes the polls at kennedy makes sculpture out he covers it in clay then he murders a person and he starts taking cutting their hands off and stuff and he covers them in clay and then people art critics come along and they're like oh this is marvelous you most excellent artist and then it becomes a famous artists overnight because he's so talented right nineteen fiftynine bucket of blood and and then having the big art exhibit is i start exhibit too much information on bucket of blood from nine hundred and there are hot lights in the art exhibition hall and the klay starts melting and much to their horror the champagne and vichy swabs crowd sees that there are human parts underneath and so they all run out screaming and that's the exciting climax of the movie pretty much right and i wouldn't recommend the movie necessarily but it's kind of a fun one from my childhood and then i started reading about the new york times reporter alley watkins and they're like wow how does she get all these scoops she just keeps coming home with one scoop after another she's like thirty one flavors on a banana boat she's now a banana split thick she just one scoop we've got another scoop how many scoops can this one woman get this is amazing well yesterday the new york times put out a funny story how an affair between a reporter and a security aide isn't not a security aide has rattled washington media now it's funny right there and they got three typists for the democrat party scott shane and emily flittering.

"roger corman" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"roger corman" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"Do you have a preference on rehearsal i get it because i mean not all films i usually have never gotten it and you just recently i've got like one this film i just did call dr angry i had nine days of hersal like what like really so i was shocked but you know i think it helped i mean i as an actor coming from roger corman style of movie making never had rehearsal so it was it was great i think it helps the director and help them set up their shots and helps them sort of they it's their first film or their second film and if there's a lot of money involved they wanted to be over prepared themselves so a lot of times rehearsal isn't for the actors as well as for the director to see their visions is set up the shots before how they're going to get it on its feet right of course folks backstory dot net is alive yes i am so excited that i am cutting into tell you the great news you could finally read backstory magazine on a desktop or laptop via backstory dot net yes we're still an ipad in google play on androids no you cannot read the full magazine on a smartphone yes we're working on an app so that you can read the full magazine on a smartphone but yes you can read the magazine right now on a desktop or a laptop at backstory dot net and yes you could read our blog there too and that actually you can read on a cellphone so there's some good news for cellphone people now if you're already an ipad subscriber firstly thanks for supporting us and also if you wanna read us under desktop you of course can you just need to follow these simple instruct.

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"roger corman" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"roger corman" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Talk and text and euro wildcard wednesday requests hey before we hit the news here you know we were just talking about matthew's film club screening of his the pickwick theatre and his screening is of king kong and it's tomorrow at two in the afternoon for matinee and then a special seven thirty performance of king kong nineteen thirtythree classic and but i would like to plug my film clubs screening my next film club screening is going to be on april third tuesday april third my phone called screenings are usually the first tuesday of each month and i'm very excited to be hosting screening of little shop of horrors from nine hundred eighty six classic based on the broadway musical which is based on the roger corman movie from the sixties rick moranis and ellen greene and a big giant plant that eats people it's a terrific movie and it's a wonderful musical and if you've never seen it you should come out and see it and if you've never seen it on the big screen wonderful to see the great frank is directed it speaking of sesame street and did a great job directing it and it's lively and funny and awesome and has a great cast and really memorable and fun songs but what's really special about the screening that we're doing on tuesday april third is that we got a hold of the director's cut franchises director's cut because his original ending was deemed a little bit too crazy and a little bit too dark and a little bit too out there so warner brothers made him change the ending and some years ago he restored the movie and we have the director's cut with the alternate ending so it's going to be so cool to see that on the big screen i've never seen the alternate ending on the.

matthew pickwick theatre king kong ellen greene frank director roger corman rick moranis