17 Burst results for "Roger Angell"

"roger angell" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

06:14 min | 1 year ago

"roger angell" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

"Tip gurjin covers baseball for ESPN and Tim. This is the first chance that you and I have had talk since Bob Gibson passed away on Friday. A look I I didn't really know him. I talked to him briefly one time. He played before I covered baseball. He played before you covered baseball but everyone who played against him as I remember the way that described him. He was his ferocious competitor as we've ever seen in sports of any kind. What do you think? I totally agree I i. wrote all this for a wrote, his own bed, which was not easy to do. But in it I remember dusty Baker telling me once that when dusty revealed player he asked about Bob Gibson Hank Aaron his teammates at whatever you do don't stare at him. Don't talk to him and if he hits you with a pitch, don't charge them out 'cause they'll kick your ass and to me that subs up who Bob Gibson. The competitor was I believe he's fiercest most ferocious pitcher in history of major. League Baseball and I'm ten years older than you buster. So when I grow up I, saw him and I still watching in the sixty eight and sixty, sixty, seven, sixty, eight, world series it was I was spellbound. It was breathtaking to watch him pitch and you get him to know him later I recognize just how angry he used to pitch, and that's how I was part of it beyond being a great athlete. So I told all these stories that. Yesterday I talked to Johnny Bench Johnny Bench told me that his Dad Janis Dad was a really good player and used to say all the time. It was son who was seventeen eighteen years old they be watched the big league game together and he'd say I can hit that guy I can hit that guy. So Johnny Bench faces Bob Gibson for the first night he strikes out in each of the first three plate appearances. He comes back to the dugout and he literally laughing about how overmatched was against Bob gets it and Janis Manager Day Briscoe looks at him and says what the hell are you laughing about Johnny said my dad could never hit that guy that's how great Bob Gibson was. Yeah. And he harkens back to a time Tim when. Athletes didn't just focus on one sport. He he was a tremendous athlete of different sports when when as he was growing up. Yeah he played basketball. CREIGHTON and he played a year for the globetrotters and he once told me that his basketball days made him a better baseball player and vice versa, which I tell people all the time. If you WANNA be good a good baseball player play another sport and buster that's sixty eight and we all know about the one point one, two, E. R. A. But he made thirty four starts that year he threw thirteen shutouts he threw twenty. Eight. Complete Games. So no active pitcher has twenty eight complete games for their career. Justin verlander has twenty six. That's the most Gibson at twenty eight in a season and just imagine this now once during the sixty eight season, did the manager come to the mound and take the ball away from? Bob. Gibson. He was pinch hit for six different time didn't come out of after an inning. But now once during the season, did the manager come out and say Give. Me The ball or taking you out not once that's how great he was especially in that. One of my favorite pieces ever written was a piece done by Roger Angell by on Bob Gibson and you know he describes the last pitch that Gibson through and that seventeen strikeout game in the nineteen sixty, eight world series game two and the reaction of the hitter and I can't remember off top of my head was. Whether it was Willie Horton or alkaline but he said that the the the flinch from the hitter. was remarkable and if you go back and watch video that was incredible and I love the story to about how when he broke Colfax is record by getting the sixteenth Tim Carver was catching. It was like trying to get him to step off and look at the scoreboard and see that he'd broken a record and Gibson was furious like no, I still have more work to him. Right Buster I maintain and I'm a little biased here I think if I could pick one pitcher to pitch game seven of the World Series One pitcher in baseball history I would pick Bob Gibson a 'cause he was great. His stuff was great and competitive nature was like nothing I've ever seen plus he won two World Series Game Sevens with complete game victory nobody else's ever done that. So I just just so sad buster I really have not to. Change the subject but alkaline Tom, seaver, Lou, Brock Bob Gibson all in one calendar year it just that is my childhood right there. Those are my childhood baseball heroes that I watched and just when I was starting to truly understand what the game was about and like sixty six, sixty, seven, those were the guys I was watching and I watched five Gibson more than anyone as a you know a nine year old growing up in Maryland it was tremendous. Jack clarity the cardinals pitcher got to know Bob Gibson here's what he told. Reporters after the cardinals were eliminated the other day. He's a legend first and foremost, and then he's somebody who? knows. Lucky. That's relationship was enough to learn from. And you don't get that from from people are very often you don't get the opportunity to learn from somebody of that caliber in somebody. Who is that good? Very often. Yada Molina the cardinals catcher talked about Bob Gibson. Hard. Losing. Lanes..

Brock Bob Gibson Bob Gibson Hank Aaron baseball Tim Carver Johnny Bench basketball dusty Baker cardinals Janis Dad ESPN Justin verlander Yada Molina Roger Angell E. R. A. Maryland CREIGHTON Willie Horton Colfax Janis Manager
"roger angell" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:57 min | 1 year ago

"roger angell" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That money and our drive begins tomorrow. So anything you can spare is appreciated at dot org's slash Tony, we're a bit behind where we need to be so we'd appreciate hearing from you make a pledge and end the drive. This's The New Yorker radio hour. I'm David. Some years ago, when I was an intern at the Washington Post, I was sent off to do a feature story on a writer might always loved and still do. His name is Roger Angell. Rogers to baseball, writing what Willie Mays was to baseball playing fleet elegant and everyday player who never fails to astonish you, which is why he was elected as a writer to the Hall of Fame in Cooperstown. At the New Yorker, Roger Angel is nothing short of royalty. He's been publishing in the magazine since the Second World War. His mother was Katherine White, the magazine's fiction editor. And one day Roger would take her chair. Editing the likes of John Updike and Beatty and William Trevor. 20 years ago, I sat with Roger one night in the left field seats of Shea Stadium, eating popcorn, drinking beer and biting my nails. It was a glorious night. Yankees Mets. A subway series. It was Game five. And as it turned out the clincher for the Yankees and in the locker room afterward, awash in champagne, the Yankee manager Joe Torry, greeted Roger As a visiting eminence appear. We left the locker room soaked in Dom Perignon. Now I'd like us to lift a glass to celebrate Roger Angel one more time. Pretend you've got some bubbly at home because he's turning 100. Roger joined me on the radio hour a few years ago, and he was just 95 at the time. And a collection of his work called This old man. All in pieces had just been published. Roger. You practiced non fiction as it were by night and fiction by day. For years and years. You were the fiction editor of The New Yorker. To this day you read short stories for us and in the fiction department. Was this bred in the bone with you? I think I think some of our listeners will know that your mother really had singular responsibility for introducing serious fiction to the New Yorker, Catherine White. And you must have grown up. Hearing about this process going this process. Mind my stepfather was a V white, who is being white and running for the magazine every week, and my mother and stepfather is house was full of galleys and pencils and racer rubbings and And conversation about the magazine and about Harold Rustin and about the writers of the day and Sure I paid close attention. But I wasn't planning to be a New Yorker editor or to be a New Yorker writer planning, wasn't it? I was hoping to be maybe a boy natural herpetologist at first. First name, but I didn't pay attention. Tell me about this old man By Roger Angel. All in pieces is Roger this old man. Roger Angel on peace. Well, I'm a little tired of the Joker in the title already. But tell me about the book itself. You've gotten here Cem obituaries that were published in The New Yorker Online. You've got a couple of long sustained essays. Some baseball writing well. I wrote the piece this old man I started the piece in 2013. I think like late in the year on DH, I think, can you long about February? Something like that came as a complete surprise to me just plopped it on my desk and I wrote it in different pieces so important what I was doing, and it was about Physical ability, and it starts off with a description of mark my arthritic hands. And which would you say the tips of your fingers look like they've been the subject of torture by the point my forefinger at you like a pistol and fired in for your nose. I hit you in the knee but describes, um some of them are everyday abilities of age. And I didn't quite know what I was doing. But I knew that loss was at the middle of this that I had lost my wife of 48 years I lost a daughter than Ah Belova Dog of Carol's in line. Went out the fifth floor window in the middle of off panic was jumped out the window, the fifth floor and was killed. Losses for people My age are common. At Hershey, one off a poet, lost his son and wrote a great book about last year. And he says that anybody over the age of 65 has a £100 bag of cement of loss on his shoulders, so I don't know how they touched on these subjects. No. If I wanted to even And I did so actually, through the loss of the dog. I described the death of Harry's this dog and then threw in Carolina. Well, we couldn't get over waiting for him. And the lady in our bathroom between us on the floor except through the next back and forth, and I said, We're also weeping for my daughter, Callie, who committed suicide a few years earlier. And events. No, he couldn't just get our minds around in any way, but it was for both. But I don't want to drill on this side. You want to make much of this because everybody's experienced loss, and there are many changes of moves of this peace are patched the thing together and I love some of the satyr paragraphs that are hard to take, often followed by a joke or a lighter moment. There's some actual jokes in there. Is OK, because I like to take shows. I count on sharks myself. I'm known to tell jokes, and there's also the opposite of loss. There's new love. Yes, and this was happening. I was finding someone new in my life. My president, wife, Peggy, and Time was going by and I was still engaged in life. And I said that old people are like everyone else we need. We need connection. We need love. We need intimate love. I mean, there's their sex. The piece ends with life against all other things and lodged against Dolan's. Yes, but I wanted to say what was happening with me, which happens for other old people. Well, People fall in love while people have love life have intimate connections have sex lives, and people don't like to admit it mostly their Children, but because there's somehow revolted by where it is, but I think people getting over this because it's now known. I mean, it's not something to be repelled by something to be grateful for. This brings up something else, which I've noticed with Rutgers that I've dealt with. Now and then a writer lives long enough fist indigenous to happen much with American writers of the famous thing about America right? There are no second acts in American lives. Writers that go on and on, often go back as Updike get go back to the same subjects again, and I get him back to his mother to the sandstone farmhouse. To his father to his teenage cording years and did the same story really again and again, but much better each time with increased feeling. Some of the very best doors, he wrote for us. We're at the very end, and the same thing happened with another writer of mine that I edited over a period of 40 years. V S. Pritchett, great British writer. In his middle eighties Sunday Guns Amazing Hot Street, writing some of the greatest stories of his life full of life full of sex full of our more on adventures and comedy and childhood things or rushing on And I think.

Roger Angel Roger writer The New Yorker Roger Angell baseball editor Yankees John Updike The New Yorker Online Cooperstown Willie Mays Washington Post Tony David intern Dom Perignon Catherine White
"roger angell" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:26 min | 1 year ago

"roger angell" Discussed on KCRW

"Some years ago, when I was an intern at the Washington Post, I was sent off to do a feature story on a writer who might always loved and still do. His name is Roger Angell. Rogers to baseball, writing what Willie Mays was to baseball playing fleet elegant and everyday player who never fails to astonish you, which is why he was elected as a writer to the Hall of Fame in Cooperstown. At the New Yorker, Roger Angel is nothing short of royalty. He's been publishing in the magazine since the Second World War. His mother was Katherine White, the magazine's fiction editor. And one day Roger would take her chair. Editing the likes of John Updike and Beatty and William Trevor. 20 years ago, I sat with Roger one night in the left field seats of Shea Stadium, eating popcorn, drinking beer and biting my nails. It was a glorious night. Yankees Mets. A subway series. It was Game five. And as it turned out the clincher for the Yankees and in the locker room afterward, awash in champagne, the Yankee manager Joe Torry, greeted Roger As a visiting eminence appear. We left the locker room soaked in Dom Perignon. Now I'd like us to lift a glass to celebrate Roger Angel one more time. Pretend you've got some bubbly at home because he's turning 100. Roger joined me on the radio hour a few years ago, and he was just 95 at the time and a collection of his work called This old man. All in pieces had just been published. Roger. You practiced non fiction as it were by night. And fiction By day For years and years. You were fiction editor of The New Yorker. To this day, you read short stories for us and in the fiction department. Was this bred in the bone with you? I think I think some of our listeners will know that your mother really had singular responsibility for introducing serious fiction to the New Yorker, Catherine White. And you must have grown up. A hearing about this process going this process in mind. My stepfather was a V white, who is baby void and running for the magazine every week, and my mother and stepfather is house was full of galleys and pencils and racer rubbings and And conversation about the magazine and about Harold Rustin and about the writers of the day and Sure I paid close attention. But I wasn't planning to be a New Yorker editor or to be a New Yorker writer planning, wasn't it? I was hoping to be maybe a boy natural herpetologist at first. First name, but I didn't pay attention. Tell me about this old man By Roger Angel. All in pieces is Roger this old man. Roger Angel on pieces. Well, I'm a little tired. The Joker in the title already. But tell me about the book itself. You've got in here some obituaries that were published in the New Yorker online. You've got a couple of long sustained essays, some baseball riding well. I wrote the piece this old man Ah! I started the piece in 2013. I think light late in the year and I think has you long about February. Something like that came as a complete surprise to me just plopped it on my desk and I wrote it in different pieces going quite know what I was doing, And it was about Physical ability, and it starts off with a description of my my arthritic hands. And which would you say the tips of your fingers look like they've been the subject of torture by the five point my forefinger at you like a pistol and fired in for your nose. I hit you in the knee but describe some some of the or everyday abilities of age. And ah I didn't quite know what I was doing. But I knew that loss was at the middle of this. I'd lost my wife of 48 years I lost a daughter on DH Ah Belova Dog of carols and mine. Went out the fifth floor window in the middle of a panic was jumped out the window, the fifth floor and was killed. Losses for people My age are common. Let her see wonderful poet, lost his son and wrote a great book about last year. And he says that anybody over the age of 65 as the £100 bag of cement of loss on his shoulders, so I don't know how to touch on these subjects. No. If I wanted to even And I did so actually, through the loss of the dog. I described the death of Harry's his dog and then threw in Carolina. Well, we couldn't get over weeping for him. And he lay in our bathroom between us on the floor except through chemically next back and forth, and I said, we're also weeping for my daughter. Callie, who committed suicide or coffee is earlier. And events. No, he couldn't just get our minds around in any way, but it was for both. But I don't want to drill on this. I don't want to make much of this because everybody's experienced loss and There are many changes of moves or this piece are patched the thing together and A lot of some of the satyr paragraphs that are hard to take, often followed by a joke or a lighter moment. There's some actual jokes in there. Is OK, because I like to take shows. I count on sharks myself. I'm known to tell jokes, and and there's also the opposite of loss. There's new love. Yes, and this was happening. I was finding someone new in my life. My president, wife, Peggy, and Time was going by and I was still engaged in life. And I said that old people are like everyone else we need. We need connection. We need love. We need intimate love. I mean, there's their sex. The piece ends with life against all other things and a large against all odds. Yes, but I wanted to say what was happening with me, which happens for other old people. Well, People fall in love. While people have love life have intimate connections have sex lives, and people don't like to admit this mostly their Children, but because there's somehow revolted by well where it is, but I think people getting over this because it's now known. I mean, it's not something to be repelled by something to be grateful for. This brings up something else, which I've noticed with Rutgers that I've dealt with. Now and then a writer lives long enough fist interest happen much with American writers of the famous thing about America right? There are no second acts in American lives. Writers that go on and on, often go back as Updike get go back to the same subjects again, and I get him back to his mother to the sandstone farmhouse. To his father to his teenage cording years and did the same story really again and again, but much better each time with increased feeling. Some of the very best joys, he wrote. For us. We're at the very end, and the same thing happened with another writer of mine that I edited over a period of 40 years. V S. Pritchett, great British writer. In his middle eighties suddenly got this amazing hot street, writing some of the greatest stories of his life full of life full of sex full of our more on adventures and comedy and childhood things all rushing out. And I think that all of us do this of any age because we go basically go over the same material in our in our minds again and again. The stories that really mean a lot to us. And psychologists and experts on the subject say that this is what the memory is. It is a trying out of a scenario again and again. Because it may be of use. That's what memory is. And this is why the same scenes Riker after I wrote scenes, a lot of this president stuff I used to have dreams about, I think about over and once I put him down and getting published, I don't think about him anymore. It's very strange. It goes away. When you go back and read your earlier stuff. Do you recognize it doesn't feel like you. Not there. Very really stuff. No, it feels like Hemingway. And can you relate it all to the decision like Philip Roth's to stop writing. Well, I haven't got there yet. Extremely lucky. I'm 95 still writing my goodness..

Roger Angel Roger writer Roger Angell baseball Yankees editor John Updike The New Yorker president Cooperstown Willie Mays Katherine White Washington Post Shea Stadium intern Dom Perignon Philip Roth
"roger angell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:42 min | 1 year ago

"roger angell" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The corona viruses already taken from us and beloved and prominent people and yet its impact has been disproportionately on the poor the unknown accounted and people of color today on the New Yorker radio hour we'll talk about unequal access to health care and even to preventative measures like social distancing social distancing is critical but you have to have a certain class position really to be able to fully engage that practice I'll talk with scholar Kiandra Yamada Taylor later this hour and since we can't watch baseball there's just no baseball to watch all remember seasons past with one of the all time great observers of the game the new Yorkers Roger Angell that's the New Yorker radio hour just ahead live from NPR news in Washington I'm Jeanine Herbst with more than five hundred thousand coronavirus infections in the US the trump administration is floating the possibility that some parts of the country would be able to return to normal starting on may first but isn't here's Nell Greenfieldboyce reports the administration is also trying to temper expectations the commissioner of the food and drug administration Steven Hahn spoke on this week from ABC news he said the model show we're close to the peak and that may first is one possible target date but we've got to get the data as they come in we have to look at what we know about this illness what's happened in other countries and put them into the situation today the plan moving forward he says testing shows there are hot spots with lots of people infected but some places have fewer cases Surgeon General Jerome Adams however said on fox news that most of the country won't be able to reopen by may first he said it will happen bit by bit place by place based on the data Nell Greenfieldboyce NPR news Chinese authorities say high school seniors in Beijing will return to class in two weeks on April twenty seventh and here's Emily Feng reports this announcement comes as China slowly reopens institutions and restarts its economy speaking of high school seniors will go back to school after more than two months of online learning due to the outbreak of cove in nineteen some provinces re open their middle schools and high schools as early as the first week of April but in Beijing in international transport hub concerns about a second wave of infections in travelers returning from abroad have prompted more locked on measures including requiring all domestic travelers entering the city to quarantine for fourteen days earlier this month China to lead its annual college entrance examination normally held in June by a month the exam is life changing for many students and decides what they study and which university they attend family Fang and pure news one U. K. prime minister Boris Johnson left the hospital today and thank England's National Health Service for saving his life as he battled covert nineteen that isn't yours Frank Lankford reports more than ten thousand people have now died from the virus in UK hospitals Johnson who spent time in intensive care unit credited healthcare staff for keeping him alive when quote it could have gone either way I have two days left hospital after a week in which the NHS has saved my life no question Johnson is recuperating at Chequers the prime minister's country state and H. established criticized the government for not providing enough personal protective equipment at least twenty eight healthcare workers have died from covert nineteen according to the BBC one of the government's senior scientific adviser said the U. K. is likely to be among the countries in Europe worst hit by the corona virus Frank Langfitt NPR news OPEC oil cartel another oil producers agreed today to boost oil prices by cutting about ten million barrels a day in production that's one tenth of global supply it's a measure to stop sliding oil prices in the face of falling demand because of the pandemic this is NPR This Is WNYC in New York I'm lance lucky governor Andrew Cuomo says new data continues to suggest New York state has reached a plateau in covert nineteen cases he says the number of people being intubated went up over the weekend but total hospitalizations appear to be leveling off a sign that new Yorkers must continue to heat social distancing guidelines you're not seeing a great decline in the numbers but you're seeing a flattened earlier he in Merida Blasio sparred over who has the authority to keep schools closed though Cuomo says it's still too early to determine when they should reopen he says that decision will require the state to coordinate with New Jersey and Connecticut and the testing for covert nineteen needs to become faster and more widely available before that can happen New York City says it's facing a shortage of swabs that it needs to test patients for covert nineteen the city's department of health says public testing sites and hospitals could run out in a matter of days Carolyn Lewis has been reporting on the issue for Gothamist the city has said that it's looking for new sources of swaps but that there's just not enough supply right now to meet the demands most tests for the coronavirus require obtaining up to two nasal swabs per patient a lack of diagnostic kits has already forced the city to limit testing to specific groups such as people who are hospitalized the elderly and those with pre existing conditions get ready for rain it'll begin after one AM and continue all day tomorrow and possibly heavy at times with thunderstorms toward mid day some storms with that heavy rainfall near sixty seven very windy some gusts will be near sixty miles per hour this is W..

"roger angell" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:53 min | 1 year ago

"roger angell" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Radio hour I'm David Remnick around this time of year would have been a joyful one the start of baseball season not the worst casualty of this pandemic by far but for a fan the loss of baseball is a bitter pill the deprivation of a really beautiful distraction and there's talk that maybe the season will open in June but that's really impossible to now until then I want to revisit a conversation I had with the great baseball writer Roger Angell who is now ninety nine a few years ago I brought Roger to the studio to talk about his long and remarkable career at the magazine in more than seven decades he's contributed fiction movie reviews comic poems essays about aging and loss that really isn't a genre that he hasn't touched but on the subject of baseball there is no greater writer than Roger no one and for this he was inducted into the baseball hall of fame in twenty fourteen so this is a thrill for me as well as an honor the roster of spring honorees is stuffed with old heroes of mine like red Smith and Tom meaning and with baseball writer friends who have also been models and heroes folks like Jerome Holtzman and Peter Gammons and bill Madden who were so quick to put me at my ease in the clubhouse in the fill me and whenever I turned up again my gratitude always goes back to baseball itself which turned out to be so familiar and so startling so spacious and exacting so easy looking and so heartbreakingly difficult but it filled up my notebooks in seasons in a rush a past time indeed and that was an amazing day Roger I just wondered you know year and a half later looking back at what it meant to you you've been writing about baseball for a long time since the early sixties I was extremely anxious beforehand I was anxious about so many friends of mine are coming up this enormous distance also is not going to be very good and I actually was using a mailbox near the end was from weight but the middle I got there was just terrific but you had to invent a voice for this you have to you have to figure out a way of covering baseball god knows the baseballs especially when you began was the focus for sports writers and in fact in the fifties the the most depressed US border of the boxing guys were in and in baseball and baseball there are pressure was sheer terror I don't know what I was doing as a baseball fan I've been a writer but I've not read about baseball or only a little bit and I was very self conscious talking to the players really quite quite scared why is that well I I felt that they would they would know more than I did they wouldn't of what's this guy doing here I was I was shocked and well the nervous so what I did was to sit in the stands at first and because I felt I didn't realize that nobody is running about the fans and I was a fan and I could sit in the stands and be a fan and also be a writer is the press box a bad place to cover things from no I don't think so but once you get used to but I wasn't I wasn't at ease in the press box yet one of the things that always amazed me about your baseball riding is that you have a tone a of of a of a happy man of of of someone who's going at this at his leisure and that all the difficulty of writing which we know to be the case is somehow way out of the frame that there there is this voice of someone just in love with what he's watching that's that's hard to achieve well it it developed over the years I've made I didn't really plan it in advance it was just it was some kind of me what what was the kind of sports running that you couldn't stand what we try to avoid actually when I started Sean said William Shawn the other the other day my editor said once you get out of spring training and take a look and he said we don't want to be sentimental on we don't want to be a tough guys to live two things to avoid and Shawn know anything about baseball nothing nothing my first pace he came into my office here in the Dallas my first piece that spring training and he pointed to a page place on the on the pages of what's this I looked and I said that's a double play bill they said was a double player cannot explain the tournament is she's cold with excitement did you find it harder to talk with players as time went by as you got a little older did you gravitate more toward coaches and managers and when they call you Sir you're in big trouble yeah and I gravitated toward good talkers as of as I said before but today fin out was what I needed the good talkers become less and less numerous I yes I think so it's very mean and job right but got over eighty it was impossible for me to talk to players really because they would say Sir and and also as you've said the the habit of talking openly as a person not as a very well paid celebrities semi celebrity ball player is pretty will go on because it's a big difference when the ball players are making about as much as a as a solid orthodontist should either make sure as much as an older daughter but she did pay attention my side and I would carry no swim right in the state by blowing out some and keep our ears open listen for something I remember being outside the officer Jim for the Kansas city manager after his great star George Brett at another extraordinary day at the plate and I'm waiting to go in to see the manager on there to all cultures at their lockers just outside the door in their underwear and clogs talking couple country gosh and one of them says the other everything that George heads goes through the infield like a stream of milk this country image and I wrote that down the road to Hana wow thank you wait days for things like the non fiction again Roger you practice non fiction as it were by night and fiction by day for years and years he was a fiction editor of The New Yorker to this day you read short stories for us in in the fiction department this is bred in the bone with you I think I think some of our listeners will know that your mother was really had singular responsibility for introducing serious fiction to The New Yorker Catherine white was the the person who brought real fiction to The New Yorker in you must have grown up hearing about this process is going this process my my stepfather was the one who is the the white and writing for the magazine every week and my mother and stepfather's house was full of Dallas and cancels and racer rubbings and and conversation about the magazine about Harold Rosson and about the writers of the day and sure I pay close attention but I wasn't planning to be in New Yorker editor of The New Yorker writer what we will be planning wasn't it I was hoping to be maybe for natural for herpetology first first to him but I didn't pay attention and my mother was anything Levin of off off and people like that who had the folk of take editing was this fall as usual Haute he wearing the famous the bulk of editing was by the great New Yorker if founding editor Harold Ross who love clarity above all was not classically or much educated but loves clearness and in the middle of a few some terrific Nabokov member I think part of his speech memory pieces is wonderful more memories about his family there's a line that at the dinner table summers has passed the nutcracker and one of her Russ is endless queries it was had about twenty or thirty four is what every piece of copy he said from the evidence we've been given so far I would have assumed that the vocals were more than one nutcracker family so don't miss I was looking I was looking through some letters that became Gerald Ross and Roald Dahl wrote all those great children's books but also a number of things for the new Yorker memoir pieces the Yorker wrote a scathing letter to Ross complaining about the editing and the number of comments that he had injected after things he says it is if you would take a great comma shaker and sprinkled commerce route might well I wish our style idea to lighten up a little bit Roger what is age do for your writing how does it affect things how does it either deep in your work or make it more difficult what what's the effective time on a writer I'm not sure I mean I'm I'm aware of my life morning powers I really am but I can't I'm not ready long pieces of are going out there and read it on the ten or twelve thousand word baseball please I'm not sure and that's and that's a matter of of what the getting up and down so doing the interviewing and doing the traveling and and taking the time love a lot of hard work and it's hard for me to get around trust me see it's hard for me to hear a little bit and I'm doing much I'm very happy to fall back into and do pose some blogs but with with this this is the amazing thing you are in your mid nineties I hope you don't mind me saying I think you're perfectly aware of it and yet sentence by sentence your is funny and as touching and as good a writer if you ever were and you've taken to the internet in a way a lot of people resisted we took right to it well I liked the brevity of the bar you can make it quite short are you good with just go on as long as you want to go and then just stop it's sort of like making a paper airplane no it's it's about the it is I used to love my paper about mid grade paper airplanes and you throw out the window takes it goes a little ways are different because beautifully and then goes out of sight is forgotten forever and that's like a blog reads but if you like immediacy of the internet yeah you you've got the post and it's six o'clock it's there and then you're getting well it's taking me full Millie afternoon sometimes right fair enough but no I've I've I can sort of see the and one I'm starting which is not bad tell me about that this new book you you've put together an enormous range of things we've got in here some obituaries that were published in The New Yorker online you've got and a couple of long sustained essays it was real talk about some baseball writing letters the book is called this old man by Roger Angell all in peace this is Roger from this old man Roger Angell on pace well I'm a little tired of the joke in the title race but tell me about the book itself well I I wrote the piece this old man our system does turn the patient in two thousand thirteen I think late late in the year and I think Hannity along about February something like that it came as a complete surprise to me just well opted on my desk I'm done I wrote it and different pieces and quite know what I was doing and it was about physical debilitation the stars over the description of mark Beyer arthritic hands and which would you say they view the tips of your fingers look like they've been the subject of torture by the engine five point my forefinger right you like a pistol and fired up for a free or knows that each of the needs but China I describe some some of the or every.

David Remnick baseball
"roger angell" Discussed on Inside Supercars

Inside Supercars

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"roger angell" Discussed on Inside Supercars

"And Pretty cool we might say some International rices in in In some and hopefully we can do the same with Tom. You know some of the dramas and I'm Gary for racism. Say We could you know. Make car racing on and and because sort of trot trauma exit. Because they're more popular internationally involved possible and now you'd be putting your hand up for the super speedways. Generally it would appear that some scouting mcglasson got a good handle on the racing format given his win yesterday. Davis Woo. Yeah he does he's He's a sort of a bit like myself. He's being being Sim racing for quite a while. Now so You know we've we've already seen on. Rico which is the platform that You know the Easter as we'll be held on for quite a while Yeah it doesn't surprise me but it's but it's pretty good to sort of You know the general fantasy. He's he's also competitive on the same as using real off so that's pretty cool way to say I can't imagine what it would mean the defense and the big thing is it's the opportunity where you might be able to get yourself into a rice with your real life heroes and mix it up with them. Yeah yeah that's also true You know also rice for one of them in real offer. Ready You know as soon as the helmet goes on mold because the window and you know it's the same for the today series as well as soon as you go right on track It's it's a lot grabs for me Yeah that'd be pretty cool if it happens but Yeah would have you had much experience. Some of these other tracks given a fail. Ryo Formula One acce- begun to No I haven't really I've done more oval racing and Sort of a little bit right right. Single mom nicely tended to the oil stock but I've only just started to take more of a generally interesting to sue because auto racing now and You know starting to roll out by Trying to more racing stuff. It's an interesting world one of which I haven't played in but it's going to be a fascinating say over the next few weeks as to how this pans out because it's obviously going to fill a void of no real on track performance. Yeah obviously another fence. That have much thought Do they give it a chance? Even though you know it's it's being branded a tyke racing You know the the competitiveness and Not all all the characteristics in real walk will be Shown on TV. So I can't wait for myself and sort of being a a journey for me You know my mom on rising sort of always followed my real LoC rising finally On on the big stage and and Rice or very one. Who Have you settled down yet? Because the last time we spoke you sort of couch surfing I shall. We say you lose sight several times you settled in a place where you're not going to be for No I haven't Still based in Noah. But I'm on my couch couch with all the stuff that's happening in the world living on the edge just enjoying it all right. Well we keep hyping you enjoying yourself and keeping healthy and we look forward to seeing you when you do get back on the steering wheel because we'd like to work so fat diet and I'm sure we'll thank you joining us on the go and that's it for another episode of inside so because it's certainly fascinating the brody's side of the racing business tomorrow. Not WE'RE GONNA HAVE NINE. Prendergast's has been charged with the price of getting a whole series up and running. He's been less involved in getting livery sorted out from various other things on the cows so he'll be on the show tomorrow night so enjoy listening to him on Tuesday. That's it from inside tippy guys Craig. Guerrilla tiny witbank inside sue cows is produced by thunder media shooting next on for more walking the podcast task for Roger. Angell mobile device search inside supercars. The views expressed on inside supercars including the panelists and guests. Do not reflect the views of the network thunder media Radio any publication or ray broadcast of the show without the expressed written permission of thunder media is strictly prohibited..

Rico Davis Woo Gary Prendergast Sim Tom Rice Craig Roger brody
"roger angell" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

08:52 min | 1 year ago

"roger angell" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Well in the state of California so this what's got to be done to stop and contains to contain this coronavirus this is what these other countries didn't do on time so I commend everyone and we'll get through this together Nika I've been saying Annika it's indica or again there's any guys been on with us before as I said the the book the incredible women of the all American girls professional baseball league the covers one you just want to rub your hands and arms feels a little bit like a baseball but Nika is one of the outstanding illustrators cartoonists artists authors in the country her cartoons or illustrations are unsurpassed and I mean that sincerely and the book tells the story of this amazing time of baseball in the nineteen forties so Annika thank you for being on they give you too much of a build up on your keep going keep going you know I don't know if I should call you soonest illustrator and artist but I tell you and I say this to everyone who's going to get this book it is beautiful and it is one that everyone should have so how do we describe you are you an artist the cartoonists illustrated what how would you like me to describe it oh my god oh sorry IT cut out just a little bit there are you there yes would you like me how would you like me to describe you I think you just I think you just covered all the bases no pun intended I appreciate that thank you I think I I would consider myself all of those things as well I don't I don't really know how to describe my own work I never expected thank you you covered it all right well is it in the back it says an illustrator cartoonist designer writer humorist archivist and baseball devote T. so that covers it for me but tell us about the book and have the same about it it's really I mean it's terrific and I just love looking at the pages is there if we lose Anika okay all right we're gonna we'll get any come back and make sure you're back and you could go ahead all right fish will RAF half let me know when the kids back and we'll talk about this book in the it's the power of live radio as we do these but the the pictures in here just terrific and her illustrations are the best that tells a story because if you saw the movie a league of their own you get the great background for with the all American girls professional baseball league was like in the forties and the forward is by Jean after men of course an executive with the New York Yankees for many years but the real part of the book that special is that Annika has these interviews and statements from people who played in the league so you get a feeling for what the league was all about fish do we have any feedback we have fish back fishes there the Avenue got back yet okay Anika hi Larry are there you are back I we have rafted fish looking for you and they they found you very good all right so let's for finding me thank you so much let's talk about the book ensure that so people understand why this book is special so go ahead the floor's yours wow well I you know I've been a longtime giants fan and have really enjoyed the opportunity to to spend a lot of time drawing and the ball park in San Francisco and I think that's where I met you up and be broadcast area and I've put together some drawings for a little book of illustrations a few years ago and just kind of it just kind of snowballed from there I it kind of came to the realization that you're looking for my drawings that I I didn't have any drawings of women wasn't telling any visual stories of women in baseball and so I just start kind of went to the first story I know which is a league of their own and it it just kind of went from there I started digging in online and found some wonderful stories and just started illustrating the mostly for fun but the more stories that I found the more I just kept feeling inspired to tell these stories and the ways that I tell them which I don't know if it's the best way or not but it's fun for me and and I pitched it to chronicle books which is just you know well I don't throw from the ballpark so that that was really cool and and here we are and use these women I mean I just had so much fun the initial pitch for the book with a lot different than what it turned out to be and I think it turned out to be a way better and such I'm an incredible experience in the process required a lot more research than I had really even thought about our plan on so I just kind of had to learn how to be a researcher and learn how to be an interviewer I was able to travel around and interview a lot of these women who are still living played dissidents some of the cities that they played and visited some really wonderful archive like at the university of Notre dom and south bend Indiana and Rockford and just some really incredible archives that I just couldn't believe I was getting to do this I don't consider myself any sort of like a collegiate you know academic type researchers so it was really really fun for me to take some of the stuff up and put it all together and you know I'm a story person I'm not really a I love history but I wanted to to put it together in a narrative way and you know some of my favorite baseball writers are more on the narratives of writing like Roger Kahn who we just lost our Roger Angell or Doris Kearns Goodwin of you know or even going much further back so I wanted to stitch it together in something like that and then of course the fun part for me the funnest part for me was when illustrating the whole thing so it was it was a lot of work but a lot of fun and I really put a lot into focusing on the real scared of the league and the enjoy you know the joy they had entering at the opportunity the amazing just how unique it was for that moment in time and the legacy that these women had created and also the athleticism and a lot of things that people don't know about just from watching the movie that you might not find readily available so I wanted to make all that available but in a way that people enjoy so that's what I mostly did you did it so successful and the combination of the illustrations and just the anecdotes that take you through the history of of the league and just re reading one and again fans know this I love books I could just pick it up and start reading it and and just get the feel for the book and here's one that's under etiquette and speech and here's the attic that wonderful Parbhani Barney Ross this is from a Louise LU Arnold the pitcher from nineteen forty eight to fifty two self wonderful empire Barney Ross but I was pitching to this girl who wasn't the best hitter and he called the strike a ball of course my catcher was yelling at him and I said Barney I want to tell you something he said yes Lou and I said you're going blind he said Lou own tell you something you go back to that mountain I'll show you how blind dumb getting and you know it's it's no it's it's classic baseball and the illustration of the catcher and the umpire arguing with one another is just it's just beautiful yeah you you did it do you this is a labor of love and it's a book gov it's like the movie after watching the movie you just want to watch it again and again and again and every time it's on you see it and this is the kind of book that every time you pick up a page it brings back something to you about this era and then the illustrations are just just gorgeous how does one get the book tell me zero well you can get it anywhere that books are sold and normally I would recommend your local independent bookstore but I know that those may or may not be open to most people so that you can get it anywhere.

California Nika Annika
"roger angell" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

06:52 min | 1 year ago

"roger angell" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"In real life and there's also a whole generation of girls who. I mean it makes me feel so old to think that a League of their own is over twenty five years old but I've had the conversation with a lot of people younger people and people my age where I tried to explain to them. They say what? What is the book about and I try to tell them and then they kind of get this blink. Look on their face and they say well you know like Have you seen the movie a League of their own and so many of them retain that blank look on their face like say? Oh I've heard about the one about the you know so I think it's a good time. It's good time to talk about it or sure to stories again. Well but it's also the manner in which you present it right is is. Very graphical illustrative verses Pros. Well pros in their right. But it's not it's not what one would normally expect to be. Sort of a traditional sort of non-fiction heavily. Footnoted kind of thing or nor is it a traditional sort of oral history. We've seen a number of of those. They're they're still To their credit number of of women who still in their seventies and eighties nineties who are still alive and kicking an an and celebrated frankly in a lot of major league and other Sporting Environments but I guess it's also a credit to the fact that your skill set right being an illustrator and an artist by trade graphic design. And all that it lends itself very well to storytelling and frankly Gives maybe a whole sort of audience. Who wouldn't have the time or the wherewithal or the a be able to pay attention. Frankly to reading pros vs more. I guess frankly entertaining way too if you will educate on some history here while also maybe giving a little Alignment to the current struggles. I guess of women trying to play baseball improve themselves strangely that they have to. Yeah Yeah Well. Yeah well thank you. I mean you know like you said it. I guess it's just I mean it is a just my skill set naturally and how I do things and how I approach things but Yeah you know. It's it's tough because not everybody learns the same way or interested in the same things or retains information or interested in things for the same reasons but I myself I don't know I was one of those kids that just I learned so much better. Oh so much more interested if there was a picture with it whatever. The thing was Or I would make one. I all my notes in high school. Were you know? Mostly drawn and not written But you know baseball itself Emmy Stories and kind of going back in time You know you can do so much with words but a lot of people just like you said. Don't have the patience for a lot of words or Can hold the interest but baseball also is one of those things that when you really get the clinical You know detailed part. You know the academic aspect of baseball you're entering into a whole language that Even people who love words don't really care to learn or know or you're GONNA lose people real quick when you start going into the details of the game Even my even myself you know I I love that stuff and I'll get interested but You know that's why I love. Writers like Roger Newell or Roger Kahn who you know. We just passed away because they focused on that real. You know the emotion the size the smell the found the funny quits so Those are the words that interested me and still interests me But even still you know if you read the summer game which I'm reading again right now. 'cause I just love it and it gets me excited for spring training but You know even even Roger. Angell will go into some detail those of baseball that. If you aren't a fan of baseball you don't know about baseball year. Just GonNa drop off And I really just. This story is about so much more than baseball if bigger than baseball. It's bigger than just women's history is bigger than sports It's bigger than art. It's bigger than you know I feel like A. It's so important that it's accessible to everyone And anyone and and that being said not just visuals but also the the sort of digest ability of it. You know I love being able to pick up a book and open to any page and getting the gist of what it's about and maybe even laughing out loud for a minute or you know just the able to to pick up a page and read a little bit and enjoy it but then if I have to put it down. I can't and even though this book follows sort of a linear narrative from beginning to end of the League I didn't want it to be one of those things but felt like work You know I wanted to do all the work. I don't want the reader to work So you know and and baseball itself is also Can Be very visual. There's a lot of exciting wines there. There's a lot of Beautiful Colors Particularly in the forties and fifties Who It was really fun to play with. There's a lot of beautiful typography and lettering and and clothing. Oh my God and the uniforms and the you know It's just so visually rich and era particularly so I dunno it just felt like it'd be fun and you know the entertaining medium. I mean a League of their own is a great testament to that that these women did not talk about it. Most people even there on families did not know these women play baseball until any Marshall Major League of their own. A lot of people. I've heard from a lot of people say I know. My mother played professional baseball until she told us. We were going to see the movie and she said I did that. That would be you know And I think that's pretty incredible but you know so. What Penny Marshall did was basically gave life to a lot of these women and they're like see but it's the Hollywood film and it had to be entertaining and So you can see the power that however detail oriented or accurate is it. It's not completely historically accurate but it served a wonderful purpose and I think that's more I think that's the more important aspect of of.

baseball Penny Marshall Marshall Major League Roger Roger Newell Roger Kahn Angell Emmy Stories Hollywood
"roger angell" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"roger angell" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"That ever was ballot nice to have you on the show and let me ask you what you explained that subtitle what made holiday so great in its heyday after World War two well already was partly when it was launch which was right after World War two when millions of people soldiers and others were coming back from the war and were full of optimism and a publishing company called Curtis decided that great idea would be to capitalize on the idea that these folks are coming back and were ready not only to settle into new homes in my new cars and finish their educations but also to travel to places that were peaceful and interesting to them and made them forget what they had gone through during the war the list of writers is so incredible them it would take too much time for Melissa monitors he be white a waiter later went on to become the other than New Yorker Roger on gel the baseball writer Alistair Cooke check carrying Joan Didion Tom Wolfe Ray Bradbury it's an incredible credible list I wanted a were the same as well known writers at the time or was this in the very early part of their careers many of them are already well known may be white was associated with the New Yorker and he had published children's books Charlotte's web being one of them elements of style which is the famous will come on on grammar and usage and is son in law or shall we say his extends son in law was Roger Angell who was working at the time in the nineteen forties for a holiday magazine so that's how that came about and then you know others were ready to go to wonderful places and the editor at the time Ted Patrick was smart enough to take advantage of their wanderlust there were two photographers who were very famous Henri Cartier Bresson and slim Aarons press on of course was known for turning candid shots integrate artwork but talk to me a little bit about slim Aarons he apparently never met a warm climate or celebrity hang out for Montecarlo two port of fino that he didn't like he was I guess what you might call a character wasn't he was a character I knew him quite well because I met him during my days as at holiday in the late nineteen sixties and then when I went to travel and leisure he also contributed a lot there he was told six of six four something new rash he had an arrogant side to him but he was a spectacular photographer and he knew how to get through the front doors of some of the most beautiful homes and resorts in the world when you look over the travel magazine landscape in America today keeping in mind that my alma mater National Geographic traveler just close down their print editions going all digital but they're still travel leisure there is confidence traveler and there's a far what do you think about when you look at today's magazines well quite different from holiday obviously because first of all holiday was oversized and at a time when magazines like look at Saturday Evening Post in life were also popular and they had all the space in the world to give over to these riders so many of the pieces were and four thousand five thousand in the cases we be like seven thousand words and they were it was a dream book in the beginning it was really for people who were armchair Pat travelers because there were no object until the late nineteen fifties today everything is mass travel people need information of the pieces are shorter and the travel books are in competition with digital and some of them have their own websites you are absolutely right hemisphere his new book is called holiday the best travel magazine that ever was a look back at holiday magazine that started after World War two when mass travel was really a new thing for America I really appreciate your joining us.

"roger angell" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"roger angell" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"That ever was Pamela nice to have you on the show and let me ask you one to explain that subtitle what made holiday so great in its heyday after World War two well already was partly when it was launch which was right after World War two when millions of people soldiers and others were coming back from the war and were full of optimism and a publishing company called Curtis decided that great idea would be to capitalize on the idea that these folks are coming back and were ready not only to settle into new homes in my new cars and finish their educations but also to travel to places that were peaceful and interesting to them and made them forget what they had gone through during the war the list of writers is so incredible them it would take too much time for me was the monitors Phoebe white a waiter later went on to become the other than New Yorker Roger on gel the baseball writer Alistair Cooke jet carrying Joan Didion Tom Wolfe Ray Bradbury it's an incredible credible list I wanted a were the same as well known writers at the time or was this in the very early part of their careers many of them are already well known may be late was officiated with The New Yorker and he had published children's books Charlotte's web being one of them elements of style which is the famous book on on grammar and usage and is the son in law or shall we say his fence son in law was Roger Angell who was working at the time in the nineteen forties for a holiday magazine so that's how that came about and then you know others were ready to go to wonderful places and the editor at the time Ted Patrick was smart enough to take advantage of their wanderlust there were two photographers who were very famous Henri Cartier Bresson and slim Aarons press on of course was known for turning candid shots integrate artwork but talk to me a little bit about slim Aarons see apparently never met a warm climate or celebrity hang out from Monte Carlo to Porto fino that he didn't like he was I guess what you might call a character wasn't it he was a character I knew him quite well because I met him during my days as at holiday in the late nineteen sixties and then when I went to travel and leisure he also contributed a lot there he was told six of six four something new brash he had an arrogant side to him but he was a spectacular photographer and he knew how to get through the front doors of some of the most beautiful homes and resorts in the world when you look over the travel magazine landscape in America today keeping in mind that my alma mater National Geographic traveler just close down their print editions going all digital but they're still travel leisure or there is cotton S. traveler and is a far what do you think about when you look at today's magazines well quite different from holiday obviously because first of all holiday was over sized and at a time when magazines like look and Saturday Evening Post in life were also popular and they had all the space in the world to give over to these riders so many of the pieces were and four thousand five thousand in the cases we be white seven thousand words and they were it was a dream book in the beginning it was really for people who were armchair Pat travelers because there were no jets until the late nineteen fifties today everything is mass travel people need information the pieces are shorter and the travel books are in competition with digital and some of them have their own websites you are absolutely right Tennessee or his new book is called holiday the.

Pamela nice
"roger angell" Discussed on The Rewatchables

The Rewatchables

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"roger angell" Discussed on The Rewatchables

"This is a good one. I have a lot of thoughts on this Hobbes versus the Wimmer's fantastic kicker. Couldn't strike me out with one hundred visits re is on in the Lamma love contests skin. So. What about you there? Huckleberry scared. Why don't we going down Baker incredible? As basically a lot of people have failed playing Babe Ruth. And the best version of Babe Ruth in from Hollywood version was actually Joe Don Baker is the Wimmer. Oh, it's perfect. He's great. This is the gut. Yeah. The swagger don't athletic anyway. I mean for sure compared to John Goodman the show. Hebrew. Yes. That's true. That's true. I I love also that we can we can Timestamps us. Right. So. Roy is supposed to be thirty four ish in the nineteen thirty nine season. This is twenty three inches twenty three twenty three's Babe Ruth warehouse. Sure. I mean, it's the fourteen war MVP. Yeah. So the idea Babe Ruth and his fourteen war MVP season. Engaging in Cordoba abet with ROY Hobbs is just thrilling to think about him Babe Ruth or you like having the Wimmer as like a cover. I like the whammo as a cover kind of. She just worked for it. Like one degree as a viewer as you would have had to go lefty. If you're going to actually have them be Babe Ruth, and that's tough to find a lefty. Joe Don Baker that that's tough. Yeah. Now, I I was I'm in favor of this. I like in general, the blend of real life, names and figures and fictional creations. I was like when stories kind of more free and fiction. This is a great scene and. Also leads to a great question of nobody with bass on back foul tip early takes out. Duvall were the poor catcher the old guy. I mean, the great moment dangers and Duval just backs up yet pieces and Amherst like, hey, you're gonna call it from there while I'm more concerned about not sustaining a concussion here calling it properly. That's a classic Hobbes's. I batting practice. When they finally let him I love that one. Let him hit. That's a great one. I mean, she that back. Not bad kid. Would you get this? I made it myself latrine your home wonderboy. With that on there. What does it mean minute a long time ago when I was a kid? I wanted to be very special. After I been here every day. And then finally let him hit and he's just cranking them greats. Swing by Redford model offered Williams. Right. That's in the Roger Angell New Yorker piece so crucial that him. And they're both really looked like baseball players. Yeah. Le- really really buy. It you buy it. Yeah. The batting practice scene is wonderful for three reasons. Okay. Just the sheer spectacle. Right. It's like watching Josh Hamilton and the homerun derby. You realize that the characters were having the same experience that you are as viewer. So you're totally mesmerized and captivated by what you're seeing people remained goes get the war. Water fountain lady who's up drinking eviously had a scene complaining about the quality of the water? Why can't they fix this? You know, you understand how forlorn he is. And how just decrepit the team in the stadium and everything about their situation is, but even he who was so reluctant so has attendant to turn to ROY in part because he thought it was being duped by the judge. Yeah. Drinking that filthy water. Just guzzling it. And then the third reason the line you just referencing. I've been here everyday. You really realize that ROY is kind of a dick. Yeah. He's kind of an asshole. And there are a lot of moments in the movie where you're like, this is not necessarily a nice guy in that is. Cover basically, every baseball hero. We've had he's just like sort of a jerk. He's he doesn't hesitate to be rude to people he really does on some level, and this is not necessarily a winning characteristic trait. It's like a little alienating. He actually feels really entitled. He thinks he deserves this. He thinks he's owed something and that he was denied it by forces outside of his control, and that that was really unfair. And that he obviously has waited patiently..

Babe Ruth ROY Hobbs Wimmer Joe Don Baker Hobbes MVP baseball Duval Huckleberry Roy Roger Angell New Yorker Lamma John Goodman Hollywood Duvall Cordoba Josh Hamilton Le Williams Amherst
"roger angell" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

04:17 min | 3 years ago

"roger angell" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

"I find out what I don't know about the game. That's a great motivator. But for me, I just always starting out. I just wanted to write. I never even thought about doing something in television. It just kind of all as as the world changed and the and the media landscape change. But I think the principles are still the same know there's no delete key on TV though. There's no second dra- third-round. But I think it's no I said about passionate curiosity certain come into play. And I think it's the way you treat people as well. I mean, a lot of what we do. Even though the technology's really change a ton ally hasn't changed in terms of how we really up rate on the currency of trusts. No. Roger Angell set. Best job was really to get people to bare their lives to him. You know, he always was drawn to the people who are very good communicators talked to reveal themselves part of that as a writer getting people comfortable with you that they can trust you. They can share their lives and their stories, and maybe didn't share on it every day. And you know, it's hard for me to tell somebody out to do that. But it's something you have to be aware of. And hopefully, it comes somebody naturally. But I do think it's it comes down to really relationships that you have with people working. At those skill sets individually in terms of, you know, writing a story structure of story script, you know, the mechanics of being on air, you can learn all those things and those skill sets. But I think the passion and the respect that you show to people something. That you better have inside of you to make it in this business because the great business, but as you know, Richard it's so competitive, there's so many towns of people out there that trying to do this job halfway you just not gonna make Tom my colleagues at the Ken Rosenthal. Jayson stark are very prominent on social media. The majority of the well-known baseball writer, certainly or or multi media types in the US Joel Sherman types, John Heyman are at least have a very big presence on Twitter. Maybe they're on Facebook and Instagram and other place. I just know they happen to be on Twitter. You are famously if that's the right word not on social media. Not on Twitter you've made that decision. And that's kind of the very interesting decision to me in two thousand eighteen I it just means Tom you once again or the smartest person out there. And Secondly, but it's interesting because you know, as you know, so many organizations want their people on social media, and you can understand why it's publicity for the product. It. It's a way to get your words out there to places that normally you would not get to. But you've made a decision. You miss a specific decision. Not to be part of that world. And I wonder why. Well, it's probably all the people who are who tell me met. I wish I were you or not? No, it's I guess it's just a personal decision for me. I just think I'm not comfortable with that idea about a lot of things that it's as well to, you know, especially things like snark and self promotion and things like that. I just don't have an interest in that. I I'd much rather prefer that? If he about the work that I do rather than about me personally. And listen, I write for largest sports magazine in the country MLB network. I'm box. I write dot com, you know, producing a lot of things out there. So it's not as if you know people want to read me or hear from either not option to find them. And you know, again, I do things as a feature writer and broadcaster as an analyst that you know, it's probably I like to think has some crafts involved in producing that kind of work. And you know, social media tends to be more the Mike. Crow wave variety and getting stuff out there quickly. Maybe things that you haven't really thought all the way through. And I don't know. I guess I'm giving you a long answer. And the short answer would be that it just I don't feel like suits my comfort level. Now. Listen, it's an honest answer. I appreciate that very much. And again, I think you you've probably figured out something that all of us can figure out. Why do we treat sports like a religion? Why does sports.

Tom writer Roger Angell Twitter John Heyman Jayson stark dra Ken Rosenthal MLB Facebook US Joel Sherman Richard Instagram analyst
"roger angell" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"roger angell" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Coming on. Of course, Beninese, right? That will do it for today. Thanks for listening and thanks to everyone who joined us. Thank you to effectively listener, Rachel pollinator, whose parents re spoke to earlier on this episode for letting us know about them and about the same Bill, which has been part of her parents lives for longer than she has. And I would remind everyone that affect we've out listener John Ackerman made a t shirt of the two forty-sevens. So if you want to wear it on your body without having it be part of your body. You can go to the T forty-seven shirt dot com to find it. I have two quick. Things to add the first if you haven't read Roger angels new article on Monday, I recommend that you do. I was a little worried about Roger who has many of. You know is my baseball writing idle and writing idle period, certainly one of them, and he also occupies that role for many people. I know he hadn't written since may. And I was hoping that he would be back for the postseason usually heap blogs about the playoffs at least when New York teams are involved, and he didn't this year, and he's ninety eight years old, and I was somewhat concerned and even more. So when I saw on Monday Roger Angell trending on Twitter, but I should have known. He was trending because he wrote something great ninety eight or not this was not about baseball. It was about voting and Rodriguez's knows a thing or to about that as well as someone who I voted for presidential election when FDR was running. Anyway, I was very heartened to see a new piece for Roger I also liked the message of the peace. I'm sure that your decision about whether to vote or not if you're even hearing this before election day is not.

Roger Roger Angell Roger I John Ackerman baseball FDR Beninese Twitter New York Rodriguez ninety eight years
"roger angell" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"roger angell" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Hey speaking of dot getting out of the way did you guys see ken jails punch himself who was more of a slat yeah i don't think he really went for it i think if he went for it would have been more interesting there he held back he held back a little bit i guess it's like the dwight truth punching yourself in having the element of surprise sort of thing i i don't know whether it's possible to punch yourself hard enough to actually hurt yourself but it looked like it could've heard i'm not sure i've ever seen this before in fact i probably haven't 'cause roger angell wrote that he had never seen this before it roger angeles ninety seven years old and has been watching baseball since literally lefty gomez i win angel said he looked like a newborn flailing in his crib anyway i'm not sure how to react to that because it seems like ken giles's had a pretty tough year and he's always been expressive on the mount in good ways sometimes and now in bad ways so this was on tuesday for anyone who didn't see it justin verlander held the key is scoreless in struck out fourteen of over eight innings and then can giles came in the ninth inning and immediately gave up a three run homer to gary sanchez and also put the couple guys on base ahead of him and he was upset and he out punch himself or slapped himself in the face and normally this was like the opposite of the eric lower reaction that you and i talked about last week jeff were lower in his debut it course field gave up grand slam to no one or not oh and just sorta smiled like yeah he got me this was the opposite of that and i i mean.

roger angell baseball angel ken giles jeff dwight roger angeles justin verlander gary sanchez ninety seven years
"roger angell" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"roger angell" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"Not in the way people would think you going to say it created characters for them did that whole but you seem to like to start shit yeah sometimes i like to i would like to start shit when it's justified right like i to me it's like there's two types of people who do this you know especially now it's the people that start shit just to start shit right i think a lot of local sports radio hosts are like that yeah but i think when you start shape when you if you really believe what you're saying it's a little different i always try to whenever i'm writing or talking to podcasts it's to me it's gotta be genuine it's it's always how i feel i might be wrong i might not have all the facts that i needed when i made the assessment right i genuinely feel that way so you started your so your style started unfold in in college you're not quite yet now in college date because i was trying to write a little bit from the fan perspective in in meld that with some other things but what did you like reading by journalistic was all kinds of people but this hunter s so when i was in boston they had these we just had random we had a couple of awesome sports con this ray fitzgerald and lima fill and they did not write the typical sports com were they writing for what period for the boston globe and the comms that they wrote were basically you know thoughtful a little bit from the fan's perspective they weren't stuff like carlton fisk is a coward and needs to go like they didn't write that stuff and so it was a little bit of that it was other roger angell and the new yorker the way he wrote fans perspective was a big influence i don't know if you've ever read a book william goldman wrote a sportsbook with mike lupu william goldman's the famous via writer and he wrote from the fan side and luca row from the reporter side and it was about this year near exports and goldman's fan columns i basically just started ripping off like that style in college so i was like that's that should work as a com.

carlton fisk roger angell william goldman writer boston ray fitzgerald lima mike lupu reporter
"roger angell" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"roger angell" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"I found his whole story to be so fascinating for a couple of reasons one i'm always interested in gifts when athletes get gifts you know my favorite all three of all time you've read the roger angell piece on steep less steve blasts the someone who are the famous steve blass it was named after him having the disease baseball was just having your mind shortcircuit in a way that he's sabotages if you've never read that google roger angell steve the gods yes but i i guess i i don't know what i find so interesting about it and maybe why i feel so bad for him is that he has been ridiculed on the internet every day for months and that's my greatest fear not my greatest fear but it's one of an and i to you guys probably see that and you think oh he can just escape it just don't look and maybe it's because it's an age thing or something but when god says a healthier attitude about social media than anyone i've ever met he just goes there for the praise and ignores all of the criticism always tells me to do that and it's not pot i don't think it's possible in my generation that's how that's how he consumes the internet i've been doing it for a while i mean i really have i used to be affected by like all the negative comment i did but i just i scroll through them i literally i see them right i just go to the next one i find there's been so much freedom and release in that for him i mean what can i say regular rubicon.

steve blass roger angell google
"roger angell" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"roger angell" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"Who are the famous one st blast it was named after him having baseball was just having your mind short circuit that he's sabotages you've never read that google roger angell steve the gods but i guess i i don't know what i find so interesting about it and maybe why i feel so bad for him is that he has been ridiculed on the internet every day for months and that's my greatest fear nominate is fear but it's one and i to you guys probably see that and you think oh he can just escape it just don't look and maybe it's because it's an age thing or something but when god says a healthier attitude about social media than anyone i've ever met he just goes there for the praise and ignores all of the criticism he always tells me to do that and it's not pot i don't think it's possible in my generation that's how that's how he consumes the internet i've been doing it for a while i really have used to be affected by all the negative i did but i just i scroll through them i literally i see them right i just go to the next one i find there's been so much freedom and release in that for him i mean what can i say regular rubicon are you the same way i'll tell you where mine was formed from because i don't think it's normal i wasn't the same way for the first fifteen years of my career but you become a newspaper columnist and nobody agrees on anything so i developed sort of fifteen years of immunity of only taking the criticism from people i respect just i have to respect you can't be an egg on twitter i have to respect you so that i can filter through some of that stuff orig nordahl together these i think today now we grow our circles are social circles the people we allow in the people who affect us are so much whiter than they used to be that you don't we don't grow up with those bubbles we don't grow up knowing okay my circle is eight people or i care about these people you grow up now believing the entire world is connected to me unconnected to them their opinion matters it's inescapable i don't think people today are like can have that attitude that you're espousing.

baseball google fifteen years