19 Burst results for "Roe V. Wade"

"roe v. wade" Discussed on CNN Political Briefing

CNN Political Briefing

02:22 min | 2 months ago

"roe v. wade" Discussed on CNN Political Briefing

"In the issue. So how did we get here while a good place to start is the breakdown of the current supreme court. The court has only recently become a six three conservative majority with former president trump's nominee nation of justice. Amy conybeare who took the seat of liberal icon ruth bader ginsburg before then the courts but five four times with justice john roberts frequently acting as the deciding vote during barrett's confirmation hearing she was asked she agreed with the view that roe v wade should be overturned by the supreme court. What she had to say was evasive. That just it's a contentious issue. Which is i know one reason why it would be comforting to you to have an answer. But i can't express views on cases or pre commit to approaching case any particular way. Conservatives are confident that she will rule in their favor. And that's important because just last june before barrett took the bench. Roberts joined with the liberals to strike down louisiana abortion law stunning conservatives including longtime stalwart. Clarence thomas to understand justice thomas's impact. Let's briefly go back in time. Twenty nine years ago in a landmark decision called planned parenthood v casey. That upheld the core of roe v. wade. Just as thomas joined a descent calling row plainly wrong and in row aromas constitutional decision. This was only about a year after he took the bench. Of course doing justice thomas his nomination hearings when asked about his thoughts on a woman's right to choose. He refused to comment one way or the other at that point in time i do not believe that a sitting judge on very difficult and very important issues. That could be coming before. The court can comment on the outcomes whether he or she agrees with those outcome. As a sitting judge in another descent justice. Thomas wrote that row is grievously wrong. For many reasons with the most fundamental is at the core holding that the constitution protects a woman's right to abort her unborn child finds no support in the text of the fourteenth amendment time and again justice. Thomas has since said that roe v wade has no basis in the constitution. Thomas has been on the bench for almost thirty years. This is twenty twenty one and the court is now six three. Thomas has another shot.

Thomas Amy conybeare Roberts thomas john roberts barrett ruth bader ginsburg six fourteenth amendment trump Twenty nine years ago Clarence thomas one reason five four times last june six three roe v wade almost thirty years twenty twenty one wade
"roe v. wade" Discussed on CNN Political Briefing

CNN Political Briefing

03:35 min | 2 months ago

"roe v. wade" Discussed on CNN Political Briefing

"This podcast is sponsored by net suite by oracle. Hello everyone. I'm ariane vogue cnn supreme court reporter in for david chalian and this is the cnn. Political briefing this week. The supreme court agreed to take a key abortion case next term with so much on the line. The supreme court has agreed to take up a major abortion case this fall mississippi law banning most abortions after fifteen weeks potentially setting up a major challenge to roe v wade in the majority conservative court. This is what conservatives have been waiting for and trump and mcconnell certainly delivered critics. Say this case is a direct challenge to roe v wade. It's also the biggest abortion case. The court has heard since nineteen ninety two. It can tell us so much about the priorities of this conservative court. So this week we're going to take you through the basics of the mississippi case how we got to this point and what this means for both sides of the issue. Let's i give you a little background on the case in question. The state has a fifteen week abortion ban which then governor phil bryant a republican signed into law in two thousand eighteen mississippi governor phil bryant has signed some of the nation's toughest restrictions on abortions in the law. House bill fifteen. Ten was signed into law on monday and it goes into effect immediately. There are exceptions but only for medical emergencies or cases in which there is a severe fetal abnormality not for instances of rape or incest. The law was struck down in november twenty eighteen by a federal judge in mississippi and the us court of appeals for the fifth circuit upheld that ruling in december twenty one thousand nine hundred mississippi then asked the supreme court to take up the case and the justices put that decision off for months this week. They finally agreed to hear it for next term in doing so they could gut or limit the nine thousand nine hundred seventy three landmark supreme court decision roe v wade which protects a woman's right to abortion prior to viability as it currently stands viability can occur at around twenty four weeks of pregnancy. Mississippi is only the latest in a litany of states pushing for more restrictive abortion laws south carolina. Oklahoma and idaho have qualified bands this year on abortion at the onset of a fetal heartbeat. Also this year arkansas. And oklahoma have enacted near-total abortion bans and montana ban the procedure at twenty weeks. None of the bills have gone into effect. They all represent conservative efforts to strip down roe. V wade arkansas governor. Asa hutchinson said as much when he signed a near total abortion ban back in march. I signed it because it is a direct challenge to roe versus wade. That was the intent of it. I think there's a very narrow chance that the supreme court will accept that case. But we'll see but now one of the cases has reached the court. Mississippi's law will be blockbuster. Case with the justices revisiting an issue that still deeply divided the country some fifty years after the landmark opinion another twist the ruling could potentially come in the run up to the twenty twenty. Two midterm elections and the mississippi case will be the third time the justices have acted on an abortion related case this term they also agreed to hear a kentucky case and reinstated long standing fda restrictions for patients seeking to obtain a drug used for abortions early in pregnancy. It shows how this conservative majority is.

Asa hutchinson december twenty trump monday twenty weeks november twenty eighteen mcconnell david chalian south carolina nine thousand fifteen week arkansas march this week idaho this year twenty twenty republican third time two thousand
"roe v. wade" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

Diane Rehm: On My Mind

06:33 min | 2 months ago

"roe v. wade" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

"Am on my mind. Could this be the bro v wade. When trump ran for president he promised to feel as premium core with justices. Who would overturn the landmark marches gin now with three of his appointees on the bench. The nation's highest court is poised to do just that on monday. The just is his agreed to hear a case at strikes. The core of the precedent set by row back in nineteen at need three that. A woman has a constitutional right to an abortion. Mary ziggler is professor of law. At florida state in her. Most recent book is titled abortion in american legal history. V wade to the present. She joins me to explain the legal question in front of court and abortion excess as would look like it fro worse struck down mary this week. These are court agreed to that could challenge roe v. Wade tell me about this mississippi law that is coming before the court sure so in twenty eighteen mississippi passed a law that banned most abortions at fifteen weeks gestation with certain exceptions for either health emergencies. Or what the state calls severe fetal abnormalities and the theory underlying the law is that fetal pain is possible at fifteen weeks now just as a as a starting point. That's highly contested. Most other states that have abortion restrictions based on fetal pain. Don't even start until the twentieth week. And most research would suggest fetal pena's impossible until the twenty ninth thirtieth week. But what's really salient about the case. Is that the supreme court has said you can't ban abortion before viability which usually is around the twenty four th week maybe twenty second twenty third week with heroic medical interventions but clearly not the fifteen th week. So what's interesting or important. Is that for the court to uphold this mississippi law it would either have to overturn all of roe v wade or at least the part of roe v wade that says no bans pre viability. So what about heartbeat doesn't heartbeat come in to question here as well potentially right. I mean so if the supreme court is to to get rid of the viability limit. One possibility or one question that would come up with. What is the limit. So if it's not viability what is it and the proponents of heartbeat. Laws are waiting in the wings to say well. It's heartbeat because either in their view a heartbeat is viability right. They would say at the point that you can detect heartbeat or fetal cardiac miscarriages much less likely or in the alternative that a heartbeat is just a better alternative to viability. And so that's one possibility. Of course the supreme court could come up with any other limit right. They could say the limit is fifteen weeks or i mean quite possibly they could say. There is no limit and states can ban abortion. Whatever they want. Helen soon is a hurt. Beat audible It's usually around six weeks. Gestation it can sometimes be anywhere between six and eight. I mean and at that time. Perhaps a woman doesn't even know she's pregnant absolutely especially for people who have irregular menstrual periods. Exactly what is the issue. The main question that the court is going to be dealing with. I would say there are two questions the question. The court granted is. Is it ever okay for states to ban abortion before viability. So they're certainly going to be confronting that and they may be asking whether viability as limit makes sense and then related question will be if they think viability doesn't make sense. Can you get rid of viability without the whole structure of abortion rights collapsing. Right i mean the supreme court may want it to collapse raped. And i mean if they don't the question may be. Is there a way to to have a right to worship without the viability limits. And what about questions of access. Well i think this is not so much. An access cases a case really about the fate of roe v wade. Obviously if the supreme court says okay we don't don't worry about the viability limit anymore. That a lot of the kinds of limits on access we've seen would be much more likely to go into effect so whether that's bans on particular procedures or bans on abortion earlier in pregnancy. But this is more a case In the kind of tradition of are we going to have a right to worship or not than it is about access which is one of the reasons why you see so much more panic about this case really on the among progressives because this is a much more direct strike at ruby wade than anything. We've seen since the nineties. I would say i ca. Mississippi is not the only state pushing to get before the supreme court with his town case so there are a whole range of states out there trying to get their cases. They're absolutely so one i'm watching. The supreme court already has petition from arkansas. A law banning abortion when a person realizes that a fetus. More child has down syndrome. Their whole bunch of laws like this. This so-called eugenic worship laws. There's laws limiting access to medication abortion. There's laws limiting the most common surgical procedure. After the first trimester called dilation and evacuation of there's lots and lots of stuff in the pipeline. And i think you're you're right to point that out diane because it seems a little more likely to me that this supreme court will end up overturning roe but maybe take one or two cases to kind of set that up i just doing it in one fell swoop so we may be looking. I think at the reversal of rome. More likely and twenty twenty three or twenty twenty four than in twenty twenty two. So it's worth keeping an eye on. What else is in the pipeline. Because those might actually be.

Mary ziggler one fifteen weeks trump first trimester monday nineteen two questions fifteen th week twenty second eight Mississippi one question twentieth week One possibility arkansas six three twenty twenty three Helen
"roe v. wade" Discussed on Ordinary Equality

Ordinary Equality

08:04 min | 5 months ago

"roe v. wade" Discussed on Ordinary Equality

"What she should do. Norma had sacrificed her body and years of her life for a movement that hadn't wanted her to represent much more than a pseudonym on a piece of paper. She was extremely poor and without many resources. The antiabortion side used her to one of the conditions of the bribe. They gave her took away. One of the most meaningful parts of norma's life her longtime partner. Connie gonzales here's the money. The people who became so entangled in her life in her post road life were basically using her. She was very vulnerable. She had no money. She was poor. She wasn't particularly educated and then came to her and said. Hey we'll give you all this money if you sort of switched sides and she said okay. I'll do that and sort of tragedy that attends. That decision was the fact that she was in a lesbian relationship. She was in a relationship with another woman a very serious relationship for years and years and years and before these these anti choice campaigners these terrorists essentially would even give her the money that they promised to give her if she switched sides they forced her to give up this relationship that was really important to her in the winter of two thousand seventeen. Norma passed away. From her deathbed she spoke to her experience with the reproductive rights movement. Did they use you as a trophy. Of course i was the big fish. Do you think they would say he used them. Well thank you. It was a mutual thing. You know i check their money. They put me out in front of the cameras and tell me what sign. That's what i'd say women have been abortions for thousands of years if it's just the woman's choice than and she chooses to have an abortion then it should be safe roe versus wade. Help save women's lives. Here's gloria allred again. And then of course in a way. She made a deathbed confession on a documentary She knew was getting to be the end of her life and she confessed that she was really pro choice. All along which i'm sure was very disturbing to the anti-choice side because they appeared many of them to enjoy having her as in a way. A poster child for the anti choice movement kind of nanna. Jane roe was anti choice. But i guess she managed to wipe the smiles off their faces. What she said she was really pro-choice along And i as a lawyer think about norma mccorvey in the context as a litigant It's very difficult for people who are not lawyers and not involved at the legal process to understand that a lot of times litigation especially this high impact supreme court litigation is actually not about the plaintiffs. You have to have a story you have to have an actual person with an actual injury but at the end of the day because it takes so long and the processes so involved the individuals who are involved in the litigation may not actually get any relief they may not benefit. And so you know again. Norma as a person with no Resources very little education. She seeks out a lawyer to help her get an abortion and many years later there is a decision that helps everyone but her get that thing that she was seeking. And that's really hard to understand and it's really hard to explain as a lawyer. It's hard to make clear. This case is actually about a bigger issue and a bigger cause than you or your immediate situation and so. I'm not sure that she had that conversation. And i'm not sure that she understood that in the end even if they win the case She wasn't going to win. So i can see how she would have felt very disappointed and let down by being part of something so big that did not benefit her personally And i think. I don't know i think women just get really taken advantage of and used as pawns. And it's sad to see that she felt like both sides were kind of using her. Yeah and i think that's what was so interesting to me and watching it that she's kind of like you both used me and i'm gonna go out on my terms with my story as i see it and normal corby was a survivor and i think that's something that i respect about her. Although i didn't respect all of her tactics right. I i see that. She was facing some pretty tough circumstances. She was marginalized in a number of ways and she kept reminding people that. Hey what's a winfrey. You doesn't necessarily necessitate a win for me. And it sounds like her voice wasn't always heard and so i think it's a good cautionary tale for all of us to who find ourselves wanting to support survivors of broken systems. In general to really listen and to really listen to what people need and also to try to fight for policies that promote access. And i think it's important to remember especially when it comes to human rights. It actually doesn't matter what when individual person believes like it should have no import one way or the other that the plaintiff in roe versus wade changed her. Mind it doesn't matter what one person thinks. That person is still permitted to not terminate a pregnancy. That's fine saying like nina. Someone changed their mind. I understand the rhetorical flourish. And i understand the emotional impact of that argument. But when you really think about it it shouldn't matter at all it's totally true. It's totally true and that there has to be the sort of legal strategy. I think it's interesting. Because a lot of times i mean i've seen it and my own personal life and family experiences where people think that you know taking a case to trial or having a legal engagement. All of a sudden is going to fix things you know and a lot of people don't truly understand that the law is the law but it doesn't mean that the law will ensure access or justice. It's about how you wield the lots. How engage the law. And how you hold the law accountable. As we're all too aware road did not solve all our problems. It did not preserve the right to access abortion for all people in all instances a huge part of that failing ties back to my favorite topic. The ira the rookie was based on substantive due process rights or rights to privacy but in doing so the court completely ignored equality which should be at the heart of the issue in nineteen eighty-five the late great justice ruth bader ginsburg then an appellate level judge openly expressed her disappointment and the roe versus wade decision to ignore how abortion access discriminates against all women or as she wrote a woman's quote ability to stand in relation to men society and the state as independent self sustaining equal citizens instead of asking the justices to acknowledge that under the constitution. Women should have unassailable control over their bodies. Because we're full fledged human beings. We instead settled for an argument that in their minds. Male doctors should have some say in what we do with our bodies and that legislators with no medical expertise can also meddle in the way that we access our healthcare that fundamentally puts us on shaky ground both legally and.

Connie gonzales Jane roe Norma norma thousands of years ruth bader ginsburg both sides One both nina many years later one one person two thousand seventeen years one way nineteen eighty-five gloria allred corby rights
"roe v. wade" Discussed on Ordinary Equality

Ordinary Equality

04:23 min | 5 months ago

"roe v. wade" Discussed on Ordinary Equality

"Was minors second. low income. Folks lost out on very quickly after row. The supreme court held that states and the federal government may exclude abortion from the otherwise comprehensive healthcare coverage provided medicate. Perhaps the most emblematically excluded in the roe. Decision was bro herself. As we know pregnancies are time sensitive endeavors. The law on the other hand is not particularly fast. Moving years passed between the first lawsuit and the final supreme court decision. I always need to take a deep breath. When i think of the weight of this but norma mccorvey the abortion she sought when the nineteen seventy-three decision was handed down in washington called norm to share the good news exclaiming we want normal replied. No you one. Why would i be excited. I had a baby. The fact that the suit was a class action lawsuit on behalf of all pregnant women made it so the circumstances of the case did not hinge on norma's pregnancy alone. Well that was a savvy legal. Move it left. Norma's immediate need for relief behind in service of the greater good. The movement around roe v wade was not particularly kind to normal overall. Here's gloria allred. The famed women's rights attorney she represented norma for a time after the road decision. I met norma mccorvey also known as jane roe of roe v wade many many decades ago at a big rally a pro choice rally in washington. Dc and i think she came up to me and she said i'm jane roe and i said oh. Are you of the speakers today at the pro choice. Rally which i thought she would be and should be one of the speaker. She said no. They won't allow me to speak and they didn't invite me to speak. I said really am so surprised about that. And in any event after that she stayed in touch with me and she wanted to speak. So i helped to start speaking out. Because i think it's important for people to hear more about pro-choice and she wanted to speak about it felt she had a right to speak about it. That went on for some years. So the woman whose case one us all the right to access legal abortion didn't get any relief herself and she was excluded from the pro-choice movement in a sort of mean girls way given that context one of the biggest scandals to rock. The post real world was when norma became an ally of the anti choice movement. She's likely to trade traded her status as a symbol of one side of the abortion debate to that of an icon of the other and both sides water as jane roe norma. Mccorvey is a different story. This was paraded around is a big win for the anti choice movement. I mean turning vivo of roe. V wade into anti-choice advocate was quite the scoop. And there's nothing. They love more than a redemption narrative. But the story wasn't that simple. Here's gloria again. And then one day. I suddenly received the news and also let me know that she'd gone over to the anti-choice side now. My feeling was that she was pro choice and because that was her attorney. I'll never say what she said to me or what i said to her because that's confidential. But i always had the feeling that she was pro choice and had done it. Because you know the anti choice side would perhaps pay her for speaking or help her with some form of economic support. She needed that. She didn't have sufficient funds to live. And the pro-choice side was not doing that. They weren't having her speak and.

Mccorvey gloria allred Norma today first lawsuit washington roe v wade both sides jane roe norma norma norma mccorvey jane roe one nineteen seventy-three norm one side second many decades ago one of one day
"roe v. wade" Discussed on Today in True Crime

Today in True Crime

02:55 min | 6 months ago

"roe v. wade" Discussed on Today in True Crime

"To the story. The seven to two supreme court ruling on roe. V wade may have been revolutionary. But it wasn't the first time. Abortion had come under review indeed. The ancient greek philosopher. Aristotle believed that terminating pregnancy was ethical if performed within the first ninety days and one could argue that he was late to the game. The first recorded abortion took place some twelve hundred years before aristotle weighed in on reproductive rights around fifteen fifty bc women commonly relied on herbal supplements to end just station surgical procedures. Were also done. But they were far more dangerous. A shovel like tool known as an embryo. Thome and a scissor. Like tool named the cranial class were used to aid with extraction. Sterilization of medical tools was not widely practiced and heavy bleeding and infection. Were common as time went. On midwives and homeopathic doctors became better at providing simple remedies to reduce fertility and induce a menstrual cycle thereby eliminating pregnancies commonly accepted herbal abortifacents. Include tanzi safflower. Scotch broom mug work wormwood and essential oil. A penny royal. These methods aren't as widespread today as the nineteenth and twentieth centuries gave rise to a medical system that largely rejected nature opportunity and because the advent of modern medicine was male dominated patriarchal ideas about a woman's right to choose slowly began creeping into the medical field. The catholic church also held influence during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries further solidifying anti-abortion rhetoric but despite the virtue signaling by top doctors and religious groups women continued seeking abortions. They found secret clinics willing to operate but the clandestine meant that women had little to no grounds for recourse if they were hurt during the procedure then in one thousand nine hundred sixty the food and drug administration approved the pill as a means of regulating menstruation and preventing unwanted pregnancy. But as we mentioned it was quickly stigmatized reserved for a certain kind of woman given the prudish view of reproductive health. It's amazing that roe v wade was decided a mere thirteen years later since the decision. Abortion rates have steadily declined as birth control and education on reproductive health have become more widely accessible. Abortion.

Aristotle seven first first ninety days nineteenth and twentieth centu first time Thome thirteen years later one thousand nine hundred sixt today greek two supreme court one years fifty twelve hundred aristotle fifteen
"roe v. wade" Discussed on 5-4

5-4

05:23 min | 7 months ago

"roe v. wade" Discussed on 5-4

"I think there's like if you're a law student or a lawyer. You probably heard in law school. That roy v wade was a week decision. Right right and the reason you heard that was almost certainly because conservatives have won this meta argument about the role of judges with respect to the fourteenth amendment roe v wade wasn't incorrectly decided roe v wade was decided based on a very reasonable understanding of the fourteenth amendment a very reasonable understand right and the conservative development of this framework in which judges are said to have no discretion with respect to the fourteenth amendment was in reaction to roe v wade and griswold reconnect right. Don't actually believe that judges shouldn't have discretion. They give judges all sorts of enormous amounts of discretion when it comes to aiding the conservative causes. It's to me a tremendous feat of the conservative legal movement that they have been able to successfully paint row as being incorrect to the degree where like liberal students across the country. Probably give that at least some credence if not already with it outright. Right like in law school. When you're in con- law and Talking about roe..

fourteenth amendment roe v wade griswold roy v wade wade
"roe v. wade" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

05:16 min | 1 year ago

"roe v. wade" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Roe V. Wade and you as much as anybody your historian author and you talk about this daily Robi way the woman behind it was she would probably tell you at the time used as a pawn well you know she absolutely would and and then years of recent years she's even recanted much of her position and now she's you know in fact pro life and you know it's it's just it's so interesting that you know the last you know that they've got this manufactured crisis does your which goes on whether it's climate change or impeachment or portion of the gun rights rallies and a simple fact of the matter is you know trump did something that no one has seen the president has ever done before which is speak at this particular margin there seems it is a new larger new rally going on almost every single day in America so the right really does seem to be not just waking up and showing up in a really I'm really invigorated by that we're looking for to November of twenty twenty but you know roe versus Wade and I'm I'm in the state of Alabama we've made everything about abortion illegal and we knew that it would eventually get slapped down by a federal judge which it did but that was the hope that we get this thing for stirred in front of the Supreme Court hopefully post impeachment that's going to happen Michael I have to ask you and probably shouldn't ask you because you're a white male and for that you have all kinds of sins attributed to you sorry about that but I'm a female and when I hear this phrase women's reproductive rights and people try to hold that up as a mantle for which they can do whatever they want to do it almost makes me want to weep because to me it's not a right about your reproductive whatever it has everything to do with with killing the most innocent and those are the ones we are supposed to be the most protective of and it's it's heartbreaking but it's what America has become and it's celebrated by the left as president trump pointed out Friday well you know I mean I I'm sensitive to the fact that you know we are talking about a woman's right to her body and what goes on but she also has a right to keep her knees together you know that that the father in this case you don't have to write down he should have some kind of right of recourse if something were to take place here is it unfortunate that that women the was a bear the brunt of this conversation perhaps you know life is unfair I don't know how else to put it but at the end of the day the moment that baby is conceived we're talking about a third party you know interestingly enough if you kill a pregnant woman in the state of Texas that counts as two homicides and while we can't see see this for for what it is nationwide is just beyond me I think it transcends because I've made the argument that climate change in abortion and an immigration and everything else is going on it's all basically the same argument and that his government is prepared and that the fact of the matter is that you know it's a feels good do it that's right if you want to transition this transition you know if you want to go to the bathroom go to different bathrooms you know there's no there's no mores anymore because their moral code anymore I realize it's a tough debate and as it yeah so as all old white guy with a bunch of students by the way of guilty most of mine but you know what with that Sam you know I I I realize it's a tough conversation and there might be extemporaneous circumstances where where abortion has to take place it's abortion as an industry that's got to come to an end I'm I'm very I'm so tired of Michael you talk about the sins of the white man I'm so tired of the talk of toxic masculinity and all these other things and as I said before what America has become today is where what president trump pointed out the left celebrates abortion and I just I just don't know how far we can go how long it's going to be before that gets turned around I understand what it was like back in the day apparently back alley abortions with coat hangers I am sorry to be so playing in my language but the fact of the matter is we have seen we know more and more since nineteen seventy two that was ages ago when it comes to scientific research we know way more about what a fetus feels and knows and looks like and how he or she moves in the womb and I just cannot believe we are where we are today in twenty twenty well you know again I believe it goes back to to the government as the ultimate arbiter of our moral code in this country and you're right you know science is proven out that there's a great deal of depression amongst women to go to abortions I personally have no probably a half a dozen women have had one although it never affected me personally but every single one of them has carried regret in some cases all through their lives there's absolutely positively no upside when you consider the longevity and the and the you know the quite frankly the finality of the aborted fetus versus the you know the temporary discomfort having the pregnancy and the the possible financial strain I put for the relationship damage it might cause but over the course of the last forty or fifty years there just doesn't seem to be any upside whatsoever to this particular issue from the perspective of terminating this pregnancy so I do think it is something I need to be back down in front of the stage for them to decide you know what their individual positions are going to be on this but at the end of the day.

Roe V. Wade Robi
"roe v. wade" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

08:21 min | 1 year ago

"roe v. wade" Discussed on Today, Explained

"In Millhauser you covered the Supreme Court for Vox. And you're at the court yesterday for oral arguments in this case. June Medical Services v Russo. How did it go? It's a little surprising. So when I woke up Wednesday morning I thought those zero percent chance that the Supreme Court would vote to strike down this antiabortion law okay and when I left. I was a little surprised by Chief Justice Roberts who is very conservative and very conservative in particular on abortion I left. There's a thirty percent chance that he will flip over and vote to strike down the antiabortion law which means the clinic would win and the state of Louisiana would lose. That's right I think there is at least some chance that there's going to be five votes in favor of the clinic here on the reason. Why is that? The state claims that it passed this law in order to protect patient's health and Robert seemed unpersuaded at times by that argument. It's not a convincing argument. There's very little empirical evidence for it. Hope Medical Center the abortion clinic at the heart of this is performed about seventy thousand abortions and only four of those have led to complications that required hospitalization. So you know if your fear is that. There's this epidemic of People who are having complications after they have an abortion require hospitalization. And they can't get into the hospital because there isn't fear not problem has already been solved by the fact that abortion is very safe and the chances that abortion patient is going to require. Hospitalization is vanishingly. Small is the argument that the clinic made in front of the court yesterday. That's right yeah so the clinic and I and I should point out like some of our listeners. Be Having Deja Vu here. The reason why they might be having Deja Vu is because in two thousand sixteen. There's a case called whole women's health. V Heller Stat chief justice and May it please the court? The Texas requirements undermine the careful balance struck and Casey between faiths legitimate interests in regulating abortion and women's fundamental liberty to make personal decisions about their pregnancies. They are unnecessary health. Regulations that create substantial obstacles to abortion access and what the Supreme Court said in that case. Is that admitting privileges. Laws do not benefit patients and basically all at the clinic was arguing. This case was hey that thing that you said less than four years ago still true the Federal District Court after trial found the two provisions were unconstitutional. They constituted undue burden on a woman's right to choose. The Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit reversed. We in agreed with the District Court and we reversed the court of Appeals. So why here the case then? They've already decided something so close in Texas. The biggest difference between whole woman's health the case from four years ago and June medical. The case that was heard this week has nothing to do with the facts of the cases. Nothing to do with the law has everything to do with the personnel on the Supreme Court four years ago Justice Kennedy was stolen the court and Justice Kennedy. You Know I. I wouldn't call him a huge defender of abortion rights. You voted to strike down the overwhelming majority of the abortion restrictions. That came before him. But every now and then he would see a restriction. That goes too far. You're cutting too far in into this core constitutional right that Mike Boorda's recognize and that's what he said in whole woman's House Kennedy's gone on Kennedy was the fifth vote whole women's health and his replacement. Brad Kavanagh has a very consistently antiabortion record in making your argument you ignored and I believe mischaracterized Supreme Court precedent. You reasoned that Jane Doe should not be unable to exercise our right to choose because she did not have family and friends to make her decision. The argument Rewrite Supreme Court precedent and Gorsuch is also fresh to the court from that two thousand sixteen decision. That that's right yeah. Neal gorsuch was appointed to replace justice. Scalia who actually died. While the whole woman's health case was pending so did gorsuch and cavenaugh weigh in on Wednesday in any way. That might suggest how they're going to vote. So gorsuch was quiet at the oral argument but based on his record when he was a lower court judge he took a very aggressive steps against planned parenthood. Like I'm pretty darn confident that core such is going to cast antiabortion votes. Cavanaugh also signalled that he intends to vote with the state here and Kavanagh's argument so remember that whole woman's health the Texas case said that admitting privileges don't do anything to benefit patient health and it also said that. It's also really hard for doctors to get these things early for abortion. Doctors take to get amazing privileges and so this is a huge burden for no benefited struck down capital. How do we know? That's true in Louisiana. Sure it might be true that in Texas. It's really hard for abortion doctors to get these credentials but maybe it's different Louisiana. Is it no? It's not the American Medical Association and the Medical Association representing Obstetricians and gynecologists filed an amicus brief where they said Nope Zane the evidence in the case suggests that it's the same there several doctors in this case who tried to get admitting villages and weren't able to do so you know and and often it was for the exact reason that I said. I like one of the doctors for example only provides medication abortions and doesn't really have much of a medical practice beyond like every now and then prescribing on medication abortions and so. This person admits pretty much. No one to a hospital because there's no need that for any of this. Doctors patients go into a hospital and so that person would have really tough time getting omitting village. In fact the state's own expert witness admitted that yeah that that doctor would have a tough time getting admitting privileges. So what's the bigger picture here? We know from what you said about giving the state a thirty percent chance of winning this case here that Louisiana would go from three abortion clinics to maybe just one bright which would make the procedure even more restrictive in the state. But but what's going on here with the Supreme Court Roe v Wade and this new cast of characters. So this case is likely to come down to Roberts you know he was the only person I saw up there who seemed in any way uncertain about how he would vote. And Roberts really doesn't like Roe v Wade you know if the lawyer for the state had come in and said we think that Roe v Wade was wrongly decided and and we think that this court should overrule at. And here's the argument for why. This should be overruled and they've just been opened about what they were trying to accomplish. I think there's a really good chance Roberts would have said like that's what I want to. What the state did instead is. It passed this law which is really an abortion restriction but it's Kinda disguised as a health regulation and then they asked the justices to say like we want you to pretend that this lol is going to protect people's health even though we can't provide you much evidence that it will and even though you said for years ago that it won't and even though our lawyer is now in an oral argument and the liberal justices peppering her with questions asking her to Find Demonstrate. Evidence. This will protect women's health and she's unable to do it. The state was asking the justices to participate in a pretty deceptive. Act here. There's a chance that Roberts isn't GONNA go there. But what does it mean for the next case that comes? That isn't handled this way. That doesn't have this precedent. What does it mean when someone comes to the Supreme Court to this to this new cast of characters gorsuch and Cava and says Row v? Wade is bad law. Yeah I mean I think the bad news for people care about abortion rights is. I think that there's a chance that Roberts gives Roe v Wade a stay.

Supreme Court Justice Roberts Court of Appeals Texas Louisiana Supreme Court Roe Justice Kennedy Federal District Court Wade District Court Neal gorsuch Brad Kavanagh Deja Vu June Medical Services Millhauser Hope Medical Center Roe Russo Vox
"roe v. wade" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

Distillations: Science + Culture + History

02:58 min | 1 year ago

"roe v. wade" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> There's <Speech_Music_Female> still a stigma around <Speech_Music_Female> having <Speech_Music_Female> and talking about <Speech_Music_Female> an abortion. <Speech_Music_Female> There's still a lot of <Speech_Music_Female> assumptions out there <Speech_Music_Female> about who gets abortions <Speech_Music_Female> and who <Speech_Music_Female> becomes an abortion advocate <Speech_Music_Female> what kind <Speech_Music_Female> of people they are <Speech_Music_Female> in the <Speech_Music_Female> nineteen sixties Sherri <Speech_Music_Female> Chessen confounded <Speech_Music_Female> a lot <SpeakerChange> of those expectations. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> I think what it <Speech_Music_Female> does show us is <Speech_Music_Female> like maybe the assumptions <Speech_Music_Female> people have <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> is. These <Speech_Music_Female> people are actually much <Speech_Music_Female> more radical <Speech_Music_Female> than they think. If they would <Speech_Music_Female> look at their pictures <Speech_Music_Female> they'd see women <Speech_Music_Female> dressed <Speech_Music_Female> in <Speech_Music_Male> early early <Speech_Music_Female> sixty <SpeakerChange> suits <Speech_Music_Female> and pearls and things <Speech_Music_Female> and might <Speech_Music_Female> write them off but they're <Speech_Music_Female> actually quite radical <Speech_Music_Female> in <Speech_Music_Female> talking <Speech_Music_Female> about abortion. <Speech_Music_Female> I mean coming forward <Speech_Music_Female> with something that US <Speech_Music_Female> incredibly <Speech_Female> stigmatized <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Sherri didn't disappear <Speech_Female> after. <Speech_Female> She got an abortion. <Speech_Female> She <Speech_Music_Female> kept speaking <Speech_Female> out for all the <Speech_Female> other women who still still <Speech_Female> needed them <Speech_Female> and the experience <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> changed <Speech_Music_Female> her at <Speech_Female> the time. I knew <Speech_Music_Female> that I wasn't going. To <Speech_Music_Female> get my way if I <Speech_Music_Female> ranted and raved <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> but <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> over <Speech_Female> the years and <Speech_Music_Female> if you were to meet me <Speech_Music_Female> now <Speech_Music_Female> I think my <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> anger <Speech_Music_Female> built <Speech_Music_Female> up and <Speech_Music_Female> when I see other people people <Speech_Music_Female> suffering <Speech_Music_Female> and <Speech_Music_Female> in the <Speech_Music_Female> same manner <Speech_Music_Female> and when I see <Speech_Music_Female> mostly <Speech_Music_Female> the male <Speech_Female> of the species <Speech_Female> deciding <SpeakerChange> for <Speech_Music_Female> us what we should do <Speech_Music_Female> I get <Speech_Music_Female> excuse the expression <Speech_Music_Female> pissed as hell <Speech_Music_Female> I do. <Speech_Music_Female> I <Speech_Music_Female> finally <Speech_Music_Female> got angry. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> North <Speech_Female> begs to still <Speech_Music_Female> speaks <SpeakerChange> out about reproductive <Speech_Music_Female> rights. <Speech_Music_Female> I <Speech_Music_Female> will do anything <Speech_Music_Female> that I can <Speech_Music_Female> to <Speech_Music_Female> help. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> It's <Speech_Music_Female> it's important <Speech_Music_Female> that others understand <Speech_Music_Female> what but <Speech_Music_Female> some of US did <Speech_Music_Female> to <Speech_Music_Female> get rights <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> and <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> It it <Speech_Music_Female> scares <Speech_Music_Female> me to <SpeakerChange> think <Speech_Music_Female> that <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> People <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> who had never walked <Speech_Music_Female> in our shoes <Speech_Music_Female> and have never experienced <Speech_Music_Female> this. <Speech_Music_Female> Try to make <SpeakerChange> decisions <Speech_Music_Female> for us <Speech_Music_Female> today. Hey <Speech_Female> access to abortion <Speech_Female> is actually <Speech_Music_Female> more vulnerable than <Speech_Music_Female> it has been for decades <Speech_Music_Female> in <Speech_Music_Female> twenty nineteen fifty <Speech_Music_Female> eight abortion <Speech_Music_Female> restrictions were passed. <Speech_Music_Female> The State <Speech_Female> of Alabama has banded ended <Speech_Female> almost entirely <Speech_Female> new restrictions <Speech_Female> are <SpeakerChange> being proposed <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> all the time. <Speech_Music_Male> I think <Speech_Music_Male> one way to put <Speech_Music_Male> all this together <Speech_Music_Female> is to <Speech_Music_Male> is <Speech_Music_Female> to just show the <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> sort of strange <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> combination <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of on one <Speech_Music_Female> hand to steady <Speech_Music_Female> progression of <Speech_Music_Female> women throughout the <Speech_Music_Female> twentieth <Speech_Music_Female> and Twenty First <Speech_Music_Female> Century and <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and yet yet <Speech_Music_Female> at the same time. <Speech_Music_Female> You know the backlash <Speech_Music_Male> you <Speech_Music_Male> know. <Speech_Music_Female> Arguably <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> it was a more <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> some respects it <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> was a more progressive <Speech_Music_Female> period <Speech_Music_Female> Right <Speech_Music_Female> around the time of <Speech_Music_Female> ro Than <Speech_Music_Female> it is <SpeakerChange> now

"roe v. wade" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

Distillations: Science + Culture + History

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"roe v. wade" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

"By nineteen seventy twelve states had passed reform laws and that year New York Hawaii Alaska and Washington repealed their criminal abortion laws completely. Burn something thing Nelson happened in one thousand nine hundred seventy a woman in Texas named Norma mccorvey file a lawsuit against a district attorney named Henry. Wade she was single pregnant pregnant with her third child and had tried to get an abortion but her life was not considered in danger so it was a legal in Texas and she couldn't afford to lead the state her case. Ace made it all the way to the. US Supreme Court where they used the pseudonym Jane Royale this was a rover swayed court. Today ruled that abortion is is completely a private matter to be decided by mother and Dr seventy-two ruling to that effect will probably result in drastic overhaul of state laws on abortion specifically specifically the court. Today overturn laws in Texas and Georgia and rule. The government has no right to enter into a decision which should be made by the mother and her doctor. The nineteen seventy-three seventy three ruling putting into the therapeutic abortion puzzle. It was a huge win. For All the women who fought to make it happen from Pat McGinnis to Sherri Chessen Chechen and also the doctors because without them fighting to protect themselves. It might not have happened at all. The main author of Roe was Harry Blackmun. Who did a great service to American women and I know way mean to at all to denigrate him but for him? Writing row was all about protecting acting. Doctors it's not that he was unsympathetic to women getting abortions. But you know if you read the language of Ro It's the physician and his his capacity. Should be able to decide etcetera etcetera and a lot of feminist actually including Ruth Bader Ginsburg have criticized row sang sang rather than being decided on the right to privacy and rather than focusing on protecting the physician. I ideally row should have been decided on on the issue of gender discrimination. Only women get pregnant. Therefore only women are denied certain quote benefits such as being able to participate in society because of unwanted childbearing..

Harry Blackmun Texas Supreme Court Ruth Bader Ginsburg New York Hawaii Nelson Sherri Chessen Chechen Ace US Wade Dr seventy-two Pat McGinnis Jane Royale Henry Alaska Washington Georgia Roe
"roe v. wade" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

Distillations: Science + Culture + History

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"roe v. wade" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

"Country if Sherri Chessen was the gentle wave of the abortion rights movement calmly convincing the world. That things needed to change had McGuinness was the fire and she advocated for total repeal of all abortion laws. She helped connect women to illegal abortion providers or ones out of the country. She also taught them how to do it. Themselves had McGinnis never asked women why they needed abortions. She just trusted that each one had her own good reason the. The U Approve of abortion for any reason. Some hundred thousand women every year. This is California women alone subject themselves improperly properly or illegal abortion I think that in itself is a rather staggering figure and I feel great indignation as a woman to think that women in half subject themselves to second rate medical care for a safe surgical procedure but women like Pat McGinnis mark gaining traction with mainstream America. It took women talking as Mother's about disability for the idea of abortion rights to gain. Traction I think a lot of in feminism lost cars did not WanNa look at what this meant that German measles was about birth defects and disabilities. That this is this is a scary thing to touch. That's what they began talking about that. It's it's as mothers. They make this decision and eventually they do change.

Pat McGinnis McGuinness Sherri Chessen California America
"roe v. wade" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

Distillations: Science + Culture + History

05:14 min | 1 year ago

"roe v. wade" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

"How does a mother knowingly bring into the world a child to suffer I I cannot do it? I couldn't do it for two seconds knowing what I knew. I had to take the course that I did. And I don't regret an Chapter Three the mothers this group of one and a half to four year old children in the clinic reception area are all in the rubella program at the Texas Children's Hospital in Houston individual sessions is with the social worker focused on current stresses produced by the presence of a handicapped child in the family. Dorothy bigs already had a young. Thanks sound when her daughter Leslie was born. She was in the hospital about six months. Her first year apply within the first just few years she did have a total of twenty surgeries. We did everything in the world. We knew to try to give her the best chance we it could. We were so poor we didn't have we just borrowed many. You know to do anything that we could One of the hardest lessons that kind of hit me was when she became school age. I worked for the schools. I worked for the Dallas public schools and I went into the office and I said you know I want. I know that you don't have a facility to help her her but I won't hurrying row. She's of age to be enrolled in school. And I won't her name down so that you. I know that she is out here and they refused to even do that. Bertha's husband left the family when Leslie was five. I think his words were distort know how to handle it and so Dorothea was a single mother to both Leslie and her son until Leslie Flea was nine and she went to live in a group program for children with Congenital Rubella Syndrome if I don't sound at this point being Sorry for myself dramatic here. We're trying to do but it was literally nine years ears of you didn't know if you could take a shower can do anything because you had to be on alert all the time and You know be able to provide that care and it was. I guess I I went into probably deep depression during those times. I don't think are recognized within but I know that I can remember thinking you know. Oh if I had never been born then. This wouldn't have happened to her. Some people were starting to recognize the impossibility of the situation. And it wasn't only about how nineteen sixties America viewed and treated disability. It was also viewed food and treated women. The gender imbalance was real and the unequal demands on women began during pregnancy starting with an impossible assignment. Mint just don't get rubella so German measles what are you supposed to do when you get this message. here's an epidemic. The main vector is little kids and then the advice that they're given is okay so avoid children women of childbearing being aged avoid children so this is the most ridiculous advice. It's the baby boom. It's not exactly easy for women to avoid Loyd children their their lives are often wrapped up and children. We probably don't have to tell you that when these women brought their babies home they were the primary caregivers because of the lack of societal support because of how hard that made it to keep special needs children at home and how expensive it could be. Many parents saw no other option but to place their children in institutions in fact doctors often pressured parents to institutionalize their children at birth Newborn infants are institutionalized commonly at that time there advised institutionalized the blind child the intellectually impaired. Child disc- Oh have another baby in some ways. These women were losing their children no matter what if this all sounds like a trap. That's because it was there was no ideal or perfect choice here. That's what we mean. Keep saying this was an impossible situation. Women recognized bad and you have right away women looking for abortions right off the bat I mean they put it all together themselves and they find people and they say I'm pretty sure I've been exposed..

Leslie Flea Texas Children's Hospital Houston Dorothy bigs Leslie Bertha Dallas America Loyd Dorothea
"roe v. wade" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

Distillations: Science + Culture + History

09:10 min | 1 year ago

"roe v. wade" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

"In nineteen sixty two the US. Watch from a distance as the so-called the Litt- mine disaster her hit Europe. The drug was thought to be so harmless it was given to women for morning sickness. Of course later we realized it wasn't harmless at all. There were a whole range range of disabilities associated with the limited but the FDA never approved it so people in the US saw themselves as having avoided a tragedy which reminds us of the undercurrent running through this entire story. A deep seated fear of disability when housewives began demanding abortions. It wasn't just that mainstream society saw them as nice respectable ladies who of course should make decisions about their own bodies for themselves. It's it's that. Each one was seeking an abortion for a very specific reason to prevent what mainstream society saw as a tragedy. A disabled child. Okay all the little sparked the anxiety among women but rubella made it persists and so to understand the world they're living in. This is what they're being told there. Are these headlines. There's going to be twenty thousand damaged babies in the United States with German measles and they're calling deformed and dangerous children that are going to be born so picture that people had in their minds and the pictures that were running the newspapers at the exact same moment where pictures of the solidified babies as they were called and Faber called freaks and monsters. This was the picture in people's minds and they were terrified the response to the forecasts of so called damage. Rubella babies was widespread panic and it was considered a crisis in the making but a huge part of that crisis was was actually the social situation that these children would land in beyond the stigma around disability. which let's face it still very much exists to this day? A in the nineteen sixties. There was zero material social support for babies children or adults with disabilities. They don't think at all about well. What can we do? The baby's we'll how could we improve the world for them. It doesn't come up as a question. Everything that might be needed was on the shoulders privately of the parents in terms of education in terms of Therapy medical needs. There's no right to public education. There's no mainstreaming does not like a disability rights movement. This is all in the future in fact many parents of children with congenital. Rubella Syndrome went onto advocate for disability rights and unhelped eventually get the Americans with disabilities act passed. Of course that's still decades away but it was this historical moment in the specter of solidified enters the American consciousness that abortion to enters the debate in nineteen sixty one Sherri Chessen was living in Arizona with her husband and four young children. She was pregnant with her fifth when she took something. Her husband had gotten Europe. I can still remember him putting him up in the high high highest cabinet in our kitchen why he was saving them. I have no idea never thought of that till this moment. Then why did he save them. Sherri Chessen by the way is called Sherry Finkbeiner in almost all the media we found of her. She told us that think behind was her first husband's name but it was never her legal name so in a sense she says the Kress created. Sheri Fink Fine. Sherry became the first woman in the country to deliberately tell the public like about her decision to get an abortion but that was not her original plan she quietly went to her doctor in Arizona and he consented to a therapeutic abortion Shen but before the scheduled procedure she started to worry about all the other women who might find themselves in the same position. My first thought was Oh my God. The Air National Guard from Phoenix had been in Germany the year before so I thought maybe they brought it back and other mothers others would inadvertently take it like I did so. She called the newspaper and anonymously told a reporter her story that Monday on the front page of the paper was an article with the Words baby deforming drug may cost woman her child here. It did not name He. At that time it came close at Scottsdale mother of four and I think it said that Bob was the teacher at Scottsdale High School. It didn't matter what was printed. The county attorney announced that any doctor gave her an abortion would be violating Arizona's US abortion law which remember only permitted them if the woman was going to die Sherri doctor called her at work and told her he couldn't go through with even so I put the phone down and instead of crying. Like I'm Kinda doing now. I put my hands on my hips and said I'm calling the county attorney's office and I called and I said I just WanNa know what the attorney general has to do. Oh with interfering in any families Decision to Take care of their what they think incas best for their own family Sherry did get an abortion but she had to go to Sweden to do it every doctor she approached in the. US refused her. For fear of being prosecuted. Her story became a sensation and reporters documented every step of her experience. Here's a news clip from nineteen sixty two justice. She's leaving for Sweden supplant. What are your plans after Sweden and so worried about today that I just want to do what's right for myself in my family and I don't feel bitter towards anyone I i? I don't feel bitter towards people who opposed as religiously. I only hope that they can feel that we're doing what's best in our case in in in could feel some of what's in my heart and trying to prevent the tragedy for happy. As American women watched her story unfold. They learn two things. One was how dangerous solidified was. The second was how hard it was to get an abortion for what people increasingly saw as a valid reason and even though she was an unlikely spokesperson for abortion she was also kind of the perfect one to change the conversation in nineteen sixty one. The media framed abortion as dangerous and women who got them as sexual deviants or at best victims then along came Sherry. She was young married white and a mother four times over in fact she was also also pretty and practically made for. TV In fact she was actually the beloved host of a Children's TV. Show called the Romper Room. She was completely inoffensive. Offensive to nineteen sixties Middle America and she went on. TV and very sweetly told the world that she needed an abortion and she explained why and they listen to her Jerry think by CETERA. Nineteen sixty two might controversy was also at face press conference immaturity. I I am not an expert in field. I have studied the question. I'm not a doctor. A lawyer I am not so few logically involved at all I know is that I was somebody who needed one. Under certain given conditions a Gallup poll showed that fifty two percent of Americans approved to her abortion. But there ever so many people who didn't approve to put it mildly that the F. B. I.. Had to help protect her family. Negative reaction was pretty damn ugly. I will tell you a in some of these letters that they would send me a picture of myself with dagger through my head with blood running down the worst ones were pictures that people would send cutting the limbs off my children and it was heartless it was criminal was insane and we asked Sherry. She was surprised that she had to leave the country to get an abortion. I guess shocked would be more than than surprised because I thought my doctor would just pop me in the hospital. I realized one day I had poison myself with a manmade poison poisoned. I was going to get a man made Dr to to get that poison out from me and I just fought till two. I was successful but the trouble is pregnancies. Don't wait while you're fighting. I was lucky I found this out when I was just a couple couple months pregnant so I had more time because I always felt I felt quickening. You know the baby move I was I was unique gone because then it would become instead of fetal growth. As I was told to think of it it would become a baby. And I didn't want it to be a baby.

Sherry Finkbeiner United States Sherri Chessen Arizona Europe Sweden FDA attorney Sheri Fink Scottsdale Scottsdale High School Air National Guard Kress Romper Room Phoenix Faber reporter Bob Middle America
"roe v. wade" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

Distillations: Science + Culture + History

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"roe v. wade" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

"The origin story. Rubella has been around for a long time it's not like it's suddenly suddenly appeared in one thousand nine hundred sixty four but for most of its history. No one was really worried about it. You know it's an infectious disease. It was very minor. Are there lots of things that people got that we don't get so much anymore in the US Mumps chicken pox scarlet fever in the early twentieth century. That that were dangerous in you would quarantine your kids at home and you hope they survived. German measles was really really minor. Arash Arash that lasted a couple of days. Didn't even try to confine your kids to bed and nobody worried about it sometimes. You didn't even know you had it. Historian of Medicine Lesley Nicely. Regan wrote a book about the rebel DEMOC and how it helped change. Abortion law called the dangerous pregnancies by the way she calls rubella German measles when she's talking talking about the nineteen sixties that most people would have called it at the time so this wasn't something pay people paid any attention to and it's not until World War Two that that there is a connection is figured out between German measles pregnancy and a series of birth birth defects. Remember Dortha big said. It was Leslie's is that caught her attention. Cataracts were also the key clue for an Australian ophthalmologist named Norman. Greg in one thousand nine forty one all of these mothers whose babies had cataracts started coming to see him now. This is a very rare problem and he begins to investigate this and go and send out questionnaires to other doctors defined are using these cases and then when he begins against to make a connection. He's they also start talking to the mothers of the children who are bringing them in and somebody said to him mm-hmm you know. I wonder if it's related to my having German measles one I was pregnant and rather than dismissing it. As that's doesn't make sense cents. That's ridiculous. He actually kept that as a question in mind and began looking at the other cases and asking. Do you remember number whether you had a rash to Jeb German measles and found out that almost all of the cases where they could get information. They had had a rash that had German measles during during their pregnancy. Norman crag did something fairly radical. He listened to women and he learned something important in an alarming from them. A virus that had previously been thought of as harmless was in fact harming babies and your d'oro and remember this is nineteen forty. One women won't be told about the dangers of things like smoking and drinking during pregnancy for another few decades. Most people don't yet understand things that pregnant women and chess or reviver she contracts can affect a developing fetus in nineteen. Forty one norman. Greg didn't have the whole picture yet but he started spreading the word. He talked to other doctors doctors at medical conferences. He also wanted the radio to alert regular Australians and he immediately got phone calls from other mothers where their children were for. Maybe three four five years old and they said my child is deaf and I had German measles during pregnancy mincy. So I think there's something else as well and then because of those calls he followed that so that's one of the things that's really important in this is. He listened to the mothers when they came in with their their knowledge of their infants and their own bodies and their suspicions.

Norman Greg Arash Arash Norman crag US Regan Dortha Leslie
"roe v. wade" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

Distillations: Science + Culture + History

07:55 min | 1 year ago

"roe v. wade" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

"An estimated twenty to thirty thousand thousand children were born with a congenital rubella Sandro as the result of the nineteen sixty four sixty five rebel epidemic in the United States So imagine this it's the mid nineteen sixties and you're pregnant. There's a rebel epidemic sweeping the country. It's very contagious. Rubella is in a wave kind of like Zeka it's pretty harmless for most people even most children but when it's contract during pregnancy and see it can cause devastating birth defects and developing fetuses. This is a news clip from nineteen sixty nine crippling abnormalities. Bad sight and hearing Heart Activities Mental Retardation at least twenty thousand other babies were still rubella epidemics comment cycles six to nine years apart most authorities authorities expect the next epidemic could come in the spring of Nineteen seventy-one. Rubella is one of those diseases that we barely remember anymore. But but you're probably familiar with the vaccine. It's the are in the m our vaccine but in nineteen sixty four. There's no vaccine yet and no reliable liable diagnostic test yet. Either doctors are still working on that. There's also no real way to prevent yourself from getting it. And if you wind up having a baby with congenital rubella syndrome. You're on your own. There's no social support of any kind for people with disabilities. An abortion is not legal legal and it won't be for nearly a decade north. Biggs was one of the tens of thousands of women who contracted Rebelo while pregnant in the nineteen sixties. It wasn't during the big epidemic of nineteen sixty four to sixty five but years later in nineteen sixty nine. She had it when she was just two and a half weeks pregnant. But it went undiagnosed announced so it wasn't until after her daughter. Leslie was born that she realized something was wrong. I was walking down the hall and the way the lights lights hit. Leslie's is a thought. Something doesn't look right about her eyes. Cataracts are frequent frequent symptom of congenital. Rubella Syndrome blindness often follows like it did with Leslie I think one of the most difficult halt things for us was that we just kept getting blow after blow after blow because one disability they would show up and then another one would show up in another one would show up. Children born with Congenital Rubella Syndrome. Leslie often have multiple disabilities and the viruses effects on the fetus. Are More severe the earlier. The mother hasn't remember Dorothy had it when she was just two and a half weeks pregnant. Leslie is now fifty years old. She's blind and deaf. She has heart problems and severe intellectual disabilities. Ken Leslie here you know. Can Leslie see you now now. Now how. How do you communicate with your daughter? This is the why it's through touch can Not hearing or seeing. I've often thought you know this is just a dark silent world for her. Dorothy Dorthe Struggles with the idea. That things could've gone differently. I had been Ill before I even knew I was pregnant and went to the doctor and to see what was going. On and I had had a slight rash so I Asked the doctor. Could this rash rebel. He I said when and I'LL BE WE'RE GONNA have rebel. You'd had it in the sixty four sixty five epidemic. He did tell me that he ran a test and In bed it was not rebel. So when Lesley was born and we started Sing disabilities ace at went back to him and he said well. I'm just going to have to be more careful next time. He said I was so sure that that he wasn't I didn't run the tests. It's been suffering life is I see it. And it's it's something that I wish I could have Really known at the early part of the pregnancy because I would never have bled her. Go through all this. I definitely would have chosen abortion to save her from from all she's gone through I. I think it's important for people to now that it's not because you think oh I'm going to have a baby who's disabling. It's going to cause me a lot of trouble. It's more that you just don't want them to have to go through that. It's not you're not wanting when you go there you don't want the child go through it. Maybe you're wondering what Dorothy bigs means. Means when she said she would have gotten an abortion in nineteen sixty nine because we just told you abortion was illegal. Well there's an asterisk a a big asterisk so big in fact that this whole entire story actually takes place within. Rovers Wade won't happen until nineteen seventy-three before then abortion laws in most states had some kind of exemption for medically necessary or so-called therapeutic abortions but each state made up its own rules some were strict in Arizona or Minnesota for example. You could only get an abortion if you were going to die. Other states rules were more vague. I'm in Illinois for example if there had to be a bona fide medical reason but even in the states where therapeutic abortion was legal and the grounds for one were well-defined fine getting one was anything but straightforward it varied between states but also between cities hospitals individual doctors by the mid nineteen sixties. There was already a growing movement. Feminists were pushing to legalize abortion without restriction. But they weren't gaining enough traction to get to row. Oh actually took an epidemic and uneasy alliance with an unlikely group of activists nineteen sixties housewives during the rubella epidemic. Many women men who may have never identified as abortion rights advocates found themselves seeking abortions only to discover that that asterisk was not big enough so they pushed on it. Many of them spoke out and insisted that they were in an impossible position. One that was not only devastating and heartbreaking But completely out of their control and they demanded that they get to be the ones to make tough decisions about their own reproductive lives. They demanded did that. People listen to them and people did eventually because of who these women were but more importantly how they were portrayed bend. The media white middle class responsible married mothers. They changed the national conversation around abortion from something rooted in sexual depravity the endanger to something rooted in the cares and concerns of motherhood does certainly not. Everyone agreed with them. People listened and this historical stoorikhel moment. All sparked by virus paid the way for the legalisation.

Congenital Rubella Syndrome Ken Leslie United States rubella Dorothy Dorthe Dorothy Dorothy bigs Biggs Rovers Illinois Lesley Rebelo Arizona Wade Minnesota
"roe v. wade" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

Distillations: Science + Culture + History

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"roe v. wade" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

"I'm Lisa Barry Drako and this is distillation 's a podcast powered by the Science History Institute. Our next episode is about the rubella epidemic that swept swept country in nineteen sixty four and sparked a national conversation around abortion. Maternal viral infection during pregnancy especially in the first three three months has the potential for producing a number of harmful effects in the developing fetus. When the rebel outbreak hits panic sweeps the country? So there are these headlines headlines There's going to be twenty thousand damage babies a deep seated fear of disability combined with a pre. Ada World led many women to the conclusion that they needed an abortion but there was a problem. Abortion was illegal with very few exceptions in this episode. We're going to hear from women who spoke out. As mother's how does a mother knowingly bring into the world a child to suffer. I cannot do it. I couldn't do it for for two seconds knowing what I knew. I had to take the course that I did and I don't regret it as mothers. They demanded they should be the ones to make tough decisions about their own. Reproductive lives demand of people. Listen and eventually grudgingly people did. It's not what most of us think of as the Movement for abortion rights because it's not it's not Grounded in sexual freedom. It's really about family family and children and it is. It's grounded in motherhood. These housewives are probably not who come to mind when you think of abortion activists from the nineteen sixties but they helped push the conversation forward around reproductive rights and this historical moment all sparked by a virus pave the way for Roe V. Wade the tune into the next episode of distillation 's on December seventeenth..

Ada World Lisa Barry Drako Roe V. Wade Science History Institute
Roe, Wade and Supreme Court discussed on WJR Programming

WJR Programming

00:51 sec | 3 years ago

Roe, Wade and Supreme Court discussed on WJR Programming

"President Trump's US supreme court nominee faces his. First confirmation hearing tomorrow Brit Kevin. All has, been going through mock hearings with White House, lawyers hitting him with tough questions eight say including. His views on the road versus Wade nineteen Seventy-three ruling establishing a right to choose abortion cavenaugh will certainly, deflect. Direct, questions about row on CNN state. Of the union judiciary committee member, Senator Lindsey Graham well here's what I hope he'll do if there's a case before him that challenges are Roe v. Wade that he, would listen to both sides. Of, the story apply. Attest to overturn precedent Preston is important but it's not in. Ballot abortion opponents have hoped Cavanaugh will, provide the needed. Vote to overturn Roe while choice advocates are sounding the

ROE Wade Supreme Court Senator Lindsey Graham Brit Kevin Union Judiciary Committee Anne Cates Detroit Cavanaugh Gordon CNN President Trump White House Preston United States
Is Roe v. Wade Is Hanging by a Thread?

"News

03:05 min | 3 years ago

Is Roe v. Wade Is Hanging by a Thread?

"To transform the rule of law and our country during the campaign trump promised to only pick a prolife judges i am putting prolife justices on the court itchy abortion activists are calling it a pivotal moment while abortion rights defenders are saying they are in dire immediate danger the senate should reject on a bipartisan basis any justice who would overturn roe v wade or undermine key healthcare protections democrats insist there should be no confirmation vote at all until after the midterm elections they point to the fact that republicans blocked brock obama's last pick for ten months before the two thousand sixteen presidential election but republican leader mitch mcconnell says there must be no delay republicans are dealing with a razor thin one vote majority in the senate that means they can afford to lose only one that's why you can expect republicans to put intense pressure on three democrats three democrats who voted for neal gorsuch his choice last time around and who are now this year up for reelection it states that trump won big george stephanopoulos and cecilia vega spoke with abc's chief legal analyst dan abrahams san abc supreme court contributor kate shaw looking to answer the question so many are asking after justice kennedy's resignation why now robie wade that's where all the early energy is going to be that's right but let's be clear there's no question that roe v wade could be in jeopardy but that doesn't mean it's going to get overturned everyone's talking about overturned overturned as a practical matter justices liked to show deference to previous opinions meeting it's unusual to say we're simply going to overturn a decision because we now disagree with if it happens on occasion but it's very rare more likely what you see is an opinion effectively get gutted meaning states that want to restrict abortion will increasingly make laws that are more restrictive and more restrictive and then have those laws challenged in the hope that those laws are able to move forward and ineffective would mean that it becomes nearly impossible for women in a number of states to get and you can be sure that whoever president trump nominates is going to do his or her best not to show their hand on roe wade during the confirmation you don't want to admit you know what your position is on any case in the confirmation process the rule is when you're asked about a particular case you say this could come in front of me and as a result i'm night i'd have to see what the facts of the case were but you've got to believe that the president is going to know a lot about any candidate that he considers justice kennedy didn't make from the bench where you surprise you were there we all knew it was a possibility but i don't think anyone in that building really believed he was going to do impart because you know he seemed to send a message with his travel ban separate writing that he had some concerns about some of president trump's conduct and rhetoric he wrote separately to sort of say you need to acting ways that respect constitutional values like equality but in the end you know i think he did want to be replaced by republican president and this was the surest way to see that.

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