40 Burst results for "Roe Roe Roe Roe"

Fresh update on "roe " discussed on Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:40 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "roe " discussed on Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

"High 70s. Look for a little cooler error on the way Saturday and even the possibility of some morning rain showers, but otherwise drying out later in the day and we'll wind up with more sunshine on Sunday in a high about 80 and slowly creeping up to near 90° by the middle of next week. Seattle 78 now Tacoma 81 ever at 75 and in downtown Bellevue 81° at 6 25. Well, there's concern that the changing abortion landscape in this country post roe V wade is going to cause further strain on blood donations. The story from Greg hirsch, doctor Kirsten alcorn is co chief medical officer at bloodworks northwest, and she tells me they're braced for more pregnancy related complications among women coming here from other states. Either dude to non medical S pen out of the horse and where they end up with complications that require blood transfusion as a supportive treatment or where other pregnancy related care is not attended to people end up with bleeding issues. She says at this time they don't know the exact impact of all this, but it comes at a time that blood supplies remain alarmingly low, especially for a positive red blood cells. Those represent about 40% of the population, bottom line, the doctor says they're going to need more blood donations. Greg Herschel, northwest news radio. As students go back to school, they're also headed back to athletics during the hottest part of the year. Doctor Richard so, with Cleveland clinic, says heat illness is usually the result of overexertion in hot, humid weather. It can cause fatigue, muscle cramping, or heat stroke, which can be deadly. He recommends drinking plenty of fluids to stay hydrated, even the night before hitting the field. Heat exhaustion may include headache, vomiting, dizziness, or fainting, if these symptoms show lower their body temperature as soon as possible. You put ice over their larger arteries and blood vessels, you put ice in their groins ice in the armpits and hose them down. Encourages athletes to take breaks and listen to their body if they seem confused or have slurred speech, seek medical help right away. That's from como forest Tyra majors. And the Food and Drug Administration is recommending people testing themselves for COVID at home take a second test within 48 hours because at home tests are less likely to detect the virus than PCR tests. The FDA made that recommendation to rule out false negatives. The FDA notes at home tests are authorized for repeat use, and it adds people should use multiple tests over two to three days, especially if they don't have symptoms. Our northwest news time 6 27, right back with headlines from around the world an ABC

Roe V Wade Greg Hirsch Kirsten Alcorn Bloodworks Northwest Greg Herschel Richard So Tacoma Bellevue Seattle Cleveland Clinic Athletics Dizziness FDA Stroke Headache ABC
Kimberley Johnson on How Trump Ruined Bipartisan Mainstream Media

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

02:08 min | 3 d ago

Kimberley Johnson on How Trump Ruined Bipartisan Mainstream Media

"We you pointed this out, but it's just this mainstream media stuff just drives me insane. You were saying, I don't even hear them cover. They've covered Democrats doomed so many times. I know you're missing the Democrats and pulled ahead in generic polling. There's new polling showing Biden and Harris beating Trump beating desantis showing Harris beating desantis. And they just don't, they're so hard. They never report on that. Yeah. They're just so we D to this storyline, right? And meanwhile, like you said, I think roe is a huge thing, but I think it's not even the only thing. Like, look at the most legislatively successful president since LBJ with a 50 50 Senate. I mean, it is truly every barometer 50 year low in jobless. I mean, the jobless numbers just came out Friday. I mean, I don't know how you can spin it anymore that Biden is an incredibly successful. What do you make of the approval numbers for him because to me it's just this relentless mainstream media coverage that I don't know how we overcome it? Yeah, I mean, I think I know CNN, the guy who wants CNN is like Friends with Donald Trump. Obviously, these people who own, I don't know how many there are who own the major cable. And then obviously the big papers. You know, they're wealthy and unfortunately in some cases wealthy business owners, which prefer Republicans because they get all the tax breaks. And you know, and then they have the friendships and whatever. And I don't know the behind stories, but yeah, there's, you know, the fairness doctrine going away. Right. And 24/7 news that is reliant on views clicks and attention. I think that's where it's coming from an unfortunately people are more concerned about clicks and dollars than they are about just getting the news out. What we used to be as a country where it came to news and we could all no matter what party you were in, go to that ABC News NBC News CBS world news tonight, whatever it was. And we could all just, you know, we might not agree, but we all believed them. Right. No longer happened. We killed that. Right.

Desantis Biden Harris CNN Donald Trump Senate Abc News NBC CBS
Fresh update on "roe " discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

01:04 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "roe " discussed on All Things Considered

"Belief that the decision should be up to a patient is common here and is shared by the majority of Americans according to recent polling. The reason resounding vote in Kansas striking down a proposed state constitutional amendment that would have stripped away abortion protections is consistent with the finding. Other states are relatively short drive from Carbondale, including Missouri, Kentucky, Arkansas, Indiana, Mississippi and Tennessee, all have enacted extensive restrictions or total bans on abortion. Despite restrictions in the surrounding states, Illinois is one of a handful that expanded abortion access since roe was overturned. The right to the procedure was enshrined in state law back in 2019. Jennifer pepper heads choices, a reproductive health clinic based Memphis. She plans to expanding carbon down in the coming months, making it a regional oasis for abortion services. You know, I was staring at a map and it just kind of all came to me. And said to my team, I think it's this town in Carbondale. Depending on when the clinic opens, it will become the first or second here to offer elective abortion care in decades. In 1985, anti abortion doctors and nurses petitioned a board of carbonyl memorial hospital, the largest in the region to stop the practice and the board voted to do so. George maroney was a hospital administrator at the time, he's now retired. It was just the pressure of people in the community. And board members are easily pressured. As before, some in carbon donates surrounding communities aren't happy about the prospect of the town's new role in the abortion debate. Abortion opponents from the region testified at a recent city council meeting in hopes that politicians would find a way to intervene and keep any new clinics from opening. I do not want to see an abortion clinic here either. I am against abortion. And please don't bring death to the city and to our region. And this is going to haunt you the rest of your life. Councilman, Adam louse, has pushed back on the opposition. What they've been told is that there is nothing that we can do, and what I've told them speaking for myself rather than for the city is that even if there were something, I wouldn't participate in that and I don't think there's a majority for it. While the media impact that new abortion clinics will have on Carbondale isn't clear, advocates are welcoming them as the city becomes a draw for those seeking abortion services

Carbondale Jennifer Pepper Carbonyl Memorial Hospital George Maroney ROE Kansas Arkansas Mississippi Missouri Kentucky Tennessee Indiana Memphis Illinois Adam Louse
Indiana becomes 1st state to approve abortion ban post Roe

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 6 d ago

Indiana becomes 1st state to approve abortion ban post Roe

"I'm Mike Gracia reporting Indiana becomes the first state to approve an abortion ban post role Indiana has become the first state to pass new legislation severely restricting access to abortions since the U.S. Supreme Court ruling in June that overturned drove the wade The Indiana legislature approved the near total abortion ban Friday and Republican governor Eric holcomb then signed the bill The legislation does allow some exceptions including in cases of rape incest and to protect the life and physical health of the mother After the Supreme Court ruling that removed constitutional protections for abortion Indiana was one of the first Republican run state legislatures to debate tighter abortion laws I'm Mike Gracia

Mike Gracia Indiana Indiana Legislature Eric Holcomb Supreme Court
Fresh update on "roe " discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

01:29 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "roe " discussed on All Things Considered

"From the lemelson foundation. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm wanna summers in Washington. And I'm Elsa Qing in Culver City, California. A prosecutor in Madison county Nebraska has charged a woman with helping her daughter abort a pregnancy illegally. And some of the evidence against her was handed over to police by Facebook, and Pierre law enforcement correspondent Martin costy has been following the story and joins us now hi, Martin. Hi, Elsa. Wait, so is this the first abortion prosecution after the overturning of roe V wade back in June? Well, some have framed it that way, but it's a little murkier than that. What happened is that in April, the police in the town of Norfolk, Nebraska, investigated two women, Jessica Burgess, 41 years old, and her daughter, Celeste Burgess, was 17 at the time. The investigative them for mishandling human remains, police say a fetus that Celeste said was stillborn was illegally disposed of that it was burned then buried, and the women were initially charged for that in June. But then police got a warrant to see the women's private Facebook messages, and they say those show that this was not a miscarriage that, in fact, Jessica had helped her daughter get pills to perform an illegal abortion. Okay, but why would this alleged abortion be illegal if it happened before roe V wade was overturned? I don't get that. Well, police say the pregnancy was 23 weeks along, Nebraska law bans abortion after 20 weeks. Now that wouldn't have been enforceable under roe V wade. Now it would be, but legal experts doubt it could be enforced for an abortion done weeks before the Supreme Court's ruling. Even justice Brett Kavanaugh said so in his concurring opinion, so you're right that these felony abortion charges may not very well hold up in court. Okay, well, let's turn to these Facebook messages. I understand please got them with a warrant, right? While investigating, as you say, the mishandling of human remains, how exactly do these messages lead to these illegal abortion charges? Well, these are very private conversations between a mother and a daughter, they're a pretty Frank. They talk about when to take the pills, Celeste writes. I will finally be able to wear jeans. We should say that we tried to reach the burgesses and their lawyers by phone today without success. But the two women have pleaded not guilty. And how is Facebook explaining why they gave police these private messages? Well, they wouldn't talk to us about this. And talk about this on the record. They rarely do in cases like this, but their parent company meta put out a statement. And it says police gave them quote valid legal warrants, and they say the warrants did not mention abortion. But what they don't say is whether they would have handled this any differently if they had known it was an abortion investigation. I talked about this with Andrew Crocker. He's a senior staff attorney with the electronic frontier foundation. And he says, if a warrant is legal, a tech company like Facebook is going to comply. Every day across the country, police get access to private messages, and this is an extremely routine part of everyday criminal investigations. I think a lot of people are waking up to it because of the far ranging nature of how we expect abortion investigations are going to go. And it's going to touch people's lives many more people's lives in a way that maybe they hadn't thought about in the past. Okay, well, maybe this is routine, but what do you think Martin, do you have any sense of whether companies like meta are going to be feeling a lot of public pressure not to cooperate with abortion investigations? Well, these data companies have a long-standing policy of complying with warrants that are valid in the jurisdictions that they're coming from. And even Andrew Crocker at the EFF says it's probably not a great idea if they're going to start picking and choosing which kinds of criminal investigations they're willing to cooperate with. What he would like to see, though, is that companies like meta might be willing to start keeping less information about people on hand so it's not available when law enforcement comes calling. And of course, people do have the option of shifting their conversations to other platforms like signal or telegram where everything is encrypted end to end, and that company doesn't have couldn't hand over your messages even if it wanted to. That is an option. All right, that is NPR law enforcement correspondent Martin Costa, thank you, Martin. You're welcome

Roe V Wade Nebraska Lemelson Foundation Npr News Elsa Qing Facebook Martin Costy Jessica Burgess Celeste Burgess Celeste Brett Kavanaugh Andrew Crocker Culver City Madison County Elsa Pierre Martin Norfolk Washington Jessica
Gov. Ron DeSantis Suspends State Attorney Andrew Warren

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:45 min | Last week

Gov. Ron DeSantis Suspends State Attorney Andrew Warren

"Announcing that he is suspending a woke George Soros endorsed state prosecutor. Take a listen. The constitution of Florida has vested the veto power in the governor, not an individual state attorney. And so when you flagrantly violate your oath of office, when you make yourself above the law, you have violated your duty. You have neglected your duty and you are displaying a lack of confidence to be able to reform those duties. And so today we are suspending state attorney Andrew Warren effective in media. And I say good for you, governor, there is so much great content and sound bites coming out of that press conference. This was absolutely phenomenal. This is how you do it, folks. This is how Republicans win the day. You see, so many Republican governors, and we've got one here in Tennessee. His name is Bill Lee. And he won't do something like that. He'd never go after the state prosecutors who refused to enforce the law. And by the way, that's what Andrew Warren is accused of doing. Andrew Warren went out there and announced that he doesn't care what the Supreme Court decided about roe V wade that they would not be prosecuting any abortion cases in Tampa Florida. He was literally going out in front of the cameras and daring the governor to do something. And guess what? Ron DeSantis has the man parts to back it up. Ron DeSantis got out there and he's been doing this from day one.

Andrew Warren George Soros Florida Bill Lee Roe V Wade Tennessee Ron Desantis Supreme Court Tampa
Fresh "Roe   " from Morning Edition

Morning Edition

01:07 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh "Roe " from Morning Edition

"Me how to get my name on your 30 thought I need to ask somebody to get the letter she'll be locked my rocking at The Rock in Newark come tomorrow right now 74, make sure you grab that umbrella this morning if you're heading outside, it's raining. Sky showers and thunderstorms through early afternoon, it'll turn sunny and 86. At 7 45. I wanna go do all I gotta work on that at the end of the episode I stuck with me. I hope Whatever.. This is morning edition from NPR news, I'm Leila folded. And I'm a Martinez. When roe V wade was overturned, Wisconsin used a state law from 1849 to ban nearly all abortions. In neighboring Illinois, abortion rights are protected. Now, Planned Parenthood staffers in both states have teamed up to support patients who want an abortion no matter which state they call home. From member station WBZ in Chicago, Kristen shoresh reports. Natalie hartwig is a nurse midwife in Wisconsin at Planned Parenthood. When roe V wade fell, her clinic stopped performing abortions. Now about two days a week, her wig drives at least two hours from her home in Madison across the border into Illinois. She leaves as early as 5 30 in the morning. Her son still in bed. To get to the Planned Parenthood clinic in Waukegan. It's a suburb in far northern Illinois. Luckily, it's summer. For now, he can sleep in. Making the truck to Illinois allows her to care for abortion patients. She can't do this at home. In Waukegan, she works in the recovery room, monitoring patients and taking their vitals. And she got her license in Illinois and is trained to provide medication abortion. Even as a nurse with an advanced degree, she wasn't allowed to do this in Wisconsin, when abortion was still legal. She can treat these patients virtually through telehealth visits from anywhere in Illinois. This was really just what I was always supposed to do and there's nothing that's going to keep me from helping our patients. The Joaquin clinic is Planned Parenthood of Illinois busiest for out of state abortion patients. There's been a burst of people from Wisconsin in particular. Within a month of row overturning, there was a tenfold increase in patients from Wisconsin, traveling to all Planned Parenthood clinics in Illinois. What used to be 35 patients a month? Jump to 350. And that doesn't include Wisconsin residents who received abortions with other providers. Planned Parenthood of Illinois prepared for this moment. They opened this clinic in Waukegan two years ago. It's about a 20 minute drive from the Wisconsin border. They knew that if roe fell, Wisconsin would largely strip away access to abortion. Inside the clinic, there are usual exam tables and ultrasound machines. There are also signs of what this space used to be, a big bank on a busy retail strip. The assistant manager as we're a figueroa took me on a tour. He points out hints of the past, like the shiny vault in the break room. Can't get inside of it. I really wish we could, but it's really cool to just have here. More than a dozen staffers with Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin, commute to Waukegan. Some a few times a week, some a few days a month. Doctor Kathy king is the organization's medical director. She said, well, her staff is dedicated to providing these services. It comes at a cost. It is a burden on our clinicians and nurses and medical assistants who have young children at home. It sounds great. Sure, we'll all just travel down to walk Keegan, but the logistics of that in the sacrifice of doing that on just people's day to today lives takes a toll. Still, she says the sacrifice has helped with staff from Wisconsin. The Waukegan clinic has doubled the number of abortion appointments available, and they're still ramping up. This could be a model for other states where abortion has been further restricted. Within a month after Rafael, dozens of clinics closed, as 11 states across the Midwest and the south implemented bands. That's according to the gut mocker institute, which supports abortion rights and tracks the issue. That's love providers looking for work, while clinics in places like Illinois need help to care for a surge of out of state patients. For NPR news, I'm Kristen shore and Chicago. This story is a collaboration

Illinois Wisconsin Waukegan Npr News Roe V Wade WBZ Kristen Shoresh Natalie Hartwig Roe V Wade Fell Planned Parenthood Clinic Joaquin Clinic Leila Newark Martinez Madison Chicago Kathy King Figueroa Waukegan Clinic Keegan
Danielle D'Souza Gill Joins Her Dad to Talk About Abortion

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:05 min | Last week

Danielle D'Souza Gill Joins Her Dad to Talk About Abortion

"A big development in Kansas, which some people who have focused solely on the election primaries have not emphasized. But there was a referendum in Kansas, the point of the referendum was to modify a provision in the Kansas state constitution that would return the abortion issue to the legislature. And this was up before the people of Kansas and they voted the amendment down, which is to say they voted to keep the constitution as it is, and you might say, protect abortion rights, abortion rights, so called in Kansas. Now, Kansas is a moderately conservative state, and so the left is celebrating this. Wow, the abortion issue has so much political traction for us. It's going to help us to promote our promote Democrats in the midterms. So I kind of wanted to get your take on what's happened in Kansas and what is this a message to the pro life movement to gear up? It is because the left is going to stoop to any level to do any kind of disinformation campaign to really scare people into thinking that things are much worse than they are in reality, Kansas is a conservative state. There are solidly pro life state. And even in Kansas, there are only actually have in the whole state a couple abortion clinics. And of course, that is a couple too many clinics, but in reality that this state they're saying is becoming this Mecca of abortion now. People around another states can come to Kansas for abortion, but we're really talking about really just very few people who I think are these very radical pro abortion advocates. And they were the ones who turned up who really got other people to show up by, I think, scaring them. And they're thinking that perhaps the laws were different than they were. And I think the pro life side probably thought, oh, you know, roe V wade's overturned. So we're good to go now and we can just rely on the states to be conservative and pro life that they will pass the laws we want, but the other side really showed up and unfortunately our side didn't.

Kansas Legislature Mecca Roe V Wade
Fresh update on "roe " discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

01:07 min | 19 hrs ago

Fresh update on "roe " discussed on Morning Edition

"Morning edition from NPR news. I'm Leila folded. And I'm a Martinez. When roe V wade was overturned, Wisconsin used a state law from 1849 to ban nearly all abortions. In neighboring Illinois, abortion rights are protected. Now, Planned Parenthood staffers in both states have teamed up to support patients who want an abortion no matter which state they call home. From member station WBZ in Chicago, Kristen shoresh reports. Natalie hartwig is a nurse midwife in Wisconsin at Planned Parenthood. When roe V wade fell, her clinic stopped performing abortions. Now about two days a week, her week drives at least two hours from her home in Madison, across the border into Illinois. She leaves as early as 5 30 in the morning. Her son still in bed. To get to the Planned Parenthood clinic in Waukegan. It's a suburb in far northern Illinois. Luckily, it's summer. For now, he can sleep in. Making the truck to Illinois allows her to care for abortion patients. She can't do this at home. In Waukegan, she works in the recovery room, monitoring patients and taking their vitals. And she got her license in Illinois and is trained to provide medication abortion. Even as a nurse with an advanced degree, she wasn't allowed to do this in Wisconsin, when abortion was still legal. She can treat these patients virtually through telehealth visits from anywhere in Illinois. This was really just what I was always supposed to do and there's nothing that's going to keep me from helping our patients. The Joaquin clinic is Planned Parenthood of Illinois busiest for Odyssey abortion patients. There's been a burst of people from Wisconsin in particular. Within a month of row overturning, there was a tenfold increase in patients from Wisconsin, traveling to all Planned Parenthood clinics in Illinois. What used to be 35 patients a month? Jump to 350. And that doesn't include Wisconsin residents who received abortions with other providers. Planned Parenthood of Illinois prepared for this moment. They opened this clinic in Waukegan two years ago. It's about a 20 minute drive from the Wisconsin border. They knew that if ro fell, Wisconsin would largely strip away access to abortion. Inside the clinic, there are usual exam tables and ultrasound machines. There are also signs of what this space used to be, a big bank on a busy retail strip. The assistant manager as we're a figueroa took me on a tour. He points out hints of the past, like the shiny vault in the break room. Can't get inside of it. I really wish we could, but it's really cool to just have here. More than a dozen staffers with Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin, commute to Waukegan. Some a few times a week, some a few days a month. Doctor Kathy king is the organization's medical director. She said, well, her staff is dedicated to providing these services. It comes at a cost. It is a burden on our clinicians and nurses and medical assistants who have young children at home. It sounds great. Sure, we'll all just travel down to walk Keegan. But the logistics of that and the sacrifice of doing that on just people's day to today lives takes a toll. Still, she says the sacrifice has helped with staff from Wisconsin. The wake and clinic has doubled the number of abortion appointments available, and they're still ramping up. This could be a model for other states where abortion has been further restricted. Within a month after Rafael, dozens of clinics closed, as 11 states across the Midwest and the south implemented bands. That's according to the gut mocker institute, which supports abortion rights and tracks the issue. That's love providers looking for work, while clinics in places like Illinois need help to care for

Illinois Wisconsin Waukegan Npr News Roe V Wade WBZ Kristen Shoresh Natalie Hartwig Roe V Wade Fell Planned Parenthood Clinic Joaquin Clinic Leila Martinez Madison Chicago Kathy King Figueroa Keegan Gut Mocker Institute Rafael
Kansas's Abortion Swing Does Not Mean a National Win for Democrats

The Ben Shapiro Show

02:10 min | Last week

Kansas's Abortion Swing Does Not Mean a National Win for Democrats

"As New York Times reports, consider far western Kansas, a rural region along the Colorado border that overwhelmingly votes Republican. In Hamilton county, which voted 81% for Trump in 2020, less than 56%, chose the anti abortion position on Tuesday. In greenlee county, which voted more than 85% for Trump, only about 60% chose the anti abortion position. The worst wing areas that swung left, cities and suburbs, there were some people who showed up, turnout was pretty high. It is also true, however, that the turnout being this high was for a single issue. Not necessarily for a presidential election or for a gubernatorial election. So a lot of people voted on this particular referendum who did not vote in the democratic primaries, for example. And so you could see something very similar happen. Let's say the Democrats try to stack state ballots with abortion referenda in an attempt to get people out to the ballot box. Well, it's quite possible. We'll split their ticket and they vote in favor of the things the Democrats are proposing if people agree with what voters just didn't in Kansas. And then at the same time, they don't vote for the actual Democrats. The notion that this is going to provide some sort of inflection point for Democrats going forward, I think is wrong and I think it's even more wrong because the federal Democrats feel the necessity to get out over their skis on this thing. And what this did, what the overturn of roe versus wade did, is it relegated this back to the states? Well, we just saw as a state like Kansas. Sort of unpredictably decided that it was further left on the issue of abortion than people thought it was. How exactly is that a, how exactly does that mean that role being overturned was a massive problem for the states? Obviously it is not. Now Kansas is actually getting to decide for itself. What it wishes to do on abortion, which is called federalism. But Joe Biden is trying to ref federalize the issue. He's trying to take it up again, re centralize the issue, which I think is actually not going to be particularly the popular. And the reason I think that's not going to be particular popular is because, again, people in Kansas may be worried about what happens to them in Kansas. But why exactly do you think that that's going to motivate them to vote on federal abortion legislation that applies to people in Alabama? What makes you think that everybody wants this to be a national issue predominantly when the Supreme Court is very unlikely to allow it to become a national issue in the first place.

Kansas Greenlee County Hamilton County New York Times Colorado Wade Joe Biden Alabama Supreme Court
Abortion Pills Will Be the Next Battleground in Post-Roe America

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

00:50 sec | Last week

Abortion Pills Will Be the Next Battleground in Post-Roe America

"The two Senate Democrats hoping to protect access to medication abortion by codifying the FDA's authority over reproductive healthcare products that several red states took into usurping that power so they can ban drugs used for abortion and miscarriage. This is going to be the next front because this is what Carlos, we have now that we didn't have back with roe is medication. So now they're going to go, how do we stop that? Are you four 86? Right. It affirms that the FDA's authority supersedes state law when it comes to FDA approved drugs, including those for medication abortions. I mean so if somebody gets raped like a child, they can't take RU four 86 to prevent something gestating and then that reminds them of the terror that they faced on that ugly evening day slash morning. That I think is a good term. There are forced birth party. That's what it is. It's force birth, whether it wants the babies, and we want them white.

FDA Senate ROE Carlos
Are The Republicans Going To Blow 2022?

The Ben Shapiro Show

01:55 min | Last week

Are The Republicans Going To Blow 2022?

"We have a bunch of results from Republican primaries across the country. And what they are showing is sort of a mixed record of candidate selection from Republicans. This is not been a major surprise given the fact that Republicans very often nominate candidates in what are supposed to be wave years who are kind of sketch. You remember this in 2010. There were a bunch of Republican candidates in what should have been lean our races who seemed out of the box and then ended up losing very winnable races, Republicans have an unfortunate tendency in primaries to select the people who they think are the most passionate. The most potentially game changing. And then those people go on to lose the general election. The famously William F. Buckley suggested that the art of politics when it comes to primary voting is to select the rightmost candidate who can win and very often Republican voters forget that last part of the sentence who can win and they just select the rightmost candidate and understandable mistake. This is complicated by cross currents from president Trump because so much of American politics has now become a litmus test on loyalty. And so when president Trump attacks a candidate, very often, people resonate to the candidate, the Trump endorses, even if the candidate that Trump endorses isn't exactly a person who is likely to win a general election simply because they feel the person that Trump is ripping on is not sufficiently loyal to the cause. There are all these varying sort of eddies in American politics. And what this is amounting to is Republicans blowing the chance perhaps to actually win back the Senate or win a broader majority in the House of Representatives. Yesterday Nate silver is 5 38 switched its projection to forecast for the first time that Democrats will actually keep the United States Senate. That is a direct result of candidate selection by Republicans in primaries ranging from places like Georgia to places like Pennsylvania. Nate silver wrote on Twitter. It seems clear. There's something happening here and move into our Democrats in recent polls isn't just statistical noise. He says that something is probably in part or indeed mostly jobs, meaning the Supreme Court decision to overrule roe versus wade, but there are quite a few factors that will come to look better for Democrats over the past few weeks, including their legislative agenda.

President Trump William F. Buckley Donald Trump Nate Silver Senate House Of Representatives United States Georgia Pennsylvania Twitter Supreme Court Wade
Biden to sign executive order to protect travel for abortion

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last week

Biden to sign executive order to protect travel for abortion

"President Biden today will take a step aimed in part at protecting women traveling between states to get an abortion It's another in a series of executive actions the Biden administration's taken since the Supreme Court's roe V wade decision The president will sign an order letting states that have not banned abortion to apply for specific Medicare waivers that would effectively help them treat women from out of state as the president launches a federal task force on access to reproductive care many Democrats and abortion advocacy groups are pushing for more including declaration of a public health emergency on abortion White House officials have said that would not accomplish much Sagar Meghani Washington

President Biden Biden Administration Roe V Wade Supreme Court Medicare White House Sagar Meghani Washington
 Kansas voters resoundingly protect their access to abortion

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | Last week

Kansas voters resoundingly protect their access to abortion

"Kansas voters want to protect their access to abortion Kansas voters have rejected a ballot measure that would have allowed the Republican controlled legislature to tighten restrictions on abortion or ban it altogether Tuesday's referendum was the first test of voter sentiment after the U.S. Supreme Court in June overturned roe V wade in a statement president Joe Biden says this vote makes clear what we know The majority of Americans agree that women should have access to abortion and should have the right to make their own healthcare decisions The anti abortion group Susan B. Anthony pro life America says the vote is a huge disappointment and it calls on anti abortion candidates to go on the offensive

Kansas Roe V Wade Legislature U.S. Supreme Court Joe Biden Susan B. Anthony America
Kansas voters uphold state abortion rights, CBS News projects

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | Last week

Kansas voters uphold state abortion rights, CBS News projects

"I'm Mike Gracia reporting Kansas voters protect abortion rights and block a path to an outright ban In the first test of U.S. voter sediment on abortion rights since the Supreme Court overturned roe V wade in June voters in Kansas protected the right to an abortion in the sunflower state Borders rejected a measure that would have allowed the Republican controlled Kansas legislature to tighten abortion restrictions or ban it outright In Michigan Thank you thank you Thank you Donald Trump endorsed conservative commentator Tudor Dixon won the Republican primary for Michigan governor That sets up a November general election showdown with democratic governor Gretchen Whitmer In Missouri trudy bush Valentine beat ten candidates in the democratic U.S. Senate primary but she'll be the underdog against Republican attorney general Eric Schmidt in November in

Mike Gracia Roe V Wade Sunflower State Borders Kansas Tudor Dixon Kansas Legislature Supreme Court Michigan U.S. Donald Trump Gretchen Whitmer Trudy Bush Missouri U.S. Senate Eric Schmidt
US sues Idaho over abortion law, citing medical emergencies

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | Last week

US sues Idaho over abortion law, citing medical emergencies

"The Justice Department's taking its first major action in response to some states enacting restrictive abortion laws after the Supreme Court overturned roe V wade Today the Justice Department filed a lawsuit against the state of Idaho Attorney general Merrick Garland says federal law requires that anyone coming to a medical facility for emergency care get necessary treatment In abortion if needed Idaho's law would make it a criminal offense for doctors to provide the emergency medical treatment that federal law requires The high courts row decision is likely to lead to abortion bans in roughly half the states Garland says his department will keep working to protect reproductive freedom Washington

Justice Department Roe V Wade Attorney General Merrick Garla Idaho Supreme Court Garland Washington
Supreme Court Political Hackery Revealed in Sam Alito's Rome Speech

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

01:22 min | Last week

Supreme Court Political Hackery Revealed in Sam Alito's Rome Speech

"This political hacked Ness goes all the way up to the Supreme Court. I guess there's a new low, but Sam Alito is she wrote about Sam Alito went to Rome to correct some jokes after overturning roe. He said apparently Sam Alito went to Rome and let his free flag by guaranteeing he is now known internationally as a head. Yeah, this is him. Here we go. I had the honor, this term of writing, I think, the only Supreme Court decision in the history of that institution that has been lambasted by a whole string One of these was former prime minister Boris Johnson. But he paid the price, what really wounded me was when the Duke of Sussex addressed the United Nations and seemed to compare the decision whose name may not be spoken with the Russian attack on Ukraine. Wow. The crisis test has Boris Johnson and Trudeau. I mean, now he's admitting it. I mean, it's out in the open now. You've got a Supreme Court, the majority of whom are conservative hacks. Right. And we'll deliver for all the people who and Sheldon White House is right about this and he's been right about this for three years now. He's delivering for their donors the same way a congressman would.

Sam Alito Supreme Court Rome Boris Johnson Ness Duke Of Sussex United Nations Trudeau Ukraine Sheldon White House
Bipartisan compromise bill would restore abortion rights

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | Last week

Bipartisan compromise bill would restore abortion rights

"I Mike rossia reporting there's a bipartisan compromise bill in the Senate that would restore abortion rights Four senators have introduced bipartisan legislation to restore abortion access following the Supreme Court decision to overturn roe V wade The legislation was introduced by Democrats Tim kaine of Virginia and kyrsten sinema of Arizona and Republican senator Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska The legislation would prohibit most state regulations that prevent abortion access before fetal viability State restrictions would be permitted as long as the mother's life is protected The bill is not expected to pass and it's unlikely to even be brought to a vote But backers say the legislation is intended to signal to state legislatures and the public that a majority of the U.S. Senate supports codifying roe Mike Gracia Washington

Mike Rossia Kyrsten Sinema Senator Susan Collins Tim Kaine U.S. Senate Lisa Murkowski Supreme Court Virginia Arizona Maine Alaska Mike Gracia Washington
Rabbi Jonathan Cahn and Eric Discuss Trump's Effect on Roe v. Wade

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:50 min | Last week

Rabbi Jonathan Cahn and Eric Discuss Trump's Effect on Roe v. Wade

"Welcome back, we're talking to rabbi Jonathan Khan, author of many books, including the harbinger, the harbinger two, son of harbinger, just kidding. No. Harbinger meets avenue Costello meet harbinger, the film is called the harbingers of things to come. It's available at Salem now, dot com, all kinds of other stuff in here. When you talk about the jubilee of abortion, which we just covered, you were relating that to the Supreme Court overturning roe V wade, and there's no question that is utterly historic. I mean, it's a monumental thing that something which was a bad law, not just because abortion is evil, but the law itself was bad. It was a high handed overreach by the judiciary to legislate something. It has no business being found in the constitution. It's just complete nonsense. But to have that actually overturned in our lifetimes, thanks to Donald Trump, who appointed three originalists to the Supreme Court. Yes. Yeah, a few things. One is, and remember we once talked about a thing called the paradigm. I think that I'm just going to say one thing about that. I won't go, yeah. What's one of your books? Yeah. Yeah. And one of the things about Donald Trump is I saw that he's following with America. He kept following this pattern of jehu jehu was the wild guide. And he comes up while the nation's falling away from God. But the one thing that one thing that jehu does, which is if he only did that, it would be enough. Is he opposes the worship of bail, which is the offering of child sacrifice. So the thing is that so jehu actually causes the temple of bail to fall. Donald Trump, as you said, he's the one who appointed the three Supreme Court Justices and by that act he caused roe versus way to fall.

Rabbi Jonathan Khan Supreme Court Donald Trump Costello Jehu Jehu Jehu America
Greg Gutfeld and Charlie Discuss the Hilarious Babylon Bee

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:15 min | Last week

Greg Gutfeld and Charlie Discuss the Hilarious Babylon Bee

"For the day. And again, this is why the Babylon bee is so unbelievably brilliant. Because. You can not decipher between the Babylon bee headline and what's happening in The New York Times, I'm just waiting for the fema press release. Hurricane incoming, no need to be urgent. Yes. You're a KKK member. Yes, no rush, no rush. You may die, but you know, you'll be an antiracist. Yes, exactly. I hate the Babylon bee for reasons that they might be funnier than me. And that is a problem. But you know what's interesting going back to the left, what's happening to the left. As the Babylon B gets funny or in funnier, what's less funny, the onion. The onion actually did, they actually now kind of do serious stuff, and I'm like, what happened? And it's like, you know, some things just you just can't joke about. Even the onion, like the roe V wade thing, and we can't even joke about that. You know, and so then they just trash somebody, whatever. Meanwhile, the Babylon bee is, has flipped the script. You know, now the onion is dean wormer, their animal House, and they're really sweet, smart people. I mean, who would have thought that a Christian website is funnier than all the cool atheists?

Fema The New York Times Hurricane Dean Wormer
Poll: Democrats Lead by 4% in Midterm Races

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:31 min | Last week

Poll: Democrats Lead by 4% in Midterm Races

"Democrats are leading in the midterm race with a 4% edge over the GOP on the generic congressional ballot. This is a Suffolk university USA Today poll. 44% should if the election were held today, they would vote for a Democrat, only 40% said they'd vote for a Republican a 16% remain undecided. So maybe that's the key if you believe this poll. But I just want to ask you, simple question. Do you honestly believe that more Americans are upset about roe V wade? Being overturned? Then being able to pay the bills, you know, we fall into a trap with polls. And the trap is this. If a poll confirms what we hope for or what we think, we like the poll. If it doesn't, we don't like the poll. And I don't want to fall into that trap. I'm just going to ask you the smartest audience in America. Here in the relief factor dot com studios as we kick things off for a Friday, July 29th. Do you honestly think that this poll is correct that more Americans are concerned about abortion? Than they are, the economy, their bank account, their 401k, filling up the gas tank, going to the grocery store. Being able to buy a house pay rent?

Suffolk University Usa Roe V Wade GOP America
Justice Alito Cracks Dobbs Jokes Abroad

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:15 min | Last week

Justice Alito Cracks Dobbs Jokes Abroad

"Want to play for you justice Alito abroad, talking about European reaction to the Dobbs decision. Can we play cut number one of justice Alito yesterday? A few weeks since I had the honor, this term of writing, I think, the only Supreme Court decision in the history of that institution that has been lambasted by a whole string of foreign leaders. Who felt perfectly fine commenting on American law. One of these was former prime minister Boris Johnson. But he paid the price. Post hoc ergo propter hoc, right? All right, so that's a joke. And don't take it as anything other than a joke, because of course, former prime minister Barack Johnson is still the prime minister, but justice Alito is gracefully telling non Americans that they don't get the make Supreme Court law. The United States Constitution dictates what Supreme Court law is. And even if they made a mistake, 49 years ago with roe and doubled down on that mistake, 30 years ago in Casey, now the court has it right. It is up to the states.

Alito Dobbs Supreme Court Barack Johnson Boris Johnson Justice Alito United States Casey
Same-Sex Marriage Bill Advances in Congress

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:42 min | 2 weeks ago

Same-Sex Marriage Bill Advances in Congress

"The defense of marriage act repeal is coming before the Senate soon, and it's past the house, some of my very best friends in the Christian legal movement, for example, the lines depending freedom, oppose Republicans signing on to this. I support them doing so. The complicated part is the politics, according to The Washington Post, actually it's not. It's the theology, like other mainline Catholics and Christians, I believe that human intimacy is reserved for a man and a woman inside the bounds of marriage. But the United States supermajority of people don't, obergefell leapfrogged the constitutional process and slammed down obergefell in a 5 four decision. I would have joined the chief justices descent at the time the decision, but since that time unlike after roe, there has been acquiescence of the states, no efforts to overturn a burger fell, and unlike roe, enormous reliance. I believe it's a half million Americans are in the same sex marriage. And that number will grow every year. So the idea that obergefell is going to be challenging the states is absurd, the idea that the Supreme Court would ever retreat on that is absurd, but people who oppose same sex marriage should realize that we want the precedence of uncontested decisions like those involving the for exercise clause over the last ten years to stick. And in the long term, when the left rises up, we want them to have to run into a decisive and reliance interest, and by codifying obergefell, they might want to add an amendment to codify Trinity Lutheran and the hobby lobby decisions, et cetera. But they should vote for it.

Obergefell The Washington Post Senate United States Supreme Court Trinity Lutheran
"roe  " Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

03:37 min | Last month

"roe " Discussed on Latino USA

"Question mark. You know, we want to do a temperature check. So Jessica, what's your temperature check? How do you feel? It's been a day and it hasn't stopped since May when the Dobbs opinion was first leaked. This is a really dark moment in our country's history. And I'm not one to think that we haven't had a lot of dark moments before this. I'm pretty clear eyed, but I want to really just sort of level set. What happened on Friday was the Supreme Court unequivocally took away a right. It had previously recognized. And how this then proceeds, the fallout, the dominoes that come from this, it's a moment for everyone in this country to take pause and understand that what we have is an anti majoritarian rule from the Supreme Court and it is about to drastically change the way we understand our personal lives in this country. I mean, it's so fucking deep. It's just like you just like, oh my God. We just got rolled over by a boulder, hit on our heads. Many of us did see it coming have been seen it coming actually for decades. Kim, tell me how you doing? You know, it's interesting. A lot of times I feel like my job as a political analyst and a legal analyst in a way serves as a buffer to some of the more horrific things that happen in the world because I put on my work hat, right? And I think about the legal analysis and the political analysis and that sort of keeps me keeps my mind occupied. But for this, that's been very difficult to do as a woman as a person of color, that the court not only rolled back a fundamental liberty right that I thought that I learned in law school would protect me and others. But also did it in a way that calls into question so many other protections. So preciously recently enacted and recognized protections and then turned around and said, well, you know, if you want protection in this way, you have to demonstrate that throughout the history of this nation that it has been a tradition. To protect these rights. And then I think so many people are screwed then because so many of these protections are so recent. We can't prove them because they weren't protected as a tradition in our country. So that's the part that's most jarring for me. It's been a couple of days. You've had some more time to process what's your what's your temperature check, my friend? I'm dizzy with the horror of what's happening in the United States of America. And so on a very profound level, it just feels like, yeah, everything is shaking the earthquake is happening underneath our feet. Yeah, what we've just heard is that it's not just about abortion. Deep issues of privacy and therefore questions of things that we have taken not for granted, but gay marriage, contraception, all of these things are now being discussed. And it feels very dystopian, and then at the same time, no, this is real. I did say something when I was at the American library association meeting on Saturday morning after the decision, I said a million or more activists were just born. Because of this. Yeah, they became, they became activists as a result of what happened. Because I became a little activist when roe V wade was first being.

Supreme Court Jessica boulder Kim United States of America earthquake American library association roe V wade
"roe  " Discussed on The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

06:17 min | Last month

"roe " Discussed on The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

"I'm talking about the Supreme Court's momentous decision to overrule overturn roe versus wade, and the effect of that is not to outlaw abortion, but to disperse it. Disperse the decision about abortion to the several states. Each state can now pass its own laws. So in a strange way, the court wasn't even deciding the abortion issue at all. What the Supreme Court was deciding is on this question who should decide? Should we the Supreme Court decide for the whole country? Should each end with virtual woman in the country have their own, say you may say over their womb and it's like, this is mine. It may be a separate life. It may have its own toes. It may have its own fingers, but nevertheless it inhabits my body and therefore I have, you may say, the life or death decision to make over it. Who should decide in the court to basically say, look, we live in a democratic society. When there isn't an enumerated right in the constitution that has to be protected even against the majority, then the democratic process applies. And that means that states get to make these decisions through a process that will, in effect, reflect the moral consensus or at least the moral plurality of people living in that state. Now, it's kind of interesting that when I look at all the articles on the topic, they seem to have a kind of erroneous premise. Here's The New Yorker. When the Supreme Court takes away a long held constitutional right. But it was not a constitutional right. It never was. And that's really a leader's point, Alito says, in a sense, we're not taking away a right, the right never existed. Roe versus wade was wrongly decided from the beginning. It's kind of like saying the Brown decision in 1954 overturned the right to segregation. No, they never was a segregation right. The plessy decision going back to the 1890s was bogus from the beginning. Yes, it was an effect for 50 years, but that doesn't put it into the constitution in any more than an abortion right can be found in the constitution before. No, it wasn't there before. It wasn't there now. It isn't there now. So that is the key point. And this is even what the dissent ignores here is the descent or rescinding an individual ride in its entirety and conferring it on the state, this is an action the court takes for the first time in history. Now, there would never was an individual right. The individual right was fabricated from the was fabricated from the beginning. Now, the immediate consequence of all this is kind of amazing. And that is that abortion clinics are closing down in the red states. I'm just reading now from life news. West Virginia is now abortion free as the state's last abortion center has stopped performing abortions. Confirmed all three abortion businesses in Alabama have stopped killing babies following the Supreme Court decision to overturn role. Now, how is this possible? I mean, normally, abortion is now immediately illegal in Kentucky, Louisiana and South Dakota. How is it possible for a court decision to come on Friday? An abortion clinics to be closed. We don't buy Monday. And the answer is this. A number of these states had what are called trigger laws. So a trigger lies, okay, you're claiming that abortion is constitutional as a constitutional right, and there's a Supreme Court decision roe V wade in effect that declares, however, implausibly that there is this right, we will pass a law so that if at any moment that this right is rescinded or overturned or proclaimed to be bogus by a majority of the Supreme Court, then boom automatically are pro life law goes into effect. And so a bunch of states, I believe, a dozen or so have these trigger laws that kick in. They kick in virtually instantaneously, maybe not quite as quickly as the examples I gave, but my point being that these states don't have to go back. And make new laws. They've already passed the law, the law is valid as long as it is upheld in the Supreme Court and that is the case now. Now there's a bitter backlash you may say from the left and I'll be talking about it in the days ahead. But here I just want to talk about the idea that's been echoed by several people, even Susan Collins gave it a little bit of rhetorical deference. And this is the idea that somehow the Supreme Court Justices lied when they, when they went through the confirmation process, they lied, well, they lied how. They didn't lie by saying we're never going to overturn roe versus wade. In fact, they refused to answer that question. So you can say that they lied about that. Well, what do they lie about? Well, they lied about the fact that they said in their hearings that they considered role to be settled precedent. But there's no lie there because that was simply a matter of saying, I mean, if some law, however preposterous, has been in effect for multiple decades. In this case, 40 years. Well, 73. Almost 50 years. It is settled precedent. It may be bad precedent, but it's still settled precedent. And so I don't think these guys lied. I think what they did is they just played the stupid verbal game of the left. The verbal game of the left is to try to extract from justices, statements in advance about how they're going to rule on questions like role and the judges were like, listen, we'll play along with this little you may call it verbal ping Pong. It's just a measure of how degraded our political culture is that justices can't, in effect. Say, candidly, listen, you lunatics, there's no abortion right in the constitution, hold up the constitution of the light, squeeze lemon juice on and see if you see an abortion right in it. You won't see one any more than we do. So since you can't be honest and do that, you have these little verbal pirouettes. But when the time comes, the justice is ultimately due what they did in this case, they actually looked at the constitution to see if there was such a right and in it.

Supreme Court wade Alito The New Yorker Roe West Virginia South Dakota Brown Alabama Louisiana Kentucky Susan Collins
"roe  " Discussed on COVID-19: What You Need to Know

COVID-19: What You Need to Know

04:38 min | Last month

"roe " Discussed on COVID-19: What You Need to Know

"Blocked them from being able to have any regulations whatsoever for training to abortion right. The polling is very clear while voters might not want to have row overturned. They don't understand row. They don't understand the implications of overturning it. Voters actually, by huge majorities support banning abortion at 15 weeks spanning abortion when a fetal heartbeat is detected. There are all types of regulations that the American people are behind and now they finally get to work through their elected representatives through the democratic process to protect the unborn and to protect the mothers and fathers who are involved in all of these issues. Terry even if it does not make abortion illegal outright 26 states are likely to ban abortion now that it's now that ro is overturned 13 states have trigger bans that take effect almost immediately. So the reality is an abortion will be far harder to come by in much of America. Right, but frankly, I don't think that that's a bad thing. Abortion should be harder to come by in America because these are unborn children. The arguments from the other side from the pro life side of this is that these are human beings. These are human beings that deserve rights that deserve at least 9 months in the womb and then to be given up for adoption, they deserve a shot at life. And frankly, I think that that's more than reasonable. There's always going to be exceptions. For right now, we have to deal with this through democracy through democratic means for people vote and get to decide. What's so terrible about roe is just how anti democratic it is, how anti American it is, it took the decision away from the people to be able to decide whether or not they want to allow something that they view as barbaric as the killing of unborn children in their states. These are critical issues. And frankly, if you disagree with the decision, I would urge you to get involved in politics. Get involved in the electoral process and get your politicians elected or unelected based on how they vote on this. But for so long, the unfair aspect of roe has been that people who want to protect the unborn haven't been able to pass laws to do it. What other area of our society? What other area of our law do we actually ban people from being able to organize and mobilize and politics? We allow all types of restrictions on gun rights on the Second Amendment and that's totally constitutional, right? And then there's a specific amendment in the constitution protecting the right to bear arms. But we allow people to regulate it. There's nothing in the constitution that protects any right to abortion, whatsoever. It's a penumbra of a penumbra. Terry Schilling at the American principles project, those committed to reproductive autonomy include doctor Katie McHugh and o-b-gyn and abortion provider in Indiana. How are you digesting this ruling? My gut reaction is that I am gutted. I am so devastated for our patients and for the people that rely on the freedom to make their own private medical decisions. This decision handed down by the Supreme Court does nothing to protect anyone's life except it just goes straight for control and oppression and I am so, so devastated for all of us. What now going forward? How are you going to help your patients? That's a really important question. Here in Indiana, we don't have a trigger band. So I actually am in clinic today providing abortion care and every one of my patients has been asking about what happens and can I still get my I just saw in the news that the Supreme Court overturned roe can I get my procedure this afternoon? Indiana doesn't have a trigger band but moving forward, we fully expect my state and many other states to prohibit this safe and very evidence based compassionate care. So what we're doing is mobilizing folks to help get people out of state, especially those folks who can't afford that transportation or afford child care or to take time off work. Just try to get those people funds and support and resources. And we're lobbying for the inclusion of healthcare and parental leave and all of the types of things that someone who might call themselves pro life should be advocating for. So we are very pro people pro life of the person and we want to make things better for our patients. Doctor Katie McHugh joining us from.

roe America Terry Schilling American principles project Katie McHugh Terry Indiana Supreme Court
"roe  " Discussed on COVID-19: What You Need to Know

COVID-19: What You Need to Know

01:36 min | Last month

"roe " Discussed on COVID-19: What You Need to Know

"And the balance that existed is for Congress to restore the protections of roe V wade as federal law. Aaron, the president is saying, this is now on Congress that Congress needs to codify the protections that roe V wade had for the right to an abortion. But the problem is they don't have the numbers in Congress to do that. They've tried to do that in recent weeks after that draft decision had leaked, but it wasn't doable. So the president today was saying that Americans now need to get out, make their voices heard and in November and in subsequent elections, need to elect more lawmakers who will do just that. Not even just at the federal level, but do it at the state level as well in order to try and restore those protections that roe had made the law of the land. And it wasn't just abortion that he said was at stake. No, the president back when that draft decision had been leaked in early May had expressed significant concerns about what this would mean for a variety of rights that Americans now take for granted, and he reiterated that again today. He said row recognize the right to privacy that this is ingrained in the fabric of this country right now. That Americans have the ability to make the best decisions for their own health in terms of birth control. Also, the ability to decide who you want to marry. And he explicitly called out justice clarence Thomas, who, in his writing on this decision, called for the reconsideration of marriage equality and the right to contraception, President Biden says this is extreme and says it is a dangerous path that this Supreme Court is taking the nation.

roe V wade Congress Aaron roe clarence Thomas President Biden Supreme Court
"roe  " Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

Dennis Prager Podcasts

04:10 min | Last month

"roe " Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

"I'd love to hear more arguments. For a late term or midterm abortions. The notion that a man can not have a moral opinion on the issue because he doesn't get pregnant. Is painful to hear. The reduction of the human beings that that argument engages in, by the way, it was used there was somebody wrote in The New York Times about me. I think it was The New York Times. Or at some paper. Then Dennis prager has no right to an opinion on abortion because he doesn't have a uterus. You have to go to college. I'm not saying my caller did, but one generally has to go to college to think that poorly. Morality is now based on gender. It's a left wing position. That's true. Okay, thank you for calling. Let's Sacramento California and Stephen hello. Hi, Dennis. Hi. Haven't called you for a while, but man, I just want to tell you, maybe your audience would like to hear an opinion of convicted felon and how I feel about the Supreme Court decision on the guns. What was your felony? Oh, man. Oh, God. Road rage. Can I just say that? Back in the 70s. And anyway, I suddenly conviction was reduced to misdemeanor dismissed because I got to my probation without any trouble. I haven't been in trouble since I was a Democrat then. I've woken up. I'm a conservative now. Thanks to you and big part, by the way. And I totally no longer criminal anything like that, but I want to tell you how I feel about the gun law. I am thrilled because there's a convicted felon. I can't own a gun because I follow the law. And if I'm out in public and some thugs start shooting, first of all, I know it's not a law abiding citizen that's carrying legally because they don't start shootouts. So I know it's a folks shooting. I want somebody near me that's carrying a gun legally that can take this thug out. Cops don't get there right away. And I want people to carry guns to keep law abiding citizens safe. Well, I have a lot of sympathy for that position. It has come to the point where there are definite risks with concealed carry permits. There's risk to every policy there's a risk to raising the speed limit. But I think it's a good idea. We'll be back. The Dennis prager show. Hello, my Friends, Dennis prager here. It's the open lines. A lot of calls on roe V wade. And I'm taking calls on all sorts of subjects. I still put out this challenge of a moral argument for an abortion on a viable phoebus. There, you don't need religion. I'm a big believer in religion as the basis of morality, but you don't need it there. If you believe that human life should be protected, I don't understand why being in a woman ends that protection, especially given the fact that if she wants the baby, it's considered a human. At any age, even before viability. There is no moral argument for abortion on demand. It's killing a child on demand. Let's be honest, certainly when it is viable..

Dennis prager Stephen hello The New York Times Sacramento Dennis Supreme Court roe V wade California
"roe  " Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

Dennis Prager Podcasts

06:09 min | Last month

"roe " Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

"Well, my Friends, I discussed the verdict, obviously. The whole first hour will certainly have some calls on it the next hour. And the happiness hour is never deferred. It is just the rule of this program. Is there a conceivable time if there were nuclear war? Would I cancel the hour? I'll come through it when there's a nuclear war. I consider happiness to be an extremely important subject the happy make the world better the unhappy make it worse. There are happy and unhappy liberals happy and unhappy conservatives. There are no happy leftists. I'm happiness is a major source of the nihilism of our time, the screaming, the hysteria, the non hysteric is a happier person. I am a happier person, and because I had contempt for the lockdowns from month two. I didn't listen to them from the second week. I gathered with my bunch of 15 Friends every Friday night for Shabbat dinner from the second week. Of the lockdown. When you don't buy into hysteria, you're a happier human being. When you are easily frightened and easily panicked, you are not a happy human being. It seems to be easier to be a sheep. But the sheep of the human species are not happier. So, some strong views on the happiness issue. Hence the happiness hour for now 23 years. I'm on probably between 48 and 50 Fridays a year. Probably, what do you think? How many Fridays do I miss for, you think? Fewer, I try not to miss Fridays because of the happiness hour. Anyway, it's virtually every Friday of the year. Because I think of it as a service to you, the truth is, it's been a service to me. I have learned that men's an immense amount from you on the issue of happiness. And it has been very good for me during difficult times in my life, everybody has difficult times in their life. I don't know of an exception to that rule. I am not an exception to that rule. But I have tried to live by my advice. My plea, the people act happy, even if they don't feel it. It's good for you and it's good for others. We have a moral obligation to have a happy countenance. We owe it to others, not to inflict our bad moods just as we don't inflict our bad breath on other people. That's the reason there is no even consideration. Of discussing the dominant news item of today with the roe V wade, overturned decision of the Supreme Court. We'll do it plenty I assure you, but not on the happiness hour. However, I will address today a very tough issue. For which I don't have great answers, but I want to address it anyway. I try to have great answers on most problems confronting most challenges confronting your happiness, I happiness, anyone's happiness. But the subject that I have chosen for today may not have a terrific answer. It may have some non terrific answers, and that's what the police that might be of some help. And that is, how do you maintain a happy family and happy friendship? Where you differ on moral social slash political issues. That's a toughie. I'm not sure that there is even an answer. Which is why it's so tough. And I feel a little bad because I do, in fact, try to give you answers to most of the questions that arise with regard to happiness, but I'm not sure I can do that in this regard. Many of you listening to me right now have an adult child, alienated from you because of politics. Or a really, it's not even politics. I find that a cheapening word, because of social issues or differences with regard to social and moral issues. Take the take the one that is in the news. The roe V wade issue, let us say you believe that abortion is immoral because there is a human being in a woman's womb. And your child, having gone to Yale, believes that what a woman has in her womb, if she considers it to be a pimple, it's just a pimple..

roe V wade Supreme Court Yale
"roe  " Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

03:12 min | Last month

"roe " Discussed on Latino USA

"Hey, we're back. I'm talking about what it would look like if roe V wade is overturned for communities of color. And I'm joined by Tina Vasquez. And Laurie bertram Roberts. Let's jump back to our conversation now. We all recognize, in the overturning of roe V wade, the people who most will be affected are the people who are poor, economically disadvantaged, do not have access to information, IE resources, the ability to have transportation, time off, and actually Tina, you know, when I read your personal essay about this, you really encompass that. So I'm wondering if you could please share with us a fragment of what you recently wrote for prism reports. The only thing that really stood between me in the future I wanted for myself was money. But as it turned out, money was the hardest thing to come by. I did not know abortion funds existed, and as a poor Latina in a deeply repressive and abusive home, there were few places I knew to turn to. At the time, I did not have the kind of relationship with my parents that would have made it safe to ask them for help. I'm certain my father would have beaten me and forced me to become a parent. But I also knew my parents didn't have a dollar to spare. Thank you, Tina. Can you actually start us off in this conversation? With your very personal moment, when you're 19 years old and you're carrying a pregnancy that you did not want. I was trying to save money for my abortion and my partner was substantive dependent. And he knew where I was saving my money and he would take it and he would use it for drugs. And so I had to reschedule my appointment a couple of times. And I became increasingly desperate, but at the end of the day, I told my partner's mom that I couldn't pay for my community college textbooks. And she gave me the money, and that's how I was eventually able to do it. I didn't drive. So getting to the clinic was also really challenging. I was living at home. I couldn't talk to my parents about any of it, and even then, among other people's stories I've heard, especially folks who are undocumented, folks who live in the south, disabled folks like that I had a pretty easy experience and I lived in California, which is widely thought of as a state where abortion access comes pretty easy to people. In the piece I talk about how I would pray that I could get the money to have an abortion or I would pray that I would have the courage to kill myself because I felt every moment that I was pregnant and I didn't want to be with agonizing to me. These are the things these are the real life things if you're a young woman and you end up pregnant. Laurie, this is the work that you do on a daily basis in Alabama. It is. Which in many ways is a state where it already kind of operates as if, right? Yeah. Access to abortion is so, so. I mean, I know the state of misery. There is one clinic. And Mississippi as well. So when you hear that roe V wade could likely be overturned, tell us about who you know will be affected most and describe for.

roe V wade Tina Vasquez Laurie bertram Roberts Tina California Laurie Alabama Mississippi
"roe  " Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

Dennis Prager Podcasts

03:58 min | 3 months ago

"roe " Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

"Promo code prager. Hi, everybody. I'm Dennis prager. Did you know that the United States since roe V wade has had the most liberal or if you will left wing views and laws on abortion in the world? So let's compare America to Europe when you see all this hysteria from the Democrats, which is, I think, not completely, but largely politically inspired. They seem to be facing a calamity in November. And they see this as their way out, vote for us, and not the woman suppressing Republicans. By the way, in every poll I have seen more women are pro life than men. I'd like you to hear a video that prager university put out. Years ago, by Alicia Krause, and its titled who's more pro choice Europe or America. And I would ask you to send this to it's free, of course. I would ask you to send this to every person who thinks that a calamity has just or will just take place. The leak is unprecedented, but it is not at all surprising. There are no rules in the world of the left. If it can advance a leftist cause, but putting that aside, if the leak is accurate, if this is the way the vote will take place, I'd like you to send this to everyone you know, and have them realize that we are the most radically none judging, legally speaking, of abortion of late term abortion included in, I think the world may be maybe one or two countries is similar to the U.S., but certainly the countries that people on the left hold up as models for the United States do not have anywhere near the allowance for abortion that we have had since roe V wade, so please listen. American progressives look to Western Europe as the model of what America should be. So here's an area of European social policy that progressives will definitely want to examine more closely. Europe's attitude toward abortion. It happens to be much more restrictive than that of the United States. That's right. Western Europeans as progressive and secular as they are have a much more conservative attitude about abortion than American progressives do. Here is what Emily matcher wrote in the Atlantic magazine in 2013. I assumed that Western Europe would be the land of abortion on demand. But, as it turns out, abortion laws in Europe are both more restrictive and more complicated than that. Waiting periods decried by American pro choicers as unreasonably burdensome, are common. In Germany, for example, nearly all abortions are illegal after 12 weeks. And there's a three day waiting period and mandatory counseling before a woman is allowed to have an abortion, even during the permitted first 12 weeks..

America roe V wade prager university Alicia Krause Europe Dennis prager Western Europe Emily matcher Atlantic magazine Germany
"roe  " Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

Dennis Prager Podcasts

03:56 min | 3 months ago

"roe " Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

"Dennis prager here, thanks for listening to the daily Dennis prager podcast to hear the entire three hours of my radio show commercial free every single day become a member of prager topia. It also gets access to 15 years worth of archives. As well as The Daily Show prep, subscribe, and prager topia dot com. Hello, my Friends, welcome to the Dennis prager show. It should be noted most people know this, but in the world of hysteria, which is the oxygen of the left hysteria, you will notice that, correct? All we do is go from hysteria to hysteria. Country would be in really relaxed, loving shape, were it not for the left hysteria. I didn't read to you yesterday about the number of young people who apparently suffering psychological effects from fearing that they will die in the heat. Of global warming, that's hysteria. Very few people deny that the earth is getting warmer. We don't deny that. We called deniers. We never denied that. We deny that it is an existential threat to biological life. It's another left wing lie because that's the way they can get people hysterical and get what they want. The lockdowns were hysteria. The closing of schools was hysteria. The mask mandates was hysteria. Or were hysteria, if you will? We don't lack for them. The latest is roe V wade. In the larger states of the union by and large, nothing will change. Roe V wade was and a handful of pro choice professors of law, acknowledged this over the course of the years like Lawrence tribe is left winger. At Harvard, to his credit, said it was a bad decision. Nobody even debates whether it was a good decision. They debate whether they like the decision. It's a big difference between liking a decision and a good decision. It would have struck the most intelligent and moral individuals of the past, as bizarre. That the Supreme Court of the United States saw in the U.S. Constitution a right to have an abortion under any circumstance. It is unique in the world of morality, and I'm not invoking religion or God, an atheist could understand and appreciate and agree with everything I'm saying. This is nothing to do necessarily with God or the Bible or religion. Misses pure logic and morality. We have created a right that doesn't exist as in hinted at. The flimsy excuse of the court in roe V wade, a right to privacy. What does that mean? So in private.

Dennis prager prager topia roe V wade The Daily Show Roe V wade Lawrence tribe Harvard U.S. Supreme Court
"roe  " Discussed on Opening Arguments

Opening Arguments

05:59 min | 3 months ago

"roe " Discussed on Opening Arguments

"As we have been flagging for you, it explicitly brings the Janice versus asked me test that we may be the only podcast on earth that when you say what's the worst Supreme Court decision of the past ten years, you know, would have Janice versus asked me on the list. I told you that that was going to be the vehicle that the conservative Supreme Court used to radically redefine the principle of stare decisis, and they have now done so explicitly. Justice alino has done so. That's part three of the opinion. So with that in mind, let's tackle part one a and I'm going to read a large passage of this to you, and I am going to tell you this is two a number one beginning on page 9 of the slip opinion. And I'm going to tell you that in the entirety of what I read. Other than making fun of roe V wade and citations, therefore, to roe V wade. There is not a single case cited, nothing zero, none. This is 100% an invention of Samuel Alito. So again, when you are dealing with uncle Frank talking about how, you know, roe V where it wasn't in the constitution. These principles are found nowhere in the Supreme Court's prior jurisprudence. They are the opinions of Sam Alito and nothing further. They are backed by citation to no authority. And I can not believe it begins by validating the dumbest, most craven argument that we've been swatting aside since the show began. Let's start out. The constitution makes no express reference to a right to obtain an abortion. And therefore, those who claim that it protects such a right must show that the right is somehow implicit in the constitutional text. Okay, at least give him credit for the second half of that clause, right? So now how do we show that the right is implicit in the constitutional text? Prior to this decision, what you would ask is, is this consistent with the conception of the rights of ordered liberty and you would look at the history leading up to now and say, hey, in a free society, do we generally care about what people do in their bedrooms or do we generally let them be free to do what they want? Oh, we let them be free to do what they want. Great, then that's part of the right to privacy. And if you haven't heard or break down on griswold V Connecticut, it's a two parter. Go back and listen to that because that's essentially what the jurisprudence says. I'm paraphrasing, but not by much. Bolido begins and again, this is 98 pages of gaslighting. Row, however, was remarkably loose in its treatment of the constitutional text. It held that the abortion right, which is not mentioned in the constitution. Again, that's not the test, right? Yeah. Marriage isn't mentioned in the constitution. Contraception isn't dimensioned in the constitution. Anyway. Yeah. Is part of a right to privacy, which is also not mentioned. And that privacy right row observed had been found to spring from no fewer than 5 different constitutional provisions, the first fourth 5th, 9th, and 14th amendments. Now again, this is not a strange result. And the idea that the 5th and the 14th amendments overlap considerably is mainstream jurisprudence. The idea that the first and Fourth Amendment overlap is mainstream jurisprudence. So putting it all together and saying like, yeah, as the court did in griswold and saying, you know, there isn't a single place that refers to a right to privacy in the constitution. And by privacy, they meant the right to make personal intimate decisions, such as whom to marry and whom to have sex with. Privacy in the sense that we typically use it today. The fact that it flows from the penumbra or from multiple sources is it should not be strange. And there is, I will point out zero citation here that that is strange that there's anything wrong with saying that a right comes from multiple overlapping places within the constitution. If that were a problem, then the right's most beloved cases, right? McDonald versus Chicago. Required in extending the Second Amendment protection out through via the incorporation doctrine to the states required multiple amendments. The Second Amendment isn't good at it. It's good enough for D.C. V Heller because D.C. is a federal jurisdiction. But you can't strike down a state law without incorporating the Second Amendment and zero cases that incorporated the Second Amendment. So, you know, you could replace that with. Where does this fiction come from that overlaps the second and 14th amendments? That's crazy. So part of the gaslighting is him stating that as though it's self evidently stupid that it comes from multiple amendments. And it is not there is no case that says that he didn't even quote row. He quotes roe, that's it. I thought he'd just characterized what roe said. Okay. There are, let me see if there is a direct yes. One possibility is that the right was founded in the Ninth Amendment's reservation of rights to the people. Another was that the right was rooted in the first fourth or Fifth Amendment or in some combination of those provisions. And that this had been, quote, incorporated into the due process clause of the Fourteenth Amendment just as many other Bill of rights provisions had been incorporated. There is a direct quotation as well as a bunch of sort of scarce sites..

Janice versus Samuel Alito Supreme Court Justice alino roe V wade griswold craven Frank Connecticut D.C. McDonald Chicago roe
"roe  " Discussed on The Doug Collins Podcast

The Doug Collins Podcast

04:36 min | 3 months ago

"roe " Discussed on The Doug Collins Podcast

"Roe V wade? Here's also a start of the I need to tell you. If you listened many times to the conversations that go on around the court's picks and the president's picks on the court over the last 50 years, they have determined that roe V wade is the ultimate litmus test. It was not as bad necessarily in the 80s and 90s. It was still there, but it has grown tremendously in the last 25 years. Here's the interesting fact for you. The court takes up maybe, maybe Supreme Court. One to two cases every ten years in abortion. Maybe. It's so important, however, that people put all of their determination on who should be a Supreme Court Justice on how they actually interpret roe V wade and would they be willing to overturn it. I think in many ways, this has become a disservice to the court. I think it is something with the court that deals with all areas of our life, not just this one, which is so vitally important, which I believe they got wrong to start with, and I'm freely cite that in this podcast. I think when you deal with it, it is made the court impose its judicial activist will own a nation that was already dealing with this in the political realm. If you take this out away from the people, if you take this away and say that the court is going to imply this, especially in this instance, when you were actually moving forward, this is what is called. Now you can agree or disagree, but you can't disagree with the facts. This states and we name them all from 1967 home through 1970 other for continuing it, even up until the passage of the court decision roe V wade were adding to abortion rights in this country. Much of the Sagan of those in the pro life movement at the time, which was when nacy and which were really nonexistent because he'd never been a need to at this point, but as they were making progress in legislatures, they chose to take it and hopper speed it up into the courts, courts made it applicable to the country. Then you have the problem in which we face today in which everything surrounding the United States Supreme Court typically starts and ends with what is the justices view on abortion. And this is really where we come. Now, since roe V wade, there was a couple of cases that began to roll back some of roe V wade strengthen it in some ways also take away from it. Casey Planned Parenthood case, this was instituted what will be known as the undue burden test. And that is, if a state could number one state could begin to put restrictions on the access to abortions, whether that be through access to clinics, access to hospitals, access to ultrasounds. I mean, you start building on this progression, parental consent, all of this that would be weighed into this. The question was after Casey, Casey uphill the tenants of roe V wade, but then said that if anything was to affect any of these parts in any of this time of the pregnancy, so to speak, the viability issued these other things that it hadn't made the undue undue burden test. Was it an undue burden on the person, the female to enact her right to terminate a pregnancy? Now, over time, you also had court cases that ruled that the father right or was they had no rise in the choice of abortion and others. Now, before though, I do need to get back a twin decision that also opened this up a great deal on roe V wade with dovey Bolton dough was the same day. It doesn't get the attention that roe does, but it's very important because it defined health of a mother is including all aspects of health psychological mental physical spiritual all aspects. So that basically opens it up for anyone when you say that you can have an abortion based on mental health or anything else, this is where dough comes in and says, look, that's a valid reason to restrict it because that you then run up later in the Casey case, the Casey Planned Parenthood case has to undo burn and how does that affect how someone would get an abortion now when you understand that for those this becomes a semantics exercise on how you actually define life of a mother? Is it health of a mother or life of a mother? Those are two distinctions. Dough made it very clear that health of a mother, it would include anything. Even if they just basically were depressed and wanted to get an abortion, that was a valid grounds of health of a mother. Life of a mother being a different story. So I needed to go back and pick that piece up.

roe V wade Roe V wade Supreme Court Casey dovey Bolton United States Casey Planned Parenthood roe
"roe  " Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

07:02 min | 9 months ago

"roe " Discussed on Today, Explained

"Sharpen your foresight and get ahead of the year ahead. Oh yeah, oh yeah, oh yeah. All persons having business before the honorable, the Supreme Court of the United States are admonished to draw near and give their attention for the court is now sitting. God save the United States and this honorable court. Ian millhiser, you covered the Supreme Court here at vox, abortion has had a very eventful year in the United States mostly pertaining to the state of Texas, but today a Mississippi abortion case was heard at the Supreme Court of the United States. What happened? Based on what I heard today in this Mississippi case, I think the most likely outcome is that roe V wade is doomed. Donald Trump promised when he if he got elected president, he would nominate justice who had overruled roe V wade. If we put another two or perhaps three justices on, that's really what's going to be. That's what will happen. And that'll happen automatically in my opinion because I am putting pro life justices on the court. He appointed a third of the Supreme Court, and it now looks like when you take those three justices plus two more who are already there, that there are probably 5 votes to overrule roe V wade in its entirety. There are almost certainly 5 votes to do considerable damage to the right to an abortion. Okay, well, just to understand how we got there, let's first talk about the Mississippi case. What's going on in that state? So Mississippi passed a law, they style it as a 15 week abortion ban so that you can't get an abortion after the 15th week of pregnancy, but the clock starts ticking on the first day of the person's last menstrual period. So if you know anything about anatomy for most people that's going to be a 13 week ban for abortions. And the reason why that is unconstitutional at least under existing law is in a case called Planned Parenthood V Casey. The Supreme Court said that there was an absolute right to an abortion states can not ban abortions prior to viability. Viability is the moment when the fetus can live outside of the womb. That's typically around about 24 weeks, and whether you think that this is a 13 week ban or 15 week ban, 15 is less than 24, like, you know, this is a pre viability ban. In order to uphold this law, the Supreme Court is going to have to overrule at least part of Casey. Okay, so that sort of sets the table for what happened today here in Washington. And there were a lot of people outside the Supreme Court letting their feelings be known, I believe. Yeah, I mean, they're always are for cases like this. I think pretty much everyone who follows the court. Knew that this is the single greatest threat to abortion rights, since roe V wade was handed down in 1973. And so you had a whole slew of protesters who were really excited about the possibility that the constitutional right to abortion may cease to exist and you have a whole lot of protesters who were really disturbed by that possibility. And they all met and waved their signs around today in front of the court. And what happened inside the court? It was clear from the beginning of the oral argument that the stakes are very high. Mississippi's lawyer got up and immediately asked the court to overrule roe V wade. Rowan Casey had failed. But the people, if given the chance, will succeed. This court should overrule Rowan Casey and uphold the state's law. I welcome the court's questions. There were some instances where a justice might have asked a question like, well, is there a more incremental approach? Is there something that we could do to uphold your law that's shy of upholding roe V wade? And that lawyer just kept coming back to. I mean, sometimes you give an answer, but he kept coming back to really what you should do is overrule roe V wade. Nowhere else does this court recognize a right to end a human life. Everyone there knew what was at stake, including the justices. And the counter argument, how is the right to an abortion defended? A huge question in the case is the importance of something called starry decisis. Stare decisis is the rule that courts are supposed to follow their own precedent. In case this court carefully examined and rejected every possible reason for overruling row. They have to have a really, really good reason to overrule a precedent. And one thing that kept coming up over and over again is it's not clear what the reason is to overrule roe V wade. Pregnancy itself is unique and imposes unique physical demands and risk on women. And in fact, has impact on all of their lives and their ability to care for other children, other family members on their ability to work, and in particular in Mississippi, those risks are alarmingly high, it's 75. Mississippi, their lawyer kept trying to argue that things have changed. They kept trying to argue that medical technology has changed in some significant way, but it really hasn't. Pregnancy looks pretty similar now to how it looked in 1973 when roe was decided there really hasn't been any fundamental changes here except for one. And that is that the Supreme Court has a lot more conservative Republicans on it than it did when roe was decided or when Casey was decided. And how did the 9 justices on the Supreme Court receive arguments from each side today? So you have three justices on the court. Clarence Thomas, Samuel Alito and Neil Gorsuch, who want the most maximalist conservative outcome in pretty much every case. And they did not betray their normal instincts in this case. Sam Alito at one point seemed to compare roe V wade to plessy V Ferguson, the segregation decision. So suppose plessy versus Ferguson was re argued in 1897. So nothing had changed. Would it not be a sufficient to say, that was a egregiously wrong decision on the day it was handed down. And now it should be overruled. Most eyes, I think we're on Kavanaugh and Barrett. Who are the two justices that will decide whether the court will overrule robots entirely or take a more incremental step against abortion rights? There was one point where he rattled off a long list of cases, including Brown V board of education. If the court in those cases had listened and they were presented in with arguments in those cases adhere to precedent in Brown V board, adhere to plessy. In West Coast hotel, adhere to Atkinson adhered a lot. And.

roe V wade Supreme Court Mississippi United States Rowan Casey Ian millhiser Supreme Court of Planned Parenthood V Casey Donald Trump Casey Texas roe Samuel Alito Washington Neil Gorsuch plessy plessy V Ferguson Clarence Thomas Ferguson Kavanaugh
"roe  " Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

04:13 min | 11 months ago

"roe " Discussed on BrainStuff

"Both roe v wade and planned parenthood v casey so let's talk about precedence. They're considered as authority for deciding subsequent cases involving similar facts or legal issues. The concept called stereo decisiveness. Which means let the decision stand in. Latin provide stability and predictability in law when a new president is established or laws changed on an issue. It's known as a landmark decision olym- quiz said president is one of the cornerstones of our judicial system. The system of president provides that when courts make decisions in those decisions become law they will remain on the books until that same court or an appellate court overrules those precedents a judges and justices often rely on precedents to make rulings and other cases. A for example. Five justices relied on the precedent. Set by casey when striking down a louisiana law that would have required doctors performing abortions to have emissions privileges at a state authorized hospital within thirty miles. Forty eight kilometers of the clinic. The supreme court can overturn in existing precedent with the majority vote. And this happens perhaps surprisingly more often the general public realizes about two to three times a term linquist says though these cases unlike row aren't ones that make the news. If roe is ultimately ended the aftershocks would be felt immediately eleven states have trigger laws in place that would instantly ban abortions conversely fourteen states plus washington. Dc have laws in place to protect abortion access. Overturning roe would also add strength to texas's sp eight law linquist says however if roe is upheld quote it will have major implications for the texas case simply because it will reaffirm the core right to abortion prior to viability. The supreme court isn't likely to deliver a decision in the mississippi case until these spring or early summer of twenty twenty two..

roe v wade casey linquist roe louisiana supreme court texas washington mississippi
"roe  " Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

08:25 min | 11 months ago

"roe " Discussed on BrainStuff

"Of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff lauren. Bogo bomb here nearly fifty years ago the. Us supreme court made one of its most controversial rulings with its landmark decision in roe v wade. The ruling declared that states criminalizing. Abortion violates a woman's right to due process meaning a woman has the right to choose whether to terminate a pregnancy with limited government restrictions. Until that point. Nearly all fifty states outlawed abortion except in cases to save a woman's life or health or in situations such as rape incest or fetal anomaly in the years since that landmark decision state legislators have made numerous attempts to chip away at abortion rights through ballot measures and legislative moves and together have passed more than one thousand three hundred restrictions on abortion. Dozens more are currently making their way through state legislatures but the president set by roe. V wade and its progeny case planned parenthood v. casey remain intact however a mississippi case set to be reviewed. This fall by the supreme court holds the potential to shake the very foundation. Upon which these cases stand the aftershocks. Of which will either strengthen or reshape the future of abortion rights in america it began on january twenty second of nineteen seventy-three when by vote of seven to to. The supreme court legalized abortion in the us. Under roe v wade. The court's judgment was based on the decision that a woman's right to terminate a pregnancy fell under the freedom of personal choice and family matters protected by the fourteenth amendment to the us constitution. The case created the trimester system. Which says states cannot impose any restrictions on women choosing to terminate their pregnancies during the first trimester. Though it does allow some government limits in the second trimester states can restrict or ban abortions in the last trimester once the fetus becomes able to live outside the womb however roe v wade also established that in the final trimester. A woman could obtain an abortion if doctors certified that is necessary to save the life or health of the woman in nineteen ninety two. The supreme court made another landmark decision in planned parenthood v. Casey in that case the court upheld a woman's constitutional right to have an abortion established by row but also applied the undue burden standard for abortion restrictions establishing that no laws should be too burdensome or restrictive of one's fundamental rights. There have been numerous challenges to roe. And casey through the years that the supreme court has struck down including a ban after six weeks in north dakota and ban after twelve weeks in arkansas. The court also struck down two thousand sixteen texas law that impeded clinics abilities to perform abortions earlier this year however texas lawmakers found a way to get around the supreme court at least for now at midnight on september. First of twenty twenty one. The nation's strictest abortion law went into effect in the state known as the fetal heartbeat bill or sp eight the law bans abortions after six weeks of pregnancy. That is six weeks after a person's last menstrual cycle which is before most people know they're pregnant and far earlier than legally provided by roe v. Wade what makes texas's law different from others is that it's enforceable only through private civil action. Essentially that means that the law empowers citizens to sue abortion providers or anyone who helps another person get an abortion or even intends to assist someone after a so called fetal heartbeat has been detected a which the bill defines as cardiac activity or the steady and repetitive rhythmic contraction of the fetal heart within the station sack. Although biologically the hardest we know it has not developed by six weeks so it's not really a heartbeat but rather the just coordinating effects of a small group of cardiac cells. The person suing does not have to be connected to the person considering the abortion or to a provider or even live in the state of texas if the accuser wins their case the person or entity being sued would have to pay the accuser or accusers. At least ten thousand dollars as well as costs for attorney's fees according to the law an independent abortion provider in texas called whole women's health then challenged the law in an emergency application to the supreme court on the grounds at the six week ban was unconstitutional. The supreme court remained mute on the subject until hours before the law went into effect. Issuing an unsigned opinion consisting of a single long paragraph that stated the abortion providers failed to make their case. Though chief justice. John roberts who was appointed by republican president. George w bush and left leaning justices steven briar elena. Kagan 'em sonia. Sotomayor dissented a for the article. This episode is based on. How stuff works. Spoke with stephanie lindquist. A foundation professor of law and political science at arizona state university and the recognized expert on the supreme court and she explained that the texas law was able to skirt a supreme court review at this juncture quote because it relies on private actors to enforce the law as opposed to state officials. And no one yet has enforced. It accords are very reluctant to resolve cases that have not yet reached a concrete dispute however the us department of justice has a different source of standing. She explains on september ninth of twenty twenty one. The department of justice sued texas on behalf of us citizens on the grounds that texas's abortion law is a violation of federal law attorney. General merrick garland said during a news conference quote. The act is clearly unconstitutional under longstanding. Supreme court precedent the justice department filed the lawsuit in the western district of texas and seeks permanent injunction. But the case will likely eventually make its way to the supreme court when roh went into effect in nineteen seventy three the majority of the court comprised republican appointed justices. Even justice harry blackmun. Who wrote the roe. V wade opinion had been appointed by republican president richard nixon. Since then linquist said the ideological orientation toward abortion has changed. The republican party is now firmly entrenched as the party that opposes abortion before president. Donald trump took office in two thousand seventeen. He vowed to appoint justices to the supreme court to overturn roe. V wade justice anthony. Kennedy's retirement in two thousand eighteen and ruth bader ginsburg's death in september twenty twenty allowed trump to do so with conservative pittsburgh. Cavanaugh and amy coney baratz the supreme court now has a six to three conservative majority with all six having taken hostile positions against abortion at one point or another since roe was decided. Legislators in conservative states have pressed to impose additional restrictions on abortion. But linquist says they now see a window of opportunity with the personnel changes at the supreme court quote a with the majority of justices being catholic and most of them being appointed by republican presidents. The assumption is that now is the time strike while the iron is hot. Legislation can finally get the supreme court. Where roh could be challenged and struck down another such opportunity to entice the supreme court to revisit roe. V wade presented itself in dobbs v jackson women's health organization. This case stems from a law passed by the mississippi legislature in two thousand eighteen that banned abortions after the fifteen th week of pregnancy jackson women's health organization the only licensed abortion provider in mississippi challenged the law's constitutionality after a us district court and the us district court of appeals for the fifth circuit sided with the clinic. Mississippi took the case to the supreme court on may seventeenth of thousand twenty one. The supreme court announced it would review the case. This fall the outcome of which could impact the precedents set by.

supreme court roe v wade texas us casey roe justice department wade lauren steven briar elena stephanie lindquist linquist mississippi Casey merrick garland north dakota arkansas Wade harry blackmun
"roe  " Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

The Dental Hacks Podcast

03:34 min | 11 months ago

"roe " Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

"Would you like to support the very dental podcast network. Then you should take a look at our sponsors. The very dental podcast network is brought to you by our friends at micro copy dental single patient. Use carbide burs. Diamond verse polishers in a variety of single use products. That make your office more efficient. Your infection control simpler and your dentistry better. Here's a tip. Use the mica. Copy very fine finishing diamonds to adjust and contour composite. And you'll spend less time polishing. I use them every day on every composite restoration. They have all kinds of shapes and sizes to fit any dentist routine. Find out more information at very dental. Podcast dot com slash micro. Copy the very dental podcast network has also brought to you by denture c. e. by dr russell schaefer dentures. Get a bad reputation dentistry. Quite if you dennis even brag about how long it's been since they've done a denture. Is this you dr russell. Schaefer wants to reverse this trend..

"roe  " Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"roe " Discussed on Fresh Air

"Republican candidates have been telling me for as long as i can remember that they want to overrule roe v. Wade they want to appoint justices who will overrule roe. V wade on. There are six justices on the supreme court right now who have said in their own writings in one form or another that that they disagree with current abortion press president some of them said explicitly. They want to overrule roe. V wade but there are six justices who have said in their precedents that they think that cases like and casey were wrongly decided. And i believe that you know i believe donald trump when. He told me that his justices would vote to overrule roe v wade. I believe the justices who've been saying in dissenting opinions for many years that they would overrule roe v wade. I believe that when justice barrett signed a letter while she was still a law professor attacking abortion rights. And you know and saying that you she she should work to get rid of abortions that she was telling the truth. You know the only thing that i'm doing here and again like i could be surprised. I shouldn't speak with absolute certainty. But i am taking them at their word. My guest is ian mill heiser. Who covers the supreme court for. Vox this afternoon. After we recorded the interview the justice department announced it's filing a lawsuit to challenge texas's restrictive abortion law. We'll hear more of my interview with ian millhauser after a break. I'm terry gross. And this is fresh air. Let's get back to my interview with ian mill. Heiser who has been writing about the recent supreme court order allowing restrictive texas abortion law to go into effect. He's also been writing about the courts. Voting rights decisions the increasing use of the shadow docket and the courts. Larger moved to the right in his new book. The agenda how a republican supreme court is reshaping america. He writes that while congress has become increasingly polarized and dysfunctional. The supreme court has become the locus of policy making in the us and the policies are largely conservative. Three of the six conservative justices were appointed by president. Trump millhauser says some of the courts least understood and most arcane decisions are fundamentally reshaping our nation. He's a senior for. Vox where he focuses on the supreme court the constitution and threats to liberal democracy in the us. Millhauser is a lawyer and clerked for judge of the. Us court of appeals for the sixth circuit. So if the supreme court either.

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"roe  " Discussed on Opening Arguments

Opening Arguments

07:49 min | 1 year ago

"roe " Discussed on Opening Arguments

"I mean i guess not out of nowhere but like you say broke late even for this supreme court i was surprised and and i'm about to explain it all right. So let's get this right to be opening arguments levels of clear here. The supreme court did not overturn roe. V wade because it did not issue a ruling on the merits. They did not rule on the merits of anything. This is what we call shadow docket. What they did was allow a blatantly unconstitutional law to go into effect before overturning roe v wade which is something they were probably going to do around april or may of next year and as far as i can tell and i spent the better part of the morning looking for counter examples. This is what happened. Today is literally unprecedented in the history of this country. So let me let me give you an example of how this never happens. And let's suppose it's nineteen sixty two. And i'm a poor person in prison. I did not have a lawyer appointed from the time the law the land was case called bets versus brady. Which said yeah. You know you get a court appointed lawyer if it's a capital case or if there are issues with competence sore in know certain extenuating circumstances but just because you're to portable afford a lawyer you don't get one. There was no right to court appointed counsel as mike teach at. Lowe's buy mind every time. Yeah so let's imagine then. I file a habeas petition to the supreme court. And i say yeah. I know betsy brady. But you're about to hear you've already got pending on your docket. Abs petition. From my buddy clarence gideon and you know you guys on the supreme court pretty. It's nineteen sixty two. You're pretty liberal bunch. Some pretty sure you're gonna ruling gideon's favor and you're going to overturn that betts v brady case You're gonna say that everybody gets a right to a lawyer. That's gonna freebie eventually so why not. Just let me out right right right and you know. What did they do. Give gideon v wade. Right right came out in nineteen sixty three and it was nine. Oh right like not. Controversial unanimous overturned. Betsy brady did exactly but yeah this hypothetical petition and by the way there were actual petitions and not to this hypothetical petition. The supreme court would that same super. Liberal supreme court would not have granted relief at that time right. They have granted anticipatory challenges. Still lie yet. They would've said maybe we'll change the law but until then we live in a country with the rule of law and the law says you're not entitled to it. Sorry this is going to be an episode for. We have covered almost every component of this on multiple previous episodes of the show. So episodes twenty. Seven and twenty eight are when we covered the planned parenthood versus casey decision. If you haven't listened to those if you came in like it stormy at stormy daniels maybe come back and listen to twenty seven twenty pretty good and the shadow docket late much later on obviously but the shadow docket with And recital right yup shadow docket. We talked about on episode five seven up. Yeah so all of the components here are things you can search the away website for it. We have covered an in depth. Even if only get this far. what they're doing. It's not just which is already bad enough. It's not just that they're obviously overturning roe. that's already bad. it's that the this is completely unprecedented. I'm so sick of republicans getting to feel like and call themselves. They're just calling balls and strikes balls and strikes they're just constitutional umpires over there and they're doing this a field goal in the middle of a baseball game. I'm not getting so let me break down exactly what happened. Because i think i can make this clear even to uncle frank exactly how radical this is so point number one. Texas passed a law. And we're going to talk about all the provisions of this has. Wow is it a doozy. It's sb eight. That bans abortion after six weeks. Guy point to existing constitutional law is super duper to the ends of the earth. Clear that you cannot do that. Yeah and i am going to quote from planned. Parenthood versus casey five zero five eight thirty three at eight forty five. To forty six quote we are led to conclude this the essential holding of roe. V wade should be retained and once again reaffirmed. It must be stated at the outset and with clarity. This is the supreme court talking that rose essential holding the holding. We reaffirm has three parts and again if you listen to our episodes. They're actually missed. They're actually changing roe. V wade a little bit here but nevertheless this is the law of the land. Good law right now. The central holding of roe v wade as reaffirmed by planned parenthood versus. Casey has three parts. I is a recognition of the right of the woman to choose to have an abortion before viability and obtain it without undue inference without undue interference from the state continuing just in case that's not clear enough before viability. The state's interests are not strong enough to support a prohibition of abortion or the imposition of a substantial obstacle to the woman's effective right to elect a procedure. So that's the law. The law says if it's pre viability you cannot ban abortion. The state's interest is not strong enough. Now if you've listened to the show you know. I don't think viability is a crate. Archea you know. I prefer the original restaurant. But doesn't matter what i think it matter did should matter what the law is right. So the law states cannot prohibit abortion before viability. Sp prohibits abortion before viability. Six weeks way way way before him here go. Oh god. States can't prohibit abortion at six weeks so what happened. what happened. Was what what i expected to happen. Whole women's health and abortion provider in texas. They went to a us district court. Judge ticket the in joint which happened. Because it's obvious because the reason. I said it's obviously in custody show. So then texas appealed to the fifth circuit and the fifth circuit as we have documented at great length hates abortion. It is stacked with antiabortion activists who have bent over backwards to misconstrue laws whenever it comes to upholding the conservative result of that law right and we talked about that at length. And the whole woman's health versus heller steph opinion so fifth circuit hates abortion and they reversed the district court. I wasn't surprised by that either. Then whole women's health appealed to the supreme court and the supreme court then did to fix i is. They did nothing they just sat on the application and let sba go into effect and then belatedly a day later at around midnight last night as of our recording midnight on wednesday they released an opinion that i will read to you in full because that opinion citations included is four hundred eleven words so two thirds of a page about the length that you might expect from a reasonably bright fifth graders book report and so when we explained the shadow docket episode five. But this is what we mean. We mean with no explanation with no analysis without committing to anything imprint. This opinion allowed a blatantly unconstitutional law to go into effect. So there is no discussion of the case. On the merits there was no analysis espy. Eight there is no analysis of row. It does not faked a row. It does not say to casey. It is just procedural but that procedural means that the texas law goes into effect until it is briefed. Argued litigated at the district. Level appealed to the fifth circuit on the merits briefed argues coast to oral argument..

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