35 Burst results for "Roe"

Who is underpricing Roblox?

Equity

04:10 min | Last week

Who is underpricing Roblox?

"Which filed to go public last year was going to debut as any said before the year some. Ipo's went out that were rather exuberantly received. And is that it. Whoa whoa whoa hold on. Because robots was going to let a lot of shareholders sell their shares at the ipo price in the offering and they didn't those shares me miss price fair enough so what they've done is they have raised a five hundred twenty million dollars series. H at eight twenty nine point five billion dollars valuation effectively replacing what they would have done in the ipo raise. And then they're going to direct list. So everyone will be unburdened in able to sell their shares. That they'd like to their experience the traditional ipo process and into the blocks brand a sufficiently large drive interest in the company. Now guys we've all heard ad nauseam complaints from adventure. Classes danny's old stomping grounds. That banks mismanaging. Ipo's underpricing them and rewarding their clients essentially with free money. Here's my question now. Roadblocks us at a price for itself thousand nine point five billion. What do we say out. And it's worth thirty five billion the first day won't they also have yet again mistrial. Peo- does this situation. This new solution actually fix anything. I think one of the big challenges. They faced the raises past brown from driessen. In february twenty twenty it was valued at four billion and they raise one hundred fifty million bucks with tiny percentage. and what. you're seeing the exact same thing this time with the series h five hundred twenty million at twenty nine point five billion valuation one point seven percent solution. So it's very tiny. But i think what they wanted to do was sent a very strong signal to the market of. Here's where we see the price. Today there are investors who are investing at this price. Last price was four billion. This is thirty. And i think they wanted to market support for the argument that they should be valued at this price. I don't think they looked at a lot of the other things on the market. And like wow. It's really hot. That was the story line. And i just. I'm very skeptical. But i think this is a proof point of saying look. There is actually market depth at these prices. And it sets the tone of the ipo more strongly than if they had just gone out. Kind of blindly. When we're i want to get into take on this but like we hear a lot of complaints from these about bankers mispricing. Startups andriessen bought a bunch of shares from roadblocks earlier in twenty twenty out of four billion dollar valuation. Now it's worth thirty. That's seven and a half times as much. Who's underpricing roadblocks. Here is that the bankers. Or is it andriessen horowitz. I have a suspicion. That it's the bbc's. I think it's amazing that we never talked about that. We always say. Oh the cow. Well the vc's did not dramatically underpriced screwing the employees who are doing the work out of equity and a fair representation for the show when you see these numbers. I know you're more early stage person. But how does this make you feel one. That's awesome framing alex. So i love that. I thought about snowflake when i saw robots giving that twenty nine point billion number when snowflake was planning to go public at its last raise it was valued at twelve point. Five billion obviously one of the most successful. Ipo of twenty twenty its market cap on. A went out was thirty three point. Seven billion a huge difference. And i think maybe roe is feeling in some ways. Like snowflake miss price. Let's just feel that confident about ourselves. I don't know if that's a fair enough. Compared because i'm sure they're very different businesses but if robots is misplaced and a lot bigger it will also be one of the most successful. Ipo of all time. The new price for robotics is crazy over you. I think one of the big questions we have to ask what's flow the ipo. Look at this. And i got his ms price. Well at a certain point of you're only doing one point six percent solution like of course you want to get you want to nail it perfectly. But the reality is if you're only bloating one point six percent who cares the question at the. Are you floating fiber shares ten percent of the shares thirty percent of the shares. Because that to me is a huge difference compared to some of these earlier rounds where the delusion is much smaller. Yeah for sure. And one thing we've seen just circle back to the point of ipo's being cuoco. Mis-priced is a lot of companies have had a very thin flow and start to trade and so you've seen asymmetric demand from retail investors compared to very very limited shares available which of course ratchets up the initial trading price feeding fodder into the argument. That bankers are better pricing. And this is not to defend bankers. The point is this. it's not like everything is as cut and dry as fits into a tweet. That's what i'll say just to be clear. Andriessen is making the most noise about myspace. Ipo's it's actually benchmark. Don't want to conflate everybody in my head is just vc's but it's worth noting that girly for border a bit worker less active invest. Whatever he is america's area go.

IPO Driessen Andriessen Andriessen Horowitz Danny Brown Snowflake BBC ROE Alex Myspace America
Trump says he'll 'fight like hell' to hold on to presidency

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | Last week

Trump says he'll 'fight like hell' to hold on to presidency

"President trump continues to push Republican lawmakers to roe versus lost to Joe Biden during tomorrow's joint session of Congress at a rally in Georgia last night trump wound up his supporters then I take it this White House we're going to fight like hell he was there to campaign for the Senate race but spent a lot of time repeating false claims election a claim rejected by election officials and the courts Biden won the electoral college three oh six to two thirty two and Republicans likely don't have the numbers to contest it a dozen in the Senate and more than a hundred in the house say they plan to oppose I'm Julie Walker

President Trump Joe Biden Georgia Congress White House Senate Electoral College Biden Julie Walker
Navy official says 'uneasy deterrence' reached with Iran

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:47 sec | Last month

Navy official says 'uneasy deterrence' reached with Iran

"Naval official in the Mideast Vice man, Admiral Sam Papa Roe tells the annual conference Manama Dialogue. Going on and Dubai that the U. S. Has reached what he calls an unease E deterrence with Iran after months of regional attacks and seizures at sea have found Iranian activity at sea to have to be cautious and circumspect and respectful to not risk unnecessary. Miscalculation or escalation at sea. Vice admiral also sided former Defense Secretary Jim Mattis is words saying, quote, Be polite, be professional and have a plan to kill everyone in the room. That's how we conduct ourselves at sea

Admiral Sam Papa Roe U. S. Mideast Manama Dubai Seizures Defense Secretary Jim Mattis Iran
A Conversation With Jenna Belk a\Andnd Anthony Magnabosco

The Atheist Experience

04:42 min | Last month

A Conversation With Jenna Belk a\Andnd Anthony Magnabosco

"Welcome anthony. How are you. i'm good jenner. Thanks for having me back. I think this is our second time together on. Xp offer not our first time working together. But i think our second time on. Xp diener we both have a very similar interest in our approach to how to talk about these things. And so i really like your se. And i like to promote it. Every chance i get so please feel free to talk all about it. What he wanted to tell us. Okay well. I guess for the last several years. I've been doing something called street. Epistemology which is a way of engaging with somebody where you're not arguing and debating with them or ridiculing them it's a way of encouraging encouraging them to explain how they concluded that their view is factually true in a way that kind of opens them up and reduces defenses and is coming from a place of honesty and really trying to figure out. What's really going on here. Is this really true and has been picking up. It's kind of been getting getting some momentum. There's been a lot of communities that had been forming online and Even local groups to practice this method around the world. This isn't just a us thing either. This is what's been really exciting to see that there are groups forming around the world or people with varying degrees of interest in learning this method. And not only exploring claims about god's but all different types of claims. One of the most exciting things i heard recently was that There was a theorist that encountered somebody using street pyschology with them and later on the thank them for the conversation. I think and said that. Now using this tool to engage with other people on different claims that they make. That is very exciting to me. When i hear that. And i'm a huge proponent of this method. I certainly didn't create it but i've tried to be a developer practitioner promoter of it for the last several years and i think we've come a tremendous way since it was was first developed several years ago and i'm excited to see where it goes next. Maybe somebody who's watching today will be the next person that brings se further along. And i'm excited to see roe and get better than words that even today. I know that it helps me move very very quickly. Through my angry atheist phase. I actually reached out to you. I was like i think i can do this. This is going to be really helpful to me. i think i know what you're doing. And there's kind of a strategy to it. You know the way that you kind of ask questions and at first i resisted the way that you would approach it sometimes telling people in advance that the way that your questions may alter their mindset a little bit and i kind of resented that i because well that kind of gives me the impression that it's manipulative but acknowledging that makes it i think less manipulative it. I think so. That was a big criticism. So we're developing this thing that seems to be improving conversation on difficult topics where people tend to have better clarity on their views and the quality of their reasons but yeah sometimes we ab- we get feedback from people who say like you should tell them where you stand on that claim or you should at least prepare them for what they're in for which i find a little humorous because we don't do that with every Any engagement with a person. We don't normally do that. But people are thinking that we should be doing that with this approach. Which makes me think that there is something unique and special about it and we probably do have an obligation to give people a heads up. It's not like they're like if i'm engaging with somebody on the street i'm usually flagging down a stranger who has no idea about what they're in for so yeah. I think i do agree that we probably have an obligation to be as transparent as possible and maybe even warn people like i want ask you some serious some challenging questions here it might cause you to think about your view you might even change your mind you can. You can lay it all out there. And i guess the more that you. There's a risk there of course because the more that you lay out the more you can alarm. The person and men raise the fences. But i think that's that's a fair tradeoff. I'd rather have a slightly defensive conversation partner and also being more informed about what they're getting into. That's something that we didn't do five years ago though that this is something that we've been developing because feedback from people who are watching these engagements right. And that's that's the thing that we necessarily need to do as much today because honor show calling us. But just i just wanted to mention that because i do think that that's an important point. It's kind of implied. However there have been times where i've been on this show or like truth. Wanted where i think some callers have been put up to calling in that and i've seen it actually what i'm not on. Does this happens Sometimes i think some callers don't know what they're getting into jail and encounter if we encounter some callers like that i'd like to just give them a heads up. I'm totally okay with that. But i think for the most part. We'll probably get callers. Who know what's going on

Jenner Anthony ROE
Woman In Critical Condition After Apartment Fire In Englewood, Chicago

Bob Sirott

00:45 sec | 2 months ago

Woman In Critical Condition After Apartment Fire In Englewood, Chicago

"Condition after being rescued from an apartment fire in the Englewood neighborhood, the fire ripped through a second floor corner unit. At about one AM the scene 500 Block of West 72nd Street. The 32 year old woman was taken to the hospital with smoke inhalation. A family of five living beneath where the fire started, has also been displaced. Resident Shad Roe, Brooke says the family was awakened by knocks at their door and an alarm going off at my kids and my grandkids up, so so that's that's about about it. it. It It is is just just a a maid maid is is isn't isn't scary scary fit. fit. Wake Wake up. up. I don't know. If you're gonna live with firefighters, they're still trying to figure out what started that fire. A woman has been stabbed

Shad Roe Englewood Brooke
Legal pot, anti-abortion measures pass on state ballots

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 2 months ago

Legal pot, anti-abortion measures pass on state ballots

"Legalizing marijuana and curtailing abortion were among the scores of hot button ballot measures voters weighed in on this election day a total of one hundred and twenty proposed state laws and constitutional amendments were on the ballot in thirty two states touching on issues ranging from voting rights and racial inequalities to taxes in education nationwide push to legalize marijuana gained momentum with victories in Arizona and New Jersey where voters approved its use by adults age twenty one and older in Louisiana voters affirmed in anti abortion amendment the measure asserts there is no state constitutional right to abortion that could come into play if the US Supreme Court overturns its roe versus Wade decision that legalized abortion nationwide Ben Thomas Washington

New Jersey Arizona Louisiana Us Supreme Court Ben Thomas Washington
The Last Four Years, The Last Five Decades (with Rebecca Traister)

The Cut

04:50 min | 2 months ago

The Last Four Years, The Last Five Decades (with Rebecca Traister)

"Idea for a future radio story. Today, is January twentieth. Two Thousand Sixteen. Donald Trump was just inaugurated. That was me four years ago I wanted to capture my fears and concerns about trump's presidency. So I hopped in the recording studio my old job recorded a little audio time capsule. I've kept this file on my computer for four years. Didn't listen to it until recently. So many people in this country are so excited about trump. Is can't believe I could disagree with this many people. Innocent innocent extremely privileged belief. But I guess that's why I wanted to ask you avery of the future. You who have lived through one term of. The trump presidency. So weird just a few questions. So I recorded fifteen minutes of questions about the state of the country for my future self, which is to say me. Currently. To answer did he build a wall around Mexico or did he try Oh man I mean yeah. He's still trying like actively according to customs and Border Protection, there's been three hundred, seventy, one miles of new wall completed but there's still a lot more to go. So we'll see is marijuana legal. Depends on the state you live in, but it's fully legal in eleven of them. So yeah. Yes or no Legal. Well, no. It could be. There were a bunch of other questions that I won't bore you with because I. Realize I can't actually answer most of the questions from my past self. Like they're all kind of complicated and still in process and it turns out a lot of the rights I was worrying about four years ago are still very much under threat now. Including the issue that I was most frightened about. On Donald Trump's inauguration day. The very first question I asked to my future self. Was this one. Are Abortions illegal. Did HE DE-FUND PLANNED PARENTHOOD? Of course I, know abortions are still legal for now the law of the land upholds Roe v Wade. Although I'm not sure I really understood how complicated the answer to this question actually was. And is especially now that trump has appointed three supreme court justices. So I want to start asking you that big question. Are Abortions illegal. Well, yeah. They are legal right now for some people, they have been inaccessible to millions more preceding trump's inauguration. Rebecca Tracer is a writer at large for New York magazine and the cut. So where we are right now is that we're closer to abortions being illegal than we've been in my life time nominated by President Reagan and serving thirty years on the court. He was often the crucial swing vote you know Anthony Kennedy's retirement breath Kavanagh's confirmation, and here today not because I want to be. Terrified riding completely over the testimony of Christine Lousy Ford I. Do not believe that these charges can barely per bed judge cabin from serving on the court Susan Collins vote for breakfast all these things on a court. level. were sort of big publicly covered wakeup calls and there has been women in the streets. Right there have been women and men in the streets there have been people in the streets. Four years into Donald, trump being president the like. The reality of that is hitting a lot of people hard. But one of the ways that we got to this point is that the inaccessibility and the project of making abortion illegal. Didn't hit anybody hard enough. Inaccessibility isn't just recent. It's now it happens now around the country for millions of women for whom enough barriers have been put in place that that role might as well not exist because it actually doesn't serve as a barrier. It doesn't serve as a protection of their right to get the care that they need. So there are states. In the country where the the laws are so prohibitive where there have already been people jailed for abortion.

Donald Trump President Reagan Marijuana Susan Collins ROE Rebecca Tracer Mexico Christine New York President Trump Writer Anthony Kennedy Kavanagh
Why a New Abortion Ban in Poland is Causing a Furor

PRI's The World

05:31 min | 2 months ago

Why a New Abortion Ban in Poland is Causing a Furor

"Today in Poland where for five straight days. Now, streets across the country have been filled with protesters as we mark the swearing in of new Supreme Court, Justice Amy Coney Barrett, and wonder how the court will now see Roe v Wade Poland is an interesting case protesters. There are angry precisely because of a high court ruling on. Abortion last week, Poland's constitutional tribunal outlawed the practice in all but the most exceptional of circumstances as the world's Europe correspondent Orla Barry reports. The latest legal decision is now being widely condemned by women's rights, groups, Justin of it. The refs as a founding member of the abortion dream, team they're a well-known group of activists who says out in two thousand sixteen to de stigmatize abortion in Poland the dress had an abortion in. Two thousand six and even though she worked with an abortion support group called almost no one about your own experience for more than twelve years up to two thousand, eighteen I was talking about this as anonymous person. I was not showing my face I was afraid about my community for threats says, she worried what our neighbors would thank her. There's nothing unusual about women keeping their abortion secret in Poland more than one thousand. Legal abortions for carried out in the country last year but women's groups reckon that the number of illegal abortions or those performed abroad is closer to two hundred thousand. No one knows the exact figure the court ruling last Thursday. Permits Abortion only in cases of rape incest and the mother's life is at risk activists say that just adds to the stigma and it helps explain why women have been out protesting every day since. In more. So last night protesters poured red paint across the city's main bridge holding up signs that read you have blood on your hands, and this is war in the western city of Poznan demonstrators interrupted Sunday church services. Video posted online. A couple of dozen protesters are seen approaching the altar chanting we've had enough, but the refs ca says young people using such fury at the church is something new for Poland. There are very young women who are protesting chorus creaming on the on the priests in small towns. And like really today jurors, it is something which hasn't been seen on the streets before this is something new. What we see ninety percent of Poles identifies Catholic, and since coming to power in two thousand fifteen, the ruling law and Justice Party has promoted what it calls traditional Catholic values but recent surveys show the majority of Poles did not support more restrictive abortion laws. Activists say the new measures are a threat to women's rights in Poland Hillary Margolis is a senior. Researcher. With human rights, Watch under the Lawn Justice Party, we've seen repeated attempts to completely ban abortion also to obstruct sexuality education schools to really smear and undermine women's rights, groups and activists including those who work on violence against women and Margolis says, it's not just women's rights conservative politicians have in their sides the way they've used the concept of the so called traditional family to undermine women's rights but also lgbt rapes is very worry but in some ways has seen. Some success you they've managed to get people afraid and that is I think part of how they have kept power. But protesters say they will not be deterred several university faculties canceling classes tomorrow and some companies have announced a day off. So workers can protest Anthony in eleven. Scott is a sexual and reproductive health and rights activists based on more. So she says is not just young women who are taking to the streets taxi drivers joined yesterday form as join and. Some smaller towns and of the groups that has already joined the protest were actually the police officers that goes ing one of the provinces they just took their helmets off and they entered the crowd in order to participate. But not all police officers support the demonstrators that have been street clashes in Warsaw and Levin of SCO worries things might get more violent yesterday. The prime minister gave permission for the Military Police to join the police in the streets and they only do. You really believe that there is a huge risk of riots and the public turning islands. The Polish government has been accused of appointing judges loyal to the ruling party activists are hopeful that an international body like the European. Court of Human Rights could challenge the recent decision on abortion on that basis. In the meantime campaigners say they're worried about their future in Poland I asked just thrift Ska from the abortion dream, team if she's concerned about being targeted by authorities of cars every. Day that we are expecting them. So if there will be some kind of idea to close us, we will move abroad and we'll be still working will not stop for the rest says no matter what the government does women will continue to have abortions in Poland, and groups like hers will keep fighting for the right to do. So for the world I'm Morna Barry.

Poland Court Of Human Rights Wade Poland Hillary Margolis Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney Barrett Orla Barry Justice Party Morna Barry Europe Rape Lawn Justice Party Justin Poznan Founding Member ROE Warsaw
Mississippi asks Supreme Court to review 15-week abortion ban

WBZ Afternoon News

00:39 sec | 3 months ago

Mississippi asks Supreme Court to review 15-week abortion ban

"The attorney general of Mississippi, asking the nation's highest court to review its 15th week abortion ban. CBS's Katie. Myth tells us if the court accepts the case, it could lead to a reconsideration of Roe versus Wade Recipes. Ban is one of two abortion related cases that are currently awaiting the Supreme Court's decision on whether to hear that The court declines to hear those another 17 are just one step away. Abortion rights groups fear that have successfully confirmed Judge Bear it will be less protective of abortion rights than her predecessor. Liberal icon Ruth Bader Ginsburg voting in the Senate for the confirmation of any Cockney Berry expected to take place on Monday.

Supreme Court Ruth Bader Ginsburg CBS Wade Recipes Mississippi Attorney ROE Senate Berry
Senate Judiciary Committee sends Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court nomination to full Senate as Democrats boycott vote

Morning Edition

05:38 min | 3 months ago

Senate Judiciary Committee sends Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court nomination to full Senate as Democrats boycott vote

"And I'm Noelle King. Good morning, the Senate Judiciary Committee has advanced the Supreme Court nomination of Judge Amy Cockney Barrett. Mr Chairman, the votes for 12 years and 10 not present motion is passed. Thank you. All 12 Republican senators voted for her nomination. The committee's 10 Democrats did not show up. They were boycotting the proceedings. NPR congressional reporter Claudia Gonzales has been following this story and the proceedings. Good morning, Claudia. Good morning. No. Well so fairly short today. This morning. What happened? Yes, it all went by very quickly, all said, and done and under 12 minutes. This is a very traumatic Shift from what we saw last week with hours and hours of testimony at least 20 hours of questioning Barrett by the members on the panel, both Republicans and Democrats, But today Democrats boycotted they did not show up. Republican senators on the Judiciary Committee sidestepped that no show to move barrettes nomination forward to the full Senate. Democrats said they were boycotting because they wanted to highlight the damage that bear it would do to healthcare, reproductive and voting rights and the fact that the vote took place amid a presidential election. And this is one battle. Democrats say perhaps the lose, but they're looking to win a bigger war. Graham alluded to that when he talked about the next vote on the Senate floor. Let's take a listen They started this On May For up to May that be a 60 vote requirement in the Senate today, and he's referring to the Senate filibuster there. This is a requirement of 60 votes that was once needed to approve a nomination like barrettes. But the filibuster was eliminated in 2013 as Democrats struggled to move their judges forward when they control the chamber with the tight margin, So that's what Graham is referencing, and he added later that perhaps this will be addressed again in the future. However, now that the Senate is controlled by Republicans with tight margins, they're able to push through barrettes nomination with just 51 votes. It's a preview of the battles to calm that this will go on after barrettes nomination this conversation even as far as she goes to the floor to be considered by the full Senate, and we see if Democrats ultimately changed the dynamics of power in the Senate or the presidency through the upcoming election day. How did Democrat to respond today? They didn't just say nothing right? Yes, there had been rumors for days that Democrats could boycott these hearings. They were facing a lot of pressure from outside groups to even skip out on the hearings last week questioning their it. But they decided not to do that last week. Instead, they did it to Dae. So later yesterday, they confirmed that they would all not show today they're empty seats were filled instead with images of Americans who have used the affordable care act. This is a case that could become it could be considered before the court next month. And so this is one critical issue They've been highlighting all along. They also held a news conference after the vote. This was led by Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer on the steps of the Capitol is take a listen. The nomination of Amy Cockney Barrel. Is the most illegitimate process I have ever witnessed in the Senate, and her potential confirmation will have dire, dire consequences. For the Senate. With his Supreme Court and our entire country for generations to come. So this was the theme they've been driving through this entire process. Barrett will shift the court to a 63 conservative majority, and they say she's a foe to the affordable care act. The landmark abortion rights case, Roe v. Wade, and she could play a role. If there's a dispute in the election. This is activated activated opposition as well. There were protesters outside the capital. Speaking against this nomination, this resulted in about a half a dozen arrests so far today I spoke to Judiciary Committee Democrat Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut yesterday, said the watchword for them is no more business. As usual. He and the other members have been driving home this point that this is a sham process. It's not normal. It's not writing Americans should see it for what it is and probably see more of this in the coming days, because there is so much acrimony over this nomination. Yes, exactly So many reasons. We're in the midst of a pandemic. We're rushing this through in 30 days, one of the fastest, we've seen the fight over health care. And, of course, you know the division between Republicans and Democrats. Really. Exemplified by President Trump pushing this forward and so there's a long history as well of these fights over the Supreme Court in the controversy surrounding these nominations if we go back to 2016, Democrats try to move forward. President Obama's nominee at the time. This is Judge Merrick. Garland and Republicans refused because they said they were so close to an election months away. But here we are now people are early voting and they're pushing this through. So this is set into motion a series of debates to calm and we're even hearing about it from the Democratic nominee Joe Biden this morning. We understand he told 60 minutes that he's going to create A study a commission to bipartisan commission to study whether they should add more seats to the courts a lot more to come here, including next week, right what happens then? So tomorrow, the nomination for Barrett actually will reach the full Senate floor. It's going to be followed by some procedural votes on Friday, as well as on Sunday. In between, we're going to see a lot of debate an argument back and forth. But the rial final moment for this will come Monday when the full Senate will submit their votes for bear to confirm or vote against her nomination to the Supreme Court. NPR congressional reporter Claudio Gonzalez. Thanks, Claudia. Thanks for having me

Senate Judge Amy Cockney Barrett Senate Judiciary Committee Supreme Court Claudia Gonzales Judiciary Committee NPR Reporter Graham Noelle King Mr Chairman Joe Biden Chuck Schumer Judge Merrick Richard Blumenthal
What we've learned about Barrett's views on abortion cases

Her Turn

08:11 min | 3 months ago

What we've learned about Barrett's views on abortion cases

"Judiciary Committee hearings in full swing this week. Arlene's outta wrote this report. For many feminists, it is the most painful, outrageous and sad irony that the Supreme Court seat once held by Ruth Bader Ginsburg, one of the most staunch supporters of women's rights and civil rights, will soon be held by another woman. But one who seems to be the mirror opposite of R B, G and all her views the Senate Judiciary Committee hearings this week on the nomination of Amy Cockney Barrett to the Supreme Court. But her views on full display despite the fact that she repeatedly refused to answer questions about her opinions, questions on such settled issues as the right to birth control and the right to vote, including a peaceful transition of power. As the result of that vote, all got I cannot comment answers. When asked about her view opposing same sex marriage, she offhandedly used the term sexual preference when referring to the LGBT plus community, even though many activists say the term is offensive. One after another Democratic senators tried to press her on her record, such as the fact that she previously signed onto an ad describing abortion as barbaric and calling for the Roe v. Wade decision to be overturned. Her two dissenting opinions and abortion related cases, one of which involved allowing minors to get an abortion without notifying parents by way of judicial bypass, and another that would have required fetal remains to be formally buried. Observers say 17 cases related to abortion are one step away from the Supreme Court and three including a 15 week abortion ban from Mississippi could be taken up as early as its next session. And her only nod to any progressive opinion. Barrett seemed to support the idea of desegregation by calling the Brown v. Board of education decision a super precedent that isn't likely to ever be overturned. The Judiciary Committee is set to vote to approve barrettes nomination next week with a vote of the full Senate by the end of the month. Bang. With the nomination of Amy Cockney Barrett to the U. S. Supreme Court. Questions about her ties to the religious right have raised concerns about the fate of Roe v. Wade and a person's right to reproductive choices. Her turn. Reporter Ellen La Luzerne spoke with Karen Garst, who author to anthologies about the impact of religion on women. Women beyond belief, and women versus religion. Last received her PhD in curriculum and instruction from UW Madison and is a current resident in the state of Oregon. 2016 you published a book Women Beyond belief. In the book's introduction, You stated that you wrote the book after learning of the 2014 U. S. Supreme Court decision regarding Hobby lobby's denial of reproductive care for their employees. Your reaction was to question why a corporation can use its religious beliefs. To dictate the healthcare a woman could receive. Fast forward to today when we're witnessing the Supreme Court nomination process for a woman who is a valid Lee, a member of an extremist religious sect that believes that women should submit to their husbands What was your reaction when you heard about the nomination of Amy Clooney Barrett for the U. S Supreme Court. First of all, I wasn't surprised because Trump has already appointed people to the Supreme Court. I didn't watch quite a bit of the confirmation hearings of his previous nominees, so I wasn't surprised that he appointed someone who's conservative. He vowed when he was elected that he would appoint justices to the Supreme Court who would overturn Roe v. Wade. If Connie Bear is confirmed, What is your opinion about the impact that this might have for future cases such as the Affordable care act and a woman's right to choose? Well, I think it's going to have very dilatory ous impacts because now we're going to have a Supreme Court. That is considered very conservative. I believe six of the justices will be considered Catholic, and there are going to write decisions as they have for that have a conservative bent. I think it's very unfortunate that the Supreme Court has become so politicized. If we look in our history. One of the things that I was doing some research on was previous decisions and Brown vs the Board of Education. Which desegregated schools was fundamental change to the way this society was operating was a 9 to 0 decision, and people saw what was happening in society, and I talked to a friend of mine who is a lawyer there. Who said, you know, there's this public sentiment. That's how culture changes. And people were attuned to that, And now we're not appointing people to the Supreme Court who have an open view. They're very, very one sided, and I think it's totally tragic that she's going to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg. What do you think the consequences will be for Roe v. Wade and access to freedom of choice? An abortion? There will always be abortion. The question is whether it's going to be safe and whether it's going to be legal. There has been throughout time before Roe v. Wade. It was back alley abortions, and I think younger women today they don't know what it was like before then Roe v. Wade. If it were completely overturned, I think would have a revolution. It might take a while to put it together. Rather, I think what they'll do is just approved all these restrictions on it, making the doctors who on abortion clinics we associate with the hospital, whether it's making AA lot regulations on the clinic itself and what it can have and what it has to have delegating more. The authority of states and people are going to have to say I don't want to live in a state like this. If they overturn it completely and make abortion illegal. I just Hey, I'm ready to start the revolution. I don't think they're going to go that far. But who knows? What do you think, drives the women who are supporting people like Coney, Bharat and Support these types of efforts to keep women as subservient to men, such as the belief system of Annie Cockney Barrett. Religion is an indoctrination in a set of beliefs. I'm 70 when I was growing up in the fifties in Bismarck, North Dakota. Every person I knew went to a church or there were three Jewish families who went to a synagogue. But it was part of everybody's life. So you're indoctrinated in that It's your family. Everybody else around you is like that. Unless you're exposed to something different. This shapes who you are. And we know that Trump was elected by conservatives by people who identified as religion, particularly fundamentalist religion. That's too he appeals to, and it's unfortunate that the religion hasn't changed enough to deal with our society today. What is interesting to me? Is that this woman, Amy Cockney Barrett is very intelligent. She is ah, Notre Dame professor. She's an appellate court judge, and she has seven kids. I can't imagine trying to balance all that. But in spite of that conservative religion, it is pretty hard to say, Well, she's helped meat of her husband because she is Ted her own career. In your

U. S. Supreme Court Amy Cockney Barrett ROE Wade Ruth Bader Ginsburg U. S Supreme Court Judiciary Committee Senate Judiciary Committee Annie Cockney Barrett Brown Arlene Senate Hobby Lobby Mississippi Donald Trump Bismarck Ellen La Luzerne
Republicans Close In on Barrett Confirmation to Supreme Court

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:55 sec | 3 months ago

Republicans Close In on Barrett Confirmation to Supreme Court

"A sham. What we are seeing here is an exercise of just raw political power. This is the first time in American history that we've nominated a woman who's unashamedly pro life and embraces her faith without apology. And she's going to the court. Senate Judiciary Committee chair Lindsey Graham, who over Democratic objections has scheduled a committee vote for this coming Thursday on Supreme Court nominee Amy Cockney. Barrett. I'm w T. Opie's Mitchell Miller and the party line vote is expected to tee up a vote by the full Senate the final week of this month on Ly Days ahead of the election. Jarrett has completed her confirmation hearings, where Democrats tried unsuccessfully to pin her down on her positions on Roe vs Wade, the Affordable Care act presidential power and a host of other issues throughout, she tried to steer away from saying anything controversial. We shouldn't talk about Republican judges and Democratic judges because I think they're just

Senate Judiciary Committee T. Opie Senate Lindsey Graham Supreme Court Amy Cockney Mitchell Miller Jarrett Barrett ROE Wade
Hundreds Gather For Boston Women’s March In Opposition Of President Trump, Amy Coney Barrett

WBZ Morning News

00:59 sec | 3 months ago

Hundreds Gather For Boston Women’s March In Opposition Of President Trump, Amy Coney Barrett

"Yesterday for the Boston Women's March, voicing opposition to President Trump and his Supreme Court nominee Amy Cockney. Barrett. Here's W. P. Z's Mike Macklin. They gathered on Boston common at the foot of the staircase leading to the Massachusetts State House, women and men adding their voices to the National Women's March movement. March organizer Shivan Ready for telling the world that we're standing here for human rights will not let Donald Trump take that away from the demonstrators Fear President Trump's Supreme Court nominee judge any Cockney Barrett. Will swing the court's majority conservative threatening Roe v. Wade and the Affordable Care Act. They also fear Trump will refuse to accept the November vote. Should he lose to Joe Biden in person or by now, before Victor is announced you November, the demonstrators marched from Boston Common to City Hall Plaza. Calling for voters to defeat Donald Trump. That's doubly busy is

President Trump Donald Trump Cockney Barrett Supreme Court Boston Women Amy Cockney Boston National Women Shivan Mike Macklin City Hall Plaza Massachusetts State House ROE Joe Biden W. P. Z Wade Victor
Trump and Biden offer starkly different views of the pandemic during dueling events

World News This Week

04:16 min | 3 months ago

Trump and Biden offer starkly different views of the pandemic during dueling events

"American voters heard from President Trump and former vice president joe. Biden this week in separate town halls. This after a head to head debate was cancelled when the president refused to take part in a virtual event. Biden. On ABC from Philadelphia, the President in Miami on another network ABC's Mary Bruce covers it all the candidates not face to face, but still fighting from afar offering contradicting vision how to lead the country out of this pandemic. With masks. But I've heard many different stores masks I wanNA president doesn't wear a mask or makes fun of folks like me when I was wearing a mask for a long time then. People say well, it must be that important. President. Trump says he and the country are on the mend even with cases on the rise, we have done an amazing job and. It's rounding the corner and we have the vaccines coming and we have to therapies coming. But Joe Biden said the president failed the American people he said he didn't tell anybody because he was afraid Americans would panic is a presidential responsibility to lead and he didn't do that. He didn't talk about what needed to be done because he kept worrying in my view about the stock market the President on defense I knew it. Was a big threat at the same time. I don't WanNA panic this country I don't want to go out and say everybody's going to die the most shocking moment of the night trump refusing to denounce the fringe conspiracy group Cunanan, which baselessly believes Democrats are satanic pedophile ring that only trump can stop. I. Know Nothing about it I do know they are very much against pedophilia they fight it very hard but I, know nothing. You do now I don't know new I don't know on the Supreme Court the President who's running as a pro life conservative wouldn't say if he wants Roe versus Wade overturned, it would be inappropriate. Just say right now while Biden, still refused to give a straight answer on whether he supports expanding the Supreme Court but he's promising one soon saying voters have a right. To know even as eighteen million, Americans have already cast their ballot. No matter what answer I gave you if I say it, that's the headline tomorrow. It won't be about what's going on. Now the improper way they're proceeding voters have a right to know where they do have a right to know they're standing I'll have a right to know where I stand before they vote. So you'll come out with a clear position before election. Yes. Depending on how they handle this both candidates also addressing issues of racism and how they plan to bring the country together I'll say it loud and a very proud of it. And I have a great relationship because what I've done with the African American community. I'm very proud of it. The president who refused to disavow white supremacy at the first debate grew visibly frustrated when asked why he hesitated to do so. Each every time but people can I'm sure they'll ask you the white supremacy question I denounce white supremacy. Tell you one thing if I'm elected president, you will not hear me race baiting. Dividing you trying to unify cedric humphry pushing Biden on whether he's taking the black vote for granted besides you ain't black. What do you have to say to young black voters who see voting for you as further participation in a system that continually fails to protect them if young black women and men vote, you can determine the outcome of this election not a joke. You can do that and the next question is at my worthy of your vote can i? Earn your vote then detailing policy proposals to help black Americans gain wealth the president again sowing doubt without evidence about the election's legitimacy own. FBI. Director says there is no evidence of widespread that he's not doing a very good job biden saying win-or-lose he'll keep working towards a more perfect union Mr. Vice, president, if you lose what will that say to you about where America is today well could say I'm a lousy candidate and I didn't do a good job. But I think. I, hope. That Doesn't say that we are as. Racially ethnically, and religiously at odds with one another as it appears. The president wants us to be analysis from ABC News Chief White. House correspondent Jonathan.

Amy Coney Barrett continues to be questioned at Supreme Court confirmation hearing

Democracy Now! Audio

03:55 min | 3 months ago

Amy Coney Barrett continues to be questioned at Supreme Court confirmation hearing

"I'm a change as many have mentioned next central threat and it's affects around us do you. covid nineteen isn't. I think. Yes. I. Do accept the Covid Nineteen is infectious that that's something of which I feel like we could say you take judicial notice of it's an obvious fact. Yes. Causes Cancer. I'm not sure exactly where you're going with this, but you know the the notice. In question question is what it is answer. Harris. Yes. Every package of cigarettes warns that Smoking Causes Cancer. And do you believe that climate change is happening and it's threatening? The air we breathe in the lottery. Senator Again I was wondering where you were going with that. You have asked me a series of questions like that are completely uncontroversial like. Nineteen is infectious whether smoking causes cancer and then trying to analogize that eliciting an opinion on me that as a very contentious matter opinion from me that has on a very contentious matter of public debate and I will not do that. It will not express view on a matter of public policy especially when that is politically controversial because that's inconsistent with the judicial role as I have explained. Major plant here that you believe it's debatable. That Senator Kamala Harris questioning battering two days of hearings. j.j Barrett has repeatedly refused to answer questions about her views on abortion and the future of we'd Roe v Wade despite our public record opposing Reproductive Rights Barrett also repeatedly dodged questions on the Supreme Court's Obe grefell versus Hodge's ruling which said same sex couples could not be denied the right to marry this exchange with Democratic Senator Richard. Blumenthal of Connecticut. quickly. Decided Burger fell versus hodges. Senator Blumenthal every time you asked me a question about whether case was correctly are decided or not. I cannot answer that question because I cannot suggest agreement or disagreement with precedents of the Supreme Court. All those precedents by me now is a seventh circuit judge and I to be confirmed. I would be responsible for applying the law star decisive to all of them but you think of how you would feel. As a gay or Lesbian American to hear that you can't answer. Whether the government can make a crime for them to have that relationship. Whether the government. Can enable people who are happily married to continue. That relationship. Your. Senator implying that I'm poised to say that I want to cast a vote to overrule a burger followed I show you I. Don't have any agenda. I don't I'm not even expressing view and disagreement of Obama file. You're pushing me to try to violate the judicial canons of ethics to offer advisory opinions and I won't do that and I'm not asking you hypothetical. These are real cases I brown versus board of Education Do. You think it was correctly decided i. know you told Senator Graham you thought. So I'd like to just to clarify that point. Sure. So as I said to Senator Graham when he asked me that question I have spoken on that before and the originalism lecture that. Incorrectly decided. Correctly decided and yes, I've said that thank you. Let me ask you about. Loving versus the the loving case. was correctly decided well, loving follows directly from Brown and Brown's great correctly decided loving as well was correctly decided it was decided that was Democratic Senator Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut Questioning Judge Amy Coney Barrett

Senator Richard Blumenthal Senator Kamala Harris Senator Graham Senator Richard Judge Amy Coney Barrett Senator Supreme Court Cancer Brown Barack Obama Burger Connecticut Hodge Connecticut. ROE Hodges Wade
"Judging Amy"

Hysteria

04:38 min | 3 months ago

"Judging Amy"

"Amy Coney Barrett is is talking to members of the Senate Judiciary Committee. She's not saying much One thing that's clear from her hearing is that Amy Perez, shifty Amy Kuney Barrett is smart amy. Barrett is smarter than Brett, Kavanagh like of the. Smarter. Than Bread Kavanagh her confirmation hearing significantly less irritating on its face is it's got less screaming in it but do you think that her being? More, pleasant. Than other. Nominee his I'm specifically talking about Brad. Kavanagh, has lulled into a false sense of complacency. No, I don't think. So I really don't I think that we all probably learn a little bit more because we listen because we're not being shouted out about shouted out about making beer and squeeze in some calendars. You know I, think that we in some ways. I can't tell you a ton. From my memory of like policy questions that Brett Cavanaugh answered right like we were really put off by his temperament and everything sort of fell from there. But with her I think that senators have asked very good questions of her I think she hasn't answered most of them I, that that tells us a lot you know. I. Think especially because she is you know for someone who says that? It's my job to not forecast or say how I would vote if I were on the Supreme Court but you know she tells us that she has told us a lot. She's a very Christian she's pro-life and she brings her kids everywhere and I say this because she's a woman but I don't understand why people bring their small children to confirmation hearings it no sense. Have you seen? Pictures from Antonin Scalia is confirmation hearing He brought his entire big family. There's something to me read like sort of hat tip to her mentor Antonin Scalia who she clerked for Oh interests during okay I. did not know that during his hearing. He had like I. Think he has nine kids or something like that, and they all were sitting there in the chambers and he was. Confirmed during a time where things were a lot less contentious I mean bork already happened but he was things were a lot less contentious when he was confirmed and so there was a lot of like it. It's super weird to revisit that now because there was a lot of like people on the committee complimenting his big family and it was it was very, very strange but I think one thing that you know her family life is pretty irrelevant to. Her capacity as as a judge and her being a nice lady doesn't really have anything to do with her capacity as a judge what I was disturbed by that like. These hearings always to me seem just like an exercise and gas lighting. We know what she thinks about Roe v Wade we know what she thinks about it it is. We know and so she spends. Days pretending that we don't know and that her views are somehow something that she's going to rule on without input from her like she signed onto a letter that was written on behalf of a group that believes in vitro fertilization is manslaughter. Anyone asked her about that I didn't not yet. Did they somebody did on Tuesday they asked her if she felt like that and she said that she just signed the letter her way out of church or something I. Did hear that part that's fucking nuts i. just I hate how were being gasoline here I I it here's my question for you. Do you think because you know there are a lot of people who think that Democrats should have boycotted the hearing to show what a sham it was. I don't know how I feel about that. What do you think? I don't know I feel like the the right thing to do is. I think the platonic ideal of a member of the Senate Judiciary for this has been amy, Klobuchar Amy Klobuchar who the good aiming the good amy as you know as as she was running for president, she wasn't somebody that I whose candidacy I was enthusiastic about She's somebody who falls to the right of me on many issues. But as a member of this committee, she's done a really good job of asking pointed questions that seemed to have simple answers but that Amy Coney Barrett the bad, amy. Has Been Dodging.

Amy Coney Barrett Klobuchar Amy Klobuchar Kavanagh Amy Perez Antonin Scalia Senate Judiciary Committee Brett Cavanaugh Bread Kavanagh Senate Judiciary Supreme Court Brad Bork President Trump ROE Wade
Barrett Says She Does Not Consider Roe V. Wade 'Super-Precedent'

Bob Sirott

00:49 sec | 3 months ago

Barrett Says She Does Not Consider Roe V. Wade 'Super-Precedent'

"In her Supreme Court confirmation yesterday, Senate Democrats pressed her about abortion. During this exchange. Bharat refused to say that Roe vs Wade wouldn't be overturned all use super precedent differently, okay, the way that it's used in the scholarship in the way that I was using it and the article that you're reading from Was to define cases that are so well settled that no political actors and no people seriously push for their overruling and I'm answering a lot of questions about row, which I think indicates that road doesn't fall in that category. And scholars across the spectrum say that doesn't mean that Rose should be overruled. But descriptively. It does mean that it's Kate not a case that everyone has accepted. 1973 Roe vs Wade decision essentially legalized abortion in the U. S. The Star of the Netflix. Siri's Cheer is

ROE Wade Supreme Court Siri Bharat Kate Netflix Rose
Questioning continues on Day 3 of Barrett hearings

Wayne Cabot and Paul Murnane

00:58 sec | 3 months ago

Questioning continues on Day 3 of Barrett hearings

"Supreme Court nominee Amy Cockney. Barrett is shedding very little light about how she might rule on several cases. If she's confirmed, spent about 12 hours yesterday, answering questions, and we'll be back today here, CBS's Laura Podesta Like previous Supreme Court nominees, Amy Cockney, Barrett tried to avoid taking a stance on key issues during her confirmation hearing's not something really, that's appropriate for me to comment on I've never expressed a view on it. I can't answer questions. Like what answer she did give on Obama care. I'm not here on a mission to destroy the affordable care act. And Roe vs Wade. I can't Three. Commit or say yes, I'm going in with some agenda because I'm not did not always sit well with Democrats. It's distressing not to get a straight answer. Barrett tried to convince them it shall be an impartial justice. His confirmation hearings resume this morning at nine o'clock. They are very interesting listening. When you hear very educated people discuss these things, and we'll have

Amy Cockney Barrett Supreme Court Laura Podesta Barack Obama ROE CBS Wade
"roe" Discussed on In The Thick

In The Thick

06:20 min | 3 months ago

"roe" Discussed on In The Thick

"In America today. So they weren't even asking the question. So she's like, let's go. So now, we have two white men onstage Tuesday night. They've had problems there've been allegations very, very very let's just. Very different kinds of problems. Problems, we also have a white male moderator Tuesday nine. So White, the shining whiteness of. Trump has nominated a number of conservative federal judges and Barrett is confirmed like we said they'll be another conservative justices to Skoda's Biden says he wants to pass federal legislation to protect the right to an abortion, but he has flipped on some things and one of them which Mary has already brought up the Hyde. amendment. So let's get into this debate. How do you expect this topic to be covered in the debates and trump and bite in what are they gonNa say Mary what do you think I threw a lot your way well, I think if you start with the debate, I think trump has had a track record of wanting to talk more about abortion. Biden is seeming to pursue a strategy of thinking that abortion or reproductive justice shoes generally or sort of too divisive I mean on the merits who knows if that's right as a matter of strategy, it seems a little bit troubling that Biden seems to be prioritizing the views of say like white independence, which is presumably the group he's trying not to make uncomfortable over the views of the people of color who really Right. Black women who voted for. Exactly. Yeah. So I mean, that's a little bit. You know talking about abortion at all is, of course, a way of talking about women of color because women of color are the ones who are GONNA lose out the most Roe v Wade is gone and a reluctance to talk about that is a little bit creepy because it does bring to mind this sort of history of ignoring women of color when it comes to reproductive justice which the Democratic Party has been guilty of in the past in terms of what's going to happen I mean. To some degree, the Supreme Court is probably going to be extremely conservative and likely Undo Roe v Wade. Almost you know regardless of WHO's president unless we have some kind of court packing retirement by the Democrats, which, of course, introduces uncertainty. If trump is president, you can pretty much take it to the bank that you're GonNa have a pretty big rollback of abortion rights probably overruling of Roe, you're going to see continuing dismantling contraceptive access. You're probably GONNA see more conservative Christians in positions of power trying to limit access to other things like sex education, and like Michelle said, you're also gonNA see kind of undercutting of other programs like healthcare or. Employment Protections Employment Discrimination, protections all the things that make it hard for women of color who do want to have children to actually do it when they want to without facing kind of impossible life choices. So you're gonNA see more of that Michelle. Let's be clear. Annette wait to marry. Thank you so much for that which is that when of color will only be the canaries in the coal mine which is appointed I emphasize my book. So if we look at criminalization of pregnant women, it began as black and Latino women, but once you establish a pesident. Accelerate is on that precedent then white women become vulnerable to. Elevate where in the last few years, hundreds of white women arrested for endangering their fetuses under a law that was never intended for pregnant women along that was originally designed to try to deter folks who turned their homes into meth labs who were blowing up their homes in their trailers in. So legislators passed a law. A child endangerment law that which to discourage men from making mass in their homes but. Prosecutors go after. Pregnant women do the complicity of doctors but I WANNA go back to the debate question and even if you don't mind thinking back just a few years ago I know flipping back but I don't know. Because these things don't come out of thin air rights. Why in two thousand sixteen, where they're not questions about sexual assault and rape during the debates. Federal. Judge that said, we'll let this lawsuit go our where there is an allegation of rape against one of the candidates. Now, all of this time about emails but yet no questions about a federal judge saying, okay. This case involving an allegation of rape no questions. Any this has so much about our country and about the value of the lives of girls and women in the United States and of course, foundationally a nation that said, it was permissible for men to rape their y exactly. That would give them an out both criminally and also in civil law that it's okay to actually beat your wife. So long as the instrument US notes thicker than your thumb. So that is a foundation but also strategy to. So as folks are looking at this current. Nominee A- question should be raised about the opportunity that was had during the Obama Administration because let's be clear. This is not just a question about Merrick Garland. There was actually a deeper strategy. The Obama Administration could have been the one to say we're GONNA put forward another woman to and we're GONNA put forward another woman. And we'RE GONNA. Hug wore a black woman and we will dare you Senate Republicans and Senate. Democrats. Give her day. Yeah, and then you have a different kind of narrative and strategy going forward in terms of women getting in the street. Now you know instead who's going to get in the streets should have short for Merrick Garland America Lynnwood, kind of like so many other Supreme Court justices that we've had in the past but fashion had a woman not in given her do by Mitch McConnell. The marches that came in January and February. Yeah. They would have commented March and April and May and June leading to November, and so there are other ways in which we've been failed that they're not just Republican is a failure of imagination in terms of where women deserve to be altogether.

Trump rape Biden Supreme Court Roe Obama Administration United States Mary Michelle Merrick Garland America Lynnwo president America White Merrick Garland Senate Mitch McConnell Democratic Party Annette endangerment Barrett
"roe" Discussed on In The Thick

In The Thick

07:46 min | 3 months ago

"roe" Discussed on In The Thick

"You consume alcohol during your high school years? Yes. We drank beer. My friends and I the boys and girls. Yes we drank beer. I like beer still light beer and Amy Kuney Barrett might be in that camp to a lot of these people want to act as if they're not partisans even if they are and that doesn't mean that Roe v Wade is safe, but it does mean that it might take longer to unravel abortion rates and there's some hope in that because of course, the longer it takes the more uncertainty there is so then you. Might have, for example, retirements on the service side or deaths on the conservative side you might have court packing if that's a road, the Democrats. decided to go down. So if you're looking for kind of absolute certainty in the near term, we might not get the handmaid's tale now but we're gonNA get some kind of rollback of abortion rates but make no mistake that where it's going is an absolute prohibition nationwide of worship. Michelle all right. What's your take on the debate with and the potential of having another? I. Mean It's going to happen another conservative judge I just want to get your takes even after row there were challenges put in place for poor women, women of color with Hyde Amendment a series of Supreme Court cases that preference pregnancy, the state funding pregnancy, versus pregnancy termination even in the wake of data that we know that an abortion has a A. Shot. Even though we know that a person is fourteen times more likely to die by carrying a pregnancy to term in the United States than terminating it me, we really need to look at this for what at is you know when the State Says No, we prefer that you do this even though we know it's fourteen times more likely to kill you for women and women of Color. What is that? Place with those kinds of tomatoes I mean that really then places in context the very deadly nature of what the state is playing around with in terms of belives of poor women and women of color and I'd like to expound upon what Mary. So eloquently, put a before us to think about what the court will be doing with another conservative justice in terms of voting rights, criminal justice, the environment, all of these issues matter immigration rights, and that we must understand when we think about reproductive health rights injustice within a whole person's context, which that there are many different ways of undermining somebody's liberty and rendering them without the value of their person hood. Won't be just reproductive rights which are critically important. But what thinking about these issues in a holistic way means that we really are talking about Jim crow kind of politics mean United States, and we already see this in front of us when you have a government at quitting children ages. Yup. Separating them from their parents are up for people who are at meat packing plants that are riddled with Colbert nineteen to go back to. Work when you have a government that think that little of the wives of people have caller and that is Jim Crow. Now we can papered over with the fact that they're. Now we've gotten rid of certain swarms of discrimination in education. We see lingering effects still in housing. We still see the lingering effects of that still in boating though we still see the lingering effects of the reality is that for those people of Color. Who Have the means to somehow hopscotched? Over so many of the substantial barriers that have been put in place, not just abortion, but just living an equal life than everybody else in many ways are returning to a kind of Jim Crow Stassen. Hyperbole. That's real for all of the black women went to stand in line in Wisconsin during the pandemic summer in the primary to vote for hours and you know about Justice Ruth. GINSBURG. One of her last two cents was exactly about that. You know sort of underlying racism really with how the Supreme Court and. Supreme Court handle that which was to say if you want to vote and risk your life to do so we're not going to get right for you to be able to vote, and let's be clear in Wisconsin at the time of that. I, never though black people constitute six percent of that state, there were forty percent of the deaths. My name is Leah and I'm here to tell you about native deodorant because I, believe in using products that are clean and native has ingredients you've heard of coconut oil shea butter and Tapioca Starch. It's also Vegan and it's never tested on animals with over ten cents. Native has something for everyone. My favorite is citrus and herbal because it keeps me and good and feeling fresh while I'm bicycling around the city native is a risk free try. Every product comes with free shipping within the United States plus free thirty day returns and exchanges do what I did and make the switch to native today by going to native do dot com slash in the thick or use Promo Code in the thick at checkout and get twenty percent off your first order that's native dao dot com slash in the thick or use Promo Code in the thick at checkout for twenty percent off your first order. If we look at the history of reproductive rights for women of Color and for immigrant women there. Yeah. As you're saying, there are clear roots of racism in the antiabortion movement Michelle in your book which you first conceptualized. About. How the laws right many of these laws are from the quote unquote so-called war on drugs that have been constructed to police and criminalize pregnant women women of color in your introduction you start with this line. This is not a work of fiction although I wish it were right and you write while we may think of the handmaid's tale actually this is the United States or specifically Texas? When you recount the story of Marlisa, Munoz's in two, thousand and thirteen. Who is brain dead and decomposing and was forced by the state to state for nearly two months before she was finally taken off organ support after a legal battle the state literally had control of her body, her husband and parents had no, say there was no say because of quote unquote fetal protection. So that story so visceral, right it tells you you know the way in your book how you humanize the women criminalize victimized by these laws and we've been covering the recent reports of these forced sterilizations of immigrant women in detention. It's not a surprise. It is the natural next step we have in fact been screaming about this some of US journalists we've been talking about the sexual abuse that continuous in these places. And it's really nothing new for women of Color, for immigrants, black women for poor women, we go back all the way to slavery to Eugenics, in Your Book You Interview Loretta Ross Who's one of the leaders of the term in the movement reproductive justice who directly linked the attempt to control women with white, supremacy Patriarchy and actually let's listen to a clip of Loretta. Speaking with the Western states center well, the beauty of the reproductive justice framework is that it is the isolation of abortion from other social justice.

United States Supreme Court Michelle Wisconsin Jim Crow Jim Crow Stassen Loretta Ross Amy Kuney Barrett Justice Ruth Western states center Leah Democrats. Colbert Mary GINSBURG Roe Texas Wade
"roe" Discussed on In The Thick

In The Thick

08:19 min | 3 months ago

"roe" Discussed on In The Thick

"INTIL Charlottesville right so it takes something like the murder of heather higher than. An a coming to grips with these issues in Virginia in order for there to be a reckoning at Monticello about the life of Sally Heaven and even the offspring of Jefferson, the black offspring of Jefferson, the please the efforts over decades and decades for their due recognition. You know it. All is a part of what has been sadly an American conspiracy to actually high what has happened to black, women Daesh. All right. I'm just saying that is an American conspiracy. In terms of WHO's writing the history and the policy, right? So many dots are being connected, and as we shift to discuss about reproductive rights, it really is all connected. It's in the work that both of you have done. Yeah. So her true spicer when sojourner truth says in the eighteen hundreds in her famous women speech most people remember it as a speech about chivalry. But it's actually in that speech he says anti bore thirteen children and near each one snatched from my arms and nobody heard my cry. But God anti wanted making those connections, but we still have to talk about the. Latest right with the supreme. Court. With the passing of Justice Ruth Bader GINSBURG president trump has already announced his nominee judge Amy Coney Barrett who is a judge on the seventh US Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago and this was buried in two thousand and sixteen talking about Roe v Wade at Jacksonville. University I don't think abortion or the right to abortion is would change. Restrictions my think some of the restrictions would change. I think that's what we just saw last term. In the case out of Texas states after the criminal guys now. Affair and all of that states have imposed regulations on abortion clinics and I think the question is how much freedom the court is willing to let states in regulating abortion I think the question of you know the court has held. That in some circumstances. States can render partial birth abortion illegal very late term abortions i. think that's the kind of thing that would change I don't think the core case grows rose coral building that women have a right to an abortion I. Don't think that would change but I think the question of whether people can get very late term abortions how many restrictions can be put on clinics I, think that would change. So we talk last week right about the hypocrisy of Republicans pushing through nominee during election year right? It's an election year it's only weeks away. So we want to get into what the implications are of having a conservative nominee for Roe v Wade. So Mary you already tweeted out that Amy Coney Barrett's. Confirmation. Could in fact, mean the end of room. In fact, Mary in the first sentence of your book, you write quote with the Supreme Court likely to reverse Roe v Wade the landmark abortion decision American debate appears fixated on clashing rights and your book really complicates the idea that the Supreme Court is solely responsible for divisions over abortion rights and the backlash against it There are a handful of cases that may, in fact, reach the highest court of the country's soon, which will have a direct impact on reproductive rights and I just want to remind people that the essence. Of Roe v Wade. Is Privacy Bright Mary so Is this the end of road. Yet you saying it's the end of row. So what does this mean for abortion and reproductive rights for women particularly women of Color in this country if you're just saying this could be the end. This is the end of Roe v Wade. Well if you think about it, we already had a conservative supreme. Court majority. John Roberts is not a liberal savior. There's no real converts to the cause of reproductive justice among the courts conservative members as it was. So you can almost view amy conybeare it just kind of an insurance policy that reproductive rights will be overturned because. Yeah. Then even if you have say someone like John Roberts or you know someone else who kind of breaks ranks with the rest of the Conservatives, that's not enough anymore. It's also I think of all the court's members. If you look at he conybeare, she's been the most I think kind of vocal about her views being anti-abortion of the courts current members. Now, in some ways that doesn't really matter if you're opposed to reproductive justice because you're you know just whatever you're a misogynist or you're you're just conservative and you don't like me for some other reason, the outcome is the same but. We have less reason to doubt that she will kind of blank when the time comes it's it's a big deal in it's especially big deal for women of color. It's a big deal because Amy Conybeare, its presence on the court doesn't just extend to abortion. It also extends to contraceptive access. It extends to what's going to happen to the affordable care act, and as we know because of racial bias in this country whenever. There is less privacy and making reproductive decisions or whenever we get rid of things like the affordable care act that people who bear the brunt of that or women of Color Right? So historically, it's always been easier for women with money, and that's historically disproportionately been white women to navigate around any kind of restrictions that have been put in place that's always been much harder. I mean the the rate of deaths for. Black Women has always been higher on it was much higher before row than it was for white women we expect that to continue and I think maybe even become more pronounced I mean it's sad to say how little progress we've made when it comes to restore justice in this country. But then when the bill comes due for what it would mean to overturn Roe that that's going to be women of color paying the bill. Can I just ask and and and you know. People. I'm super honest on this show is actually had to abortion. So I, I realized now that my abortions happened just after Roe v Wade had been legal for about a decade so In the early nineteen, Eighty S. but when we think about this nominee, what is up just a moment please help me talk me down because I had to stop watching the handmaid's tale. And what made me stop watching? The handmaid's tale was when all of the women were told that they had to leave their offices because there were no more women allowed at work. So Amy Conybeare, it is a member of a particular conservative Christian faith group. It's called people of praise Newsweek reported that the group quote teaches that husbands should assume authority as the head of the household. In fact, her parents are members and her father was a coordinator of groups chapters in the south and that was reported by. NPR. So talk me down on. This does this matter at all when we're talking about women of Color Reproductive Rights? And the Supreme Court. I guess to me how much you WanNa Freak out depends on your time. So, if you really WANNA freak out, the history of the abortion debate would suggest that the anti-abortion movement is a whole. Even if you don't need to worry about specific faith groups are Amy Conybeare at the anti-abortion movement as a whole the goal has been to ban all abortions. The goal is not to overturn Roe v Wade that's like a waystation on the road. The goal is a right to life and the right to life. If you kind of follow the logic would mean that abortion is illegal everywhere right it's illegal in California it's illegal in Newark been raped. It's illegal if you're a minor of it's definitely illegal if you're a woman of color like that's the that's the end game. I think in the short-term though we still have a lot of conservatives who are interested to some degree in saving face justice. Roberts's in that camp probably bread Kavanagh's in that camp after the kind of disastrous confirmation hearings. Dr Ford has described you as being intoxicated a party. Did,.

Roe Amy Conybeare Supreme Court Wade Amy Coney Barrett John Roberts US Circuit Court of Appeals Mary Justice Ruth Bader GINSBURG Monticello Virginia Daesh Jefferson Charlottesville murder heather Sally Heaven spicer Texas Chicago
"roe" Discussed on In The Thick

In The Thick

07:25 min | 3 months ago

"roe" Discussed on In The Thick

"The other side of the country Santa Rosa Beach Florida is Mary Ziegler she's a law professor. At Florida State University she's a historian and author of the new book abortion and the law in America welcome Mary, and thanks for having me. So you get you get the idea of what we're talking about people talking about reproductive justice. And how women of color are too often criminalised in this country around the issue of reproductive justice and as you know, this is a very sweet spot for me like a very personal one But the first thing we're going to do is we're going to talk about this update with Briana Taylor case which has been for women. Just, not a slap in the face it's like we're getting pummeled. So. Just to recap the back story of Brianna Taylor back in. March she's a twenty six year old emergency. Medical technician was shot Multiple Times and killed when Louisville police raided her home last week a grand jury charged only one officer Brett Hankinson in the shooting for wanton endangerment. You know he was the one who's shots actually hit the neighbor's homes ripe. So Not Brianna Kentucky's Attorney General, Daniel. Cameron said that the officers had acted in quote unquote self defense. But as of this recording on Monday afternoon, he is yet to release the transcripts from the grand juries deliberations. On Friday Brianna Taylor's family and lawyers held a news conference. BRIANNA mother to make a Palmer released a statement. It was read by her sister who is Brianna his aunt her name is Bianca Austin. Undo camera would never do his job but what I do know is that him and countless others will go to bed sleeping with his face. Still hearing her say her name. Camera. Didn't feel her but it ended with the lack of investigation failed her the officer from told lies to obtain the search winfield her the judge who signed the search warrant field her the terrorists who broke down her door filmed her the system as a whole has filled her. You didn't just rob me of my m, my family, you rob the world of acquaintance. Acquaintance. Willing to do a job that most of us could never stomach to do a queen willing to build up anyone around her of. Who was starting to pay for? I hope you never have to know the pain of knowing your child. is in the and help. You're not able to give them. I hope you never hear the sounds of someone cry and begged for your child to get health and she never receives help. Those cries was ignored. I hope you never know the pain of your child being murdered a hundred and ninety one monroe own. To make. So. Michelle really. The question is, do you reform a system like that or? I mean it doesn't feel like you can reform a system that right here saying, Oh, right. The only officer we're going to charge the one who hit the neighbor's home some. You know we live in a society that begs best to suspend our intelligence Let's be clear about that because we know that she died her body riddled of bullets. And many people believe in the criminal justice system that what it does is to see something like that in the outcome, is that this innocent person? Sleeping in her own bed in the middle of the night. And essential care worker during these times that if she is hard, there is justice on the other side of it. But the criminal justice system engaged with black people's lives. Especially, black women's lives has historically been not rendered that last result, which is just as and that's historically. So so let's remember that historically police forces were slave patrols in the United States. The very same model of the is the same model of a badge from the sixteen and seventeen hundreds as a slave. The earliest policing laws in the United States, the earliest laws related to homicide made it not a crime to kill black people right so you could because black people were considered property. Pretty can't be killed SEC. These cases involving that weather was black people being maimed black people being murdered. Any of those things that white people were just not held to account for an even in the cases of those things that happen to be the most egregious horrific. Let's think about in it tells that still no conviction even after people admit to doing what they have done or the murder of the four little girls in Alabama, church, Sixteenth Street Baptist Church, and so many of the main with wire recording knowing exactly who did it no rest no convictions for decades. So in that historical light, we're still looking for a constitution that adequately fulfils its promise to black women well. Mary your thoughts. I think it's a good segue to what we're talking about today I think even with the say her name campaign it's so much easier to forget about what happens to black women in the justice system versus even two black men and I think that's one of the reasons this conversation is so important often when people talk about mass incarceration or criminal justice reform, they're not thinking about women and they're. Not Talking about women, which is one of the reasons Taylor story is so important but it's also a good reminder of how these criminal justice issues go beyond just the sorts of concerns about the police and about released violence and police brutality that we've all been talking about they go even into the sort of most intimate corners of our lives which are the kinds of things Michelle and I have been studying i. Knew it's. In the backdrop of what happened to be on a Taylor it wasn't until George. Floyd horrific. Murder that we all saw that then said, we'll left pay attention to Brianna Taylor too because recall that she was murdered weeks before he was. Rain you know and and it just takes that and it's so unfortunate that sort of devaluing of black women's lives such that it has to be an appendage to something else horrific happening for people to begin paying attention to the dairy and the harm of black women, and that's just historically been. So we've been several hundred years into this enterprise of a failure to take seriously and to honor the lives of black women the ways in. which their bodies have been abused through rape and sexual assault, the foundations of our nation and slavery papered over. But so real I mean in one example of that is think about Monticello literally the papering over of Sally hemmings bedroom. Yeah. So woman who has a Thomas Jefferson each her to France sired children with every element of s we've not yet dealt with Brian, our country emend literally her bedroom papered over turned into a best room.

Brianna Taylor officer Mary Ziegler Brianna Brianna Kentucky Briana Taylor Michelle United States murder Florida State University Santa Rosa Beach Florida America Sally hemmings Taylor Monticello professor SEC Sixteenth Street Baptist Churc Thomas Jefferson
"roe" Discussed on Serious Inquiries Only

Serious Inquiries Only

07:11 min | 8 months ago

"roe" Discussed on Serious Inquiries Only

"You know people who If they if they're poor if they don't have any money if like there's always going to be an opportunity to sell yourself in a certain way you know in the same way that I think like you look at. I don't know a candice Owens or something there's always gonna be people have marginalized groups who then turn around and say well. I can actually have a whole lot of notoriety and success if I become a spokesperson for like the other side. You know and then all of a sudden you're on Fox News and you're everywhere and I just kind of price that in like a yeah. That's that's always going to happen. It doesn't for me. It doesn't like convince me either way but I don't know if the right is more about like spokespeople than arguments or not. I can't tell I mean so. That's that's it's it's hard for me to answer that question. Don't you obviously my biopsies are GONNA show here? I don't think the right is particularly good at arguments or logic. I think they tend to get these questions very very wrong. I think what they're very good at is narrative and selling a story in a way that the left is not good at and the left very often wants to sort of respond to the right wing. By saying we have the superior arguments we have the American College of Obstetrics and gynecology on our side. We have the American Medical Association putting out a statement saying that abortion is essential care and should not be interrupted during the pandemic and the right is like we don't care look at this grieving. Women coup is the face behind Roe v. Wade crying about the dangerous at abortion poses to women which is something that Norma mccorvey was saying in the eighties or the nineties after her conversion which was false and so I think we ground there. I'd also I thought the short answer is no. I don't think the right cares about logic arguments and the truth unfortunately is I think that's to their advantage because I don't think most people are going to change their minds based on arguments and reason in fact like most studies bear this out. People actually don't deliberate themselves or their way and most moral judgments that they hold were swayed by stories. We're pulled in by narrative emotion. And that's what makes Norma mccorvey story to me so tragic because this is a woman who was vulnerable. Her whole life and whose vulnerabilities were exploited for the personal gain of people who were not her and I think that is so often the case in terms of abortion and motherhood is well. That's not something that often gets paid attention to one of the things that I keep thinking about during this pandemic as you keep seeing reports and hopefully we're gonna get to talk about this of increasing domestic violence. During Times of pandemic women are locked at home with abusive partners. The the socioeconomic factors that exacerbate abuse are worse because people are losing their jobs. They're isolated. They've lost healthcare. One sense of of meaning and location in the in the world has been has been lost and whether or not women have access to to medical resources or psychological. Health resources has so much to do with their particular. Vulnerability is and how their socio economically situated? And this is all present Norma. Mccorvey case like her dad left when she was thirteen years old. Her Mom was a violent alcoholic And She described these periods of her life when she was in this like therapeutic boarding school as the best years of her life because she was taken away from her home that was violent and disruptive and so she would lash out on purpose to get in trouble to be able to be sent back and then at one point. She sent to live with a cousin who she claims you know regularly raped her. Obviously she's accused of being a liar after she says this and this is just a woman who's never had agency over her own life and to whether or not she was paid to be an antiabortion activist or not. This is the story of a woman who's because of the way that pregnancy impacted her was denied agency over most of her life. And I think ultimately that's what makes reproductive rights so important. Yeah you know as you're talking about You know arguments versus narratives. I just remembered there is the shot your abortion Which I think is a is now an an organization. I can't remember. It's been a while since I came across it but I pulled it up just now and That that was all about normalizing the experience of abortion Is that something you're familiar with? I've seen that I. Yeah I've definitely yes if you WANNA talk about it when like man's playing it but it's I looked on twitter and it's got you know forty five hundred followers so I guess it's not it hasn't taken off quite as much as like a a candice Owens type thing but But it but I guess that that that came to mind is like an attempt to try to tell the story which I think would be compelling which is there are all kinds of women. Obviously a there are all kinds of people who get abortions. Don't regret it. It's a good thing for them. It's healthcare it's you know like their choice and normalizing that make sense so that came to mind. I think that's a that's a good organization. Yeah that sounds awesome. You know things like that. I worry about things like that. Only to the extent that to be able to shout your abortion one must already have quite a bit of privilege and be very different from me right like I had an abortion. And so it's very for me to sort of talk openly about that because I don't have to navigate communities where having had an abortion as the sort of thing that is going to cost me a job that's going to cost me the respect and esteem of my peers. Inouye as they're going to be additional negative consequences that come along with me saying like hey. I had an abortion. I have no regrets about that. Turned out to be a great thing for me. I'm so glad that I did it. where there are people who are in different sorts of communities where it could impact their job. It could impact their social relations like at this stage in my life. For example this is very silly example but like I wouldn't even consider dating anybody for example who has an ardently pro-choice but it may be you know maybe an Alabama Missouri you know that's going to to further have implications for one social circle or how to date are how one may be viewed and so it just gets into really weird things. Get into really weird territory. You put the sort of like performance. Tive pressure on like disclosing one's medical history. Yeah I mean I think it's a it's a social media thing I don't think they they take anonymous contributions it's not as though they're saying. Oh Catholic. Stand up and physically do it. But it's it's about kind of collecting those stories. I think and trying to harness harness the power of those stories so yeah. Do we WANNA talk. Maybe about abortion general. Kind of getting off the row. V Wade specifically Norma mccorvey story unless you had anything more on.

Norma mccorvey candice Owens Wade American Medical Association Fox News American College of Obstetrics Roe twitter Inouye Alabama Missouri
"roe" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

08:21 min | 11 months ago

"roe" Discussed on Today, Explained

"In Millhauser you covered the Supreme Court for Vox. And you're at the court yesterday for oral arguments in this case. June Medical Services v Russo. How did it go? It's a little surprising. So when I woke up Wednesday morning I thought those zero percent chance that the Supreme Court would vote to strike down this antiabortion law okay and when I left. I was a little surprised by Chief Justice Roberts who is very conservative and very conservative in particular on abortion I left. There's a thirty percent chance that he will flip over and vote to strike down the antiabortion law which means the clinic would win and the state of Louisiana would lose. That's right I think there is at least some chance that there's going to be five votes in favor of the clinic here on the reason. Why is that? The state claims that it passed this law in order to protect patient's health and Robert seemed unpersuaded at times by that argument. It's not a convincing argument. There's very little empirical evidence for it. Hope Medical Center the abortion clinic at the heart of this is performed about seventy thousand abortions and only four of those have led to complications that required hospitalization. So you know if your fear is that. There's this epidemic of People who are having complications after they have an abortion require hospitalization. And they can't get into the hospital because there isn't fear not problem has already been solved by the fact that abortion is very safe and the chances that abortion patient is going to require. Hospitalization is vanishingly. Small is the argument that the clinic made in front of the court yesterday. That's right yeah so the clinic and I and I should point out like some of our listeners. Be Having Deja Vu here. The reason why they might be having Deja Vu is because in two thousand sixteen. There's a case called whole women's health. V Heller Stat chief justice and May it please the court? The Texas requirements undermine the careful balance struck and Casey between faiths legitimate interests in regulating abortion and women's fundamental liberty to make personal decisions about their pregnancies. They are unnecessary health. Regulations that create substantial obstacles to abortion access and what the Supreme Court said in that case. Is that admitting privileges. Laws do not benefit patients and basically all at the clinic was arguing. This case was hey that thing that you said less than four years ago still true the Federal District Court after trial found the two provisions were unconstitutional. They constituted undue burden on a woman's right to choose. The Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit reversed. We in agreed with the District Court and we reversed the court of Appeals. So why here the case then? They've already decided something so close in Texas. The biggest difference between whole woman's health the case from four years ago and June medical. The case that was heard this week has nothing to do with the facts of the cases. Nothing to do with the law has everything to do with the personnel on the Supreme Court four years ago Justice Kennedy was stolen the court and Justice Kennedy. You Know I. I wouldn't call him a huge defender of abortion rights. You voted to strike down the overwhelming majority of the abortion restrictions. That came before him. But every now and then he would see a restriction. That goes too far. You're cutting too far in into this core constitutional right that Mike Boorda's recognize and that's what he said in whole woman's House Kennedy's gone on Kennedy was the fifth vote whole women's health and his replacement. Brad Kavanagh has a very consistently antiabortion record in making your argument you ignored and I believe mischaracterized Supreme Court precedent. You reasoned that Jane Doe should not be unable to exercise our right to choose because she did not have family and friends to make her decision. The argument Rewrite Supreme Court precedent and Gorsuch is also fresh to the court from that two thousand sixteen decision. That that's right yeah. Neal gorsuch was appointed to replace justice. Scalia who actually died. While the whole woman's health case was pending so did gorsuch and cavenaugh weigh in on Wednesday in any way. That might suggest how they're going to vote. So gorsuch was quiet at the oral argument but based on his record when he was a lower court judge he took a very aggressive steps against planned parenthood. Like I'm pretty darn confident that core such is going to cast antiabortion votes. Cavanaugh also signalled that he intends to vote with the state here and Kavanagh's argument so remember that whole woman's health the Texas case said that admitting privileges don't do anything to benefit patient health and it also said that. It's also really hard for doctors to get these things early for abortion. Doctors take to get amazing privileges and so this is a huge burden for no benefited struck down capital. How do we know? That's true in Louisiana. Sure it might be true that in Texas. It's really hard for abortion doctors to get these credentials but maybe it's different Louisiana. Is it no? It's not the American Medical Association and the Medical Association representing Obstetricians and gynecologists filed an amicus brief where they said Nope Zane the evidence in the case suggests that it's the same there several doctors in this case who tried to get admitting villages and weren't able to do so you know and and often it was for the exact reason that I said. I like one of the doctors for example only provides medication abortions and doesn't really have much of a medical practice beyond like every now and then prescribing on medication abortions and so. This person admits pretty much. No one to a hospital because there's no need that for any of this. Doctors patients go into a hospital and so that person would have really tough time getting omitting village. In fact the state's own expert witness admitted that yeah that that doctor would have a tough time getting admitting privileges. So what's the bigger picture here? We know from what you said about giving the state a thirty percent chance of winning this case here that Louisiana would go from three abortion clinics to maybe just one bright which would make the procedure even more restrictive in the state. But but what's going on here with the Supreme Court Roe v Wade and this new cast of characters. So this case is likely to come down to Roberts you know he was the only person I saw up there who seemed in any way uncertain about how he would vote. And Roberts really doesn't like Roe v Wade you know if the lawyer for the state had come in and said we think that Roe v Wade was wrongly decided and and we think that this court should overrule at. And here's the argument for why. This should be overruled and they've just been opened about what they were trying to accomplish. I think there's a really good chance Roberts would have said like that's what I want to. What the state did instead is. It passed this law which is really an abortion restriction but it's Kinda disguised as a health regulation and then they asked the justices to say like we want you to pretend that this lol is going to protect people's health even though we can't provide you much evidence that it will and even though you said for years ago that it won't and even though our lawyer is now in an oral argument and the liberal justices peppering her with questions asking her to Find Demonstrate. Evidence. This will protect women's health and she's unable to do it. The state was asking the justices to participate in a pretty deceptive. Act here. There's a chance that Roberts isn't GONNA go there. But what does it mean for the next case that comes? That isn't handled this way. That doesn't have this precedent. What does it mean when someone comes to the Supreme Court to this to this new cast of characters gorsuch and Cava and says Row v? Wade is bad law. Yeah I mean I think the bad news for people care about abortion rights is. I think that there's a chance that Roberts gives Roe v Wade a stay.

Supreme Court Justice Roberts Court of Appeals Texas Louisiana Supreme Court Roe Justice Kennedy Federal District Court Wade District Court Neal gorsuch Brad Kavanagh Deja Vu June Medical Services Millhauser Hope Medical Center Roe Russo Vox
"roe" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

Distillations: Science + Culture + History

02:58 min | 1 year ago

"roe" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> There's <Speech_Music_Female> still a stigma around <Speech_Music_Female> having <Speech_Music_Female> and talking about <Speech_Music_Female> an abortion. <Speech_Music_Female> There's still a lot of <Speech_Music_Female> assumptions out there <Speech_Music_Female> about who gets abortions <Speech_Music_Female> and who <Speech_Music_Female> becomes an abortion advocate <Speech_Music_Female> what kind <Speech_Music_Female> of people they are <Speech_Music_Female> in the <Speech_Music_Female> nineteen sixties Sherri <Speech_Music_Female> Chessen confounded <Speech_Music_Female> a lot <SpeakerChange> of those expectations. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> I think what it <Speech_Music_Female> does show us is <Speech_Music_Female> like maybe the assumptions <Speech_Music_Female> people have <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> is. These <Speech_Music_Female> people are actually much <Speech_Music_Female> more radical <Speech_Music_Female> than they think. If they would <Speech_Music_Female> look at their pictures <Speech_Music_Female> they'd see women <Speech_Music_Female> dressed <Speech_Music_Female> in <Speech_Music_Male> early early <Speech_Music_Female> sixty <SpeakerChange> suits <Speech_Music_Female> and pearls and things <Speech_Music_Female> and might <Speech_Music_Female> write them off but they're <Speech_Music_Female> actually quite radical <Speech_Music_Female> in <Speech_Music_Female> talking <Speech_Music_Female> about abortion. <Speech_Music_Female> I mean coming forward <Speech_Music_Female> with something that US <Speech_Music_Female> incredibly <Speech_Female> stigmatized <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Sherri didn't disappear <Speech_Female> after. <Speech_Female> She got an abortion. <Speech_Female> She <Speech_Music_Female> kept speaking <Speech_Female> out for all the <Speech_Female> other women who still still <Speech_Female> needed them <Speech_Female> and the experience <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> changed <Speech_Music_Female> her at <Speech_Female> the time. I knew <Speech_Music_Female> that I wasn't going. To <Speech_Music_Female> get my way if I <Speech_Music_Female> ranted and raved <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> but <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> over <Speech_Female> the years and <Speech_Music_Female> if you were to meet me <Speech_Music_Female> now <Speech_Music_Female> I think my <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> anger <Speech_Music_Female> built <Speech_Music_Female> up and <Speech_Music_Female> when I see other people people <Speech_Music_Female> suffering <Speech_Music_Female> and <Speech_Music_Female> in the <Speech_Music_Female> same manner <Speech_Music_Female> and when I see <Speech_Music_Female> mostly <Speech_Music_Female> the male <Speech_Female> of the species <Speech_Female> deciding <SpeakerChange> for <Speech_Music_Female> us what we should do <Speech_Music_Female> I get <Speech_Music_Female> excuse the expression <Speech_Music_Female> pissed as hell <Speech_Music_Female> I do. <Speech_Music_Female> I <Speech_Music_Female> finally <Speech_Music_Female> got angry. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> North <Speech_Female> begs to still <Speech_Music_Female> speaks <SpeakerChange> out about reproductive <Speech_Music_Female> rights. <Speech_Music_Female> I <Speech_Music_Female> will do anything <Speech_Music_Female> that I can <Speech_Music_Female> to <Speech_Music_Female> help. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> It's <Speech_Music_Female> it's important <Speech_Music_Female> that others understand <Speech_Music_Female> what but <Speech_Music_Female> some of US did <Speech_Music_Female> to <Speech_Music_Female> get rights <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> and <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> It it <Speech_Music_Female> scares <Speech_Music_Female> me to <SpeakerChange> think <Speech_Music_Female> that <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> People <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> who had never walked <Speech_Music_Female> in our shoes <Speech_Music_Female> and have never experienced <Speech_Music_Female> this. <Speech_Music_Female> Try to make <SpeakerChange> decisions <Speech_Music_Female> for us <Speech_Music_Female> today. Hey <Speech_Female> access to abortion <Speech_Female> is actually <Speech_Music_Female> more vulnerable than <Speech_Music_Female> it has been for decades <Speech_Music_Female> in <Speech_Music_Female> twenty nineteen fifty <Speech_Music_Female> eight abortion <Speech_Music_Female> restrictions were passed. <Speech_Music_Female> The State <Speech_Female> of Alabama has banded ended <Speech_Female> almost entirely <Speech_Female> new restrictions <Speech_Female> are <SpeakerChange> being proposed <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> all the time. <Speech_Music_Male> I think <Speech_Music_Male> one way to put <Speech_Music_Male> all this together <Speech_Music_Female> is to <Speech_Music_Male> is <Speech_Music_Female> to just show the <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> sort of strange <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> combination <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of on one <Speech_Music_Female> hand to steady <Speech_Music_Female> progression of <Speech_Music_Female> women throughout the <Speech_Music_Female> twentieth <Speech_Music_Female> and Twenty First <Speech_Music_Female> Century and <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and yet yet <Speech_Music_Female> at the same time. <Speech_Music_Female> You know the backlash <Speech_Music_Male> you <Speech_Music_Male> know. <Speech_Music_Female> Arguably <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> it was a more <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> some respects it <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> was a more progressive <Speech_Music_Female> period <Speech_Music_Female> Right <Speech_Music_Female> around the time of <Speech_Music_Female> ro Than <Speech_Music_Female> it is <SpeakerChange> now

"roe" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

Distillations: Science + Culture + History

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"roe" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

"By nineteen seventy twelve states had passed reform laws and that year New York Hawaii Alaska and Washington repealed their criminal abortion laws completely. Burn something thing Nelson happened in one thousand nine hundred seventy a woman in Texas named Norma mccorvey file a lawsuit against a district attorney named Henry. Wade she was single pregnant pregnant with her third child and had tried to get an abortion but her life was not considered in danger so it was a legal in Texas and she couldn't afford to lead the state her case. Ace made it all the way to the. US Supreme Court where they used the pseudonym Jane Royale this was a rover swayed court. Today ruled that abortion is is completely a private matter to be decided by mother and Dr seventy-two ruling to that effect will probably result in drastic overhaul of state laws on abortion specifically specifically the court. Today overturn laws in Texas and Georgia and rule. The government has no right to enter into a decision which should be made by the mother and her doctor. The nineteen seventy-three seventy three ruling putting into the therapeutic abortion puzzle. It was a huge win. For All the women who fought to make it happen from Pat McGinnis to Sherri Chessen Chechen and also the doctors because without them fighting to protect themselves. It might not have happened at all. The main author of Roe was Harry Blackmun. Who did a great service to American women and I know way mean to at all to denigrate him but for him? Writing row was all about protecting acting. Doctors it's not that he was unsympathetic to women getting abortions. But you know if you read the language of Ro It's the physician and his his capacity. Should be able to decide etcetera etcetera and a lot of feminist actually including Ruth Bader Ginsburg have criticized row sang sang rather than being decided on the right to privacy and rather than focusing on protecting the physician. I ideally row should have been decided on on the issue of gender discrimination. Only women get pregnant. Therefore only women are denied certain quote benefits such as being able to participate in society because of unwanted childbearing..

Harry Blackmun Texas Supreme Court Ruth Bader Ginsburg New York Hawaii Nelson Sherri Chessen Chechen Ace US Wade Dr seventy-two Pat McGinnis Jane Royale Henry Alaska Washington Georgia Roe
"roe" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

Distillations: Science + Culture + History

09:10 min | 1 year ago

"roe" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

"In nineteen sixty two the US. Watch from a distance as the so-called the Litt- mine disaster her hit Europe. The drug was thought to be so harmless it was given to women for morning sickness. Of course later we realized it wasn't harmless at all. There were a whole range range of disabilities associated with the limited but the FDA never approved it so people in the US saw themselves as having avoided a tragedy which reminds us of the undercurrent running through this entire story. A deep seated fear of disability when housewives began demanding abortions. It wasn't just that mainstream society saw them as nice respectable ladies who of course should make decisions about their own bodies for themselves. It's it's that. Each one was seeking an abortion for a very specific reason to prevent what mainstream society saw as a tragedy. A disabled child. Okay all the little sparked the anxiety among women but rubella made it persists and so to understand the world they're living in. This is what they're being told there. Are these headlines. There's going to be twenty thousand damaged babies in the United States with German measles and they're calling deformed and dangerous children that are going to be born so picture that people had in their minds and the pictures that were running the newspapers at the exact same moment where pictures of the solidified babies as they were called and Faber called freaks and monsters. This was the picture in people's minds and they were terrified the response to the forecasts of so called damage. Rubella babies was widespread panic and it was considered a crisis in the making but a huge part of that crisis was was actually the social situation that these children would land in beyond the stigma around disability. which let's face it still very much exists to this day? A in the nineteen sixties. There was zero material social support for babies children or adults with disabilities. They don't think at all about well. What can we do? The baby's we'll how could we improve the world for them. It doesn't come up as a question. Everything that might be needed was on the shoulders privately of the parents in terms of education in terms of Therapy medical needs. There's no right to public education. There's no mainstreaming does not like a disability rights movement. This is all in the future in fact many parents of children with congenital. Rubella Syndrome went onto advocate for disability rights and unhelped eventually get the Americans with disabilities act passed. Of course that's still decades away but it was this historical moment in the specter of solidified enters the American consciousness that abortion to enters the debate in nineteen sixty one Sherri Chessen was living in Arizona with her husband and four young children. She was pregnant with her fifth when she took something. Her husband had gotten Europe. I can still remember him putting him up in the high high highest cabinet in our kitchen why he was saving them. I have no idea never thought of that till this moment. Then why did he save them. Sherri Chessen by the way is called Sherry Finkbeiner in almost all the media we found of her. She told us that think behind was her first husband's name but it was never her legal name so in a sense she says the Kress created. Sheri Fink Fine. Sherry became the first woman in the country to deliberately tell the public like about her decision to get an abortion but that was not her original plan she quietly went to her doctor in Arizona and he consented to a therapeutic abortion Shen but before the scheduled procedure she started to worry about all the other women who might find themselves in the same position. My first thought was Oh my God. The Air National Guard from Phoenix had been in Germany the year before so I thought maybe they brought it back and other mothers others would inadvertently take it like I did so. She called the newspaper and anonymously told a reporter her story that Monday on the front page of the paper was an article with the Words baby deforming drug may cost woman her child here. It did not name He. At that time it came close at Scottsdale mother of four and I think it said that Bob was the teacher at Scottsdale High School. It didn't matter what was printed. The county attorney announced that any doctor gave her an abortion would be violating Arizona's US abortion law which remember only permitted them if the woman was going to die Sherri doctor called her at work and told her he couldn't go through with even so I put the phone down and instead of crying. Like I'm Kinda doing now. I put my hands on my hips and said I'm calling the county attorney's office and I called and I said I just WanNa know what the attorney general has to do. Oh with interfering in any families Decision to Take care of their what they think incas best for their own family Sherry did get an abortion but she had to go to Sweden to do it every doctor she approached in the. US refused her. For fear of being prosecuted. Her story became a sensation and reporters documented every step of her experience. Here's a news clip from nineteen sixty two justice. She's leaving for Sweden supplant. What are your plans after Sweden and so worried about today that I just want to do what's right for myself in my family and I don't feel bitter towards anyone I i? I don't feel bitter towards people who opposed as religiously. I only hope that they can feel that we're doing what's best in our case in in in could feel some of what's in my heart and trying to prevent the tragedy for happy. As American women watched her story unfold. They learn two things. One was how dangerous solidified was. The second was how hard it was to get an abortion for what people increasingly saw as a valid reason and even though she was an unlikely spokesperson for abortion she was also kind of the perfect one to change the conversation in nineteen sixty one. The media framed abortion as dangerous and women who got them as sexual deviants or at best victims then along came Sherry. She was young married white and a mother four times over in fact she was also also pretty and practically made for. TV In fact she was actually the beloved host of a Children's TV. Show called the Romper Room. She was completely inoffensive. Offensive to nineteen sixties Middle America and she went on. TV and very sweetly told the world that she needed an abortion and she explained why and they listen to her Jerry think by CETERA. Nineteen sixty two might controversy was also at face press conference immaturity. I I am not an expert in field. I have studied the question. I'm not a doctor. A lawyer I am not so few logically involved at all I know is that I was somebody who needed one. Under certain given conditions a Gallup poll showed that fifty two percent of Americans approved to her abortion. But there ever so many people who didn't approve to put it mildly that the F. B. I.. Had to help protect her family. Negative reaction was pretty damn ugly. I will tell you a in some of these letters that they would send me a picture of myself with dagger through my head with blood running down the worst ones were pictures that people would send cutting the limbs off my children and it was heartless it was criminal was insane and we asked Sherry. She was surprised that she had to leave the country to get an abortion. I guess shocked would be more than than surprised because I thought my doctor would just pop me in the hospital. I realized one day I had poison myself with a manmade poison poisoned. I was going to get a man made Dr to to get that poison out from me and I just fought till two. I was successful but the trouble is pregnancies. Don't wait while you're fighting. I was lucky I found this out when I was just a couple couple months pregnant so I had more time because I always felt I felt quickening. You know the baby move I was I was unique gone because then it would become instead of fetal growth. As I was told to think of it it would become a baby. And I didn't want it to be a baby.

Sherry Finkbeiner United States Sherri Chessen Arizona Europe Sweden FDA attorney Sheri Fink Scottsdale Scottsdale High School Air National Guard Kress Romper Room Phoenix Faber reporter Bob Middle America
"roe" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

10:08 min | 1 year ago

"roe" Discussed on On The Media

"Making it impossible. The case illustrates a blind spot in the debate around abortion if government can compel pregnancy and other cases it it can also compel abortion. It's not just abortion denied but reproduction controlled the fact that she chose birth at a time. Amblin the military was in effect. Coercing abortion made this case and especially sympathetic one in which to try and persuade an almost entirely all male judiciary that regulations of MRI implicate basic questions about women's equality women's equal citizenship statuesque Harris Justice. GINSBURG would put it. And it's happening at a time emerging out of a history in which you had four women of color being coerced. Without their knowledge or consent they come in to the hospital for other surgeries. And they end up being sterilized or you know as a condition to receiving various forms of care that they working seeking in this case raises the issue of coercion without requiring the court to squarely confront the issues of of racing. Class given who captain's drug was through the captain's dilemma. GINSBURG was also hoping to strike at another problem. One that hasn't been resolved even a half century century. Later that it's wrong. For the government to act in ways that reflect or reinforce the inferior social status of traditionally excluded groups including women. Whether it could be pregnancy discrimination it can be various forms of sex classifications it can be very restrictions on access to contraception to abortion that they're all part and parcel of a separate spheres regime but also harms women as a group and reinforces their inferior viewers status. We were able to find figures for just how many women in the US Air Force became pregnant from nineteen sixty nine to nineteen seventy-one just over four thousand nine percents of all women in the Air Force discharged for being pregnant but the Supreme Court would never hear the struck case ace. Perhaps fearing the case was a loser the Solicitor General persuaded the Air Force to waive captains trucks discharge. The justices decided this new policy for for pregnant women in active service rendered the case. Moot could you talk about what it might have looked like in the future if struck had been decided versus row right the traditional view that when a woman gets pregnant what. She's supposed to do how she's supposed to. Respond is to stop working and go home and prepare to become a mother and be supported By her husband who presumably there. And that's exactly what Ginsburg was combatting. It in struck the idea that there's a certain way that a woman is supposed goes to respond to a pregnancy and captain struck was being penalized for refusing to occupy that sort of traditional role. So that's the first points points. I think this would have been a great vehicle to decide. The issue of whether pregnancy discrimination counts potentially is unconstitutional. Sex Discrimination under the equal protection clause now in terms of struck being a first abortion decision instead of Roe Justice Blackmun who writes ro is not thinking about abortion as a sex equality right at all but struck would have been a way for them to see that there are sex equality stakes here that when you regulate pregnant women. These kinds of regulations can be shaped by gender bias and that the impacts on women are going to be substantially greater than the impacts on men and I think the equality stakes are are pretty clear instruct to a court that's capable of seeing it but given the time period and given the composition position of the court. I I wonder whether they would have even been capable struck his now a great grandmother she and her only child Tanya Tanya have a close relationship but it strained she says the choice. She made the decision she was forced to confront has weighed on them both in other time she she would ask me she would say why did you give me away and I didn't give you away. I gave you two. Did that help her. Yes it did after you know L.. After repeating it many times it did have dried saying. I wish it could have been different. I I wish I could have had you One of my regrets but she says things are the way they are because they are the way they are and that's all there is to it. Yeah it's okay Daniel. That makes a lot of sense as for her her career. She told us that suffered to even after her. Discharge ordeal was over the records from it were never removed from her air force file. She says struck was turned down for promotions emotions. For years. Stalled at the rank of captain so I raised new health. She retired as a lieutenant. Colonel but who knows how far she might have gotten another. What if as much as her ordeal illustrates the real human costs of gender discrimination? It also says a lot about the contours of the National National Discussion about abortion and where the politics of ended up today struck supports president trump. Although she says she doesn't identify with either party she gets her news from sources like Fox News. One America News Network and Newsmax. She's concerned about immigration and was involved in the tea party and like so many Americans. She has is complicated views on abortion as a Catholic. I'm supposed to be against abortion in any way shape or form. I'm not like when I was thinking about having an abortion abortion. It was like when I was one to two months. Pregnant in there wasn't any viability of the fetus period. And it would have just been you know. Just a clump themselves. She doesn't oppose abortion. If a woman's life is threatened by the pregnancy. Or if the fetus is badly deformed unviable polls show most Americans hold that view too but like fifty five percent of respondents. She doesn't want federal tax payer money to pay for it in fact she doesn't want the federal government involved at all in being a AH fiscal conservative. I believe it should be up to the states. And of course that was exactly the state of affairs before Roe v Wade was settled a patchwork of restrictions and regulations on abortion rights just as those adopted by the military. President Trump often repeats the myth that doctors perform abortions at nine months. Lawmakers in New York cheered with delight upon the passage of legislation that would allow a baby to be ripped from the mother's warm moments from birth. These are living feeling beautiful babies who will never get the chance to share their loving their dreams in the world. You know it's just it just kills my soul and this idea of allowing abortions up until the ninth month and then in leading the baby die when it's viable baby to me is it's something out of a horror movie to me. Of course neither either political party promotes infanticide and no state allows a fetus to be aborted in the ninth month unless the woman's life is threatened or if the fetus isn't viable both conditions under which struck supports abortion access. Duke Law School professor. Neil Siegel has written that. The struck case from an era past has lessons for our present debate. There's an an awfully good chance. At an increasingly traditionalist. Conservative Supreme Court is going to view. Various instances of pregnancy. Discrimination is not sex discrimination and if that's right then I think the story of struck and Ginsberg's working struck and Captain Susan Struck when my view deserves to be honored by collective memory emory. They can all serve as a reminder of the legal vulnerabilities and the real human costs of the path that the Supreme Court may very well take back and as long as the Republican doors. It's never over. We're not at the end of history. This is not the Supreme Court we're GonNa have in twenty or thirty years. Maybe not even in ten years now struck in the process of writing a book is becoming the author of her own story as she sees it. Her crusade was aimed at a much narrower target than the one seen by legal scholars wasn't about abortion was discreet step on the path toward equality. Today women no longer have to choose as between Motherhood in the military you know. It's it's something that was very monumental for the military that had to happen and it happened. Happened with me in the seventies and women should forget it because there isn't any reason why you shouldn't fight more for one and women have been doing that. Since our first woman general was in general the same year that McCain Does Subtle and tells me some you nearly fifty years later. They're still a long way to go for all women. The pregnant workers fairness act hasn't passed congress the US maternal mortality rate has actually been going up up and despite Supreme Court rulings access to abortion is more endangered than ever so coming up we look beyond Roe versus Wade to reproductive justice This is on the media. I'm Jessica Glenda of the Guardian and I'm OTM producer. Alana Casanova Burgess so instead of the equality arguments minced. We got row planted in a slate cellular quick described the shakier and more conservative ground of a women's private relationship with her doctor So what are we facing. Now she says there are two kinds of attacks on row. One is the use of trap laws or targeted regulation of abortion providers. She thinks the Conservatives on the court I have a preference for chipping away at access rather than an outright ban presumably by that theory they will never write the sentence Roe v Wade is now overturned.

Roe Justice Blackmun GINSBURG Supreme Court Captain Susan Struck Wade president Air Force US Air Force Harris Justice Fox News Tanya Tanya US Alana Casanova Burgess Neil Siegel McCain Duke Law School America Jessica Glenda
"roe" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

07:07 min | 1 year ago

"roe" Discussed on On The Media

"Was half expecting you to get off the plane with your baby and it said you have no idea how close section but there would have been too much a fighter would never work. My object was it. I was going to stay on active duty and also have something something to do with changing the rules. Struck got a total of seven discharges from the Air Force. Most coming long after her daughter had been born. She thinks it's a record captain. Susan's truck was scheduled to be discharged in the army midnight tonight. Sushi had a child while in service that's against regulations but today Miss Struck Walker. She's not married. Got An order in court justice. Douglas preventing her discharged until the issue is thrashed out. He put her infant daughter up for adoption last summer. But the air force still sought to have our discharge under existing regulations today the ninth. US Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco rejected Captain Instructs Plea and concluded that unquote there is a compelling public interest in not having pregnant female soldiers in the military establish. Susan struck is an unmarried captain in the Air Force. who had a baby in nineteen seventy? She's a Roman Catholic who would not have an abortion. The baby has been given up for adoption. The air force wanted her discharge but she got a court todor keeping her in the service until a court could rule on the constitutionality of the air. Force's action today. The Supreme Court said it would rule on miss trucks case curly next year among struck attorneys was Ruth Bader Ginsburg than at the. ACLU's women's rights project. This is from GINSBURG's confirmation information testimony in nineteen ninety-three because no man was ordered out of service because he had been the partner in the conception. No Man was ordered out of service because he was about to become a father. Strikes case happened in nineteen seventy essentially the beginning of the Gender Equality Movement in nineteen seventy one. The High Court had decided the equal protection clause applied to women too but they could still be fired for getting pregnant. Meanwhile GINSBURG was set to argue the case the same term as Roe versus Wade one of the problems in thinking about row today is that it was never planted in the firmest possible soil and then it became became easier to take wax at Dahlia liquid covers the courts for sleet and hosts the amicus. Podcast we forget through the rear view mirror. That Roe was was not actually rooted in a mother's bodily autonomy or dignity. When you go back and you read the row opinion Justice Blackmun Ackman? He had been council at the Mayo Clinic. He was obsessed with the doctors writes in that case. In fact as the New Yorker noted a few years ago Justice Blackman's decision has forty eight references to physicians and only forty four to women by locating the rate somewhere in that conversation or relationship between a woman and in her doctor again. Always a man in justice. Blackman's construction you really did privilege the physician if not over the woman at least on equal footing meeting with the mother it was simply. That's what the court understood. Was that these wise judicious man would be helping. Women make good decisions about what was best for them but but it aligns the central moral agent here which is the woman and because of that I think it set row up to be a more teetering than it needed to be. It was not planted in the soil of women's dignity women's economic equality women's autonomy. And no less. That's the person than Ruth. Bader GINSBURG has in the years since row actually deplored that in row the justices rooted the right to an abortion in terms. It already recognized privacy liberty. A woman should be free to make this private decision with her doctor and the government shouldn't get involved although they also split the right into trimesters prime ministers with more leeway for government regulation further into the pregnancy. Ginsburg made the privacy argument INSTRUC- too but she rested at primarily unequality quality grounds. And she has said that. This is the case that got her to think in those terms. The one thing that distinguishes women from men is that only eight women become pregnant. And if you're going to subject a woman to disadvantageous treatment on the basis of her pregnant status. which was what was happening here? You were going to deny her equal treatment under the law Senator Hank Brown a Colorado Republican asked Ginsburg about it directly. I can see how the equal protection -tection argument would apply to a policy that the interfered with her plan to bear the child could that argument the applied for someone who wish to Have the option of an abortion is well. Does it apply both decision to not have an abortion as well as to a decision to have an abortion. The argument was it's her right to decide. Either way her right to decide whether or not to bear a child in this case it was her choice for childbirth. The government was inhibiting that choice. It was the price of remaining in the service. The military policy toward abortion at the time was both more permissive and more coercive then civilian policy this pre row where abortion was illegal in most circumstances around the country. Duke law professor. Neil Siegel clerked for Ginsburg in two thousand three. She declined to speak with us for this story but Seagal has interviewed reviewed her about the struck case. This is the quote I would love to have it known that during the Nixon administration armed forces basis offering abortions to women in the service the dependence of Mendon service in fact in July of that year nineteen seventy the Department of Defense issued a formal policy on abortion. It was the first we were able to find mentioning it explicitly abortions were to be permitted at military base hospitals even in states where it was illegal. That's the permissive part of it and also more coercive if if you want to keep your job in the military then you have to terminate the pregnancy. Even if that was in secret in Japan struck says she was never offered an abortion by the air force but she and other women knew. The option was implied in her brief. On the case Ginsburg also emphasized strucks Catholic faith other servicewomen. Were more free to make that choice than the captain was and Struck said that she would take her vacation time to recover from the pregnancy way less than what men got to recover from. All kinds of ailments could be a broken leg could also be drug addiction. Alcohol Abuse There was no automatic discharge for any of that in so pregnancy. Unlike other disabilities was grounds for immediate media discharge regardless of individual circumstances and mothers fathers were deemed unfit to serve and so this was to be a counter intuitive abortion rights case in which a white middle-class woman with an exemplary professional record was choosing birth in the Air Force's forces policy was.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Air Force Miss Struck Walker Susan US Circuit Court of Appeals Supreme Court High Court Justice Blackman Justice Blackmun Ackman ACLU Gender Equality Movement San Francisco army Roe Senator Hank Brown Mayo Clinic Douglas Japan Nixon administration
"roe" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"roe" Discussed on On The Media

"WNYC in New York this is on the media. Pop Garfield is out this week. I'm Clyde stone in March. The supreme aim court will hear a major case called June medical services versus key about Louisiana Law requiring doctors who perform abortions to have admitting meeting at a local hospital. The law would leave Louisiana with just one clinic three years ago. The court struck down in identical Texas law. Aw but that was before justices. Gorsuch and Kavanagh joined the bench. Now everything is different. It's not just Alabama Missouri Georgia Mississippi Ohio L. Kentucky and. They're all trying to go bubble up to the Supreme Court and Overturn Roe v Wade last spring nine state. Legislatures snuck in abortion bands of various lengths all now under appeal and just last month. Ohio lawmaker's introduced a bill requiring doctors to re implant and a topic pregnancy a medically impossible procedure or face murder charges. But we begin this week not with one urgent headline but with decades of accumulation. Good evening Kinda landmark ruling. The Supreme Court today legalized abortion is extraordinarily trough event. January twenty second nineteen seventy eight would be an historic day concern. We've been faced the problem. I turnberry a slow moving avalanche twenty years ago. Abortion may have seen the easy way out for a society reeling from the collapse of moral consensus yesterday. The Supreme Court said that Roe v Wade was still alive if substantially restricted Roe V. Wade wishing very bad decision Barbara. I think it was a bad decision. As Mike Pence has said for decades. I want into put Roe v Wade on the cheap of history and this is something I think will do a.

Supreme Court Roe V. Wade Louisiana WNYC Pop Garfield Ohio Mike Pence New York Texas murder Gorsuch Kavanagh Barbara Alabama Kentucky Mississippi Missouri
"roe" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

Distillations: Science + Culture + History

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"roe" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

"I'm Lisa Barry Drako and this is distillation 's a podcast powered by the Science History Institute. Our next episode is about the rubella epidemic that swept swept country in nineteen sixty four and sparked a national conversation around abortion. Maternal viral infection during pregnancy especially in the first three three months has the potential for producing a number of harmful effects in the developing fetus. When the rebel outbreak hits panic sweeps the country? So there are these headlines headlines There's going to be twenty thousand damage babies a deep seated fear of disability combined with a pre. Ada World led many women to the conclusion that they needed an abortion but there was a problem. Abortion was illegal with very few exceptions in this episode. We're going to hear from women who spoke out. As mother's how does a mother knowingly bring into the world a child to suffer. I cannot do it. I couldn't do it for for two seconds knowing what I knew. I had to take the course that I did and I don't regret it as mothers. They demanded they should be the ones to make tough decisions about their own. Reproductive lives demand of people. Listen and eventually grudgingly people did. It's not what most of us think of as the Movement for abortion rights because it's not it's not Grounded in sexual freedom. It's really about family family and children and it is. It's grounded in motherhood. These housewives are probably not who come to mind when you think of abortion activists from the nineteen sixties but they helped push the conversation forward around reproductive rights and this historical moment all sparked by a virus pave the way for Roe V. Wade the tune into the next episode of distillation 's on December seventeenth..

Ada World Lisa Barry Drako Roe V. Wade Science History Institute
"roe" Discussed on We The People

We The People

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"roe" Discussed on We The People

"They have almost absolute the justices have almost absolute discretion as to which cases and, which legal issues. They address on what timeframe. Or whether they ever dress, certain legal issues. And Secondly, they. Contrary to the assumptions of some state legislatures legislators they don't need a prohibition of any kind to reexamine Roe versus Wade. They can reexamine row in any case with an abortion law, that arguably conflicts with Roe, and they did that in Webster, Missouri law with no prohibitions, and they did that in Casey Pennsylvania law with no prohibitions. And as I wrote in national review online last week or two weeks ago with the title of the heartbeat bills may be the least likely to attract supreme court review, frankly, I think it's unlikely that the court will take up first trimester prohibitions. It's more likely that they I mean, to just be very, very simple. It simply cases are, are, are easier than hard cases. And it's it's easier to take up cases without first trimester prohibitions than cases with first trimester prohibitions. And, and the last thing is there's a lot of opportunity because there are twenty thirty cases in the lower courts or at the court now that the court can address it, well, it's time for closing arguments in is absolutely fascinating discussion and Catherine. The first one is to you what would the world? Look like if ROY v. Wade were overturned. Well, I unlike Clark believed that many state legislatures not just ten would move to restrict access to abortion, primarily in the middle of the country in the southern part of the country, and I don't think any of those state legislators are reflecting popular opinion. Like he has proposed that is seventy one percent of Americans today. Believe that the law auto remain. What it is that row ought not be overturned. There's only about twenty six percent that believe it should be. So if you're talking popular opinion, its support for the current circumstance and state legislators often do things for political reasons that have nothing to do with popular opinion, and frankly, it affects women's lives. So my view on all of this is that people who believe in choice to make their voices heard need to elect pro choice. Legislators both in the Senate. The US Senate and at the state level that states make a major difference elections matter, and that they ought to, you know, in my view be out there canvassing knocking on doors writing postcards, getting involved in electoral politics, to change the status quo, because nothing will happen. Good for women until pro-choice legislatures control circumstance. And frankly, I feel really, really badly for the women who live in states in, which their legislators are not responsible to responsible to their needs. And, you know, Alabama, Mississippi Missouri over and over again have said we don't care what happens to your life. We don't care. What happens to your health? We wanna do this for political reasons. We're gonna pass these onerous laws and I think they'll continue to do, so until the people in those legislators legislators change. Clark last word is to you of what would a world. Look like if Roe v. Wade were returned abortion policy would be better aligned with public opinion in this country..

Wade Clark Roe US Senate supreme court national review Catherine ROY Casey Pennsylvania Missouri Webster Alabama Mississippi Missouri seventy one percent twenty six percent two weeks
"roe" Discussed on What Trump Can Teach Us About Con Law

What Trump Can Teach Us About Con Law

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"roe" Discussed on What Trump Can Teach Us About Con Law

"In a nineteen Ninety-four interview McCorvey told her reporter. I'm a simple woman with a ninth grade education who wants women not to be harassed or condemned snow glamorous thing to go through an abortion. I never had one, but I've worked in three clinics and I know the anti-choice people all ask me when do I think life begins. I don't know. I'm not a rocket scientist. I just wanted the privilege of clean clinic to get the procedure done. I don't require that much in my life. I just never had the privilege to go into an abortion clinic, lay down and having a Boertien. That's the only thing I never had. So we know the row was Norma. McCorvey. What does the weights and foreign Roe v way that's Henry Wade? He was the district attorney in the county where we're rose trying to obtain abortions. So basically he was the law enforcement official responsible for enforcing the laws. I'm a little confused as to the process by which. Roe versus Wade gets overturned, what is the hypothetical procedure in which that would be overturned? One way that might happen is that there might be some law that is absolutely nearly like getting rid of all abortions in one particular state, right? And so presumably some organization or person would bring a lawsuit, asking a judge to find that law and constitutional now on the other side, the other side, the state's voyeurs might say, actually, you know what? This is an opportunity not just to defend the legality of this draconian law, but we're going to ask the supreme court. We're gonna make a bet here that the time is right to ask the supreme court to say, you know what admit that you've made a mistake that Roe versus Wade should never have been decided in use this case as vehicle. So the court could say not just that this law is constitutional it's consistent with Roe. That's one way to do it, but they could say, you know what? Now that we're looking at this law, it turns out that our legal framework, the way we decided cases was wrong. We've made a mistake and there is no constitutionally protected right to an abortion, and they'll use that cases of Ukel. That's what would happen. And this is what you're going to see presuming the judge Cavanaugh will become just as Cavanaugh if there is a five Justice, conservative majority, solid one. Now, the Justice Kennedy is gone. You know, we're just talking about one legal area, but there are a number of legally is where different kinds of legal challenges will be raised because people who care passionately about these areas of law will feel at the time is right to bring a challenge. So there's kind of two ways in which the effectiveness of the decision of Roe v Wade is undermined. One is the supreme court holds Rovers as weight as president, but then when things come up that challenge it, they think, oh, this doesn't really violate the decision we made in nineteen seventy three. And so that's one way. Then you just kind of a road a lot of the rights from that way. And the other way is to bring some case. And then some very bold lawyer goes, you know what? We want you to take a look at that decision and then overturn it directly. Then roving Wade doesn't exist as a concept. And so you know, in theory, this thing that we the law professors talked about is we live in the system of starry decisive star. Decisive simply means that you know courts refer to prior precedents rely upon them. So we don't just overturn cases for no reason whatsoever. And the court is going to be acutely aware that anytime it has to reverse course and overturn a case, it's not supposed to do so lightly. It's gotta say that there's some really good reason to do that. Having said that the court does reverse itself from time to time. It's not an unheard of thing. So what would happen? What would a five person majority say about row simply that it was always wrong from the moment we decided it something's changed. That would be hard to say, but there is the sense of institutional legitimacy that the court and that have minimum chief Justice Roberts would certainly be aware of because let's say in this pathetic world that a five Justice majority overturns Roe versus Wade..

Roe McCorvey Justice Kennedy scientist Justice Roberts reporter Cavanaugh Rovers Boertien official Ukel president
"roe" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

04:49 min | 2 years ago

"roe" Discussed on Today, Explained

"So a lot of people assume that roe was what made a worship controversial and that couldn't be further from the truth mary ziglar is the author of after ro the loss history of the abortion debate before row in nineteen seventythree was state by state war going on to determine whether abortion would be legal in specific states heated debate on abortion is taking place throughout the country you can hear it in churches women's clubs on college campuses and state legislatures both sides press their propaganda war with rallies and marches slogans and posters for example new york state had pretty much no worship restrictions before row other states like texas pretty much didn't allow any abortions at all and many states were somewhere in between so there was an ongoing fight on state by state basis between antiabortion forces in worship rates forces to figure out what the law was gonna look like one lawmaker brought a fetus bottle to the new york debate right here in the jar fact decision is personal not only for the people of the state of new york but for each and every member of this legislature no priests were politician no doctor or any hospital administrator no government official or husband who should have the right to force any woman to have a child against her will so when row came down it was part of our ready really bitter fight the supreme court has been asked to rule specifically whether the laws restricting abortion in texas and georgia are violation of the right to privacy and a denial of individual rights guaranteed by the constitution if the supreme court decides the texas and georgia laws on abortion are unconstitutional that would open the way to legalized abortion throughout the country number eighteen role against to wait who's row who's who's wade i want you to meet jane roe of the fame case roe versus wade she is norma mccorvey norma mccorvey was a woman who a wanted tender pregnancy in wasn't allowed to because of the law that texas had on the books at the time normal corby at the time was twenty one i found myself pregnant for the third time i fan out where an illegal abortion clinic was in dallas i went to it it had been closed about a week before i'd gotten there your baby was brought to terminate opted right yes there it was viewed never had an abortion now i never have and they then took you as their symbolic case to go to the court yes her but i didn't attend any of the court hearings are testify or anything like that just knew you didn't want a baby yes and she subsequently in kind of famously became a pretty prominent simple for the antiabortion movement i've td people out of money i've saw drugs i was abusive alcoholic for many many years but i think the far greater said that i did was to be the plaintiff wrote versus white okay so rosen alias for norma mccorvey who's this young woman who wanted to enter pregnancy in dallas who was wade wade was the district attorney of dallas at the time that roe v wade was litigated and norma mccorvey and other the other plaintiffs in row were arguing that texas law was unconstitutional and filed suit against the state of texas and henry wade was the the named defendant in a landmark ruling the supreme court today legalized abortions the majority in cases from texas and georgia said that the decision to end the pregnancy during the first three months alongs to the woman and our dr not the government thus the antiabortion laws of fortysix states for rendered unconstitutional birkbeck alarm or infamously bay and second that it violated a woman's right to continue or terminate pregnancy who delivered the decision in roe v wade the justice who delivered the decision was harry blackmun who was a republican nominee interestingly and he spent a lot of time at the mayo clinic in minnesota thinking a lot about abortion as a medical procedure and doctors thoughts about abortion and a lot of that research in thinking was evident in the final opinion in roe the more recent abortion decisions out of the supreme court of in pretty close calls was row the.

roe three months
"roe" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"roe" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"So that means yes should be a justice who overturns roe v wade we should have a strict constitutionalist on the bench someone who recognizes the individual rights in this country someone who also recognizes that our founders intended that you defend life liberty and the pursuit of happiness i'm honored to have the support of the florida family action council in the governor's race in here appear in florida because they know that as governor i will always pursue a pro life agenda here in florida as florida's next governor okay congressman disad this same question to you considering the supreme court nominee that will be up here your your question would it be someone to overturn roe v wade so i'm proud to have the endorsement of president donald trump in this race donald trump has done a better job appointing judges to both the us supreme court and the appeals court than any other president in my lifetime including one of my heroes ronald reagan so god bless donald trump for doing that and i think the opportunity to replace justice kennedy is really a historic opportunity it should be a constitutionalists in the mold of justice antonin scalia or clarence thomas who understands the proper role the court is to apply the law and constitution has it's actually written not to legislate from the bench not to impose a judge's philosophy on the rest of the country say there's an analog here in florida the next governor in all likelihood is going to have three appointments to our state supreme court which is a historically liberal court they're activists they legislate from the bench i can tell you this i am best position to identify those candidates for nomination to the state supreme court who are going to apply the law faithfully and will not be judicial activists if we get it right we can end judicial activism in florida for a generation sanchez today president trump announced that he will meet with russian president vladimir putin for a summit on july sixteenth in helsinki finland is that a tweet this morning saying quote russia continues to say they had nothing to do with meddling in our election but lice president pence secretary pompeo vice president trump's own intelligence agencies have stated that interference did in fact take place so who is right so here here's the thing there's a difference between what russia may have done i think they're always up to no good and i think that they tried to do cyber stuff in our election but that's much different than saying that there was collusion between trump's campaign and russia there was no collusion and i've been on the front lines not only demonstrating that in the congress but uncovering the antitrump bias that really permeated the fbi during critical junctures of this thing you got the guy that opened up the collusion investigation peter struck he opens up the investigation a week later he said no trump won't be president will stop them and then a week later he texted his lover and said we needed insurance policy in case this guy wins so i've been one of the few who route there from the very beginning when komi was fired i was right there saying that was the right thing to do when muller was appointed i said there was no basis in fact i was on your show hours after muller was appointed i didn't have my finger in the wind i wasn't waiting for what the polls are the media said i knew it was wrong and i stood for what i believe was right.

roe