20 Burst results for "Rodney Scott"

"rodney scott" Discussed on The BBQ Central Show

The BBQ Central Show

03:37 min | 5 months ago

"rodney scott" Discussed on The BBQ Central Show

"Rip that sandow from you at your worst day ever mcdonald's rip the big rig again. See you next year but who knows. It might not be rolled out nationally next year. Don't lump me into your sicko food. Perversions you kooks you want deal with nick rib you deal with. Make rib all you want. I'm going to pass. i'm just again very happy for the fact that it gets rolled out nationally. So you guys don't have to pile in your cars and trucks and u-haul vans because i'm sure there are just super groups across facebook right now that you have to answer twenty different administrator questions to get in because you know there's folks like me they're be trying to get in there potshot you. But you're figuring out secret places to meet downloading the app and then driving hours on end head seem to think that that was an okay. I think he called it a pork burger which hey all right with as i told him last week marketed as a pork. Not a rib sandwich. It's a pork burger pressed into a weird shape with crap sauce and onions delivers. That's what you like. get on it. Send me an instagram live. I will play it on this show for every one of you weirdos that eats those amac ribs take your videos. Send them to me. I will play them. Live on the show on tuesday night. Believe it or not. i'll do that. You know the lead question to rodney scott in about three minutes from now is do you get down with the mic rip. You know that's coming. He's in the green room by the way so stand by for that. Let me talk you quickly about the barbecue guru always believing that outdoor cooking should be easy and fun because it can be longest running sponsor of the show the barbecue guru remember earlier in the year. Two new controllers to choose from the nanno q. And the dinah q. the dinah q. of course is taking place of the old Party cue which was the easiest point of entry into automatic temperature control devices the nanno q. Is the one that has the highest level of tech available right now so depending on what you're looking for you want to consider the dinah cue or the non accu- if you are looking for a ceramic cooker they also partner up with the folks that make the monolith that has a built in power fan already in it so if you have a goo- controller just hooked the controller up to the power draft fan and away you go also bunch of other accessories over there on the website so make sure you hit them up. Check mall out. Bbq guru dot com. If you have any questions about what kind of fan you should buy or what kind of control you need or other accessories that might make your grilling life a little bit more efficient column eight hundred two eight g you are you. That's eight hundred two eight eight guru and they will make sure your outfitted with exactly what you need to be efficient right of the box. Eight hundred two eight guru or bbq guru dot com. We are back with rodney scott. Stick around. we'll be right back. You're listening to the number one most loaded barbecue grilling podcast anywhere. The.

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"rodney scott" Discussed on The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

02:55 min | 9 months ago

"rodney scott" Discussed on The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

"Community. So this year discovers giving five million dollars to support black owned restaurants to places like Rodney Scott Boras, Charleston post office pies in Birmingham back in the day bakery in Savannah and hundreds more places.

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"rodney scott" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:10 min | 9 months ago

"rodney scott" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Rodney Scott's barbecue post office pies and hundreds more. Learn how you can show your support at discovered dotcom, My king for W. B. C's traffic on the three. We've had some showers around. We've got some clouds and peaks of sun. We've seen a shower. Just a short time ago has been passing through the Newburyport Salisbury area so we could get in on some wet weather as we had, especially into the evening where there could be a drenching shower or thunderstorm in afew inland spots. Mainly cloudy after that, and human overnight tonight with temperatures in the low seventy's tomorrow, very warm human son at times, but some strong thunderstorms could pop up across the region afternoon and evening with some gusty winds and downpours. Temperatures tomorrow in the mid to upper eighties sun and clouds on Friday, still a bit sticky temperatures near 80 a little less human come Saturday. With plenty of sun in the high in the low to mid eighties. Right now it is 75 degrees in Boston. There's a new ad that teases a sit down conversation between Joe Biden and former president Barack Obama. The two recently got together in Mass for a socially distance discussion of covert 19 pandemic. What the country needs to do to move forward and President Trump. He just can't can't relate in anyone. Well One of the things that I have always known about your Joe. It's the reason why I wanted to be my vice president and the reason why you were so effective and it all starts with being able to related part of the conversation also involve disbelief and Trump's handling of the pandemic, its first time in the former vice presidents presidential campaign that images of the two men appearing together have been released. The talk will be streamed in full on Thursday. Michael Kastner, NBC News radio Woman for Trump Event, Finding a new venue for an event in Maine after a brewery said that they tried to pull a fast one Stars and Stripes brewing Company in Freeport will be closed all day. Today, they said it was all over an event they thought would politicize there Brewery without their permission. President Trump's daughter in law Lara Trump and former Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi are in northern New England this week holding women for Trump events. They played one at Stars and Stripes. However, the brewery said They never gave it their blessing. As a result, they're closing all day today and they spoke about it on Facebook. The Trump camp says they're now holding the event at a different venue. Jim.

President Trump vice president Joe Biden Rodney Scott Newburyport Salisbury president Barack Obama Facebook W. B. C Boston Pam Bondi Stripes brewing Company Jim Freeport Michael Kastner Maine NBC News New England Attorney
Journalists of Color

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

37:15 min | 9 months ago

Journalists of Color

"Before the interviews I wanNA share my theory. For why all of this exploded for journalists of Color Right now? It goes back a few years. So many of us went from covering the first black president to covering Donald Trump. And ever, since trump came down that escalator, announcing his campaign back in Twenty fifteen, when he denounced Mexicans as drug traffickers rapist. When he was that he would build a wall at the border and that Mexico will pay for it. Those journalists were told to avoid using words like racist or lie to describe some of trump's worse behavior. That kind of self censorship, especially on race for a lot of us, it became untenable after we had to cover the death of George Floyd and report on that video of a black man, being choked to death for eight minutes. On top of that we are now dealing with the coronavirus pandemic, which is laying bare racial inequities across this country. And Corinthian has given a lot of us time to sit and think. Notice what's going on in the world and in our lives and in our newsrooms? You have black journalists and other journalists of color who think of themselves as truth seekers in the same way that their white colleagues, too, but very often when they tell the truth about racism when they tell the truth about. Bright, white supremacy. They're labeled as activist. Highs! They dared to bring their blackness across the newsroom threshold. PSORIATIC McDonald's has been thinking a lot about race and the news. So I asked her as a black journalist in this moment. What does she want to see change so I would say what I want is actual structural change within newsroom leadership? I do not want the equivalent of painting black lives matter on a street in yellow letters, but in a newsroom. It's visible. By that doesn't really solve anything when it comes to pay discrepancies between. White male journalists and black female journalist who do the same job have the same level of experience and one is making thirty thousand dollars a year more than the other. The other thing is that. You cannot have. Newsroom leadership that is completely made up of six Cheddar straight white men. Even. Under straight white women. Zicklin or gender straight Whiteman that power needs to be distributed more equitably. You know the other thing died. I want to see I wanNA see US cover. Race honestly. right? Race isn't just something that black people, experience or something that non white experience, attempting that everyone experience and says and so. There needs to be a baseline of literacy rate when it comes to how we talk about race with an America how it operates within American history, and how that informs. President and what world. News media has played in that way. We have to consider that. The last time that we had a pandemic, the nineteen eighteen flu pandemic. We need to recognize that. The paper of record in Chicago the Chicago Tribune. Is Basically scapegoating black people who are fleeing the American south, basically saying Oh half a million darkies are basically invading Chicago. If that's objectivity as not the kind of objectivity that I want to participate in them. Yeah, yeah, I WANNA get personal a little bit You ended up being quoted in New York Times. Article about this reckoning talking about how you didn't have a great time at the Washington Post. You've tweeted about your experience as a black woman in newsrooms. What does this reckoning meant for you? And what have you been trying to get off your chest and this moment about your experience? In some of the newsroom's that we've been talking about my hope for this reckoning. is that. There is not one more class of you know young. Ernest! Twenty two year old coming out of journalism school I'm who basically have to go through this really damaging gauntlet. We're constantly sort of questioning yourself and your own worth and I think there are a lot of really talented journalists who have been driven from the field. Because at some point, they feel like they have to make a choice between their own mental health. Or being journalist. And they just self-preservation and I cannot blame them. and that is really a shame, because think about the people that those journalists now think about the stories that they could have told. The access they could have had picked the access to walk into certain spaces at their white colleagues cannot exactly and you know one of the ways, and this is not the only way that this is important, but one of the ways that this is important is. We need them to trust us. Our job is to tell their stories and to tell them accurately and to tell them fairly. And if people are are always getting pushed out the folks who might actually be able to empathize with them who know where they're coming from right I? There's a quote from their lake when I fall where she basically expresses the you know, she's probably the only person who covered public housing who's actually lived in public housing? That, yeah, that is. Expertise right that is. Valuable knowledge so I just I want us to be able to practice our profession with humanity. Yeah, and also it's like in this moment where it seems like more than ever before. At least in my lifetime, there is such a deficit of trust. Americans don't trust institutions. They don't trust journalism. They don't trust facts. Worst argument about whether or not mask can prevent the spread of Corona virus like in this environment if newsrooms don't act in fix some of this stuff. is going to create more mistrust in the media and these news outlets will become less relevant in a moment in which I would argue. They are needed more than ever before. Yes, and you know the thing is is and I've said this repeatedly at that American journalism does have a credibility crisis. The the credibility crisis that we have I think. Actually bears a lot of similarities to. Our current sort of Voter disenfranchisement problem. Being. In Journalism, we have not spent enough time. with the very same folks who are often disenfranchised when it comes to media coverage as well right. And when we think about the press and freedom of the press is an instrument of democracy we have to think about. enfranchising everyone, we have to think about making sure that they do find us credible. The folks. If they look at the newspaper, even look at a website or they listen to the radio and their conclusion is. That these entities are not telling the truth about them in their lives and held their lives are. For them yeah for them. That's a credibility issue for us. Yeah we can fix. It failed them. That means that. We have to develop far better relationships with folks who have historically been shunned or shut out of district of media coverage are only allowed to participate in very limited ways. You know I still very much believe in that adage, the journalism exist to comfort the afflicted and afflict comfortable. Thanks again to riot, not at McDonald's the culture writer for the undefeated and also this year. She was nominated a pilot sir. My mind. I wanted to hear from other journalists of color about their newsroom experiences. And they wrote in. Here if you, my name is Lavi Cima Guy side. I'm a naturalized citizen who came to this country as a young child. I worked at a bare he a newspaper for a long time and have fond memories of my time there. I had mostly white editors, and in fact, I've only had one non white supervisor in my over two decades in journalism. My name is John. Sepulvado, I mixed. I have Mexican Irish indigenous and Black Ancestry I worked in public media for fifteen years. There are tons of horror stories. There was the white woman editor who asked me if I like dog-fighting because she quote hurt. Might People like dogfighting? There was another white woman editor told me to smile more around the office because I quote have dark features and those dark features, scared herself and other white women around the office. One time a headline I, wrote for one of my own stories, led to a newsroom wide, meeting an emotional one, where a bunch of US had to persuade top editors to let us call the president's racism what it is! The most frustrating part was that I and others had to explain to our colleagues. Why our voices were important. And partly because they reflected the communities we covered. argued. Repeat, a thousand more stories like that. But at. A point I realized. That no matter what I did no matter how good I was no matter how hard I worked. I would always be seen. As something that is not. White. And my mobile was the leave the industry. All right time for a break. When we come back, we will hear from Latina, trailblazer who refused to leave the news business. Instead. She started her own media company to tell the stories that she wanted to tell. Hey another reminder asking you all to fill out that survey for us. Okay, it is anonymous. It is short and the link for it is NPR DOT org slash I B. A. M. Survey. All one word I BAM SURVEY NPR DOT Org. Slash IBM. Filled out I'll be really happy if he do thanks. This message comes from NPR sponsor discover. Sometimes, food is more than just food. It's an integral part of the community so this year discoveries, giving five million dollars to support black owned restaurants to places like Rodney Scott Barbecue in Charleston post office spies Birmingham back in the day bakery, and Savannah and hundreds more places in your local community all across the country. Learn how you can show your support at discover dot com. Whenever you face a choice. It helps to think like an economist and this week on Planet Lenny Summer. School will start off our course in economics within workout for your brain how to decide what something newly costs for? Planet money from, NPR. People still find it really interesting salmon like I'm like no. No I. I was the first Latina in the newsroom at NPR ever to step foot. WHO WASN'T CLEANING IT? That was me right that that was that. Was this Latina? That is Maria. She's had a long career in media, not just here NPR but also at CNN NPS in two thousand ten. She founded her own company for total media. And she has a memoir. It's called once. I was you that comes out in September, but most of you probably know Maria. As the host of a very long running public radio show turned podcast from NPR and through media. It's like new USA mighty. Hossack Latino USA has been around since the early nineties. It is attributed by NPR. which is why you hear NPR in the credits, but that will be changing USA is moving. As distributor. It means nothing's GonNa Change for you. Our listener that our audience is going to get way way way bigger. We're very excited. Announcement might have been confusing for listeners, but don't worry like. She said you'll still be able to hear the show. But the Journal of Color, especially in public radio that move meant that NPR was losing a hugely influential show dedicated to covering Latino stories in the US. And from its founding NPR has been well bad on race. More than seventy percent of NPR's newsroom is white and of the sources you here on NPR's air, those voices they are more than eighty percent white. People of Color who work in public media? We have been saying for years. Fix this including Maria Hosa. We're asking the question. Are you listening? Are you hearing? And that his own ready a power dynamic that is wrong. This notion is the assumption that they the they will always have the power I. Ask Maria what Latino USA leaving NPR means for this network, but I I asked her about blazing trails. One could see your path to be one of color who found her own company as a shining success, but one could also see your path as proving that the conventional spaces in media can accommodate of voice like you the way they should you know like. I'm so proud of what you're doing, but also the fact that you have to make your own production company shows at the NPR's and the PBS's and the CNN in many ways. Don't get it and can't help people like you tell the stories that you need to tell. I was thinking about that as I was thinking about our interview Sam because. My husband calls me Aguirre, a warrior, and then as I was thinking about our conversation, Sam. I was like well. That's great i. like that, but you know what I don't want. Journalists of color to have to be warriors at into order to be able to work as To work as journalists of Contians, who can bring their entire cells into the news room? Who are going to be seen who are going to not only be seen and heard but actually. Put into positions of power to be the ones who are listening and making the decisions about. Yeah, we want that story on the front page and the headline is going to say that exactly. I want you you know everyone has been using it. Everyone's been going to twitter sharing their reckoning story, the slight the knocked in that promotion. The being told you can't do this do that. Give me one of your reckoning stories from your career when I when I come to this country, I'm born in Mexico. My whole family's born in Mexico. We're raised on south side of Chicago. You know sixties and seventies, but as Mexican immigrants we also understood the essential nature of journalism and American independent journalism and so. My father was watching. Meet the press every Sunday and we were watching the today show and we watched sixty minutes, and because of the fact that it was so American in holding people accountable and I was like that's what journalism is so long. Story Short is many years later actually a decade ago go to sixty minutes when I'm out of work and needed a job actually and. They basically like look, can you Can you come back and talk to us? When one of the old white guys get secret is really and I, said and I just remember like. Like am I supposed to laugh? It's funny. Is that a joke as being? and. As we do in the media's people of Color, 'cause we're really good at laughing things off. Like. Yeah. Banter you know the the the the the we're so smart. On. Exactly Racism! Exactly. And I got into the subway at fifty ninth street onto my apartment in Harlem and I cried on the train. and. I was just like, but I am not. You know I'm knocking to let this take me down. And that was the moment that I decided to create food. Media Winds Rams history. Takes over Latino, USA. And Expands Latino USA grows the show and let the USA's audience twenty seven years in. Is in a continual upward trajectory. You love to see it. As I. Want to ask more about what needs to happen. We are in this moment now. Where so many journalists coming forward with their stories? But it's still unclear what newsroom leaders will actually do to fix this stuff you have been on all sides of media for profit nonprofit. Give me like a checklist of the big three or four things that mass media should do right now to effectively respond to the issues raised in this reckoning. Feel like this is a moment to be having that difficult conversation, which is pushing this reckoning that we're talking about to another level. I'm going. Give you an example, Sam it brings me joy, it brings me no joy to have to ask white men in senior editorial positions how they consider my role as a Mexican immigrant woman journalist. In relation to a president who insults every single one of those things that I do? And and And basis a lot of that on his white supremacy. Which is very challenging word to even use in our newsrooms right, but yeah. I don't feel comfortable saying it. I want you to feel uncomfortable having to answer that question. Because his white supremacy does not impact you in the way, it impacts me, and I am a journalist just like you. I am an equal journalist just like you so now. You helped me to figure out. Harmon handle that because that that impacts our might quote unquote objectively, you have to be able to recognize that you do not have an ownership of activity or an ownership of the media or an ownership of public media, or it's not yours to share yeah. Did any of the issues we've discussed about. In diversity and Unfair situations that journals of have to deal within this industry. Did those factor into your business decision. To leave NPR ex. Look I've had you know NPR's my family? IF NPR calls I'm going to say when you I was absolutely and Bureau Sam he's my family. You know we hung out once, but he's. He's my brother. Because we're digesting PR so NPR's my family Mi. Familia was my first job. But You know I started a company. And I have a team of very savvy business and media executives journalists. And when they said look, we have an opportunity here in in a competitive marketplace A. Somebody PR X.. Who wants to really go big? Yeah, I will say you know they are all of these. Underground email channels and slack channels and discussion boards were journalists of color are coming together to talk about all these issues and there's been a lot of chatter about your show. What says about NPR yeah? Why am I so disconnected? Oh my God. I thought I. Thought I was like connected because I'm on twitter and I got a fat. And what folks have been saying? People who love your show Oh my goodness. They're saying well. This speaks to the larger problems. NPR has always had with content may for people of Color. They don't market it enough. They don't support it enough. You have these program. Directors at various stations put a show like yours on at not great hours. This is the stuff that people are saying. Do you I mean like to the extent that you can elaborate on it, you know. Did you feel like NPR? Neglected or didn't promote enough your type of show. So of these issues at play with the race and diversity in space like NPR. Again. Let New USA right now is growing an audience at kind of extraordinary numbers I think we're one of the few public radio programs or previously distributed by NPR. That is growing an audience at these numbers. And so the fact that. We made this decision. Says everything about. WHAT NPR. Kind of thinks. About letting USA. Now having said that I don't know you know I. Don't know the internal finances at NPR. Maybe NPR's is is really facing a a real financial challenges that I'm not privy to. And so you know, but but when you're thinking about AH, show, that has this kind of. Audience Commitment There was a point not long ago. When one of your colleagues called me up, actually she works in. She's a Latina colleague at NPR in the newsroom, and she called me up and she said. Do you think that Latino USA has been this incredibly successful because of NPR or despite NPR. And no one had asked me that and I kind of like. ooh And I said well actually despite. Despite NPR, do you think you know 'cause? There are a lot of shows not produced by NPR. Distributed by NPR. Do, you think other shows like that in your same boat that were hosted by white people or felt to maybe India leadership more mainstream. Do you think they got more support than your show did pound for pound? Yeah How does that make you feel? Like I said, that's why. I didn't. See I've been feeling this for a long time, my love. News, so Gimme a word for the emotion. Well right now I'm glad that I'm with a partnership with Pr X.. That's not gonNA units not on the table so I'm like I'm looking to the future. That's why I'm like yeah I'm all about like? It's all about the dodge this morning, boxing teacher. was making us do the we've the. We've the constant, which by the way is really really hard, and that's just how I feel is a journalist of color in a survivor Mexican immigrant woman in this like it's always like whoo. Okay well and so. That stuff that you're saying like. How does it make me? That's rolled off me a long time ago, and it is a central part of what has moved me as a journalist as a woman of color in this country is that. Is like. Oh, you're going to try to silence me or tell me that I'm not objective or tell me that I have an agenda or tell me that is not going to be successful or tell me. Okay I might go home and cry. But I'm not GONNA give up. Thanks, again to Maria Hinojosa. She's the host of the Tino USA. We asked NPR for a response to what Maria told us and they gave us this statement. We have the highest respect and admiration for the Latino USA team and from Maria Hinojosa. We are proud. That Latino USA originated at NPR member station, K. U. T., and that since nineteen, ninety-four NPR has been the program's national distribution partner today, hundreds of NPR member stations bring the show to their listening communities. We are grateful. Maria entertain who are produced a consistently wonderful show and nurtured journalist who have gone on to work all over the public radio system. We are glad public radio listeners will continue to hear Latino. USA on their public radio stations across the nation. All right now. We're going to have a chat with someone who just began working with NPR Kelly. McBride NPR's newest public editor. I WanNa talk with her. About one particular part of this entire debate, the way in which we've been taught as journalists to do our jobs that most fundamental level leads to systemically racist outcomes. I am talking specifically about the idea of journalistic objectivity. This idea that reporters only report the facts. They keep themselves out of the story, and they eliminate all biased in their coverage. A lot of folks say well. That only works if you're man and straight. And White. I wanted to find out. Why are journalism so entrenched in objectivity and whether or not this standard is fair, so I went to one of the top journalism at experts in the country I am the senior vice president at the POYNTER institute. I am the chair of the Craig Newmark Center Ethics in leadership at the Poynter Institute and I am also the public editor for NPR that Kelly McBride. Kelly has advised newsrooms about difficult journalism ethics problems for years, so it made. Made, sense to begin by asking Kelly for her definition of objectivity in journalism, it really means that you will objectively pursue the facts in order to determine the truth, and there's all sorts of things that go into that right like there's how you frame the story how you identify who you're going to interview, and then really important is who else is involved in the story. So who edits it because that the the safety nets that are created in newsrooms are meant. To help an individual program against her own bias now the problem is if all the safety nets have the same biases that that doesn't happen right and that's. That's exactly what's been happier. Also objectivity has come to mean certain different things for different journalists. There are some. Who say well objectivity means that you have to. Pretend! That kind of you don't exist, and you have to just simply say what these powerful people are saying doing. You don't provide context you don't provide analysis. It's a kind of. Totally taking yourself all the way out of it to the point where you won't even tell people if you vote or not. And I think. This is the thing for me like there's so many different interpretations of what objectivity means, yet you know that's actually kind of a confederation of two different principals in journalism, so one is the principle of objectivity in this idea that that we are pursuing the truth in spite of our own biases, and that that we actually promised, swear to God that we're going to get it right because we have all these safeguards in place, even though they've failed numerous times in the past. But the other thing is is that in American journalism in particular? It was built on this business principle of aggregating A. Politically diverse audience, and then selling that audience to advertisers, so in in Europe you see much more you see much more of the journalism coming through a political lens because that's just how the business model grew up over there, but over here especially as in different markets, you went from multiple newspapers to a single newspaper. There was this motive that was really a business motive that you would bring in the entire political spectrum and if you were going to do that, you needed to convince that audience that you in the newsroom didn't have. Any particular biases it is refreshing to hear you as a leader in the industry acknowledged that some of this is about the principles and bedrocks of our journalism, and some of it's about business, and at the end of the day for whatever reason we have ended up with a definition of objectivity. That is as much about business as it is about telling the truth and I think what frustrates so many journalists, somebody younger journalists, journalists of color or women require journalists as at newsroom leaders are resistant to acknowledge that I read NPR's social media policy, and it's couched in terms of ethics and morality and idealism. But I also know that part of it is the bottom line is. Not Do anything of the public facing person at NPR. That would possibly damage NPR's revenue streams. And I mad. They don't just say that. Yeah? They don't mean to say that they. Don't I mean that's the thing is they? Don't. They really do believe, and I actually believe also that there is. That there is a line somewhere that we shouldn't cross, and maybe it is way up the continuum on just. If you're a political reporter. You can't help people who you're voting for. Maybe the line is all the way over there. Right, because of imagine that like if you were a political reporter in you were covering. Trump's campaign and you again. I'm voting for Biden though I was that guy. Did you tell people out loud. I didn't tell folks voting for in two thousand sixteen, and I wouldn't but I think gets. Those are the ones where I think everyone can agree, but there's there's there's other things like how much of me do I. Bring to a story when I'm covering police violence against black men. Am I allowed to say that's racist. Because I know what racism is experienced, it trust me and don't make me say racially tinged. Like those, and that's where it gets murkier well. You know you know where I. I experienced this. Yeah, so when gay marriage was was a hot hot issue, right? They were different cities or states that were making gay marriage legal. The Supreme Court hadn't yet decided in San Francisco the mayor of San Francisco. made it legal and a reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle on a Saturday after weeks of covering it, the City Hall reporter went down and got a marriage license, and she was taken off the beat. Wow, and as in as an ethicist, right is a journalism ethicist. I was like wait a second. That can't be right. because. She was exercising in San Francisco. What was a legal right? You don't mean you didn't tell people who'd been divorced. They couldn't cover this issue because they'd you know somehow. Defiled the sanctity of marriage by? Getting divorced. So that was, that was where realized that you cannot penalize people for who they are. That's not fair. Yeah, because you end up with the only people that are untainted enough to do all the work are people who are only straight are people who are only men are people who have only gone to college and has a certain pedigree people who are an the deaths a problem, so bias is to right. It's just that we don't well. That's the thing, but these leaders aren't seeing those. Yeah, because they look just like them. I think now what is required to speak to the Syria. Systemic issues being raised in this reckoning. Going to have to be an acknowledgement that the movement toward writing these wrongs. It's going to be in some ways painful and you should do it anyway. From your conversations with newsroom leaders across the country. Do you think they're ready to accept that idea that this might hurt that? It might not just be. A statement and everyone shakes hands, and says sure good now now I mean nobody wants to voluntarily sign up for something painful. You do it because you know that what comes on the other side is worth head. There's individuals in every single newsroom who are part of the problem. Then somebody has to tell those people that if they want to keep their jobs, they have to stop being part of the problem, and that means that they're either going to have to be quiet. Or they're going to have to change or leave. Just leave well. That's I mean if they want to keep their job right like. Yeah and I've seen people. Who are these problem, people? I don't think I've ever seen any of them. Actually chain, but I've seen some of them. Learn to be quiet and let other people lead. And then they actually become the beneficiary. Of what comes after yeah. And then I. Think also so many lessons of me too I. Think are applicable to this meteoroid. Me To kind of work. Because a lot of folks were just literally canceled and they had to go, they were shamed. They were fired. And you said you can't be here anymore. And it was painful for them, and probably all the folks that liked them in love them but like. Sometimes, it's just that yeah. So my last question for you back to these two ideals that butt heads this idea of objectivity. But also this business idea of needing to be somewhat neutral to appeal to a large audience. And reworking probably reassessing, what objectively means a newsroom? What advice would you give to newsroom leaders? Writing up that next ethics guideline for their journalist about quote, Unquote Objectivity Post reckoning. Yeah, so this is where I'm supposed to come through with something really profound and I mean I. I am I. Am humble enough to say. That I don't have the answer yet. But I'm also arrogant enough to say that I believe after working through lots of really really hard ethics problems with newsrooms that I think we are going to find the answer and I think it's going to start by. Recognizing that there is a difference between. Revealing political bias. and. Revealing lived experience. And we need to start there and say your lived. Experience should not count as political bias. Thanks again to Kelly McBride joining us and thanks to everyone who, over the last week or so shared very very personal stories about life as a person of color in the newsroom. I heard from colleagues as well. And one thing one of those colleagues told me about all of this. She said so much of this work is convincing journalist. who think they've been doing it right for so long that maybe in some ways they've been doing it wrong. And then she said to me. This phrase really stuck with me, she said. How do you argue with the fish about the water there's. I. Don't know just yet how to do that. It's pretty difficult. It seems frustrating,

NPR United States President Trump Maria Chicago Donald Trump Mexico Mcbride Npr George Floyd Washington Post New York Times Kelly Mcbride FLU Bureau Sam Chicago Tribune Scapegoating Mcdonald
"rodney scott" Discussed on Your Presidential Playlist

Your Presidential Playlist

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"rodney scott" Discussed on Your Presidential Playlist

"That is a huge deal with the Democratic Party and south, Carolina. So anytime candidate takes the time to attend those events. Let's everyone know that you're really interested in South Carolina Interested in South Carolina voters and you're GONNA do whatever it takes to get South Carolina voters as well. Now let's talk about the barbecue aspect. So when you come this way you have to eat department Q. The low country I think they're more vinegar base. I think the upstate where I'm from is more mustard yellow base. Then I think in the middle is more like ketchup and vinegar base, but you have to come and try all of it and then a lot of people go to Rodney Scott Barbecue. So there's one in Hemingway South Carolina, and then there's one in Charleston so. Tom's dyer what he did for the arts kind of Cook off was he brought the entire Rodney Scott restaurant from Charleston to the kickoff. So he's out there serving whole mills of Barbecue. So those are just two well known staples in two well-known Barbecue joints that people know national because Rodney Scott. Says actually rank nationally with their barbecue. So you have to come to South Carolina and try those to barbecue places. I feel like if a candidate is thinking about trying to set up like the perfect photo opportunity barbecues like a worse case scenario you thanks well, if you see. You. Need to take the picture before they start eating at least what the four going into the mouth. Breath thank you so much for joining us. It's been a really really great conversation. Thank you. It's been my pleasure in Coal Co.. New York. But I am so grateful that you call me to be here today. So thank you so much. This concludes the final episode of season, two of your primary playlist I. Hope you found this helpful guide to the INS and out of the early states that plays such a large role in selecting our nominee..

Hemingway South Carolina Rodney Scott Barbecue South Carolina Rodney Scott Charleston Cook Democratic Party Tom Coal Co New York
"rodney scott" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"rodney scott" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Dot org. John welcome back to the show. It's great to have you. Thank you. So first of all let me ask you you just yesterday were embedded with border patrol agents. Tell us a little bit about what you saw. And what they were telling you about how they see this crisis. If if they even do see a crisis at the border. Yeah. It's every sector of the southwest border is a little bit different magnetic. And so the situation over here is rather different from what we're seeing for instance, in New Mexico where you have these large groups of migrants, lots of children traveling without parents and families crossing and some of them very ill and growing even sicker in in these Spartan border patrol facilities. That's over you know, west of El Paso out here in San Diego. I spent seven hours with a couple of agents yesterday, and we drove literally from one end of the sector to the other. It's about sixty miles long. And it's so interesting because really I I kind of felt like the ride along that I had was playing off of the president's emphasis in his national address from the Oval Office on the need for a border wall. What you have out here is. A sort of a show Intel of what a wall accomplishes. We we can remember those iconic image is back in the eighties of mainly Mexican immigrants who were all sort of trotting across the hills. You know, just off imperial beach headed toward San Diego and ages could do very little to stop on. We'll since then they have these really formidable walls that they are you see them under construction. He's eighteen foot tall a steel bollards filled with concrete and rebar with these anti climb sheets at the top and varied six feet in the ground. And so they wanted to show that here these walls work, and they really do divert illegal Crushers into other areas, but in terms of humanitarian crisis, which is what you asked me right across the border in Tijuana, which is Mexico's sixth largest city, you have still around two thousand migrants from the Central American caravan who've now been there a going on two months and. Conditions are not good there rather squalid in some of the ref refugees some of the shelters that I visited and so they continue to wait their turn in line trickle into the United States and to cross illegally. Okay. So I definitely want to hear more from what you saw in Tijuana. But but let's play a little bit of tape from from chief patrol agent. Rodney Scott who you spoke with when you were embedded with border patrol. And he told you I he thinks the agency needs more fencing when it's expensive and that agents already have operational control. He said to you if I understand this correctly between Tijuana and San Diego. So here's chief patrol agent. Rodney Scott customs, and bore protection has had this systematic plan that we've been acting on for years building out infrastructure where we believe we need it. And all of a sudden, it got unbelievably political overnight as opposed to what we're saying that we need so John tell us more about what Rodney Scott was telling you about that. He feels. It's got an unbelievable political. Right..

Rodney Scott Tijuana San Diego John New Mexico El Paso president Oval Office United States Mexico eighteen foot seven hours two months six feet
"rodney scott" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"rodney scott" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Dot org. John welcome back to the show. It's great to have you. Thank you. So first of all let me ask you you just yesterday were embedded with border patrol agents. Tell us a little bit about what you saw. And what they were telling you about how they see this crisis. If if they even do see a crisis at the border. Yeah. It's every sector of the southwest border is a little bit different magnetic. And so the situation over here is rather different from what we're seeing for instance, in New Mexico where you have these large groups of migrants, lots of children traveling without parents and families crossing and some of them very ill and growing even sicker in in these Spartan border patrol facilities. That's over you know, west of El Paso out here in San Diego. I spent seven hours with a couple of agents yesterday, and we drove literally from one end of the sector to the other. It's about sixty miles long. And it's so interesting because really I I kind of felt like the ride along that I had was playing off of the president's emphasis in his national address from the Oval Office on the need for a border wall. What you have out here is. A sort of a show Intel of what a wall accomplishes. We we can remember those iconic image is back in the eighties of mainly Mexican immigrants who were all sort of trotting across the hills. You know, just off imperial beach headed toward San Diego and ages could do very little to stop on. We'll since then they have these really formidable walls that they are you see them under construction. He's eighteen foot tall a steel bollards filled with concrete and rebar with these anti climb sheets at the top and varied six feet in the ground. And so they wanted to show that here these walls work, and they really do divert illegal Crushers into other areas, but in terms of humanitarian crisis, which is what you asked me right across the border in Tijuana, which is Mexico's sixth largest city, you have still around two thousand migrants from the Central American caravan who've now been there a going on two months and. Conditions are not good there rather squalid in some of the ref refugees some of the shelters that I visited and so they continue to wait their turn in line trickle into the United States and to cross illegally. Okay. So I definitely want to hear more from what you saw in Tijuana. But but let's play a little bit of tape from from chief patrol agent. Rodney Scott who you spoke with when you were embedded with border patrol. And he told you I he thinks the agency needs more fencing when it's expensive and that agents already have operational control. He said to you if I understand this correctly between Tijuana and San Diego. So here's chief patrol agent. Rodney Scott customs, and bore protection has had this systematic plan that we've been acting on for years building out infrastructure where we believe we need it. And all of a sudden, it got unbelievably political overnight as opposed to what we're saying that we need so John tell us more about what Rodney Scott was telling you about that. He feels. It's got an unbelievable political. Right..

Rodney Scott Tijuana San Diego John New Mexico El Paso president Oval Office United States Mexico eighteen foot seven hours two months six feet
"rodney scott" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"rodney scott" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Preston. In the midst of the partial government shutdown over border wall money congressional leaders are headed to the White House today. Here's ABC's Linda Lopez Trump has invited speaker designate Nancy Pelosi and Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer to the White House today along with Republican leaders, but White House press secretary Sarah Sanders, saying they're being invited for a border security briefing from senior homeland security official along the southern border officials there say they have to use tear gas against a crowd on New Year's Eve ABC's. Alec stone is in southern California border patrol agents say it was two o'clock in the morning when around one hundred fifty migrants in mass came at them trying to breach the border, and that's on the Tijuana side began collecting rocks and throwing them at agents chief patrol agent. Rodney Scott says gas and pepper spray were needed responded with the least amount of force. They possibly could to protect themselves in the border and did actually secure the border in this area. Twenty five for the migrants, including teenagers were arrested family of an American arrested on spying. Charges and Russia's say, they're worried about his health Paul Whalen was arrested last week is David says, there's no chance at Paul was engaged in espionage. And russia. He says Paul was in Russia for a wedding a two year old is recovering after being hurt. That Florida's zoo she fell into the rhino exhibit ABC. Stephanie Ramos is there the provides zoo in Melbourne Florida says the little girl stumbled and fell through polls during the zoos rhino encounter coming into contact with one of the rhinos zoo calls the exhibit in educational experience. Zoo says the program has been running for nearly a decade without any incidents at least six people have been killed in a train accident in Denmark, police say the train hit something while on a bridge linking to islands. Several people have been hurt officials in Cleveland or taking a look at the drinking fountains at the airport after six people on a flight from Cleveland to Tampa got sick. Some of the drinking fountains have been shut down at least for now..

White House Paul Whalen Russia ABC Zoo Chuck Schumer Linda Lopez Trump Nancy Pelosi Cleveland Florida Sarah Sanders Rodney Scott Alec stone press secretary Stephanie Ramos Tijuana
Mexican American border is calm

Dave Ramsey

00:52 sec | 2 years ago

Mexican American border is calm

"And migrants looking to enter the US, but the number at the border continues to grow Knox's. Jessica Rosenthal is in Sanusi drone reporting live, the deputy Commissioner of customs and border protection came here and called the caravans of Central American migrants unprecedented because of their size and willingness of some to use violence sandiego sector chief Rodney Scott had Sunday's rush by hundreds of migrants felt kind of staged. I watched significant numbers of people come across the fence, but stay right at it. Walk east and west and not walk up to Mark fully uniformed border patrol agents. If they were really trying to claim asylum, which is what you hear in the media that would have been a perfect opportunity. To walk right up to our agents. They did not do that. You defended their use of tear gas Sunday migrants had been throwing rocks at them. Thanks, jessica. This is Fox News. About Brennan

Jessica Rosenthal Deputy Commissioner Of Customs Rodney Scott United States Knox Fox News Brennan Mark
"rodney scott" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"rodney scott" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Courage. Glenn beck. Well, no one was hurt on Sunday by the tyranny of the tear gas from the US border patrol agents against the helpless, Central American babies that were just there. We don't know. But we don't know how they got there. We don't know why they were five and still in diapers. But it happened. They were just innocently trying to break through the border fence. That's all they were trying to do. No injuries were reported. But we have the next best thing we have photos, but right headlines for us. Here's a couple of samples for you. Photograph of children in diapers fleeing tear-gas at border, sparks anger or this. These children are barefoot in diapers. Choking on tear gas. Yes, that's the evil empire. The Israel of the Americas. Dare I say it if we can't catch mothers and children to lock them up in cages. Well, then we just have to do all we can to tear gas them. At least. That's the convenient narrative when you don't care about reporting on the complicated truth of the situation and actually media that complicated. You have an agenda. It was just peace loving migrants. Having a peaceful protest against the meanwhile, bully Sam who dares to enforce his own laws about entering the country. How dare him? So do we target babies with tear gas or was there another under reported reality? Well, here is the chief S patrol agent. Rodney Scott he was there. Here's what he said. I kind of challenge that this was a peaceful protest or the majority of these people were claiming asylum. We that making about forty two arrests only eight of those were females and there were only a few children involved. The vast majority of the people were dealing with adult males similar to what we saw. The first wave of the caravan that came up about a week or so ago, the group immediately started throwing rocks and debris at our agents. Taunting the agents once our agents were assaulted and the numbers started growing we had two or three agents at a time initially facing hundreds of people at a time, they deployed tear gas to protect themselves and to protect the border. Yeah. Doesn't really click with the Trump teargassing baby story. Does it? I mean there are photos. Well, there is a photo. What if I told you this whole border rushing incident was really all that unique. What if I told you that the gas the teargassing? You know, that's not that unique exact exactly five years ago on Sunday November twenty fifth five years ago. There were some migrants that rush the border fence at the same crossing point those migrants. Also threw rocks and bottles at US border agents under Barack Obama those agents also responded by firing pepper spray back at the mob. Wait a minute. And that was for one hundred this was for a thousand. There were no cameras there. No embedded reporters. No, sackcloth and ashes headlines. There are pictures. We have them. Nobody's been interested in seeing them. In fact, nobody still interested in seeing them in the mainstream media. There's no concern about the then President Obama allowing such a barbaric response to innocent asylum seekers. Well, it's just that our priorities have changed since then. I guess I wonder how that happened the photos, and of course, focus on mothers and children in is an attempt by the media to distill a very complex situation into an easy to swallow outrage pill, don't take it because we can tell you the facts the media will not they could, but they will not. So let's look into this just a little deeper, shall we?.

US Glenn beck Rodney Scott President Obama Barack Obama Sam Trump Americas Israel five years twenty fifth
"rodney scott" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"rodney scott" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Horrified. I am. But don't, you know, don't get mad at Trump? Your your anger is misguided here, especially because Barack Obama did the same thing under his administration in twenty thirteen almost to the exact day. Honestly, if you want to sit back and think about it and what parent puts their child in that position. That's the thing that floors me. So much going on here today. Rodney Scott, he's the chief border patrol agent for the San Diego sector where a lot of the action took place over the weekend. He appeared on CNN this morning to discuss the exchange, and it was interesting to hear the contrast between what CNN reports and what somebody who was working frontlines at the border actually had to say. So our one of our primary mission is to make sure that we keep the border safe insecure. I kind of challenge that this was a peaceful protest or the majority of these people were claiming Silom we making about forty two arrests only eight of those were females and there were only a few children involved. The vast majority of the people were dealing with their adult males similar to what we saw the first wave of the caravan of came up about a week or so ago, the group immediately started throwing rocks and debris at our agents. Taunting the agents at once our agents were assaulted, and the numbers started growing, we had you know, two or three agents at a time initially facing hundreds of people at a time. They deployed tear gas to protect themselves and to protect the border now. Wait a minute that didn't sound like peaceful children and innocent women begging for mercy to me that sounded like a bunch of dudes throwing rocks and trying to storm into the country. Do you hear his? I mean, what he said there at the beginning, the CNN presenter or tried to present it as such these were civil marches, these peaceful protests. No, no, they weren't. And he goes I challenge your search in that way. Because it wasn't. I would almost come back with the line. But what would I know? I was there. The only thing missing out of that little exchange with CNN. Let's hear a little bit more from Rodney Scott again, he's the chief border patrol agent. He was front and center when the caravan made its way to the border near San Diego, you mentioned something earlier. Forty two arrests were made. Let's hear ran Rodney Scott talk about that forty to cross the border and were arrested to be completely Frank. There were numerous people that actually made it across the border. We're in the process of building the new border wall here, but we don't have it completed there were some sections that had the dilapidated border wall that was made out of scrap metal the military gave us the the group breached. A couple sections of that actually tore down one small section. Started to rush across and that's another time. Then they started assaulting our agents. We're able.

Rodney Scott CNN Barack Obama San Diego Trump Frank
"rodney scott" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

05:23 min | 2 years ago

"rodney scott" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"You name? Rodney carrington. Rodney Dangerfield Rodney hood, Rodney King. Rodney Scott, anyway, he's the border patrol agent down there talking about. The types of people that were causing that ruckus about a thousand people try to bum rush the border there. Forty two were arrested. He spoke with CNN earlier today. So our one of our primary missions is to make sure that we keep the border safe and secure. I kind of challenge that this was a peaceful protest or the the majority of these people were claiming asylum. We ended up making about forty two arrests only eight of those were females and there were only a few children involved. The vast majority of the people who are dealing with adult males similar to what we saw the first wave of the caravan came up about a week or so ago, the group immediately started throwing rocks and debris at our agents. Taunting the agents at once our agents were assaulted, and the numbers started growing, we had you know, two or three agents at a time initially facing hundreds of people at a time. They deployed tear gas to protect themselves and to protect the border. That was earlier today on CNN Rodney Scott the chief border patrol agent. He was right there front lines lesson. These people weren't offering themselves up they were not requesting asylum. It wasn't a peaceful protest, right? And what did you think was happening illegally cross over the border in not get gassed tear gas is going to happen? I mean. Trump had his way it would have been a lot worse than gas. Right. I mean, quite honestly. And in the big the big takeaway from all this was with the awful photos. There's a couple of women who were out front for whatever reason with their kids and their kids were running away from the tear gas. I I've no idea what they were doing there because he's awful horrible. You know, what's push the women and children to the front because they know two things are going to happen one. You can get the photo op of the gas coming and you win the propaganda battle and number two. They're cowards. Those are the reasons why they shoved the women and children to the front so the border patrol agents have to tend to the women and children. While these maniacs. Running around doing God knows what. So we're at a propaganda situation right now instead of having legit conversation about the best way to stop what's happening at the border and fix it moving it forward, which is what we all should be having. We should be having a bipartisan discussion. On ways to make this better fixing these corrupt countries that are people are trying to get out of right? We should be having these discussions. But instead if you turn on the national news, you're gonna see on CNN and MSNBC all the anti Trump stuff about how women and kids are getting hit with tear gas. And if you turn on FOX, you're going to see how these people were throwing rocks, and they had come into them. You throw a rock, you're gonna tear gas. That's the way that it should be. It's such party lines right now, we're kind of losing sight of the big picture. How do you fix this thing? I'll listen Milana knows how to fix it. Oh, really, Tony danza sitcom daughter. She's got the answers fantastic. Oh, actually, she doesn't have any answers throwing temper tantrums on Twitter, calling president names really offering any solutions. So you mean somebody that works in Hollywood is triggered by Donald Trump. And is not offering any suggestions shocking. Can't believe this Milano tweeted this the President Trump, you teargassed, women and children. Bleep wipe. From eleven say that or not and on thanksgiving weekend new piece of s a whole m effort evil creature person. I mean if spoiled little temper tantrum to throw on Twitter, when she no, you know, but the thing is it's it's like the universe was created in two thousand sixteen nothing happened before two thousand sixteen when Trump took office. President Obama did the exact same thing in two thousand thirteen almost to the day. I think it's the same date that this happened. He border patrol agents used pepper spray to fend off a crowd that was approximately one hundred or two hundred migrants who attempted to bum rush. The exact same port of entry that happened over the weekend. Obama did the same thing in twenty thirteen it was, but it was it was tear gas pepper spray. But the poor women the poor children Nigel what a horrible person who could do such a thing. Brooke Obama, the president of the United States what is concerned about border safety. That's was. I was reading Barack Obama deported more illegal immigrants than any other president in history. United States like three million p p had a nickname Obama had a nickname in Mexico. Deport her in chief. Wow, was the nickname Obama had in Mexico. I mean, it's the same way with the Clintons to their Hillary even 2014 Hillary went on CNN. We've gotta said the clear message just because your child gets across the border that doesn't mean the child gets to stay Bill Clinton. You know was when he was president. There is signed on with legal immigration reform that was back in the mid nineties immigrant Responsibility Act, which was very very tough on immigration, but they didn't tweet being things. And that's.

Brooke Obama president Donald Trump CNN Rodney Scott Rodney carrington Rodney Dangerfield Rodney King Twitter Rodney hood Mexico Bill Clinton United States Tony danza Clintons Hillary Milana
"rodney scott" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

The Andrew Klavan Show

03:13 min | 2 years ago

"rodney scott" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

"Suddenly is at the border in Tijuana is not far away and they charged over and US border patrol agents used tear gas to disperse hundreds of these guys are from Honduras, originally, hundreds of Central American migrants at the Mexican city of Tijuana made a rush for the border fence as tensions build over the diminishing prospects for asylum seekers trying to enter the country, I'm reading from the Wall Street Journal which remembers very pro illegal immigration. They don't care about the rule of law. They just want those cheap workers for their businesses and their yawn. Lawns and stuff. That's why the Wall Street Journal with their kind of business centered agenda is so in favor of illegal immigration. It's just wrong. It's just wrong. Because the rule of law is important. You wanna make good laws laws that led us control the border? So they put on a picture, which I think will probably win the Pulitzer prize. Can you put up this picture? Yes. It's it's a woman carrying her children away from the tear gas. You see the tear gas and see this poor woman with report children running away from the tear gas. It would take a heart of stone. Not to break. It is terrible. It's telling you that if this picture doesn't win the Pulitzer prize. I'll be shocked if you look in the background all the rest of the guys are there. They're all men all men. So the whole thing is an illusion. And this photographer is falling for the allusion because he's an artist. That's why and he likes the emotions that are called up by this picture. So let's go to Rodney Scott Rodney Scott as the chief patrol agent the border patrol in San Diego, and he's on CNN. And he's describing what it was really like for his guys. Is as this invasion took place. I kind of challenge that this was a peaceful protest or the the majority of these people are claiming Silom we'd didn't making about forty two arrests. Only eight of those were females and there were only a few children involved. The vast majority of the people were dealing with adult males similar to what we saw the first wave of the caravan came up about a week or so ago, the group immediately started throwing rocks debris it our at our agents. Taunting the agents once our agents were assaulted, and the numbers started growing, we had you know, two or three agents at a time initially facing hundreds of people to time they deployed tear gas to protect themselves to protect the border. So Ana Navarro who is always I think she always says, she's a Republican. She's obviously a leftist she's on CNN, and they ask her about what this guy just said. I mean, this is a law a law enforcement officer who's telling he was attacked with rocks. There were mostly men. They families were put out there to for the purpose. Of creating images, and they ask Ana Navarro what she thinks of his response find that to be a compelling answer from chief Scott about the use of tear-gas, which was essentially look our job is to protect the border by the time. They're here or through the fence. What are we supposed to do in his claim was that most of the people storming the fence were men, not the women and children that we've seen in the pictures? Look. There are no easy answers here. And it's a very difficult situation a very complicated situation. I I don't find that a compelling answer. I you know, we have seen the images of the children in their women. And there has got to be pragmatic and compassionate Asser here that is not involved teargassing children..

US Rodney Scott Rodney Scott Wall Street Journal Ana Navarro Pulitzer prize CNN Tijuana Asser Honduras San Diego officer
Tijuana Mexico, Rodney Scott And San Diego discussed on Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

00:17 sec | 2 years ago

Tijuana Mexico, Rodney Scott And San Diego discussed on Press Play with Madeleine Brand

"US customs. And border protection commanders say they are working to harden. San Diego's two border crossings with Tijuana Mexico to prepare for the arrival of a migrant caravan coming up through western Mexico from Central America border patrol regional chief Rodney Scott says that because it now looks like the migrants will

Tijuana Mexico Rodney Scott San Diego Mexico United States
"rodney scott" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"rodney scott" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Days. But officials are asking people to be patient while roads remain closed. They say it's not safe to return as crews continue to fight the fire, remove hazards and search for survivors and the remains of the deceased while they wait me like many have gotten over the first phase of shock. I think by day five here, the adrenaline is worn off, and it's just a deep sadness and depression. Even if she's ready to start planning for her life after the fire. She's resigned for the moment to be patient for the California report, I'm Daniel Vinton and Chico. Well here in southern California just down the road from where I'm sitting thorny say the Wolsey fire killed two more people bringing the total to four you can find complete fire coverage from around the state at cow report dot org. But there has been a lot of other news the past few days, and we're going to focus on some of it now, including this from the border US military in immigration officials have laid out their plans to harden, the California border with more US troops. In fact, one of the more surreal moments for commuters. They can see humvees driving down the freeway along the US border. This is the head of the migrant caravan that has now reached you wanna keep is Steve Walsh reports. Rodney Scott head of the US border patrol in San Diego says they are increasingly confident that the caravan of migrants will turn toward San Diego. He says the marines will help hardened facilities along the border even with a seven hundred forty one million dollar reconstruction underway at these Sanusi zero point of entry it up the game. That we needed to make sure that we were better positioned.

US California Daniel Vinton San Diego Rodney Scott Steve Walsh Chico seven hundred forty one millio
"rodney scott" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

03:44 min | 3 years ago

"rodney scott" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"The first time and there's the question what do you do invariably we answer with our job but we do other things in our spare time some of us golf read or workout others collect snow globes peru's dictionaries raise fish are pastimes give shape and texture to our lives we don't baseball this called the national pastime but we also know americans pass their time this summer on the beach in the mountains at the amusement park or just lounging on a chair in the backyard tending a grill we're going to begin this hour in charleston south carolina where on a recent weekday rodney scott perched on a stool in his namesake barbecue joint on king street and pondered the origin and endurance of our laid back culinary pastime food cooked on a grill is great let help expose barbecue because that's all we do mostly is fire fire and food such elemental cooking appeals to weekend warriors content to manage heat and product pork shoulder between sips of something in the backyard and professionals like rodney scott who manages heat and pork so well he recently became just the second pit master ever to receive a james beard award he learned from his parents in rural hemingway south carolina where he put in the long hot sweaty work whole hog barbecue requires he's still uses exclusively would many barbecue joints don't but growing up there was no other more modern way we cut it we loaded it up earned down and we had to fire up and cook those job there's no oven to turn on there was no gas coming in to that i will you know there are plenty of days we wish we had something easier but you know we never had that that comfort of knowing how to just turn the switch because all we knew just to get out there and cut wood scott started using a chainsaw when he was sixteen learn appreciate graph you know the hard work energy that we put into it say hey let's let's stick to what we do let's keep with the wood and keep flavor going and here we are this year i mean there's a haze that kind of covers the place yeah and you know if you pass by on the interstate the overpass you could see the smoke sometimes when you go past that's how i spotted my building the interstate thought of smoke one day and i was like yeah that's us right there as i've been told as far as six blocks they could smell it smells good out here thank you we have barbecue people that pull up and the first thing they do is inhale and they said okay there's a chance here smells like somebody's trying to do it right okay i appreciate that there is a discerning customer that you're appealing to your it's not like you've pulled into a place for barbecues foreign definitely not foreign here then there are some customers that come in and never had barbecue like this you know they were always used to a smaller scales of barbecue ribs or brisket whether or not you sue the whole hog by the time you've listened to this three hour program rodney scott will be approximately a third of the way through cooking a whole hog along backyard smoke can be appealingly lazy scotts working pretty intensive to tend to fire because you got a lot of heat going on especially in summertime and you got to keep the woodburning at least forty five minutes ahead of time to make sure you got enough coal to continue cook if you don't have the colesberg bird down to continue cooking it throws a whole process behind maybe even giving you a risk of losing your pork or beef or whatever you barbecuing so there's a sit down time but then there's a time that you have.

forty five minutes three hour one day
"rodney scott" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

03:37 min | 3 years ago

"rodney scott" Discussed on WSB-AM

"The first time and there's the question what do you do invariably we answer with our job but we do other things in our spare time some of us golf read workout others collect snow globes peru's dictionaries raise fish are pastimes give shape and texture to our lives we know baseball is called the national pastime but we also know americans pass their time this summer on the beach in mountains at the amusement park or just lounging on a chair in the backyard tending a grill we're going to begin this hour in charleston south carolina where on a recent weekday rodney scott perched on a stool in his namesake barbecue joint on king street and pondered the origin and endurance of our laid back culinary pastime food cooked on a grill is great and that helped expose barbecue because that's all we do mostly is fire fire and food such elemental cooking appeals to weekend warriors content to manage heat and product pork shoulder between sips of something in the backyard and professionals like rodney scott who manages heat and pork so well he recently became just the second pit master ever to receive a james beard award he learned from his parents in rural hemingway south carolina where he put in the long hot sweaty work whole hog barbecue requires he still uses exclusively would many barbecue joints don't but growing up there was no other more modern way we cut it we we loaded up earning down and we had to fire up cook those job there's no oven to turn on there was no gas coming in to that i will you know there are plenty of days we wish we had something easier but you know we never had that that comfort of knowing how to just turn the switch because all we knew just to get out there and cut scott started using a chainsaw when he was sixteen learned appreciated craft you know the hard work the energy that we put into it say hey let's let's stick to what we do keith with the wood and keep the flavor going and and here we are this i mean there's a haze that kind of covers the place yeah and you know if you pass by on the interstate the overpass can see the smoke sometimes when you go past that's how i spotted my buildings on the interstate asada smoke one day and i was like yeah that's us right there but it's definitely a as i've been told as far as six blocks they could smell it smells good out here thank you we have barbecue people that pull up and the first thing they do is inhale and they said okay there's a chance here smells like somebody's trying to do it right now dan there is a discerning customer that you're appealing to your it's not like you pulled into a place for barbecues foreign no definitely not foreign here then there are some customers that come in and never had barbecue like this you know they were always used to a smaller scales barbecue ribs or brisket whether or not you soon the whole hog by the time you've listened to this three hour program rodney scott will be approximately a third of the way through cooking a whole hog along backyard smoke can be appealingly lazy scotts working it's pretty intensive to tend to fire because you got a lot of heat going on especially in the summertime and you gotta keep the woodburning at least forty five minutes ahead of time to make sure you got enough coal continue cook if you don't have the cold burned down to continue cooking throws a whole process behind maybe even giving you a.

forty five minutes three hour one day
"rodney scott" Discussed on House of Carbs

House of Carbs

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"rodney scott" Discussed on House of Carbs

"But the tradition that they do adhere to is the fact that they want to be the best and so to be the best you kind of have to have the best of both worlds you kind of have to have everything there for you in the city so accommodative if you if you have if you are common in the door with some credentials you have that stamp of approval come on in we have room for you well lulu that's the idea absolutely and i i've asked um you know locals and i've talked bartenders around and there are there are no problems with in fact a lot of them considered lewis barbecue to do to be the best barbecue in the city so boyle away economy makes sense because sean brock's not a native charleston ian wright right he's uh but he he had the um you know he he gets a type of credit it's not that that anybody needs credit but haas kind of really welcome to everybody to the idea the charleston was a you know an incredible foods that city it's always been i think no attrition that goes back foodwise three hundred fifty years as you mentioned but husk really reminded everybody charleston a place deserving right and and he had he has a great relationship with rodney scott they've they've cooked gather plenty of times they've actually been on on a mind of a chef which i actually referenced on my first house carbs appearance the actually cook the whole hog together to serve at a party so they're they're very good friend let's let's be sure to link to that while yet release remind everybody a that's that's one of the wa i'm gonna i'm that okay mental note.

sean brock ian wright haas charleston rodney scott wa lewis three hundred fifty years
"rodney scott" Discussed on Still Processing

Still Processing

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"rodney scott" Discussed on Still Processing

"Authenticity lao people use that word so freely and when i think about barbecue for instance tyson ho he owns arrogant swine he's a new yorker that is so happens to be asian who's doing great carolina style barbecue i think his places authentic i think it's i think it's blazes authentic i think his food is speaks to my soul but also when he talks about his place and he talks about his barbecue you can just feel a he's real about it he's not trying to make a book he's not trying to get an award he's not trying to like get the next big book deal you can feel it and when i look at people like rodney scott who's a pit master who is based in south carolina and howard conyers who is from south carolina whose in new orleans these are folks who are doing barbecue because it's inside of them they don't even have to speak it they don't have to say it they can tasted in their food also like to get a vibe nc while can i really feel this person's passion they have to have passion do you only get the pork dish on them on the barbecue menu eu gourd you try chicken do try brisket deathrow recourse is i think everyone keeps talking about the pork and thumbs i go for the chicken but i'm like i had a rethink my whole prochurch i always acclaimed brisket to a very texas thing owner and i i equate whole hog which means roasting or barbecue the whole.

new yorker rodney scott south carolina howard conyers new orleans tyson texas
"rodney scott" Discussed on Still Processing

Still Processing

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"rodney scott" Discussed on Still Processing

"And now they have or now they are now they're beginning to in that makes this moment a really interesting time to think about barbie john what he thinks happen recently that's put the pen masters more in the forefront a thing that america has woken up to can of its vernecular foods those foods born of place and people and grounded in tradition i think america has a can of cultural hunger for those foods today and i think that has brought barbecue to the fore and and i think there's also a younger generation of pit masters who've can of stepped into the smoke who now know how to talk about barbecue in new sorts of ways and are able to frame their work in their labor in ways that are relatable four kind of modern media audiences to think about rodney scott who got his start and hemingway south carolina recentlyopened his own place call rodney scott barbecue in charleston south carolina and one of the first times that a cameras turned on rodney is he begins to rise in import in the second half of the first decades of the twentieth century rodney says you know i'm kinda like a chef a chef goes out in his or her garden in picks out a tomato in brings it back to the kitchen and i do something very similar asked up out in the woods in a pick out mon tree and a chop it down and bring it back and i make barbecue in.

america rodney scott hemingway charleston south carolina