35 Burst results for "Rodney King"

George Holliday, who filmed Rodney King video, dies of COVID

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 6 d ago

George Holliday, who filmed Rodney King video, dies of COVID

"A Los Angeles plumber who made history by capturing the beating of Rodney king on a video camera has died of covert nineteen complications a longtime friend says George Holliday was sixty one years old not vaccinated against covert nineteen and have been on a ventilator for days it was in nineteen ninety one that holiday who'd gotten a new video camera shot grainy images of four white police officers beating Rodney king during a traffic stop he captured Los Angeles officers punching kicking and using a stun gun on the black motorist even after he was on the ground a year later holidays footage was key evidence in the officer's trial that ended with four acquittals that triggered rioting king was so upset by the burning and looting he issued this famous statement in nineteen ninety two can we can we all get along hi Jackie Quinn

George Holliday Los Angeles Jackie Quinn
"rodney king" Discussed on America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

08:07 min | 2 months ago

"rodney king" Discussed on America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

"I think that was a tactical error So i mean these are all questions. I don't think it is out of the possibility. He has a primary fight against some an. I don't any special insight against someone like rhonda. Santa's i don't think but i don't think it's wrong to expect him to earn. It doesn't mean. I like him a less. I as well i mean i. I think the guy was a tremendous president who against all odds accomplished so much but You know this. I'm not here to vindicate him there. Other people. i feel who are running for various offices who are trying to vindicate themselves. I don't tolerate that too if they're not the best i don't want him if he is the best. I desperately his mom. And that's a fabulous. You know wall college level analysis in it and it's very sound when he he's what my thinking is what stands right now and you're not you're right who knows in a year's time or eighteen months time we have given what happened to him how he was subverted. Not just by the establishment by but by people in his administration by holdovers even political appointees. There is so much real work to be done in. And i don't mean dismantling i mean demolishing the deep state that that the next the president especially after the next three years has to come in like a literal berserk. How come in. Like a flame throwing Arnold schwarzenegger when he wasn't a boy in a absolute beserk to finish and right. Now i don't even know if if if president trump would want to do that but i don't see anybody else who would be prepared to do that which doesn't mean somebody could come from the middle of nowhere like he did but the next four years of a republican presidency has to turn. Dc's deep state into a sheet of glass. And though and that's what i'm going to vote for roy moore. I have a couple of tests for the next president which is okay quiz. Hunia fire. I ray or millie and Do you do it before you take the oath or immediately thereafter. Yes yes that's it. I mean i would literally you know. Bring somebody in. Like i dunno kirch later send him over with a portfolio to the pentagon and had me sit down with generals and go kid general. What do you say you do here. But what what is your job explaining. What is your job. I mean i am the next president screwing need to devote time. I if you're gonna fix the pentagon you need an hour a day union our four. Hey hey secretary of defense. I just read their Their they hebron kennedy is on the book list at west point. I want the entire chain of command from the superintendent through you through whoever put on the list in my office tomorrow to brief me on how you're going to fulfill my intent bring your executive officer and we're going to spend a half hour and you're going to brief me and if i'm unsatisfied. You're going to be relieved. And i'm going to direct it to be retired from active duty and then you do that a couple times. The nice thing about the military while the military can went bad so fast is it's hierarchical organization. Soldiers do what commanders check. If commanders check woke kness you'll get woke up. Commanders check were fighting ability they will gleefully and gladly give you warfighting is fabulous ship on a one. You've got my votes to be that sob desert in the dod or anywhere else across the alcatel the the the nazi state okay last two very quick questions last last last questions number one short answer because we can continue this for hours the next time have i one of what i most disappointed in is the lack of anybody really doing the heavy lifting the intellectual heavy lifting for make america great again in america. I so so when reagan one there was a flowering of intellectual activity apart from a website. Here in there. i love the guys at american greatness. I love the plan on institute but but we we haven't seen a national level debate on what it means to be a conservative in the mold of america. I do you agree i. I agree that it's nowhere near the flowering is nowhere near. What wasn't reagan. A lot of our intellectuals abandoned us this eight they went they chose their sinecures uncertain. They became irrelevant or they became merav. Like when when bill kristol's stockings calls returned or when they mistook him for billy crystal twenty coma white house and say hey i loved that movie. Your under chaffey pallets city slickers. He got mad because that was what he was about. So it wasn't thought now we do have. The clermont is very good. Anton very good stop. Stop stop for the record here. He's a smart guy. He's a dishonorable man. Michelangelo michael anton on public television. After i left the white house lied about me about steve bannon. I caught him. He refused apologize. Safaa all of his great articles. He's a he's a pat so let's just scrub glanton. That's just for the record. You agree we have to do so. We need some intellectual we do and some people tried to bring it in. I saw peyot who. I've got some issues. I don't think you should president for a couple of reasons. But i articulated at a clermont. Dinner attempting to articulate a america first foreign policy. Which i think he. It was a good start. Good it was good star. What it's not there yet and you know who we can build it around. Vh has done so much we we we need. Fifty is victor davis. We always we need a intellectuals have gotten a bad rap because they behaved badly. Yes yeah and and look i i. I'm just some infantry guy and just run my mouth and tell him on jokes And there's a place for that but we need we need folks are going to think this through and give us a systemic analysis and give us and tell us what we're what we're really looking at ways we haven't thought i get a large chunk of the seventy million of the seventy four million to sign off on it so we have to have buying. Okay time this is. Super fund is a one on one because the last question. Because you'll gun. Your books are peppered with hard core gun stuff. It is so cool. There are some cameo appearances by certain people who may have national radio shows gotta by the split right now by by the split but we gotta give him full credit. He was on my radio show. A few months ago who encouraged opinion makes the finest nineteen eleven handguns in america. Well that's bill wilson. Bill bill down all right. I mean it's it's not. This is a gun that so much. The wilson combat is so much better than i am. I shouldn't be allowed to say it shouldn't be allowed on a whole isan meal out of weirdo holster. I i handled one of his nine millimeter. His comeback nine nine thousand eleven in a store was like the slide and the rails. It was like it was on glass. I'm impressed and that's the kind of like a production gun. But it's it's customer real american legend. A legend read his book as well as his life story. A cat far too much fun. We could do it for hours. That's to joe rogan for our one. Next time follow him at coach to dope. But we might have some cigars. It's called this. Flett get it now and follow him and his articles. Townhall respect is due. Thank you for doing what you do kennel. Hey thanks for having me. Dr kirker appreciate it. God bless often..

president trump kirch pentagon america roy moore rhonda merav Arnold schwarzenegger reagan millie Michelangelo michael anton steve bannon hebron Safaa west point glanton Santa alcatel ray bill kristol
How much has our country changed 30 years after the Rodney King beating

The Breakdown with Shaun King

02:03 min | 6 months ago

How much has our country changed 30 years after the Rodney King beating

"Like millions of americans have been watching the painful traumatic trial of minneapolis. Police officer derek chauvin and seeing so many witnesses have to relive the terror and pain and in some ways shame many witnesses have said that they are struggling with the feelings of guilt that they did not do enough. I mean the only thing that they could have done that they didn't would be to have thrown their bodies onto the officers onto onto. George floyd and there's no proof necessarily that any of that would have saved georgia's life but these men and women and children witnessed demand be lynched and what we're seeing at. The trial is the sheer terror. Pain grief remorse of what it means to have witnessed in twenty twenty a man be murdered in slow motion lynched in slow motion and as i've watched the trial day in and day out this weekend the expectation is that this trial could go on for. Maybe two to three weeks. As i've watched it and yesterday we saw for the first time the body cameras of the officers. Who were there i. I don't understand for the life of me why they were just now released. Thankfully many cities and counties and states across the country now have policies and laws that force body camera footage is like this to be released.

Derek Chauvin George Floyd Minneapolis Georgia
How Writer Lesl Honor Knows Poetry Changes Lives

Latina to Latina

04:26 min | 7 months ago

How Writer Lesl Honor Knows Poetry Changes Lives

"I think you for doing this. Thank you for having me. It's just such an honor to be asked and awful. What is the first poem you ever think. The first time. I was something in first grade and i think it was about a bird and my dad helped me practices into it for talent. Show or my very catholics old There was always a good talent shone catholic schools. And was there. Anyone who said who. This girl hasn't my seventh grade teacher was like you're really good writer and i was like that's nice and my mom and dad told me i have to be an attorney or doctor and then high school. I had some really great teachers who were like. This is what you should do. This is really really good. I thought about it from they're like well. Maybe it's something. nba can do this. I could be a writer writers. I love Invented just kind of unfolded. When i got to college And there were so many people that were so supportive of my writing and poetry and just teaching me how to be in that space En- just happened to what i wanted to say authentically in kind of tune out. What a lot of the other influences are other writers. I think growing up in the nineties. I wanted to talk about identity a lot. I mean it wasn't until the late nineties until we even had something in the census that allowed you to be biracial. So i would always get the questions what are you. What are you You know just very rude. Comments often feeling not enough of one of the other affiliate black enough not mexican enough. So i wrote about my identity and how i felt. Your dad is black. His new orleans. Your mom born in mexico immigrated here when she was fifteen had it those cultures. How were they playing out at home. It's lovely. I love my kids. Identify appalachian in that that even have that term to identify with my oldest daughter who is brown and we talk about how we are mirror images of each other's experience where i fought a lot to inform people of my identity as a black woman. She does the opposite to inform people of dot and so we talk about that a lot and she really pushes me to see how the world sees me had well. She's her an how they see her as black. I and how they typically see as the enough i in. What does that mean about how we move in spaces. It's a salvatori household. I think i get that. From both of my cultures. We do often that for the announcement. Those in then we have gumbo. For new year's we are very lucky to be able to tap into so many different parts of us. How would didn't play. Though when you were growing up oh my pearson talk about race. It was not a forward conversation properly until the rodney king riots. Now sophomore in high school and my father at the time was working for the lapd and so we. We did not have a conversation. The way i have with my kids about race ethnicity identity how the world sees you ought to be prepared for and then maybe around my sophomore year in high school right before the rise of doing a lot of reading and read the biography malcolm x. I say that radicalized much split on my activism button that has never been turned off since then it's pretty much in succession than the riots happened. An stuff was bubbling in. La before ride became there was a lot of tension between black and korean communities in los angeles and stuff. It wasn't something that happened out of nowhere. It it definitely was arise that shifted allots. That shifted a conversation. I never knew. My dad was locked in his apartment during the watts riots. We had never had that conversation before.

NBA New Orleans Mexico Rodney King Pearson Malcolm LA Los Angeles
"rodney king" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"rodney king" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Yeah. Dallas Independent School District is investigating a high school English teacher he gave in the students an assignment to write about a modern day hero. All right, so far so good, and he gave a list of suggestions. And on that list, Mahatma Gandhi says her Chavez Malcolm X George Floyd on that list, but also Kyle Riton house. Who's the guy accused of fatally shooting two people during the Kenosha protests. He was on the list of possible modern heroes. I find this list. Just fascinating. Mohammed Gandhi say search as Chavez Mountain Malcolm and whether you believe in what Malcolm X did or didn't do. These are people who truly accomplished major major things in society. When you talk about George Floyd He had. I guess the very bad luck to be killed by a police officer. Not that he isn't well known, but you put him in the same category as a Mahatma Gandhi. Remember Rodney King was actually Are you ready for this? Rodney King I was at and CP meeting in which they honored Rosa Parks. And there she was on the D on the stage. Rosa Parks. I mean, that's pretty rarefied air toe actually see that woman. And they introduce Rodney King. And say in here is a hero also Rodney King. I was so offended. Ah and S O to put those in the same category. It's everybody in the military is a hero all the way from the front line soldier who is fighting Isis to the guy who cuts your hair at the base. They're all heroes. Anyway, This is ridiculous. This assignment when you think of it, Can you imagine putting ah, him on? We're talking about Rittenhouse, The guy who shot up those two people at the protest in the same category as a Cesar Chavez. But he also put but he also put Um Joseph Rosenbaum, who's one of the protesters that written house is accused of killing. All right there. He is with him on the nose. That's that's crazy. And of course, misspelling Gandhi. Oh, yeah, man. He couldn't spell those people incident. I am stand. I have to stand correct that I forgot that John our own. John Ramirez also has a master's degree. Yes, he does. Yes, he does. So, John, I apologize to you is way better. Ah, yeah, anyway, so I truly do apologize. All right. Go ahead. Is it my turn? It is. It's headed to a different type of full house..

Mohammed Gandhi Rodney King Cesar Chavez Rosa Parks George Floyd John Ramirez Chavez Malcolm Joseph Rosenbaum Dallas Independent School Dist Malcolm X Kenosha Kyle Riton officer Rittenhouse
Recording police brutality: how technology is driving the new civil rights movement

The Vergecast

31:46 min | 1 year ago

Recording police brutality: how technology is driving the new civil rights movement

"Hey everybody seemingly from the verge cast really special interview episode this week yesterday the verge published feature package where calling capturing the police which was a months-long effort for almost everybody at the site to really interrogate the role of technology in the movement against police violence. The heart of the package is a feature where we talk to. People who had filmed the somewhat viral videos of police violence asking him why they did it. What happened next how they felt in the moment whether they would do it again, really contextualising these that we've seen over and over and over again we estimate videos. One is about a specific incidents with a specific set of men in Baytown Texas who filmed police violence and what happened next another one from the science team is about body cameras and police body cameras, and how they affect your perception. What's going on in some academic research that's come out about that. So I asked verge reporter, Steven and verge video producer, my calf, the two leaders of the site wide project To come on, say talk to me about the project what they learned in. Really I, keep thinking about this, the role that our phones are playing in changing our relationship to the and the government. I don't think any product manager or designer at a smartphone company ever thought that their products will be used in this way or create this moment. This is the direct intersection of technology and culture, which is something the virtuous. Investigate. So this is a really great conversation with John and Maria and a really big project. We're very proud of it that'd be read. Watch it here are John and Maria. Maria Abdul. John Steven Welcome to the virtuous easy doing well I. I'm doing great another beautiful day in. Quarantine Mario. How are you? I'm good. I'm very relieved that this really big thing that we have produced is out there. So now I get to. Take back and reflect de. So Youtube or the editorial leaders have big projects that four I would say two months we just called the police project I. Hope Everybody can see it on site. We're very proud of it in scope it looks at how people have been using technology to record the police record police behavior protests use technology and the tools to organizers protests to organize. The movement around police brutality, and then a lot of how those cameras in particular affect our relationship with the police. So it was a huge project and it looks like one big feature, a bunch of. Additional reports around that feature in two videos that my help produce. Let's start with where it came from. How did this project begin in? How did it take the shape that it ended up being on the site? That is very, very good question because. It was sort of such a big undertaking. We it started in a very different direction than it ended as I think a lot of large projects generally tend to. So it started with an idea, a sort of idea in the staff, one of our executive editor was like we should do something to capture the moment then it sort of fell on me to shape that idea. Which is, which is interesting sort of problem because I was very interested in. Working with the initial iteration of the of the project, but getting a chance to shape it meant that I had to think critically about sort of what what would fit the moment and what would capture the moment. Well, I would say so that's how we came came up with the idea of focusing on the people filming videos of police brutality because it felt like there was a section missing to the narrative that was Benjamin. Circulating around social media, which is to say, we don't really hear from those people like we hear a lot from from victims we hear from police officers, but we don't really hear from people who like the everyday people who are sort of in the line of fire and decide to make the very brave decision to pick up their phones and record and sh like shine light like shed light. On on this type of violence that really sort of goes undocumented because one of the things we police finances, it never really shows up police reports. Yeah. One thing that caught me is I say this a lot but this is a new way of using phones that fundamentally what's happening with with all of these if you look at our feature, we started at very intentionally with Rodney King. George holiday that the person who shot the Rodney King beating in the nineties using gigantic Sony eight millimeter cassette handicap which basically no one had those like some families WanNa had those. But the the that camera was present at that moment in time at one am on that corner to witness that thing was astoundingly improbable and as we've come to now, the presence of cameras is actually more likely than not in just the way people live their lives and so the decision to record seems at once. Easy simple. Everyone has a camera. It seems likely that everything will be recorded, but it also turns out to have dramatic consequences. Yeah. Yeah. I think one of the main threads which will I'm sure get into later is a lot of these people felt afraid of retaliation from the police because they posted on social media they sort of were indentifying themselves as targets, Samara and you pretty. Videos here how how did you pick the two together the verge video team did want in the verge science team did one how do we land in those two? So. At the first video and Ben Evita's. I initially saw the video on this very large like database of other videos, police brutality that had been collected, and that was being shared on twitter that we were using that we were looking through for this project, and when I first saw the video I serve noted it as something worthy. But because it had, it didn't happen at a protest. It wasn't the the video that I thought I was going to focus on but after just Justin Callum did the interview with Isaiah for the peace reporters feature in. Told me after he published the video, there had been an increased police surveillance in his life and that he was feeling a lot of anxiety and a Lotta paranoia since he published video. It just really struck me that he still even with all of the sphere and all this anxiety and what was happening he still wanted to talk to us because he had told Justin that he was interested in being part of the video project and so as soon as she told me that I spoke to him and as we sort of spoke, it was just. So clear that he understood the magnitude of recording and he understood the consequences that comes with it and yet still wanted to bring awareness to not only this moment but also what happens when you record the police? So that's how we landed on that video. So our second video on the role of body cams and capturing police brutality fell imperative that we would cover. It in that way given that it's not only bystander footage that is coming out of these recent protests. It's also a lot of body CAM footage in. So we thought it was important and imperative, and that verge science team thought it was imperative to also cover the role of camps and capturing police brutality, but also how they might actually influence how we perceive police. Violence. So it just added a different layer and a different impact to this larger piece. One thing that caught me about that and Addie has report that just is really stuck with me as we went through the project about how all these videos of protests and police violence are becoming a genre film, and as I read that and I watched the body cam video. It just occurred to me that we actually have to use of the formal language of film to describe what's happening here that the body cam is telling the story because it's one kind of camera it shows you one kind of it has a gaze and all these other cameras have another kind of perspective in it. I. Don't think we ever think about that as these videos is having maybe like that formal connection between what the cameras are doing and what you is the viewer perceived and that to me has been a very powerful through line of this whole project. Actually cameras are active participants in these stories and they shape the narrative. The same way that we we know this in every other situation where there's cameras camera shape the narrative, and they leave things out in a enhance other things and that to me I think there's going to be a big long cultural reckoning over the role of cameras in these moments because we don't really understand how that affects our blazing to the culture to the police to the state, and it's changing because the. Cameras Right now I mean it is ironic a little bit that this genre films started in Los Angeles. Well, that's the most cameras right and it's I mean like you know if you think about it that way it's like it makes sense that like Rodney, King beating was filmed by a person in Los Angeles and maybe not elsewhere but also I, think I think it's interesting that you bring up peace because i. I do think filmmakers understand this. And it is also I mean to to get not conspiratorial but to go a little bit off the rails which I still think it's in line but. The US government spends a not insignificant amount of money advising film makers were making films about the police and the military, and they do get some of these editorial. Editorial. Control some of the stuff. and. I think that perspective does shape the way that we see some of these institutions. Which is why I think it's very powerful that. People on the ground filming and they're making their own narratives about these institutions in real time. So let's start there. That's the that's the big feature. That's the piece reporters. It's eleven interviews with people who film police violence. I want to just immediately atop credit or creative director William troll and the engineer from the box media team Adler who built this thing it is beautiful is quite an experience to go through it. But the stories are actually of course, the most powerful thing. John, tell me about one thing you said to me at the very beginning of this project was this is the same story over and over again? Yes. And there's something about the volume of it that I think really brings it home feature came together and tell me hey, came to that realization and tell us what that story actually is. Yeah. So we interviewed a lot of people that was that was the hard part. One of the hardest parts of the projects was finding people who actually wanted to talk to us but I think we were using Greg sets list on twitter to find some of these people Shasta Greg I did actually interview him for. The you know that's a separate thing but yeah, I think I mean I. Think it's very it's interesting right because through these videos like they all have the same, the same beginning middle and end and. It's once you've see enough of them. It's very it's becomes predictable where the rising action in the falling action isn't purely film criticism terms I. Think the reason that we decided to go this route was because it adds context experience police violence like it's one of the things that like it really gives depth to what's going on and it's stuff that you don't normally see and the idea was to bring that sort of reality. Home to people reading, which is why the reason it's the same story every time and the reason that it's sort of like it was distracting actually at the beginning because I was like, okay, this is a different place. This is a different time. These are different people, but like chronicling the experience effective people in the same way, and that's why it was the same story every time because it's not every day that you see. Somebody who is like an officer? Who's who has sworn an oath to protect the public, just beating the shit out of. A peaceful protester and I think it's one of those things it sort of jars you out of complacency and I think for a lot of the people that we spoke to the interviews it seemed like these people were very sort of Shell. Shocked. They sort of knew the extent of the problem but a lot of them were just normal people who happen to be a protest and happened to be filming when stuff went down and so it was very strange reading these these. Reports from the ground like these eleven fourteen over and over again because. One of the reasons I think that it's important that we have the dateline like when it happened where it happened and like you know how many shares or whatever it, the the videos got was because it, it gave back some necessary context because again, if you're if you're reading this stuff in a vacuum if you're just reading reports. From. People who filmed the stuff it really does get eerily similar in for whatever it's worth videos are almost all at night. If they're usually chaotic and they all feel like are happening same place. Yeah. It's really strange and maybe they are I mean at least psychically speaking right like it's it is the same sort of mental place I think yeah and that was one of the notes as we were putting the thing together that we got from our editors was this we have to return some sense of place to it. So we we added that back in as you were kind of editing each of these individual vignettes. was there a theme that that really came out from each of the people? Was it? What what strikes me as as I watch all these videos there's just everyone has a phone out. Right like all the time it just seems like this instinct to have your phone out that to me is new. That's yeah. That's not how people thought ten years ago or twenty years ago I really do think that's in large part because of the power of social media because again, like the thing about social media, people dismiss it out of hand as like a bad and toxic place which a lot of the time it is like don't get me wrong. However, it is one of the only avenues for social change for people who are marginalized like it's a place where you can go to be heard. By by the institutions who would normally just have the power to ignore you and I think like police violence is one of those things where it is like it is sort of an abuse of power, right? It's one of these. It's like something that it won't show up on an incident report somebody like a cop like using their baton on a protester but if somebody films that and films like the circumstances where it where it happened how it happened like you you you you get a sense of whether or not this was justified and I think. A lot of the Times it's not and a lot of the Times that goes on reported and I think. People have seen that you can actually like get some measure of justice from these otherwise unaccountable institutions by sharing the stuff on social media because public pressure is still a thing and it's interesting that to go back to Isaiah Ben Evita's. He has video that officer fired like his him posting the video actually made a change at the very local level. In his town and I think I think that's a really important thing and I, that's that's sort of what's driving this stuff because again, institutions like the police were previously entirely unaccountable to the public. Mario I mean you, you are yourself filmmaker you talked to Isaiah how do you? How do you take that? That everyone is just instinctively pulling out their phone because they think it will lead to some some change down the road. I think what's interesting about Isiah specifically is that this video doesn't take place at a protest it. He was filming outside of a convenience store they were coming from a barbecue. They hadn't gone to protests recently, they were the at that moment they weren't planning necessarily planning on going to protest later that week however. In as the video begins, you hear him say I've got to get out and record this. You also hear his friends in the car say we've got a record this and yet when we interviewed them, it was the first time any of them had ever recorded police had ever been with other people who recording the police and I think that is largely part to seeing these videos. On twitter and on facebook of police violence being captured by by citizens being captured by civilians, and so they wanted to hold this police officer accountable and they also started recording him preemptively. They didn't start recording him the moment he started you know approaching them they started recording the minute they were pulling over in. So I think that really signifies to us at least to me that. Even. If you've never participated in a protest or never participated in filming the police, you now know that's an option for you. That's an option for you and that's an option for your community. It is I do think the third part that is going on said here. Is that like it is a protective thing too. You have evidence that maybe you weren't doing anything wrong even like, okay like you get pulled over by the cops and they sight probable cause like you're sitting there peacefully. You get to tell your story, view the camera to I think. These videos, I. Am sure are showing up in courts of law across the country. One thing that's really interesting about this. Again, I come back to that the piece from addy come back to the the body cam video from the science team. I was filming someone else he was at a remove right? It was his friend who is in in the encounter at the police. Most of the powerful videos we see the lead to change our are removed. They're not from the participants. How do you? How do you think that plays out in this larger? There's a lot of change in this country. Now, there's a lot of conflict actually WANNA talk we we published the piece yesterday there's been some criticism I wanNA talk about that. But right now we're we're seeing one sort of very clear perspective from a remove. How do you think that's that's playing I. think a big part of when you hear Isaiah speak about filming he talks about the fact that he constantly to remind himself to take a step back because he knew the moment that he engaged directly with these officer, the officer could come out for could come for him. You know he had he very much understood the power dynamics at play. Even, as him as the filmer, so he kept as the officer kept getting closer he kept moving back and he would ask you can hear in the learned the full twelve minute video this incident you continuously hear him ask the other officer in the video hayes it. Okay. If I'm standing here, is it okay if I'm standing here, he's very conscientious of his body and his proximity to the violence to the violence has been that's being enacted against his friends and when we interviewed him the reason that he did take a step back was because he knew that if they took him if he got arrested along with his friends that that video. Might, not like not not got published right? Like he might not get his phone back. These things might happen and he knew the power of that video and the power of what he was holding his hands and he wanted to share it with the world so that meant taking a step back so he do that and it doesn't mean that it didn't traumatize him every time he sees the video he gets. Traumatized by seeing his friends violated in this way however, he understood that the consequences would not have been possible. Had he not taken a step back and capture according? I also think. Just. Generally speaking like we tend to trust videos that come from outside sources or people who are around but not exactly involved. It adds another like an extra veneer of credibility. I think which is. Another reason that like some of the biggest videos that we see are not like it's not the body cam it's not the person on the ground being choked to death. At, somebody else. Who has has has had the same realization as as but. I think you know just subjectively with trust trust those perspectives more because they feel more objective. CVT camera just happened to capture the incident on on film. I would say with this specific incident like the group that was arrested. In Zambia. The was interested but his friends, Skyler Gilmore Phillips were they were all taking part in questioning this officer across the parking lot. So I don't think they were necessarily objective I. Don't I. Don't think they were I think they saw there being pulled over, they recognize the police officer there friend had just been with them at this barbecue and I think the fact that he was able to get the video out there in the fact that you can see the whole incident play out right? Like in our video we don't show the whole twelve minute video, but it's like five minutes. Of Not, much going on until the officer sort of approaches them. So I think the added quote unquote like credibility is that you see the beginning middle and end of that incident Isaiah did not stop recording until the police left Isaiah began filming before the police had even had even gotten out of their cars. So I think with this specific video, it's less about the eject objectively and more about the fact that he was able to capture all. How do you think that ties into one thing that we write about a lot surveillance where all being surveilled all the time you mentioned TV cameras. A on a different day in a different moment. The way our talks about like extremely prevalent C. T. V. Cameras is crap ring put a camera everywhere. Now we're being surveilled in the cops have access to this footage, right? At the same time what we've been talking about a lot is the presence of this camera at a remove actually serves a purpose is Asia. Taking that video from that remove sort of purpose. How should we think about this balance because I I personally right? Like you catch me in a different minute. I'm over here. I'm over there. Actually surveillance is good. No, I think the difference is it really depends on like the the institution that has the footage and what they want to do it. Right like the cops when they get ring footage and what I mean like it's not it's like the cops are using footage to incriminate and I think generally this is very generally speaking in very, very general terms like it's evidence, right? And you know when it's coming from people on the ground protests were filming. It's documentation it's like the same footage, but it can be used in very different ways depending on who's doing the asking. For, the footage like and where it's going I think I think that context is actually super important right? Because like in England, for example, there are cameras everywhere. There's just like municipal cameras run by the fucking. Like in London, for example, there's there's cameras run by the Metropolitan Police Department, and that's just that's just a fact of life. And I think it's interesting because like they I think they have like controls on how you can use that stuff whereas with ring networks here it's like sort of ad hoc private companies turning it over to the police whenever they feel like it. I don't know I guess I'm going on a little tangent here. I really do think that like it depends on who's asking for the footage and what they intend to do with it. I think you know people taking footage is as it's intended to sort of exonerate his friends and that they weren't doing anything wrong and this sort of an unjustified thing. And I think the intent really matters. So I think that it's not just about the presence of cameras and footage, but it's also about who has those cameras and this of act of pulling out your phone to question authority to question police officers is actually referred to as surveillance by scholars. It is the opposite of surveillance. Right surveillance is often reserved for those in power. It doesn't necessarily mean it's always the state surveilled someone but the moment that you begin to surveilled them, you were taking a bit away a bit of their agency away from them. You're taking a bit of their privacy away from them but soon, valence is this idea of challenging. Authority by trying to sort of disrupt this power dynamic by filming your oppressor by filming specifically in marginalized communities, the police, and so with surveillance, it is the idea of this is what we're talking about right like it's not mentioned one time in the videos nor is it mentioned in any of these pieces but all of this is what scholars refer to sue balance, which was coined by Steve Man, and it's all about looking from below. So you're not looking from below you're not the person who is above and the position of power. You are the person who's often surveilled right like with Isaiah and friends like they were they knew this officer they. They had never recorded this officer, but they not only knew of him. They had previously had seen incidences of him, and so I think by pulling out their phone, what they're doing is trying to challenge this authority figure to them that had represented sort of. Head oppressed in had sort of harassed or had allegedly harassed and targeted African Americans in their community. So they see this officer, they see their black friend being pulled over they understand this officer had allegedly been targeting and harassing African Americans they pull out their phone to begin to try to create a counter narrative, and before any of these things I think Bijon spoke about this earlier like when you start recording early on, you can sort of see the maybe there wasn't any probable cause and what you hear them saying the first few minutes of the video is, what's the probable cause? What's probable cause like why did you over in the officer officers aren't engaging right? and. So I think the role of that video in that moment is about who has it right? Like you can hear them. Surveillance video from above that's muted that can be distorted. It's about the person who got out of the car who started filming. Once they start one saw him started getting attacked the person who filmed at the very beginning and surveillance often doesn't involve you filming. Once you see the police officers sort of attacking someone but you film when you see a police officer because you want to challenge there are over you. Yeah. The when I say we're GONNA face a long period of cultural reckoning over this I don't think that we the surveillance scholarship is that it's very early stages right and it's not builds out. It's not complete. We're learning how it works and that to me is one of. You know when when the smartphone cameras invented I don't think people thought the people who invented the ship in the back of every smartphone thought we're going to have to have a conversation about surveillance when this is all said and done and that to me is. Right and that I think about that, all of the time like there are engineers and product managers and designers who make these products. and. Sometimes they have a guest of how they'll be used but this to me is one of the most surprising revolutionary uses of the technology right just fundamentally and I think this conversation about what does it mean for everyone to record the state? What does it mean for the state? Maybe record your back with a body camera or something else it's going to change the nature of our relationship with the people in power. It is interesting like one of the things that fascinates me about taking video protest specifically is like I think, a lot of police officers on the ground seat is violence when somebody holds a camera to them because it like it does challenger Authority, but it also like like it is a a thing creating a record in real time that they cannot control in a situation and I think it's just very strange because. Yeah I mean, the perspective really matters who's who's taking the video really really really matters. Let's talk about that for a minute in this conversation. In the feature, we have very intentionally chosen to highlight one perspective people filming the videos. We have almost no perspective from the police in return know perspective from the state in return as we are making this project I, you know the editor in chief ultimately I'm for everything I knew we were making that decision I felt comfortable with it. We do hear a lot from the police, but that notion that the camera is impeding the the police officers job that the police are themselves scared of violence they need to be protected that there are people with guns in the street Often fear for their lives how do you think that I mean the piece is almost yesterday right for many people liked it. Some people were critical of it. We appreciate the criticism and makes us better. But how do you how were you prepared for that criticism that there was no perspective from the police as after pieces published how did he react and where are you at now? That's a really I mean that's a really really good question I haven't seen much of that criticism. Charts to my filters I. Guess My. But it's I mean I think the larger question of like what police think is really interesting to me new I. Don't know if you know there's been a few years ago. I actually spent a year in Ohio reporting a story on cops there and like. Like this, this very, it was Liverpool East Liverpool Ohio, which is a very small town between it's like West Virginia Pennsylvania and Ohio. It's right on the border of those places and it was the site at one point of the like it had the worst heroin. Like heroin outbreak people were dying of overdoses every single day like the average was like one a day and the police department was like it largely fell on them to take care of the people and it was really interesting because I what I did was like I just spent like my time going on right alongside like. Suit up get my notebook get in the car and we drive around like I would smoke black and milds with this cop, and we would like He. He would pick people up and so I went to the county jail and like I saw the mechanisms of the state like from the passenger seat, which was very interesting because like the more time you spend with police officers, the more you understand that like. Seeing people seeing people's worst every day does something very bad to your brain. It puts you on extremely high alert. And it makes ordinary situation seem incredibly terrifying and I think. One of the things that goes unexplored is the trauma police officers sort of feel, and they just don't talk about it like all of these. There were seven people department all of them were very, very, very clearly traumatized. In a way that was not obvious to them, but very obvious to me is like an outside observer. And it was interesting because like the other thing that they did most of the time, it was just like social work they were just they knew all the people that were talking to they were involved in the community. Everybody knew them like I remember. The COP I was with like picked up this woman because she like had drugs on her. And he was like, why? Why? Like what happened like we talked about this I let you go last time because like you said, you were working on your raptor what happened to that and it was like one of these things where I was like Oh this guy actually really doesn't understand like where these people are coming from we ended up having to take her to the county. Jail because she didn't have money for bail is like one hundred bucks and he was like on the on the hour long ride back. He was fuming that she would have to spend this long in jail just because she didn't have hundred dollars and so it's one of these things I think like you know there are good cops. The police is fundamentally like disordered. I will say it's like. And I think both of those things are in conversation with each other because like again, there are days that are incredibly bad like this cop was telling me like the worst day of his life I ask offhandedly by the way never ask cop with the worst day of their life is. He Was Not prepared for the answer which was like he was like Oh. Yes. So I had to respond to a call this. This guy had kids who you know his his kids were friends with he locked them in the House and burn the house down because his wife was cheating on him and so this cop had to respond to the call and then go tell kids afterward what happened and it was I was just like that is just like outside. So outside of the scope of a normal person's life. That it's like did it requires examination right and I think that's the kind of trauma that these people are like seeing like one of those one of those events can scarred for life I don't necessarily think being police officer is as dangerous to save a firefighter like statistically speaking. But again, like these horrific incidents of violence really do change your perspective and I think a lot of this kind of trauma is invisible and goes unexamined and it's difficult because a protests which is a very ordinary event. There is A. There is some potential for stuff to go wrong and I think if you're on the lookout for that, like it makes it skews your perspective and you can't see what is happening objectively, which is I think why it's very important that people also film the police at these events because there is another record that is being created in real time.

Officer Isaiah Ben Evita Twitter John Steven Rodney King Texas Metropolitan Police Department Youtube Product Manager Maria Abdul Reporter United States Los Angeles Engineer Heroin Isiah Justin Callum Producer
How Does Jane Elliott's Blue Eyes/Brown Exercise Work?

BrainStuff

05:49 min | 1 year ago

How Does Jane Elliott's Blue Eyes/Brown Exercise Work?

"The past fifty, two years teacher and diversity trainer Jane Elliott has been stirring up trouble on the subject of racism. It can still be uncomfortable squirm in your seat stare at your shoes uncomfortable when she subject someone to the very same exercise she I unleashed on third graders more than half a century ago designed to expose racist thinking. Something, her method can get downright mean but again, the subject is racism, it should be troubling. Elliott came to prominence when the day after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Junior in nineteen, sixty, eight, sheep herself a white woman took her classroom of all white third graders in. Riceville Iowa and decided to teach them what it was like to face discrimination. She separated the kids into two groups those with Brown eyes and those with blue and proceeded to proclaim the. Brown. Is these superior group she allowed the group extra privileges more time recess seats at the front of the room they were told they were cleaner smarter more talented. How children reacted to this newfound pecking order was startling. The Brown eyed group immediately began to wield their dominance. The blue is almost immediately slipped into the role of subordinates. Anger flared disputes popped up. After switching roles a few days later, which gave both sides of the classroom taste of being in the lesser group the exercise ended. Many parents complained after reading about what had happened in Elliott's classroom through student essays printed in the local paper. A month or so later, Johnny Carson invited Elliott to appear on his late night talk show she became a national story. Many praised efforts at her students is but not everybody a two, thousand five storied Sonian magazine reported hundreds, viewers, wrote letters, saying Elliott's work appalled them how dare you try this cruel experiment out on white children? One said black children grow up accustomed to such behavior but white children, there's no way they could possibly understand it. It's cruel to white children and will cause them great psychological damage. Elliott spoke with us for the article that this episode is based on from her home in Iowa. She said, you think that's traumatizing try living that way for a lifetime. Elliott taught for years before she decided to take her anti-racism lesson out of the classroom and Corporate America. She's also led the exercise for the US Department of Education and other governmental groups. She's appeared before numerous church and school assemblies she was on. Oprah Winfrey's TV show several times in June of twenty twenty. She appeared on the tonight show starring Jimmy Fallon. She often faces uncomfortable and sometimes angry reactions but her goal as it has been for the past fifty two years is education. She says, it's the best weapon against racism. But good education about racism and race is hard to find. Elliott said, that's because the educators believe the same thing that they were taught and they were taught the same thing I was, which is that there are three or four different races and you can tell what a man's intelligence is by the color of his skin or the shape of his head. You can't lead people out of ignorance if you're still teaching the Columbus discovered America and we came here to civilize these savages. Will need to teach the three RS of rights respect responsibility if teachers would respect the rights of those students to learn the truth and be held responsible for seeing that they present them with the truth we could kill racism in two generations is not a doubt in my mind that could be done. Elliott at eighty seven years. Old has seen. America, grapple with racism all her life. She's marked major mile posts in the struggle over the past fifty years or so the civil rights movement and the assassination of doctor king in the sixties, the race riots in Miami's Liberty City in nineteen eighty and in Los. Angeles after the Rodney King beating in nineteen ninety, two, the protests in Ferguson. Missouri and twenty fourteen after the killing of Michael Brown and in Baltimore Maryland in two thousand fifteen after that of Freddie Gray and in Charleston south. Carolina. That same year after a church massacre. There are many others. But the problem she has been relentlessly attacking Elliott says, goes far beyond the occasional race-based. Clara. For people of Color in the United States facing racism is an everyday fight every minute of every day. Elliot said. It's only been going on with me for fifty two years. I know black women who have been doing this for eighty nine years and their mothers did and their grandmothers dead and their great is dead and their daughters and their granddaughters and their great granddaughters are going to have to do. It must be get off our polyunsaturated fatty acids and do something about this. I get paid to talk about it. They aren't even allowed to talk about it. One of the biggest hurdles in educating people about racism in the United States Elliott says is that most everyone knows it exists and knows that it's harmful but few are motivated to change it. She stood in front of. and asked who among the white people in the room would want to switch places with a black person no one ever volunteers. She cautions that recognizing the problem is only the first step but Elliott is nothing if not persistent, she says, she'll continue to educate for the next fifty years. She'll push her mantra of one race the science behind the simple words it's clear. According to the National Human Genome Research Institute your genome, the bodies blueprint that contains all of your DNA is ninety, nine point nine percent the same as every human around you. And she says, she will urge people to get out and vote November no hope of electing leaders who will attack racism as she has had on.

Jane Elliott Michael Brown Iowa United States America Dr. Martin Luther National Human Genome Research Us Department Of Education Oprah Winfrey Jimmy Fallon Johnny Carson Sonian Magazine Twenty Twenty Corporate America Missouri Elliot Rodney King Clara
"rodney king" Discussed on Rover's Morning Glory

Rover's Morning Glory

08:08 min | 1 year ago

"rodney king" Discussed on Rover's Morning Glory

"More people. Throughout your outdoors. Your. Coping with how stressful things are right now and it's just an easy. Mac. I've. Read Studies and I I, don't know. Early in the thing. That said in China that. The there's a lot more smoking China's hair, and that smoking was a factor to it was a risk factor for contracting corona virus. If, that's true or not. But of an early study. These Sony video camera time saving things something from a long time ago. The Sony video camera that recorded the beating of Rodney King by Los Angeles. Police. Department. Officers. That camera that recorded kings beating and nineteen ninety one is going to be up for auction the actual video. You Buy. Isn't that. You want to history as part of history. I. Mean I don't know fired. I tied my price range probably, but certainly an interesting piece of memorabilia y'all get along going and we get along. Say. It's being auctioned today bidding set to start at two hundred and twenty, five, thousand dollars. Wow Two, hundred, twenty, five, thousand. I read. It doesn't even work. Batteries are out of it doesn't work anymore. Is. It common for them to auction stuff off like this because I actually just saw yesterday that this happened years and years ago. But George Zimmerman auctioned off the gun that he used to kill Trayvon. Martin and somebody bought that. Evidence. In. Court. Well. I think that the court cases have been resolved for quite some time and they just get these items back. Yeah. They're done. They're your property returned to you. This actually wasn't returned the FBI didn't return this camcorder to the guy until two, thousand, fifteen, I believe five years ago. So he held onto it from when did that happen? Ninety, one, ninety, two, ninety, one So they held onto it all the way till Twenty Fifteen, why? What are they? GonNa. Do with that. That's a good question. The Guy who taped it. his name is George Holiday. And he gave it to the news, and then he turned around and he sued the news for playing it and all these news outlets. And if you to use the the say a George. Zimmerman, if you want to use the Rodney King video that was shot by him, you have to pay a license fee now. So I don't know how much money that George how they is raked in, but he's due to rake in another couple hundred, thousand dollars by cashing in on this. He said, he saw Rodney King, one time at a gas station. Did you read this one time years down the road? He saw Rodney King he walked up to him and Grad kings like you saved my life man. In this guy goes. Okay see you later nothing to say to him. He froze well, the impression that I got from this guy was that he Is, angry. That Rodney King. Who apparently settled a lawsuit with the city for about three and a half million dollars, the city of Los Angeles. This guy who filmed get none of that. And there I sensed. Why would he animosity? Rodney should have given him some is that what I think. He thinks that I'm not saying, I'm not saying. That Rodney King should give them anything. Fight tape that you're right. If you didn't tape that it never would have come to light, it wouldn't have been cops and beat them then that would have. either. So should Rodney King give the police money? thinking. There's all wacked. Well there. I think that's that's not the equivalent. The the beating is bad. The act of videotaping. It is not a bad thing in and of itself. So. You know I didn't film that nobody would know about it. He'd get no money the fact that they filmed it from his porch or wherever's balcony. I. Haven't watched that video in a long time. Is You know when you look at the George Floyd thing. There's no. Possible way in mind that you can excuse that behavior where he's on the guy's neck for eight minutes, right? It's been many many years since I saw the Rodney. King, video. was there. I mean I vaguely remember the the court case. And? All. Those officers were found not guilty by that's when the rioting broke out when they were back and eventually were convicted in federal court. Those officers so The I'm I'm assuming the the the defense. During the court trial was he kept trying to get up, he kept coming at US whatever the case may be. I don't. I'm watching a long time. What does it? Laying down on the ground, getting the crap beat out of them with huge nightsticks Book Day, take them on a high speed chase, and then you gotta after and was high, but I seem to remember that he kept getting up. I. Don't even know how it's. Okay. So I'm watching some abridged clip because like you said, it's not available to watch so. It's just him on the ground getting just kicked and beaten. Just with nightsticks. I remember that works and he's not doesn't look like he's trying to get up I. Really even fighting. I don't remember him finding I. Remember Him getting up. And I mean really beating the crap out of which I don't think you could blame someone who's getting hit with a bunch of nightsticks here you're gonna I mean. You're going to try to. You know watching us out any point. You could just put his hands behind his back and arrest them. Yeah. I'm not looking the whole thing. I've found a twenty second clip, but right, he's looks pretty down and out. Else officer Laurence Powell got was the most was the most severely punishable as for officers because he administered majority of the beating, the other officers just sorta like we're. I guess accomplices. You could say that about he did most of them beaten, that's why he was most severely punished of before officers. How do you remember the guy's name? Did you just read this recently? No, I've been ingrained in my memory because I remember watching the news and then when they were acquitted on the state charges, that's when the writing happened. And then eventually, you were convicted on the federal charges because it was a federal civil rights violation. Though, I only remember what I've read. So the name. Head Gunston, a man by the name of Jim. Holton. had. All kinds of change around the house. He said that he was always saving his change. because. He figured he could save some money. So they him and his wife could go do fun after the kids graduated from high school four kits while. He apparently would fill every single container. Any, took it. All them. And how much money that he has five, thousand, three, hundred, sixty, six dollars. The change he had all over the house, he container, he would fill it, just store it and then. You come home change. Yeah. Like you. You give cash. Yeah, and you save chase. Yes Yep. There's a Lotta money that almost seems like you would have more. Over twenty years in dollars, reverend chain. How much do you have your house in change right now, a dollar I to be honest with you I never. See. This is you know.

Rodney King Sony Los Angeles George Zimmerman China George Floyd FBI George Holiday Mac George US Martin Laurence Powell officer Head Gunston Holton. Jim
Mayors Threatens to Sue If Trump Sends Fed Officers to Patrol NYC, Chicago

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:59 min | 1 year ago

Mayors Threatens to Sue If Trump Sends Fed Officers to Patrol NYC, Chicago

"Of Chicago and New York of threatened to take President Donald Trump to court if he sends government agents to police cities, trump sent federal law enforcement officers to Portland and weeks of anti-racism protests there and he's also threatened to do the same in many other cities across the nation, the move to send agents in camouflage. Camouflage uniforms has been criticized by officials in Oregon, and also by the House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. Well, joining me for more on this is Scott Lucas professor of politics at the University of Birmingham Scott was good. Have you on the show now? There's a couple of things I'd like to understand here for example when these these forces were sent to Portland in Oregon. Are they working with police on the ground or they just flown in an trying to take control of the streets. How does it work when you send these offices in? In normal cases, the way that it should work is that the intervention is coordinated. With local authorities with his the political leaders, and with the leaders of security forces, including the police. That's the way it was done. The last time there was a national emergency amidst and uprising, which was in Los Angeles in Nineteen ninety-two after the beating of Rodney, King. This time is not known. Donald Trump and his inner circle, including Attorney General, William Bar and Chad. Wolf of Homeland Security. Sent in these forces, many of whom are not in March uniforms. Who are in unmarked vehicles symptomen without consultation with the Mayor of Portland Ted Wheeler without consultation with Oregon Governor Brown without consultation full consultation with the heads of police there in other words, this is close to being an occupying force brought in from Washington not to restore law and order as much as it is to try to quash these protests in pursuit of other goals and I would say the primary goal is the election of Donald Trump I. want to give out not because. I guess he's you say he's not playing to. The audience in the city is playing to. A national audience and he seems to be trying to get across his notion that. The Republicans and himself a good at standing up to questions and issues around law and order, whereas the Democrat is being held hostage by demonstrators on the streets and are unable to do anything to to to quell. Disturbances. Windows being smashed on stores, rare occurrences, but these are the things that he's focusing on. Your I mean this is not an entirely new playbook. In the nineteen fifties. You would say that your opponent supported the communist in the era of McCarthyism. Richard Nixon was very effective in the nineteen sixties and early nineteen seventies before Watergate at playing at the idea that protests were directed by extremist in by Anti American. Elements Russ he represented the silent majority. But if this is done entirely new playbook, this is definitely a new chapter. Because the extent to which Donald Trump has said that he does not recognize any check on his authority He said back in April Dirt Win Corona Virus, researching I want to take total control. He in the past week has consulted John you a lawyer. Most renowned for writing the torture memo in the George W Bush administration about ruling by decree in other words. This is not. Not An attempt to work through courts, not to work through Congress, it is to bypass every institution and to do it with this false. This false sense that the protests are dominated by violence by extremist, an anarchist when in five from the very start the black lives matter protests after the murder George Floyd have been largely peaceful, and that has been the case in Portland as well. A CRAWLER! This is in many cities are the police are being much more cautious about how they get involved with citizens on the streets, or they are deliberately trying to hold back from demonstrators fulfil of causing issues, but in the background, not from demonstrators in the background this the has in some cities like New York seen an uptick in in for example in violent crime and gun crime, so does he have a point? Point that you know there there is a there is a maybe in some cities. A crime wave is a is a bit of an emotive word. Maybe an uptick in crime. The actually someone might build to buy. It doesn't quite know how to deal with for example in New York. No, I mean we have had an increase in in shootings in places like Chicago. Atlanta and New York but you have quote upticks. As parts of regular patterns of crying growing up in this case amidst corona virus admits the tension which has been stoked by trump. It's not surprising that you might have an increase interest, but this is not due to the withdrawal of the police from the streets. There's absolutely no linked to that. The police were on the streets of New York there on the streets of Chicago streets of Atlanta, the issue that is there and has been raised by black lives matters. How do you have effective policing effective policing does mean trying to prevent shootings trying to crime, but it also means trying. Trying to do so working with the community responsibly, and not with the police acting violently, and that issue is being handled by not by trump a by state, local leaders in places like Minneapolis and places like Seattle and places like Atlanta they are trying to pursue a new type of policing that can actually deal with this with the long term, and not for the purpose of a soundbite with Donald trump screams, law and order even as he's trying to undermine it.

President Donald Trump New York Oregon Portland Chicago Scott Lucas Atlanta Nancy Pelosi University Of Birmingham Los Angeles Ted Wheeler Richard Nixon Homeland Security Professor George W Bush Administration George Floyd Russ Rodney
Justice for Breonna Taylor with Andrea J Ritchie

The Nod

05:58 min | 1 year ago

Justice for Breonna Taylor with Andrea J Ritchie

"March thirteen, twenty twenty Briana was shot and killed by police in Louisville Kentucky. In what's been described as a botched raid officers barged into Taylor's apartment under a no knock warrant and fired multiple rounds. No drugs were found the no knock warrant in question was actually for Taylor's ex boyfriend and his friends who live miles away. It had already been detained by the time. Please enter Taylor's home. As maddening as honest death is most Americans hadn't even heard of it until nearly three months later as the national unrest around the deaths of Egmont arbitrary and George Floyd's began to unfold. What all the stories of those killed and brutalized by police are important. Brianna isn't the first black woman to have hers reduced to a footnote in the larger narrative. Why are the guests of black women at the hands of police received so much differently, and what can we do to change that? Today to help us understand. We're joined by Andrea J, reaching the author of invisible, no more police violence against black women and women of color. Andrea Richie thank you so much for joining us today. Thanks so much for having me, so let's jump right into it and start with your book invisible. No more. Can you tell us a bit about it and like what inspired you to write this? One inspire me to write invisible. No more was the work that I've been doing for the past couple of decades, documenting or around litigating around advocating around and just generally Around black women girls, Queer and Trans People's experiences, policing and wanting to provide some context for the individual cases that we were hearing about so for instance thinking about Brianna Taylor. If you looked invisible, no more you learn that. Unfortunately she's far from the first black woman who was killed in a no knock drug raid. You bring up Taylor and I know there's definitely this feeling when I look at her case. In the cases of other black women would been killed at the hands of police. It seems like they don't get as much attention as the cases of black man who had been killed by the police. But the thing you point out your book is that that's not a feeling that that is reality. He talked to us a bit about that pattern. Yeah I think the title of the book is both a statement of fact, a demand an aspiration, right? It's a statement of fact that hosts Sandra. Bland black women's experiences of policing are no longer invisible. In the way they were pre twenty fifteen often say that before twenty fifty nine. I feel like I'd be talking underwater constantly about violence against women and girls, and it just wasn't landing, and then all of a sudden in two thousand fifteen. It's like my. My head popped above water, and suddenly there was also a lot of other voices speaking in same same thing, so in that sense. We're at an unprecedented level visibility of black women's experiences of policing. I would say that's true for Briana Taylor. There's a way in which we still have a long way to go for black women's experiences to be at the center of our consciousness around this issue to be informed by Black Women's experiences. That's the next step we have to move past visibility to action. Why do you think there's been such a difference between the reception? Of Brianna? Taylor versus Church Floyd. Our understanding of police violence is definitely shaped to the experiences, a black man who are assumed to be straight and not Trans Right. That's the story of state violence that we hear that with the media reproduces that we produce the telling stories to each other in such a way that even when black women's experiences happen in broad daylight on camera in the same way, the happened for George Floyd. Are Invisible in some way when you look at the incident report for Briana. Taylor's killing. It says no one was injured. And that's just an extreme example of how invisible violence against black women is. Here's a black woman who died in a hail of bullets blood out in her own bed in her own home where she was sleeping. Police report says no one was hurt the last reason i. think it's invisible is because. If as a society, we had to contend with state violence against black women that's informed by both anti blackness and gender violence right beside more than we would have to contend with anti black women violence in our communities. Contend again with the fact that this nation is built on violence against black women's bodies and black and Trans bodies and we're not ready to do that. You know there's this theory, though I think we've all heard that part of the reason why there's such a big difference between the response to be honest anthem response to George. Is that free? Honest wasn't caught on camera quick. Do you think about that I unfortunately point people to a lot of videotape? Black women dying on camera to police Natasha McKenna is a ten minute video of her being. tased to death by police there's. Video of Doina Johnson, a Black Trans woman, being brutally beaten in the police precinct that did not inspire an uprising in the same way that Rodney. King stood. They don't WanNa. Keep repeating kind of the the degree of violence, but what I want to say is that there's no shortage of videotaped evidence of police violence against black women I don't. Think that's. The entirety of the story is something. They also feels especially Kinda unique about Brianna Taylor's case is that it's almost become this this inescapable meam as of late like people I've seen weird social media posts like even sometimes dance challenges like it. It's kind of taken on a life of its own ultimately is that type of attention is? Is that helpful or harmful? I think that it recreates some of the narratives that produce the death of black women. I think it's recreating the notion. The objectification of black women that in this case Brianna Taylor story is an opportunity to make. A clever pun or acute mean and we've lost spree on his humanity in that. We've lost the fact that she was a sister. She was a daughter. She was an emt. She was someone who was full of joy of laughter jokes the life of the party she was. Multidimensional Person Right and I think we just need to be careful that we're not turning visibility in the way that black women have been made visible in ways that are harmful produce more violence.

Black Women Brianna Taylor Briana Taylor George Floyd Louisville Kentucky Andrea Richie Andrea J Church Floyd Sandra Wanna Doina Johnson King Natasha Mckenna Rodney
Technology Helps Train Police Officers

WSJ The Future of Everything

07:52 min | 1 year ago

Technology Helps Train Police Officers

"Around the country for the past few weeks, protests have erupted over the killing of George Floyd. The arrests kindle renewed outrage over the deaths of black Americans like Brianna Taylor Eric Garner Michael Brown among many others and the mistreatment of people of Color by police. The protests have also sparked and national reckoning for many police departments. They've been trying to reduce the use of lethal force and improve accountability among other things through training. From The Wall Street Journal this is the future of everything I'm Janet Baben. Today on the show we'll consider the future of police training with virtual reality technology. What's most powerful about the are? You're able to create worlds and circumstances and experiences that you wouldn't be able to create in the real world that can help you shift your perspective, which is really different than a training. We'll speak with researchers about how the brain perceives are and whether it can address bias. Notwithstanding or conscious beliefs or conscious convictions, and we'll talk about why a future developments in Vr police training may fall short. Tell me why you shot. Shot because he was within that zone, you know I felt there was leased departments have long used actors playing and instructional videos to train officers to deal with real life scenarios, but this can be. Pricey and not very realistic. People who make and sell virtual reality say the technology can improve training. If you play video games. You're probably familiar with VR. It's been around for a while, but we asked Wall Street Journal attack video game reporter Sara Needham, in to explain virtual reality is all encompassing. It's a matter of hardware so when you put on APR headset. Everything you see up down left right turnaround. Everything is in there virtual world one hundred percent. You cannot see anything else, so you feel very immersed the main difference between VR other video simulations you can actually interact with this computer generated three D world. It's so. That Sarah says you can get sucked in and lose yourself. I experienced this myself. playing a racing game where I was sitting down very low, and we felt like a cockpit of a vehicle, and as we went around the turns, I literally felt like we were going to crash into the wall, because I wasn't driving very well, and it scared me. For Police. It's not about the thrill or fear of race track. It's about learning how to lean into the fear and still be able to deal with it calmly. If you feel like you've done something before been in a situation before. You're better at knowing how to react. You can practice your actions in these potentially life, threatening situations and hopefully resolve altercations peacefully. We'll talk more about this in just a bit. It's one of the reasons that some of the biggest law enforcement groups in the country like the Los Angeles. Police Department are turning to Vr. The LAPD has a history connected to police, misconduct and misuse force. In Nineteen ninety-one. Were caught on tape brutally beating motorist Rodney. King a black, man. The officers acquitted of criminal charges sparking riots in Los Angeles. In the early two thousands. The department was put under Federal Investigation for. Engaging in a pattern or practice of excessive force, false arrests and unreasonable searches and seizures, the government came in with what's known as a consent decree to change the culture in the LAPD. Dr. Lou Pinella joined the department in the middle of all that in two thousand five. The Rodney King incident put a laser focus on LAPD, tactics and training as well. I believe that we have continued to expand on that every year, both by how we work with our community and the training that we offer. She's the director of Police Training and education at the LAPD and she revamped its training. Process Department currently trains officers with something called a forced option simulator. It's often referred to as first generation. VR says it trains police in real life scenarios you walk into a room and one walls, completely blank and on their, we will project a scenario that an officer has to handle. Handle, it could be anything from a person in a park to a bank robbery to an office scenario, workplace violence scenario, something like that and officers will get a call, and they'll come into the room and and try to respond to what is in front of them. In the meantime, there's a instructor at the back of the room who be on a computer. Computer and as the scenario unfolding, they are able to branch in different directions, where either the officers are calming, the situation down, or it becomes more difficult to handle

Police Department Officer Lapd Rodney King George Floyd Janet Baben Los Angeles The Wall Street Journal Brianna Taylor Dr. Lou Pinella Sarah Process Department Michael Brown Eric Garner Instructor Sara Needham Robbery
Lack of Accountability for Police Violence is Solvable

Solvable

05:09 min | 1 year ago

Lack of Accountability for Police Violence is Solvable

"This is solvable. I'm Jacob Weisberg. There is a lack of accountability for police, violence and one part of. Solving that is to give federal prosecutors more tools, so they can actually prosecute this cases. Approximately a thousand people killed during police encounters in the United States every year. And in fact, that number is held steady for nearly twenty years. Around half of those killed or white. Black Americans are more than twice as likely to die at the hands of police. They are killed disproportionately to their overall representation in the population. I'm thinking about. Say The shooting of Philander Castille. CAPLESS Tamir Rice twelve year, old boy, who was shot and killed by an officer when playing in a park in Cleveland. How do we achieve racial justice while protecting public safety? Lawyer Cheer Baynes believes the federal. Government has a key role to play. What exactly would you like to see? Happen there for Congress to lower the intense standard from willfulness recklessness, so that it would be a federal crime recklessly deprive someone of their rights under color of law to recklessly use excessive force for all the Americans who died during police encounters in less than two percent of cases, does an officer end up being charged with a crime? When you were at Doj how many times did specific language of willful thwart possible prosecution of of an officer? You think you felt a done something wrong. Routinely, that was the biggest barrier. It was always the central concern. Kira. Who's devoted his career to ending impunity for officers who commit crimes against citizens thinks we can fix this. The problem of lack of accountability for police violence is solvable. Cheering Baines is the director of Legal Strategies de Moth a racial justice organization before that he worked at the US Department of Justice, serving a senior counsel to the head the civil. Rights Division, that's the division that investigated. Ferguson Missouri and sued the city for unconstitutional policing and court practices. Baynes Co wrote the Ferguson report. Malcolm Bradwell spoke to Baynes about what needs to be done to solve the persistent problem of police impunity at the national level. To critical components are lowering the intense standard for the federal government to prosecute active excessive force criminally and using federal consent decrees to address systemic misconduct. You've been working on this question of how to make police better for quite some time right? Yes, actually. It's been an issue that's been. An issue that I've been distressed by want to do something about since I was a young kid. Actually the Rodney King case happened in the beating of Rodney King. One thousand, nine, hundred, one I was ten years old, and there are a lot of high profile incidents in the hundred ninety s with I'm dirty, yellow Louima and many other high profile cases of police violence police killings. Finish cared about as a high schooler for sure I can remember that were you in high school Chelmsford High School? It's a small town in Massachusetts next to the city of Lowell, maybe about thirty thousand thirty five thousand people. It wasn't like you were. LIVING IN LA or living in the Bronx where Ahmadou was shot, it was you were these were instance miles away. That nonetheless caught your attention. Absolutely these are national stories and I was very interested in. Civil Rights history even civil rights law. The role of lawyers in the civil rights movement. I think maybe juxtaposed that history and the principles underlying that movement with what I was seeing. Play out in terms of police violence in the country. At that time, and actually can remember. An organization called the stolen lives project that would collect information about the people who have been killed by police, disproportionately young black man. That is something that I recall, so. It's something I've. been working on for a long time ended up working on that some more in law school, focusing on it, and then it on my first job after clerking for a federal judge was to actually prosecute police misconduct cases including police violence. How early on you decide that? You wanted to become a lawyer depressingly early? Han actually I think I thought in high school. That would become a lawyer. What did you think of that decision? Well I'm an Indian kid and the child immigrants and so. I think a lot of people in that boat might relate. My mother wanted me to be a doctor. That would million other Indian children. Yeah Yeah. It's a common refrain and. Short of being a doctor, a lawyer was pretty good, so. But you know my family wasn't focused on these issues. These weren't the issues that they confronted him and they cared about it. In the sense research, generally aware my grandmother used to describe all this work as a community service or volunteer work and I'd have to actually get paid to do this job.

Officer Chelmsford High School Cheer Baynes DOJ Rodney King Jacob Weisberg Rights Division United States Baynes Co Philander Castille Ferguson Missouri Baines Congress Tamir Rice Massachusetts Cleveland Kira LA
"rodney king" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"rodney king" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"Have to do it out of me just we as a people we as a group to to actually you know move this forward or to have a real change I think we need to have those uncomfortable conversations because everybody tiptoes around everybody but now we need to get to the root of it because everybody has their judgment within themselves so if you have these into intimate conversations uncomfortable conversation yeah move forward you know cultural awareness that's what we do at the Rodney king foundation we bring culture awareness so that people are aware because something's we're not we're we're both all stars were not aware of so if I give you good understanding of who people are at the core because we were all raised differently and so some of those things are generational curses unfortunately so that's what we do we break down those generational curses so that we can move forward with each other because at the end of the day we are our brothers and sisters you know my dad say can we get along he he was asking a question he wasn't making a statement but everybody turned into a statement can we get along if we get if we stopped getting killed yeah tell them we don't keep running our lifes why what do you expect you know we can't just keep saying can we get along and we get we've been saying that for you right over four hundred years you know I look at what gives me strength I look at old images of what our ancestors all of our ancestors jewels everybody went through and that gives me power to keep going you know I can't wake up I don't feel like it many people did it before us and we got to keep going we have to use our look what we are we're able to use our voice even though it's muted we can still keep I heard dad queen well Laura Kane thank you for coming into the neighborhood and and just sharing everything that you shared with us thank you so much for having me I appreciate may god bless you going lower king in the neighborhood yeah stick around your radios big boy's neighborhood at the yeah like you can you can never hit my hide caption the switch I don't thank how do you a level Bechtel Depp is dead and the version is likely to buyers did just like two thousand dollars.

Rodney king foundation Laura Kane Bechtel Depp
A Decade Of Watching Black People Die

Short Wave

05:54 min | 1 year ago

A Decade Of Watching Black People Die

"Family of Kentucky Woman, shot and killed by police is demanding answers. The former, his son both white are accused of killing the unarmed black man again with the breaking news for Minneapolis violent protests raged for a second straight night, following the death of George Floyd after being arrested by a Minneapolis police officer last night, protesters turned their attention to the city's. The last few weeks have been filled with devastating news stories about police killing black people. And what is sick is that these stories have become the kind of news that we in the business call evergreen their stories that are always relevant and always in season, these calamities are so familiar. This point they're details have begun to echo each other July. Twenty fourteen, a cell phone video captured some of Eric Garner's final words as New York City Police officers sat on his head and pinned him to the ground on a city sidewalk. I can't breathe. Or May twenty fifth of this year those same words were spoken by George Floyd. Just before he died, he pleaded for release, as an officer kneeled on his neck in pins of the ground on a Minneapolis City Street, so we're at the point with verbiage, people used to plead for their lives can be re purposed as shorthand for completely different stories and part of our job here coast, which is to conceptualize and make sense of news like this. But genus is hard to come up with something new to say you know things we haven't already said or things we have already recorded protesters saying when we were both in Ferguson in August of twenty fourteen after Michael. Brown was killed by the police or when we were in Baltimore after Freddie Gray's death. I spent the day with junior. High school kids in West. Baltimore where Freddie Gray was from on the first day. Let kids return to school after all the protests and I will never forget the eighth grade boy who raised his hand to ask. Why have white people been killing us in slavery and they're still killing us. He said that on Wednesday April Twenty Ninth Twenty fifteen. Since it's so hard to come up with any fresh insights about this phenomenon. We thought we would look back to another time. When the nation turned collective attention to this perpetual problem. Jamile Smith Senior Writer for Rolling Stone magazine. In when I was at the new republic. wrote an article entitled. What does seeing black men die? Do for you. It was published on April Thirteenth Two Thousand Fifteen. We get to see black men tortured or killed by police a lot more often these days. So, it's worth recalling why a generation ago. It mattered so much to see what happened to Rodney King. Now the story that might never have surfaced if someone hadn't picked up his home video camera. We've all seen. We have certainly seen the black and white photographs and videos depicting police abuse of African Americans. And we'd seen the grainy images of lynchings passed. But the conventional ignorance was that this wasn't the America. We lived in now. Officers beating a man they had just pulled over. This was the early nineties after all. This was in America that viewed law enforcement in the context of the popular reality, show cops, and were Morton Downey Junior tabloid television style made uncensored aggression a form of entertainment. But when George Holidays video surface chuck him with batons of between fifty three and fifty six times signal to a lot of citizens, just how bad police violence visited upon marginalized communities, actually was six kicks and one officer one kick people either didn't know what was happening. or willfully ignorant of it. They needed to wake up. Say The Los. Angeles Police Department has a history of brutality and misconduct that goes back a quarter of a century day. We are not sure that the police is there to protect us. The fear of becoming the next Rodney King is still here. But what has changed is how often we are viewing that fear being realized. Jamal goes on to write that the ubiquity of cell phone cameras and dashboard cameras means this uncensored horror has become available on demand. He says he watched twenty two year old Oscar grant get shot and killed by a police officer on Youtube before it made it to broadcast news. That happened in Oakland in two thousand, nine on New Year's Day. And it really marked the beginning of this grim genre, in which the slain become memorialized as Hashtags Hashtag justice for Oscar grant and remember Walters Gun Eric Harris, Jomo rights videos of them, being killed became public almost back to back in two thousand fifteen. Both men were running away when the shots were fired. Walter Scott Fifty was trying to escape North Charleston police officer Michael slager. Who Shot him eight times in the back? Before planning evidence near his body to support a false account of the incident. Eric Harris was running from a team of Tulsa County deputies when Elderly Insurance Executive Robert Bates. WHO's donations to the SHERIFF'S OFFICE IN MODICUM? Training earned him the title of Reserve Deputy. Shot him dead.

Officer Rodney King George Floyd Minneapolis Michael Slager Angeles Police Department Eric Garner America New York City Freddie Gray Kentucky White Walter Scott Fifty Baltimore Rolling Stone Magazine Eric Harris Oscar Ferguson Morton Downey Sheriff's Office
Philadelphia police inspector charged with beating protester

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

05:45 min | 1 year ago

Philadelphia police inspector charged with beating protester

"Tonight. PHILADELPHIA'S DA charging police department staff inspector. That's a high ranking police officer with aggravated assault. After a college student was struck in the head with a baton while protesting on Monday but police departments argue the violence goes both ways. Cameras have also captured images of and PD cops appearing to be struck with bricks and projectiles. Some. With US tonight to talk about all of it. Chief of police for the city of Detroit Michigan James Craig Chief. Thank you very much for coming on and the chicken egg question to you is happening more, or are we seeing it more? You, know it's happening. More Brian I can take I've been a practitioner now forty four years. I was on the front seat. Of the. Unrest in Rodney King after the acquittal of the officers and riot so. This is a very different time I'm not seeing anything like it. And certainly the videos show of the Brooklyn officers troubling. I mean is one thing to put someone I don't know circumstances that led up to that. Certainly appeared not to be resist he. Certainly up in age, and then once he hits the ground bleeding. DISTAL walk by and that Render A. That's the one thing that you know when I think about Detroit. Police officers. Ribbon confrontations with violent suspects that are also had to use deadly force. But quickly transitions from. A trying to protect themselves in the community and then render a right away. And then in instances, transport him to the hospital. So to see that It was troubling. That's not what we're here for. The Sad. So many of the protesters have said some version of you try living our lives with the threat. We feel to our lives every day. Friends of mine who are on the job and police departments have. Contacted me to say you try working at twelve, a twelve hour shift getting yelled at and being in equal measure. Fearful and angry on a protest line and there. We have the equation, don't we? We absolutely do Bryant I was out on the front lines with our officers and certainly fortunately over the last several days. We had piece of protests. There have been no confrontations the day, one two, and and some of three. We're talking about projectiles being thrown at the officers in one instance a m. a railroad spikes correct. Railroad spikes I mean. Have you seen? I mean this is the weapon Using a certain way can cause break bodily harm. And so Those officers warrant at Front Line Professional. Resilient. Some of them are being spat upon. The named they were calling. They maintain. I, started nineteen, seventy seven Brian. And it certainly was a different day, so my hat goes out the vast majority, but certainly. This is not to say that those who step across a lion talking about men and women. we have to take a higher ground, but also dealing with violent. Protesters, and I'm not talking about the peaceful protest because the vast majority of them. have been peaceful. They, just want the voices heard, and we support that here in Detroit and it's worked out whale, but there have been a few valid incomes. And you've made this point locally in Detroit so well that. These. Peaceful protests and what happens at night are literally like night and day Do you have a percentage on the arrests you've made at night. How of the percentage of arrestees are from Detroit and how many are not? Seventy Percent Ryan, seventy percent. From outside of Detroit, the Metro area. And then we arrested. Confu about estate three California. So three from California from Ohio Kentucky. And so the million dollar question is why are you here? Why are you in Detroit there? Protests going on out across country. You can stay in New York in protest. WHY COME TO DETROIT? CAN SPECULATE! But certainly those are the ones that are really triggering, but but here's the magic disclosing on Detroit right now Brian, track, the African American community stands with this police department stands with this blaze chief several days ago. they said in a resounding way go home. We don't need you here. You'RE NOT GONNA. Burn our city and I remember a young man growing up here in Detroit in nineteen, sixty seven was a boy. And I remember riot, and I remember what it was like I remember the racism and the beatings. That's it then I would never be a police officer. Tonight here are say many years later. And so excited to be back home in certain meeting. One of the finest booths department America.

Detroit Officer Brian United States James Craig Chief Rodney King Assault Michigan Philadelphia California Brooklyn America Bryant New York Kentucky Ohio
Defense secretary opposes deploying active troops following Trump threat

Bill Handel

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Defense secretary opposes deploying active troops following Trump threat

"U. S. defense secretary mark esper says he's against sending active duty military members to deal with criminal behavior at protests the option to use active duty forces in a law enforcement role should only be used as a matter of last resort and only in the most urgent and dire of situations we are not in one of those situations now I do not support invoking the insurrection act the insurrection act is a law from eighteen oh seven that was most recently used during the Rodney king riots in nineteen ninety two president trump told governors earlier this week he would send in the military if states fail to call in the National Guard some states had already done so including California

Mark Esper Donald Trump National Guard California U. S. President Trump
What is the Insurrection Act and why has it been invoked before?

Buck Sexton

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

What is the Insurrection Act and why has it been invoked before?

"Active duty military police have landed at joint base Andrews as president trump threatens to use force to subdue violent protests in secretary mark as far as ordered troops from Fort Bragg and fort drum just stage in the Washington DC area and injures airforce base in poor fell for a defense official tells fox news that unless president trump invokes the insurrection act the active troops could not deploy into DC and acted in eighteen oh seven the law allows the president United States to deployed military troops within the U. S. to suppress civil disorder insurrection and rebellion it was last invoked it during the Rodney king protest in nineteen ninety

Donald Trump Fort Bragg Fort Drum Official President Trump United States Andrews Secretary FOX Rodney King
D.C. bishop 'outraged' Trump used tear gas on citizens for photo op at church

Here & Now

04:34 min | 1 year ago

D.C. bishop 'outraged' Trump used tear gas on citizens for photo op at church

"The White House Twitter account meanwhile posted a produced video documenting the president's response soon after he said this in the rose garden I am here president of law and order and an ally of all peaceful protesters but in recent days our nation has been gripped by professional anarchists violent mobs arsonists looters criminals riders antifa and others as the president spoke National Guard troops were breaking up peaceful protests outside of the White House the president then walked to the historic but boarded up Saint John's church known as the church of presidents to have his photo taken holding a Bible joining us now for more is NPR national political correspondent Mara license and Mara president trump was widely criticized for standing in front of that church including by the episcopal bishop of DC called a charade what was the president trying to achieve and do you think he achieved that and that moment when he I gave their statements I think what he was trying to achieve was sent a message to his base that he as you just heard him say is the president of law and order he also said that he was dispatching thousands and thousands of heavily armed soldiers in DC so the message was about cracking down not calming down he did say he wanted justice for George Floyd and his family but that was just one sentence he didn't say exactly how he wants to go about that whether it's prosecuting the police officers are setting up a task force on racism and police departments that the speech was very militaristic there have been some polling that showed that his base was slipping and he went back to one of his core messages about law and order and he ran on this in twenty sixteen the unrest in Ferguson and Baltimore helped him win and I think he thinks it's gonna help him again that threat to send the military into states that don't control protesters there's a lot of debate about whether he can actually do that or should he do that is not likely to happen well he can't do it whether he will do it is another question he said yesterday that he strongly recommends that every governor deployed the National Guard a lot of governors have already deployed the National Guard then he said that if you don't establish an overwhelming law enforcement presence I will deploy the U. S. military and and solve the problem now this is a little bit reminiscent of his stance during the pandemic which is I have total authority but the governors have total responsibility I don't think that the president will federalize the National Guard if he does that then he is responsible for quelling the unrest all over the country but I think that he absolutely cam or something called the insurrection act which allows him to federalize the National Guard it's been used before in nineteen ninety two after the Rodney king riots in Los Angeles bought at that time it was California elected officials the mayor of Los Angeles who requested that the U. S. military help yeah Joe Biden gave a speech today in Philadelphia ripping into the president's response to the protests what was his message and and how do you expect this issue to play out on the campaign over the next several months well I think this issue will be a big one in the campaign of course that helping depends on how long the protests going on how long the riots go on but Joe Biden has been struggling to get some air time the president has dominated the media narrative and Joe Biden is presenting himself as the polar opposite of the president and he's someone who will heal the nation he will deal with these systemic problems don't forget what gave rise to these rights was a kind of triple whammy of the pandemic has hit African American communities harder than any other the unemployment in the recession has hit African American communities harder than any other and now this these instances of police brutality so young African American men ages eighteen to twenty five who've been sitting home cooked up locked down for the last couple of months they haven't been teleworking you know they've been suffering from each one of these problems and it was a recipe for violence and Joe Biden says I can fix these problems Donald Trump isn't even addressing them that's Marlize Senshi is national political correspondent for NPR Mar as always thank you thank you

President Trump White House Twitter
How to reform American police, according to experts

Morning Edition

01:13 min | 1 year ago

How to reform American police, according to experts

"Several protests were also held in Hollywood and later looters raided a drug store on local strip mall there Connie rice is a long time civil rights attorney she worked with the LAPD on reforms after the nineteen ninety two Rodney king unrest and is a former member of president Obama's task force on twenty first century policing so what does she make of this moment rice says the LAPD has made some real gains but she says the policing profession as a whole has not this is structural we're talking systemic that's hard for people to see and understand because they can't touch it but for the first time so if you do you change the mission of policing it's not about tactics training it's about the mission if the mission is containment suppression you can't get good results from that you're going to get these riots rice also told KCRW's press play that the protests are one thing the looting is something else altogether the leaders are just opportunists and they're damaging both the because they've taken the focus off the gross injustice in the criminal justice system and and the and the atrocities that were done and then it went down to Florida and dozens of others in other videos and and they're they're just out for selfish narcissistic

Hollywood Connie Rice Attorney Lapd President Trump Barack Obama Kcrw Florida
Celebs take to streets for historic demonstrations

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Celebs take to streets for historic demonstrations

"A person who has won both an Oscar and Grammy is urging other celebrities to step it up when it comes to speaking out against police brutality Jamie Foxx was in Los Angeles for the Rodney king beating when cities exploded in rage when officers responsible for it work within of criminal charges now the actor and singer is taking part in a kneeling in San Francisco to protest the death of George Floyd who died after his neck was pinned under the need of a white Minneapolis police officer last month fox urged a crowd not to fall for official explanations about how Floyd came to its end how can we see it as a murder and they see it as a misunderstanding fox also urge other celebrities to speak out he says they need to leave their coldest sacks and join protesters on the courthouse steps I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Oscar Jamie Foxx Los Angeles Rodney King San Francisco George Floyd Officer FOX Murder Grammy Minneapolis Official Oscar Wells Gabriel
Protests flare again in US amid calls to end police violence

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Protests flare again in US amid calls to end police violence

"President trump is urging more states to call out the National Guard to fight back against violent protests the president's blaming the media and anarchists for fomenting violence and says liberal mayors and governors must get tougher pointing to Minnesota's National Guard sharply cutting down on violent protests over the weekend the Pentagon said Saturday it was ready to save active duty troops to Minneapolis if needed the ground very quickly if they have a lot of military active duty forces are normally banned from acting as a law enforcement agency in the U. S. but the insurrection act of eighteen oh seven offers an exception he was last invoked in nineteen ninety two after the Rodney king trial led to massive riots in Los Angeles there was no indication over the weekend the president intended to invoke the act Sager mag ani Washington

Donald Trump National Guard President Trump Minnesota Pentagon Minneapolis Los Angeles Rodney King Ani Washington
Protests flare again in US amid calls to end police violence

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Protests flare again in US amid calls to end police violence

"President trump is urging more states to call out the National Guard to fight back against violent protests the president's blaming the media and anarchists for fomenting violence and says liberal mayors and governors must get tougher pointing to Minnesota's National Guard sharply cutting down on violent protests over the weekend the Pentagon said Saturday it was ready to save active duty troops to Minneapolis if needed the ground very quickly if they have a lot of military active duty forces are normally banned from acting as a law enforcement agency in the U. S. but the insurrection act of eighteen oh seven offers an exception he was last invoked in nineteen ninety two after the Rodney king trial led to massive riots in Los Angeles there was no indication over the weekend the president intended to invoke the act Sager mag ani Washington

Donald Trump National Guard President Trump Minnesota Pentagon Minneapolis Los Angeles Rodney King Ani Washington
"rodney king" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"rodney king" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Karen Miller as we continue to confront coronavirus questions have popped up about the role of government what should it be what should national leadership look like today we're going to bring you a story not about corona virus what about the role of government and not about a fast moving crisis what about the slow moving one this is the story of an experiment and experiment undertaken just a few decades ago by the federal government to fix what in the early nineteen nineties felt to many government officials like an unsolvable problem entrenched poverty in America the country America cannot keep its place in the world cannot be the leadership nation we wanted to be in the next century allowing the development of a permanent underclass Henry Cisneros was secretary of housing and urban development in the Clinton administration and he thought a lot about geography where poor people lived and how much those places affected their income but and here's where the experiment piece comes in let's suppose the federal government could pick up a family and put them somewhere else with their income go up simply because of where they lived for Cisneros the question was pressing the economy was rough president Clinton's approval ratings were low and many urban neighborhoods were on edge in nineteen ninety two major riots had erupted in Los Angeles after the police beating of a man named Rodney king the incident was taped by an onlooker aired on television and the policeman who did it were found not guilty.

Karen Miller federal government America Henry Cisneros Clinton administration president Clinton Los Angeles secretary Rodney king
"rodney king" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

15:17 min | 1 year ago

"rodney king" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"The trial of Oliver north the trial of officers accused in the Rodney king beating and litigation involving Michael Jackson Martha Stewart scooter Libby and the Duke University lacrosse players one further note she has been called a **** by a prosecutor in a courthouse hallway she was assaulted by a passenger on an airplane shouting your that woman and has occasionally required surveillance by plain clothes security guards at lectures the war over memory is one of the great and perturbing stories of our time and Elizabeth Loftis an expert on memory malleability stands at the highly charged center of it in time you thought this was just going to be a friendly little chat hi Dave Dino hi everybody thanks for joining this is very nice okay Dave Dino here's the story we do this once a week we've done it now for many many weeks and every once in a while I think we should get a smart guy as a guest and we came up with the smart guy Dr Loftis this woman is so truly extraordinary and the work that she does is very different from the work of other people in light of the fact that she's looking at something that nobody really looks at and it's so important you know you just mention some of those cases that she was on and indeed our jurors and judges have gone along with her views on this almost every single time mmhm so when we had a chance to get her I thought this would be a nice thing for our pals out there that listen to this and say a few things about this very exciting technique and observations the doctor left his house so with that doctor nice of you to be on the show my pleasure okay how did you get this way let's start with an I shuddered at what how far back do I go to how did I get this way the memories do you have this appointment do well do you mean how did I get into the study of false memories are well let's start somewhere okay okay tell us a little bit about your educational background first a man I want to you to tell us a little bit how you got into this memory business okay so what I'll go back to college I graduated from UCLA with a a bachelor's degree in mathematics and also in psychology I then went to Stanford for graduate school and received my PhD in psychology and while I was at Stanford I began to study memory with another professor collaborator and it was starting very theoretical aspects of memory the kind of aspects that you could maybe talk to five other people about me would care and at some point the at some point I decided I really wanted to study something that had a little more obvious and immediate social relevance and so I decided well how bout memory for crimes and accidents and other kinds of events that end up in court cases and that's what I began to do studying witnesses to crimes accidents and other legally relevant events anybody else do this arched sure there were no I'm I'm you know one of many psychologists who well many of them do the kind of theoretical technical work that I was initially doing others are interested in I witness testimony others others other psychological scientists are studying memory for these kinds of rich events you come at this though from more than an intellectual perspective you come at this from having confronted a false memory of your own a well I've had the experience of of somebody sort of suggesting something to me hi I. if by that time I'd already been working on memory distortion for a couple of decades but if you're asking about the memory that I had of my mother at them so so that was really in the nineteen nineties I'd already for a couple of decades been working on memory distortion but I was just getting started with these rich of false memories and looking into the whole repressed memory controversy the memory wars eight I want to uncles ninetieth birthday of their relatives talk suggested to me that I was the one who are discovered my mother's body when I was fourteen years old and she drowned in a swimming pool I said no I I I don't it wasn't me it was a it was my aunt her sister who discovered the no it was you and I this relative was someone system thought I thought maybe maybe I really did maybe I had just forgotten it or repressed it or something and I began to visualize this discovery I could actually see it in my mind and then it was about a week later that the relative call to apologize I made a mistake it wasn't you who found the body but I did find myself in the position of using the you know my mental visualization mental whatever and I was you know well on my way to developing this false memory but your mind can block out a very horrific things right what what it depends on on what you mean by by block out there certainly we can not think about things and be reminded of them we cannot think about even pretty upsetting things and be reminded of them you just have to go to a high school reunion you can experience out for yourself but whether we can take let's say a decade's worth of rapes banish it into the unconscious repress it walled off from the rest of my life until you go into therapy and then by some process it gets dug out you can reliably trusted there in there it really is no credible scientific support for this okay how bout if it isn't decades of it how about a rate to a young girl at twelve years old or something is it possible that that person can so is life goes on Wall this off so even if she were to take a lie detector test it would show up normal if they said would you ever rate well when we can get into the whole issue about the reliability the polygraph and because it's that that's that's a bit questionable but I I I I think I see what you're getting at I what what certainly somebody could have an awful experience and then not think about it and even try to push it out of out of my mind and and then be reminded of it later but whether there's some process like repression or whatever else you want to call it traumatic amnesia or something I just haven't seen any good credible scientific support for this you are listening to champions of justice with Tom Girardi and Jim o'callaghan and our guest today is Dr Elizabeth Loftis professor at UC Irvine and the topic on the table is repressed memory and false memory syndrome Jim the doctor Loftis one of the things that I was curious about is whether or not the idea of people having repressed memories is a recent construction because it's historically was that something that people believed existed if you go back to the classical age or the renaissance period or the enlightenment period well I'm I'm not sure I can go back that far but certainly it was an idea that was popularized by by Freud and it's it's it's now what kind of hand me down Freudian ideas that you can take this massive brutalization and and banish it into the unconscious where it you know what exists in in some pristine foreman can recover it later on but it it it really became super popular in the late nineteen eighties in the early nineteen nineties when people started to go into therapy and by some process dig out these are horrific memories and they started to accuse their parents of abuse or their other relatives of their former neighbors are teachers or doctors or whomever and it was then at that time that I started looking at the evidence for this this is a widespread belief and was pretty shocked to find how poor the evidence was no kidding huh so as far as your research and study and so forth takes you when stuff happens you can always remember it some some way somehow no not I it's not that I would say that that's not quite true either but but because we have forgetting the normal process of forgetting in as as time goes by and we're forgetting things our memories are also becoming more and more prone to susceptible to contamination distortion transformation and so you know you can have something awful happened to you and and by some process of forgetting and exposure the suggestion you can on not think about it and maybe not even remember Tom you have dealt with this on a first name basis you have been involved in some of the cases of allegations of abuse by Catholic priests sure without a doubt and they do know that this happens many times there was a case in which this person was on a motorcycle and didn't remember anything and then he was told by the lawyer that she was you didn't remember anything and there's there's not a witness and the defendant driver and they remembered everything so I don't think there's any way to go forward and about a week later the guy calls the lawyer and he says it all came to me I remembered everything now and so forth so needless to say that lawyer was a pretty good fellow and he decided that just maybe wasn't going to go down there to that courthouse and put that testimony on but I would love to be an expert witness for the defense in that case no in the cases that I alluded to for Tom would you sometimes and have been engaged by the defense for perhaps one of the priests that was accused would you have been in get I mean not that you were but is that the type of case that you would have been engaged for where you might have examine the person making the accusations well for here I'm sitting in it with a two plaintiffs attorneys a minute go forward and then they're not gonna throw tomatoes at me but I have been involved on the health of many defendants in clergy abuse cases and teacher abuse and other other kinds of cases because of all these kids are coming in so of course there many actual real cases obviously there are and but they're also false cases and and such what I see in some of these situations is you know somebody comes forward maybe they had they they've never told anyone until they were adults so they my mate or maybe they did tell somebody at the time they weren't believe they have a a continuous memory and then there's some publicity about the case and other people come forward and other people come forward and say you know I sign I think I am recovering over repressed memory of that priest abusing me too they try to use the continuous memory as well as corroboration for their repressed memory and and so these cases are actually you know breathing some new life into this repression folklore the doctor's office you use three phrases contamination of I forget the second phrase in transformation could you walk us through what the significance of those three terms that are in with respect to repress memories well all the day to I think to answer that'll have to step back tell you a little bit about the actual scientific work that I do so in in in many of my early studies we would show people of films as a simulated accidents or simulated crimes and then we would deliberately try to distort their memory for for what they saw we'd we'd ask them suggestive relating questions we'd expect allow them to be exposed to another witness who had an a Roni is version of what happened and we would look to see when and under what conditions in an on the processes by which people will absorb that new misinformation incorporated into their memory and it causes a contamination on an alteration in the memory so I can show somebody assimilated accident where a car goes through a stop sign and then by just asking a leading question that insinuates it was a yield sign I'll get many many witnesses to say I saw a yield sign controlling that intersection not a stop sign now let me let me interrupt you now they're not intentionally line are they no no they they they have that well that by some process these they've visualize this event they've added this new bit of information that got supplied later and they've essentially constructed a memory for something that that that's distorted about they constructed it themselves they're not lying if we believe in the reliability of the polygraph we can polygraph them and they would you know come up you know they would pass they pass that policy and they would say was a yield sign they would say yes and the wind would remain flat right there at the end because they they really come to believe in the suggested information so that's one.

Oliver Libby prosecutor Rodney king Michael Jackson Martha Stewart Duke University
"rodney king" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"rodney king" Discussed on KGO 810

"Of the police officers who beat Rodney king exactly that was not broadcast and so there was shock when the officers were found not guilty for those of us who were there and covered it we knew during the trial which was not broadcast well not because we thought that the police were guilty but because we could see that the defense had done a really good job taking apart the video that everybody had won over and over again in the news without it being taken apart and we were there dated a scene going oh my gosh this thing is is headed for a not guilty or a hung and I wonder if some of the shock on some of these verdicts is due to the fact that we are not seeing the trial and we don't know what the hell's going on day today you are spot on yes I think trial should be broadcast because when people think about it and voice displeasure they haven't sat there they haven't watched the witnesses lamps and your motion they didn't see the direct they didn't see the cross they didn't see the how the person testified that he was here she was believable are unbelievable on the stand despite what they said so yes because when people complain about it okay watched the whole trial now tell me what you think about it does little snippets. on television or on the radio on while they go to they should be done as we print twelve people in from the community who sit there they represent us I have said all through my career there are some Burdick's I do not like it all that I've been the attorney on and said you know but I respect the jury's system I respect the jurors. US and understood the entire trial because they were representative of this community over here in Alameda county so you've got to live with that and what they yeah so when you're just can't smokers should have an opinion on it I go Hey wait a minute just like in the proctor case people went crazy about listen we'll wait a minute you know this you know that you know I didn't know that. did you go to get the judge on the bench and now it has the cursor on judges that was awful what happened over there to station. sells for doing that but anyway all right well you're both right a whole nother can of worms and and and and that's fine because as we let's go back to work will letter of listeners work on this Michael Cardoza divorce defense attorney with Kerr does a log former member of the district attorney's office in Alameda as well as San Francisco and Los Angeles Michael my friend good to talk to you. well you take care self bye bye all right bye bye so. what do you think of the verdicts I think they were wrong not just out of the motion by I think just because they are not going after the you know the fire department they didn't suspect the building department which didn't inspect not going after the owner I don't which was part of the defense argument. I I don't think that's reason to let off people that it least you have brought in to be responsible that said what do you make of this eight zero eight zero eight ten eight zero eight zero eight ten what do you think of the go shipped fire about say verdicts one verdict one hung jury eight zero eight. gosh. I I'm just yeah I know and I'm still floored by this a way eight zero eight.

attorney Rodney king Alameda county Michael Cardoza Alameda Burdick Kerr representative Los Angeles San Francisco
"rodney king" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

12:15 min | 2 years ago

"rodney king" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Man. Something happened to that one I don't know. I don't know. Is this is? Audio from the Joe Biden rally today. They love Joe Biden. They're expressing their support for him is doing very well in the polls turns out the Democrats, like old white guys sold straight white guys. They've got lunch bucket Joe and Bernie the Bolsheviks Sanders. And then coming in third, I think is still Buddha edge. Right. Isn't Buddha edge still coming in third but polling with zero percent of the vote is Kirsten gillibrand. I think after this, and I'm going to play the audio for you have Carson children, where she makes a bizarre argument really just a peculiar kind of Maoist argument that if you're pro-life, it's like being a racist or anti Semite, that's the same as being alive and people, their brains do not work as designed or as advertised there. There's something lunch bucket, Joe refers, the president United States as an existential threat to the United States of America. He says, literally and existential threat to America. That's what lunch bug. A J, literally is being literal. I don't think he knows what that word means. But that's what he said yesterday. Anyway. And, and it's great. And in the same little speech, she said we have to stop calling each other names and saying, nasty things about each other. And Donald Trump is a is an existential threat to America. Hey, you said yesterday, that's like Don lemon. It reminded me of Don lemon on CNN remembered down lemon saying that we have to stop calling each other names. And then he declared that the number one terrorist threat today is white men. I think he means a straight white man. This is democrat world. We have to stop demonizing people and realize the biggest terror threat in this country is white men. That's right. And you have to Joe Biden said, yesterday, stop calling people names like that. Other guy does that guy who is literally an existential threat to America enough of the name, calling existential threat, and President Trump wacked back as you might expect because that's what what he does the acting because we don't have any actual. Confirmed government officials anymore. Thanks to the Democrats. The acting secretary of the department of homeland security, Kevin Leinen was up on Capitol Hill yesterday, he testified and one of the things he testified to is that ninety percent of asylum seekers, that are let go into the into the wilds of the United States. America ninety percent do not show up for their immigration hearings for their asylum hearings. And that's not a number of their Democrats want to hear. So they'll attack Kevin McLean. And they'll call him names, and call him a liar and all kinds of things because nothing gets you in trouble in Washington DC, like telling the truth, pretty much true across America, this point, the George Soros candidates winning in Virginia. Bernie's coming to DC today to defend socialism. The news media's on his side, and never of other funds stories, the American women's soccer team really kicking butt chick. Fillet is back in the news back in the news again as well. And so we, we are, as I said at eight eight eight six three zero nine six two five. Great story out of out of Oberlin, Ohio. There's a college there, where they raise radicals where they where they produce left wing radicals. You don't find a lot of conservatives coming out of Oberlin college, and they had an episode there where the school, the university of the college, the, the Lynch mob with torches and ropes, you know, the liberals in town, tact, a local store owner because he was robbed and beaten by students. Right. So they're out to Lynch, they set out to Lynch, the store owner in or Oberlin, Ohio, because three students attacked stealing stuff from his store, and then three guys ganged up on him and beat him. And and because it turns out the. Criminals were black. The store owner is labeled as a racist by the university, and by by the left-wing mob in the community there, and it has a resolution that is quite unexpected. And I have that story for you today, because that's a that's it's, it's an emblem of what's going on cross country. They're also back to trying to Lynch, the bakery owner in Colorado because you know, he's a bigot now. I noticed they still haven't called a Muslim bakery and asked them to make their sixteen layer gay wedding cake with all LA is an expletive, deleted on the on the frosting. I noticed they haven't done that yet they're not gonna they haven't approached the orthodox Jewish bakery, and ask them to do that, either. They honestly I'd like to go to a liberal, bakery, and have them make a cake that they that they object to you could never eat it. Of course because they're leftists. They, they murdered. One hundred million people in the last hundred years, you've got to keep your eyes peeled for, for these guys. Yeah. To bakery, stories and OJ Simpson. Oh, twenty-five years. I wanna OJ's doing to celebrate to commemorate the twenty fifth anniversary of the mother of his children being nearly decapitated by a strong man with a giant knife black leather gloves. They're OJ had the cut on his hand one glove was at the crime scene. The other was it is yard, the blood on the door of his white Bronco the blood in the hotel room in Chicago. No, there's nothing to see here, the footprints of the bloody foot prints of the of the Bruno Mali shoes if the gloves don't fit. You must acquit the gloves fit. They fit just fun. But that was another thing that was the left and Johnny Cochran. The lawyer for Simpson. The lead lawyer for OJ Simpson made a a heck of a case, sue a, a jury that was eager to let OJ. Simpson go, but that was an episode in American history. Wasn't the low speed chase with the white Bronco and alcoholics who I am JD at and all that stuff? It all started twenty five years ago today. Doesn't everyone remember, if you know if you're old enough to remember where you were when, when that happened that was that was something. It was like wasn't the moon landing, but it was sort of the celebrity crime equivalent of the moon landing the entire world was tuned in for that low speed chase and the run OJ run people coming out onto the streets and highways with signs, supporting OJ everybody knew he had murdered those people, and, and then the evidence just proved beyond a shadow of a doubt, not just a reasonable doubt, but a shadow of a doubt that he committed the murders and he was let go on account of Rodney King. That's basically, it was Rodney King, and all the place that racist because it was all just a setup. They planted all that evidence. All that blood evidence, he took the evidence home with them in the trunk of his car. It's been contaminated. It's got to be thrown out. It was a brilliant defence a successful defence of the guilty man. And the guilty men went free, but he's tortured soul, I believe, and he went to jail later on for stealing his own memorabilia, if it doesn't fit you must acquit. That's right. That's right. And OJ was interviewed by the Associated Press. And I laughed out loud at one of the lines study offered it was asked about the, the anniversary June twelfth nineteen Ninety-four. It happened one night is that we don't need to go back and relive the worst day of our lives. When you say our lives, who you're talking about here was that the Royal we the Royal our, there, I'm thinking, probably was is that the subject of the moment is the subject. I will never revisit, again, this is my favorite part. He said my family and I have moved on. Some more than others. I guess that's a semi family. And I have yet you helped one of them move on. She moved on twenty five years ago when you're nearly decapitated her with that giant knife, my family and I have moved on to what we call the no negative zone. We focus on the positives. We do we do focus, I like to focus on the positives to I think it's good to focus on the positive. And you know, the, the brutal savage murder of the mother of your children. I guess it'd be negative, you wouldn't want to focus on the negative families moved on some of moved onto the great beyond some, some of moved onto other places altogether. Crazy lefties protesters wanna fly the baby Trump a balloon during the president's fourth of July address in Washington, as you know, that one in Great Britain with the they should let them do it, and then bring in maybe a Cobra gun ship, Marine Corps, Cobra gunship and blasted out of the sky. What do you say little presidential power? We give the permit and that will shoot it out. This guy f sixteen a little target practice, don't stand beneath it, though, because I can or behind because that could be a problem. So the left is they wanna fly this blimp and the, the a little mini blimp. And the Washington Post is very upset does the oats the Associated Press today, very upset that President Trump hasn't given them all of the details of his fourth. July address from the Lincoln Memorial, which is apparently going to take place. And the news media upset there is chaos and pandemonium. And, and there's a lot of confusion. They said there's a lot of confusion. They're very confused by all of this, because the White House hasn't given the Associated Press all the details of what might happen on the fourth of July. They really the sense of entitlement of the American news media, is quite extraordinary, isn't it? When the president doesn't use the words that the news media would prefer that he is. They declare him to be out of line and out of bounds. And he should have said this. He's got to say this by close of business today. Otherwise, you know what you guys have completely lost sight of your role in our society, and boy, you guys are a social problem, you, you really are near a horrible terrible social problem because you have no regard for the truth. And that's that's a big problem. Big problem. That's a fact, national park, quietly removed warning that declared all glaciers will be gone by twenty twenty after years of heavy snowfall. It was hard to find the, the sign because of the, the snowfall. The Daily Mail reports glacier, national park right here in the United States, America, quietly removed a visitor center sign saying, it's iconic glaciers will disappear by twenty twenty due to climate change. Several winters of heavy snowfall through off climate model projections, the glaciers would all disappear by twenty twenty according to federal officials a blogger. I notice the sign change and noted other signs warning of impending glacier, disappearance have been replaced. This say they have all these signs on the glaciers. They're about to go in glitz called glacier, national park where you're going to have to change your name all the glaciers disappear. The it's like the artist for formerly known as prince, there would be the national park, formerly known as glacier, but good news everybody the.

America OJ Simpson Joe Biden United States President Trump president Democrats Lynch Associated Press Don lemon Kirsten gillibrand Washington Rodney King Oberlin college Oberlin Carson Kevin McLean Ohio Sanders
"rodney king" Discussed on Citation Needed

Citation Needed

05:02 min | 2 years ago

"rodney king" Discussed on Citation Needed

"Flick. Guys. I poked sorry. You come over here to poke you in the eye cool. Godfrey to go. Great thought I thought it'd be free to go. So you get get out of jail free card. If you get beat about the head back and community chest. Okay. Say that like that's worth it. Because clearly that is not worth it. But I am saying I'm glad he's having fun. Right. Yeah. Right. Find the good in. All right. So if you had to summarize what you learned in one sentence. What would it be be white? Essay. I just I didn't mean through. Not like you. It's not like you should choose. If you could choose don't. And you're in America, don't I'm not saying one's better saying it would be. It doesn't matter. What you mean? He okay. So are you ready for the quiz ready for the quiz? All right. We'll start this whole unfortunate incident could never happen today. Because hey. We've fixed the systemic problems of institutional racism on with be we've addressed the race base disparities and trial and sentencing c or c he would've been shot before anyone had a chance to beat him. Yeah. Definitely a funny show. Great. Thank you. Yeah. Definitely see. But also because cops are a little busy with California being on fire right now. We more than once during the riots. Yeah. Does the gay says? But see. Yes. All right. I've got one for you as well. Here up many of the jurors from the Rodney King trial of gone onto prestigious careers in other fields which of the following is a job currently held by former Rodney King juror. Hey fact, checker on goop. Gastroenterologist for ally. Bosnich? Or C refereeing? The NFC championship game. Actually, I've gone secret answer D Rodney king's widow was actually one of the jurors who awarded him three point eight million dollars from the city, Los Angeles. Amazing. That's. That work. That's tricky one feel like it's after after they got married after. So I got some money. Okay. I feel like I threw some shade on Rodney king's whole again by accent. That's just a fact that's awesome to be wrong. Okay. So yeah, you nailed my question. Dan. Here's the question. What is the name of the Rodney King feature film out Jesus beet Pulp Fiction? Fight club's saves citizen. Kane. Monsters inc. Well. I was thinking about a musical the Rodney King, and I but. Citizen. Kane. Oh, sorry. Sorry continues to this day monsters Inc. Oh, all right. Oh, I feel so bad that I now have to after he made those series of jokes announced see-saw as the winner. It's the way that this whole thing works you want wanna parents, so congratulations. Okay. Well, I think I should probably pick somebody who didn't have to sit through this. So I'm going to pick ally. Bosnich? All right. We'll procedural Tom. And he thought Noah thank you for hanging out with today. We'll be back next week and by then shit schmeer OB an expert on something else. Then you hear more from seasonal Tom on the business podcast. You can hear more from heathen meal with that other do from over at scathing eightyish guy over moves in the skeptical. And if you like to help this show you purpose donation of patriot dot com slash citation pot or leave us review everywhere. You can't end if you'd like to get in touch with us check out past episodes, connect with social media or check show notes checkout, citation pod dot com. All right. Try sitting at two white officer black suspect selling cigarettes, choke to death, try that one not guilty. You're okay. White officer twelve year old toy gun hit toy and then guilty. Fuck. All right what Hispanic officer black suspect? Streamed on Facebook live that's gonna not not guilty. Now. These are all innocent doesn't I don't know. I found one found one white officer black suspect sixteen shots to the back guilty of murder. Well. Second degree murder think the system is broken.

Rodney king officer Kane Godfrey NFC Second degree murder California Facebook Tom Los Angeles America monsters Inc murder Dan Noah eight million dollars twelve year
"rodney king" Discussed on Citation Needed

Citation Needed

08:23 min | 2 years ago

"rodney king" Discussed on Citation Needed

"Done. So the news verdict it also caused smaller riots break-out elsewhere, including San Francisco, Las Vegas, Seattle, Atlanta and New York City, and there's actually even a small riot in Toronto. Which was no doubt adorable. That was just those actually just too good Canadian guys who bumped into each other and neither apologize like it's still a scandal. Just some guy. Toronto standing over a knocked trash cans screaming at America. I learned from watching you. He picks up all the garbage puts it back. Ed, very dare. Sewri? This is it's all in the order. I found it in. Little plaque with like, a Tim Horton's coffee right there shows. This is where it was dropped they cleaned it up though. But none of these riots made things better is kind of the point. I was making in case. It was an obvious doesn't really help improve the situation for an oppressed minority. If a bunch of businesses get destroyed in the neighborhood where lots of people from that oppressed minority live even Rodney King agreed with that at the time three days into the riots. He actually went on TV and gave a speech telling everyone to cut that shit out. Here's some of his exact words quote. I just wanna say can we all get along? He actually coined that people say it can't we all just get along. But I believe that's Rodney King kinda coined that phrase continuing can we stop making it horrible for the older people and the kids we've got enough smog in Los Angeles. Let alone to deal with. Setting these fires and things so weird angle. Whatever. It's not gonna change anything. We'll get our day in court, and that's all we want. And I love I'm neutral. I love every I love people of color. There's another weird. Continuum when we're time we can all get along. We just gotta end quote. A lot of what he said that day. Spoiler alert. We cannot all get. Argue with the guy just got his fifth birthday party knocked out of his memory by Billy clubs. We're really worried about air quality count is up. I just wanna take two. No, we are not worried about air quality. So. Fez. No, check two thousand nineteen racism and air quality is still probably okay. Good test still burning. So it turns out Rodney King was right during his getting along speech. There would be another day in court at least he was right about that. So soon after the riots ended the US department of Justice got indictments on those for officers for violating Rodney king's civil rights. Okay. Maybe the Ryan maybe not help. Anyway. Again, the other seventeen are fine. Somehow, at least it was something at least something, unfortunately, it turned out to be more like half of something. I guess the second trial found officer Koon and officer Powell guilty. But officers wind and Brazil were once again acquitted of doing the thing they did on video that we all saw just to be clear. It wasn't even really half of something. Good because the sentencing of Koon Powell was complete nonsense. Despite existing guidelines that called for sentence in the range of seventy to eighty seven months U S District judge John Davies only gave him thirty months each. According to judge Davies, the first fifty clubbings were totally legal. Fifty clubbings legal. He said that out loud. During a hearing only the final six clubbings were excessive. According to this judge is. Is there a weight conversion chart, they use or something? Like there was that one guy counting forty six forty seven forty nine shit. I lost. Well, no one will ever know. It's not on video. Yeah. And that's why that cop in the la-, quantum McDonald cases. So bewildered he thought he had thirty four more bullets. Yeah. So judge Davies also ruled that the specific baton strike that broke Rodney king's leg was also legal that one was legal not only because it was within the perfectly reasonable and not at all excessive fifty allowable clubbings of an unarmed citizen on the ground, but also because breaking bones is actually standard protocol. According to judge Davies, quote, Powell's baton blow that broke kings leg was not illegal because king was still resisting and rolling around on the ground. Jesus aggressive ground writhing is what the judge drive he was writhing aggressively. And then he continued breaking bones in resistant suspects is permissible under police policy and quote from a judge a federal judge. Okay. Just. I like was anybody actually really genuinely watching that video pretending to seriously asked like, okay. No. What about that? One. Now one. Okay. We go. Check out in a slow. We're. Gauge one evaluate each one on their own merit. That's what was happening that was literally part of the trial judge Davies realizes that you keep flinching until they kill you. Right. Would you getting beaten? Giving them to they're like twenty five two for flinching. Yeah. I was like a slug drives by these Cape. It to see it's every time. He only flinch twenty five time. Get fifty for flinching as an exponential rule. Six even numbered. It would have to be an odd number to be a legal because you get two at a time for lynching. Yeah. And one of the detail on Kuhnen Powell's jailtime the prosecution appealed the absurdly short sentences and the ninth circuit court of appeals actually ruled in their favor rejecting the bullshit excuses. The judge Davies gave so the prison terms got extended. But then the case got appealed again and the supreme court flipped it back to the original tiny little bullshit sentence. The white sentence. We the people find that whites. I mean, less guilty less synonym synonym. So okay. So once the dust settles of the embers burn out, whatever happened to Rodney King. Yes. So following the incident, Los Angeles mayor Tom Bradley offered Rodney King two hundred thousand dollars and four years of college tuition as an apology. So point Rodney King folded up piece of paper and slid it back across the table to mayor Bradley that said, hey, go fuck yourself. Fun diagram of how to do that that I wrote at the bottom of that paper cool, and instead of taking that bullshit low-ball king sued the city winning settlement of three point eight million dollars, which still seem super low, but gladdy one I guess something and one last thing my favorite part of king story happens over the next couple of decades before he died in two thousand twelve this time includes some serious mental trauma and a struggle with addiction. So obviously not talking about that. That's not my favorite part. But during this time, I'm pretty sure Rodney King was just driving his car around Los Angeles getting into stupid accidents. And then taunting the shit out of the is showed up this Evans like a dozen different times, including a traffic stop on the literal. Twentieth anniversary of the beating and so he's just like handing over his license like. Yup. The Rodney King. Yeah. On your shirt their face flick.

Rodney King John Davies Los Angeles Kuhnen Powell Tim Horton Toronto Ed San Francisco America Tom Bradley New York City officer department of Justice US Billy clubs Las Vegas Ryan Seattle Atlanta
"rodney king" Discussed on Citation Needed

Citation Needed

05:34 min | 2 years ago

"rodney king" Discussed on Citation Needed

"Uh-huh. But it, but he looks like he's he's fighting a three headed monster though. Yeah. Right. How was gigantic lizard fighting an even bigger three headed monster in the city's supposed to save that city literally ruin everything guys. Do not go in there. Why shouldn't we go into the studio? Okay. I shouldn't have to explain this. But this week's essay is about Rodney King and a few minutes ago, I saw ill. I walk in there with four bats can black shoe polish and a few police uniforms with the assets cut out of the pale gross. And at all look at this script. Holy shit. No guy. I even right that I've never I've never seen is that we does that every single black racial slur. As a Disney song. Yeah. I feel like he made he had we made some of these up and look at page four. No, even no I'm not doing that. I think that's actually a hate crime. So what do we do how about we just go over to my place to record today? When just leave him in there. I mean, let's do it. Let's do that. It's the only way we get out of this, Tom. Right. Someone tax than Tullamore will be. All right. Hey, guys. What's up? What's up? Sorry. I'm late. So what do you think? Like the police. Have is good, right? I'll don't turn around. Don't turn out. Oh, oh, oh. But hey, he come on. I don't think the night. Stick is supposed to go there. Okay. Mr. police expert where we're supposed to put it then. Hello and welcome to citation meet at the podcast where we choose a subject for to single article about it on Wikipedia. And pretend we're experts because this is the internet, and that's how it works now. I'm no, and I'm gonna be beating the truth out of this episode, but to get from here to there, I'm going to need a jury of my peers, Tom he fans, see soul. This is the first time anyone ever considered me appear. I realized like legally that makes it were all best friends like everybody here today on this episode. We are all best friends. Best friends. Yeah. Best friends. Yup. I'm sorry. It wasn't paying attention. I was writing in my diary best day ever. Best friends best friend LCI. So now, you may have noticed that. Stand. And king. He's funny. As you may have noticed ally. Isn't here. I'm not gonna say where Eli is or why it's not here. But I am going to use this as a segue to remind people that would members of our cast themselves Nicaraguan prisons, they turn to patriotic funds to help get them home. So if you'd like to learn how to join our patriotic ranks be sure to stick around the end of the show, and with that out of the way, tell us, Tom, what person place thing concept and on or then will be talking about today today, we will be talking about Rodney King because we like to keep both current and controversy Freeh. So well there you. Us. All right. So if you read the article and carefully time this essay for a week when ally was off are you ready to a lucid eight us? I am indeed ready. We we reviewed a movie with an African-American little person with a speech impediment this week on gone. Zero hate crimes in that. Streak owner so way today. So who was Rodney King because America hates black people know, so. Grozny king was a very bad driver who later became an activist for civil rights and against police brutality after he was almost beaten to death by team of white police officers who got mad when he tried to outrun them and resist being arrested. And apparently, he did all those things whilst blacking which was. Mistake was he said was. Yeah. Wrong tense perhaps. So following the incident, those officers were put on trial for using excessive force and despite shockingly clear evidence of their guilt. They were acquitted and this will happen in Jackson Mississippi in the eighteen. Wait. No sorry. This happened in Los Angeles, California in the nineteen nineties. This all led to the LA riots of nineteen Ninety-two also centuries of racism before that was a tactic. Into it. Yeah. To be determined. I dunno. Okay. We've all seen that video by now. And I don't know you can clearly see Rodney attacking the officers with his blood spatters. So.

Rodney King Tom Los Angeles Tullamore Jackson Mississippi Grozny Eli California America
"rodney king" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"rodney king" Discussed on Kickass News

"This is round the time in the nineties of Rodney King and the OJ trial. Right. I quit right before the OJ. Okay. But yeah, Rodney King riots. All that were part of my watch on them. The police beat you know, the LA times back then was huge. And I wasn't the only guy on the police beat the we had several like five or six, but I was one of them. And yeah, I mean, he's very formative. You know, here you are a newspaper reporter you kinda is kind of an exaggeration. But you feel like you got the inside scoop on the city. You know, it wasn't like there was no internet or anything. So like when you went home at night you've felt like tomorrow morning people. Find out what I already know, you know. So you kind of had this egotistical prince of the city feel to you that and I'm not the only one I know it affects a lot. Lots of lots of writers by in me. It was like I couldn't ever foresee that the city would come apart the way it did. After the Rodney King verdict, and here I was police reporter for the the central newspaper in this area. And like the police like to community I was totally caught flat-footed and surprised by what happened now, I know that you base. Most of your detective, Harry Bosch or the new character Rene Ballard on real cops or Malcolm's of real cops. That you've known when you write about journalists in your books are they based on you? Sometimes I mean, obviously, I've had that experience. I wrote a book called the poet longtime ago. It was actually the first book I wrote after leaving the business of newspapers, and it was a battery porter named Jack McEvoy, and that was a pretty close to being autobiographical in terms of my view of that job. And how I did it. You know, like he has some. Trump trauma in his life that that that I don't share. But it was like one of these, you know, when I write a book about Harry Bosch..

Rodney King Harry Bosch reporter Jack McEvoy LA Rene Ballard Malcolm
"rodney king" Discussed on First Things First

First Things First

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"rodney king" Discussed on First Things First

"Then it became real nine hundred ninety one that's when we saw rodney king so i've been watching videos all my dull life of african americans being harassed beat taste all types of things shot to death by officers of the law so how do i feel about it the only reason why i probably watched it was because after make comments about on tv with only reason why they're making comments about on tv's because he's a professional basketball player so now we're going to try to act like oh we're going to care little bit owed of the media owed the public oh we care about it because we're fans of sports people don't care because you know what's going to happen today other black go about their business and they're going to be harassed the way we have been around for a long long time the reality of that video is being black in america's totally different than being and america so i'm tired of looking at videos of the same thing in two thousand eighteen of summer i watched when i was younger as a young person and i've been watching all my life so people today will care but ultimately it don't matter black people cared only matter if white people care because that's the reality that we live with that i live with every day that you don't have to live with your kids don't have to live with all right i've been trained i trained my kids i trained all the kids at toasting little leagues and the kids who are coached white kids i didn't have to tell them these things about police officers because they're not treated that way now i would love to see the reaction gotha bid if it was aaron rodgers man this was aaron rodgers i believe something might happen but no this is disturbing brown just another black guy nothing's going to happen and save it how much people really really care because i know what people care about they invest their time and the resources it's no different than our kids at.

rodney king america aaron rodgers
"rodney king" Discussed on First Things First

First Things First

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"rodney king" Discussed on First Things First

"Then it became real nine hundred ninety one that's when we saw rodney king so i've been watching videos all my dull life of african americans being harassed beat taste all types of things shot to death by officers the law so how do i feel about it the only reason why probably watched it was because after make comments about on tv with only reason why they making comments about on tv because he's a professional basketball player so now we're going to try to act like oh we're going to care little bit owed of the media owed the public oh we care about it because we're fans of sports people don't care because you know what's going to happen today other black zone go about their business and they're going to be harassed the way we have been arrest for a long long time the reality of that video is being black in america's totally different than being whitening america so i'm tired of looking at videos of the same thing in two thousand eighteen of i watched when i was younger as a young person and i've been watching all my life so people today will care but ultimately it don't matter black people cared only matter if white people care because that's the reality that we live with that i live with every day that you don't have to live with your kids don't have to live with all right i've been trained i trained my kids i trained all the kids that toast little leagues and the kids coached white kids i didn't have to tell them these things about police officers because they're not treated that way now i would love to see the reaction gotha bid if it was aaron rodgers man this was aaron rodgers i believe something might happen but no this is sterling brown just another black guy nothing's going to happen and a save it how much people really really care because i know what people care about they invest their time and the resources it's no different than our kids at.

rodney king america aaron rodgers
"rodney king" Discussed on The Kinda Sleepy Podcast

The Kinda Sleepy Podcast

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"rodney king" Discussed on The Kinda Sleepy Podcast

"This lease tina states right let me let me let me let me jump in this because i completely agree with you i really do believe that we're being condition you know in the fall actually working on this program where i'm going to show the filming to la ninety two and how apparently the sessional chaos the community because our member of wind gulf win we saw rodney king beating on television we will fortify our play playoff the way that we were in raised like rappers became like what was like the voice of like of the movement is q was like you know the police have i tell them i i'm calling he will call out the prosecutors will call them out the defendant the judge the people who you know who sat in jury like and now we're being conditioned to 'cause i'm not yelled at if that was the breaking of that was the boiling point for the l a a riots what has changed now we're seeing day you i'm like what is this all to whom the spirit that we see this daily and we'd do not respond in the way that babies by la like we'll turn down and go think about this think about this you know and i'm so glad it'd be brought this up was like to be shot twenty times that's an act of great that's not the that's not i'm disarming suspect i'm putting the suspect gal a warning you shoot him in the leg whatever you was twenty started this cat she does out before it before hold on i'm gonna start your day.

rodney king
"rodney king" Discussed on I Think You're Interesting

I Think You're Interesting

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"rodney king" Discussed on I Think You're Interesting

"Nbn in new york where you're one of millions and you're not threatening your hanging out and that's where you get fall for the first time thumbs like i'm i'm i made a mistake now you know i've come to the wrong place um and it was a late in life awareness but it was an awareness so at that point that was you know late eighties at that point i was like well they've been the los angeles cup time sunshine beautiful let me move out there because it's all good out there so i move there in as i said 1990 in that was a year before rodney king and all these other things um that were going on some judge do can't shema and you he realized that the eu you can't go in search of some perfect place or because it's not in a small town mississippi while aren't gonna have any race problems you know um the the problems of the killings can exist anywhere i'm saying things now there are obvious but for me in 25 years ago as a kid gone wild this is new york is not the solution la is not the solution to stores i want to tell the things i want to do but the things that i'm gonna run up against a by the way then you go into meetings and you're the only black person in the meeting you know in the only personal caller you've pitch in things i remember pitching story in at that time janet jackson was really really big and was of his of female lead character knows like what should have janet jackson and it wasn't about race it wasn't about something but it was just and people will allow you shouldn't you know don't i want to put you know character you know in the description you know when you when you writing a screenplay right this little scripture.

new york rodney king eu mississippi janet jackson los angeles 25 years
"rodney king" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

02:01 min | 4 years ago

"rodney king" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"Isn't it true that most police officers rarely ever even pull their weapon that is true absolutely i would say it's a very small percentage actually ever drawl their gun let alone actually have to fire it and i have never been in a situation i didn't situation that i was scared now i look back and think how sunny it is 'cause it there wasn't really any reason most of the unknown though i mean in hindsight you realize there may not have been any danger bit when you're walking into an unknown situation no wonder how much training you've got in your hearts probably jack drive oh yeah uh that i've probably life i tell people of story it's probably the most afraid i've ever been on the job was uh it was a domestic call where they had hung up on on war i get to the house is far away from the city centre as you can possibly be i get there it's a lock gate i have to walk almost uh a half a mile in the in the middle of the night there's a thunderstorm on it coming towards me and i hear a a pack of wild dogs running down the hill torch absolutely disturbs been because i i thought about not even get to this complaint 'cause i'm getting mauled by dogs and as they come down and they get to my feet of course to the friendlies dogs i was gonna say that's a movie right i think i've seen this film seemed like and that just wanted to lick me to death they didn't want to see more muted to do you feel like give them cops get a bad ramp there oh yeah absolutely in twenty years i've i've seen the culture change against police and i came on right after rodney king and uh there was a negative feeling about police officers and then it it's things seem to improve specially after nine eleven we seem to be in the good graces of the public in and then um oh specifically after ferguson easy likes it um police cultures paying a price for the worst headlines out there uh w uh were finding that we're having even.

the house rodney king ferguson twenty years