36 Burst results for "Rodney"

Fresh update on "rodney" discussed on Gary Jeff Walker

Gary Jeff Walker

00:49 sec | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "rodney" discussed on Gary Jeff Walker

"W ell delegate Cincinnati New details in the person involved in an officer involved shooting with the 10 o'clock report. I'm Sean Gallagher breaking now. Hamilton County Sheriff's Office tonight identifying the man who was killed after he and a police officer in Elmwood Place exchanged gunfire during a traffic stop this afternoon. They say the officer pulled over 48 year old Rodney Barnes and Highland Avenue between Linden and Walnut streets around 1 30. Police chief Eric Bartlett said that was wind shots were fired between the officer and Barnes leaving Barnes with gunshot wounds. He would be taken a UC medical center and later pronounced dead. Barnes had been listed as a missing person after he reportedly walked away from you see psychiatric emergency services. He also was wanted for aggravated robbery and having weapons while under disability. The officer involved was not injured and has been placed on leave as his protocol. An investigation is ongoing..

Officer Rodney Barnes Sean Gallagher Hamilton County Sheriff's Offi Elmwood Place Uc Medical Center Eric Bartlett Robbery
NYC Comedy Club Opened By Rodney Dangerfield Shuts Down Amid Pandemic

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | 6 d ago

NYC Comedy Club Opened By Rodney Dangerfield Shuts Down Amid Pandemic

"Legendary comedy club is closing its doors but vows to be back destroying my life. No respect, I don't know. Dangerfield's, which was founded by Rodney Dangerfield in 1969 will shut its Upper East Side location due to what its owner's call a severe financial burden caused by the pandemic. But they say the plan to reopen in the future they do plan to re open in the future in a new

Rodney Dangerfield
With 'Deaf U,' Nyle DiMarco Strives To Show 'There Is No One Right Way To Be Deaf'

All Things Considered

06:06 min | Last week

With 'Deaf U,' Nyle DiMarco Strives To Show 'There Is No One Right Way To Be Deaf'

"On Michelle Martin. Let's go back to pre covert times for a minute. You're a college student, and you want to take a break from the grind by going out for a few drinks or maybe getting a mani pedi with your B F F. But the seats only allow you to sit next to each other rather than face each other. No big deal, right? Well, it kind of is, if you are deaf or hard of hearing, And if you use American Silang, which SL to communicate Where you use your hands and facial expressions are important. And those are just a few of the subtleties revealed to those outside of the deaf community in the new Netflix reality, Siri's deaf, you know. It follows a group of students that guided at University in Washington, D C, which is known as the on Ly University in the world, where students can live and learn in American sign, language and English. But students still have to navigate a world that isn't necessarily built for them. The creator of the series is Nyle DeMarco, the model actor and activist who won both America's next top model and dancing with the stars, the first death contestant to do so, and he is here with us now to tell us more. And through the miracle of technology. He and I are talking to each other. And you're going to hear the voice of his interpreter. Gray Van Pelt. Welcome. Thank you so much for joining us. Of course. It's my pleasure. Thanks so much for having me today. As I just noted, you've been on reality television kind of a star. You're a model dancer. Clearly an activist. How did the idea of making a show about your alma mater come to you? It's pretty interesting. It goes back to my own experience being on reality television. I always felt that the image that was kind of made of me on screen was very one dimensional was always asked specifically about my deafness about my identity's sorts of struggles, but never about the things that I liked or disliked or really anything that I would have offered more to who I wass. It was nothing really about The culture right? And the idea for this show really came with the realization that we could use this to reframe the deaf community and offering entrance into our world which is so rich in culture and so layered in diverse but one of the things that I noticed If you've seen any show about college life, then you're going to, you know, recognize the types the The athletes, the influencers, you know, I activists, But you also introduced us to another divide a guy a debt between the so called elite Capital D, deaf from well known deaf families. And then as you've described elsewhere, lower case D death, those who don't come from these well known death families. Why did you feel it was important to kind of highlight this other divide myself as somebody who views elites as a group. I see. It could be a positive thing in the preserving of sign language, our culture, You know, it's about passing down those legacies in those traditions that make our culture. So Reg. There certainly are lower case D people who might see elites as someone who's had an unfair advantage, right? Whether it's their educational background, their confidence, their identity, their language fluency coming into college debt for them often, you know, they face a challenge that They have to not only focus on getting a degree, but also focus on learning a new language and a new culture. But there are so many layers to that divide between elites and perhaps Laura Kees de definite, something that's really key for a community. It's very complicated, but it's a discussion that were starting to have one of the characters of football player named Rodney. Likes to think of himself a somewhere in the middle of this divide. He has cochlear implants so he can hear and he also signs and I want to play a clip. This's Rodney's father. Do you feel like you're in between? We're like caught in the middle. I a deft So I'm in a body community. And this is what he is saying to some degree. Is is that he gives himself a license to be a Yeah. Ronnie Rotten family is so incredible. He's one of my absolute favorite. On the show. And one thing that I really love about him is that he really, you know, showcases and embodies that there is no one right way to be deaf, right? He's already fluent in American sign language, and so he has access to both. He's able to function in a hearing world in a deaf world with SL in English versus Ah lot of other students who come in to Garland at with outside language. You know they're facing a struggle of looking to find a place to fit in. Ronnie's already got it figured out so you can see through the show. He's like, I'm good. It's one of the things I love about him. Well, one of the things that I really liked about this exchange, though it mirrors some conversations that I think we have about race in this country to Rodney's also African American, and he also Exists in the space of trying to figure out like, what does it mean to be that right now? What do I want to be the truth of me and who gets to decide that? I think at the core of it, you know, it comes from growing up specifically in a culture and having access to the language. You know, I do think that Romney is incredibly confident. And you know, he knows exactly where his intersectionality lies. I do want to mention that you've been forward facing death advocate part of Your work in this area met hiring death crew members and creatives. I want to highlight that because that's not something that you want would necessarily know watching the Siri's. But why was that important as someone who is deaf? You know, I know that if you really want unauthentic story, it has to happen behind the camera, you know, defies really captured the culture best and we actually made it a requirement that we had to hire deaf people. We wanted to ensure that at minimum, we had 30% of the deaf crew behind the scenes working and we ended up with 50%, which was incredible, and it's the first time it's ever been done in history. You know we're working. So that later we have a little Hollywood empire were able to develop our own TV shows in our movies and our content that really reflect of culture and an authentic experience. And this essentially was the start. I'm so thrilled about it. That was now DeMarco, creator of the New Netflix. Siri's deaf You It is available now. And just wanna mention that we've been hearing him through the voice of his interpreter, Nyle DiMarco. Thanks so much for talking to us. Course. This was such a pleasure. Thank you so much for having me.

Nyle Demarco Rodney Siri Netflix Ronnie Rotten Michelle Martin Washington Van Pelt Ly University Nyle Dimarco Laura Kees America Football Garland Romney Hollywood
Episode 39: How Would You Like To Die? - Drive Of The Week

F That Noise

03:35 min | 2 weeks ago

Episode 39: How Would You Like To Die? - Drive Of The Week

"I. That's fantastic. Party everybody we start every broadcast with Dr of the week. If you don't know to drive is a driver's align from a movie or a TV, show said with exceptional velocity and volume, and this segment belongs to Jamie Klein. All. Right Ladies and Hermaphrodites what we have here is the nineteen eighty, six classic back to school and I chose this because well, everyone's going back to school all the kids are going back and so there is a specific drive if. You, you already know what the drive is going to be. So it is hands down when my favorite movies with Rodney Dangerfield, my favorite comedies of the eighties and Take it away Keith. Welcome. To Contemporary American history. Professor Churches. And a lot of people histories, spags. Information Pass. ME. A man hold history. Sacred. With farm looks the and he hold sacred way a Christian takes the Bible and he holds a sacred the way a lot of people hold their marriage sacred site feel. When we dive right in my interpreting one of the easiest bins. Last twenty years of American history. Now can someone telling me why nine, hundred, seventy, five We pull our troops out of Vietnam. The failure unbeaten oganization to impact support causing ongoing erosion of confidence in the various American but illegal. Saigon. Regimes Jr.. Is She right? Popular version of what went on there and a lot of people like to believe that. I wish I could when I was there I wasn't classroom hoping I was right thinking about it. I was on my knees rice paddies with God's network. While posses like you we're back there partying. Let's Goddamn. Talk. The sideways of. So much to. Head right to that boy. Great of people people listen to the full full effect. It's not only that he cox said sideways just teeth repeating it illegally these getting closer and closer. Pitch read to. Read, man dire you know a drug induced the situation the way he acted it's it's a it's a shame that him and Farley never got on the same screen together. I don't think. It's. Wise. So maybe a kid for early. He got signed Farley. Right. David has great drive I would put that on the top ten. Easy. Maybe top five. It's it's already up there it's. A shot that we haven't done this earlier to be honest with you. It's kind of an obvious one. Well, every episodes drive the week has been absolutely fantastic phenomenal, and if you are behind any of the thirty eight episodes, folks had BAFTA noise Dot com and feel free to catch up by any stretch thing immagination

Farley Keith Rodney Dangerfield Jamie Klein Saigon Vietnam Professor COX David
Dallas Cowboys Quarterback Dak Prescott Opens Up About Mental Health

Rodney Anderson

00:29 sec | Last month

Dallas Cowboys Quarterback Dak Prescott Opens Up About Mental Health

"After DAX revelation of his fight with depression Teams CEO Oh Steven Jones telling 1053 the fan, Dak Prescott is a tremendous leader seems invincible when they when they watching. When you watch I carries himself. Watch him under pressure when you watch him having fun. He's just, you know, He's a man's man, and we have nothing but support for then. The Cowboys open their season against the Rams tomorrow night for a couple of conflicting court rulings in

Dak Prescott Steven Jones DAX CEO Cowboys Rams
Coronavirus In Dallas: Officials Announce Decrease In Confirmed COVID-19 Cases, 1 Additional Death

Rodney Anderson

01:00 min | Last month

Coronavirus In Dallas: Officials Announce Decrease In Confirmed COVID-19 Cases, 1 Additional Death

"In Dallas County continues to be downward. Health officials reporting 195 new cases in one additional death when they came out with a report on Friday. Tarrant County says another 211 people were reported with Kobe 19 with one death. The numbers are improving in North Texas, both in terms of deaths reported and hospitalizations Dr Joseph Chang as Parklands chief medical officer and says there are some things that need to keep happening. Number one. I'm gonna wear a map to prevent you getting anything that I might. That's not just coping. That's bloom. That's all kinds of other stuff. Number two. I'm going to get a vaccine. I'm gonna wash my hands because I know That if I'm going to shake your hand or I'm going to give you a bump That I'm left likely to give you something. Dr. Chang says he believes the development of a safe and effective vaccine is the next necessary major step in fighting the Corona virus, but it could be sometime next year. Artwork depicting

Dr Joseph Chang Dallas County Tarrant County Parklands Kobe Medical Officer North Texas
These smart toilets may solve India's massive open defecation problem

The 3:59

08:54 min | Last month

These smart toilets may solve India's massive open defecation problem

"India is the open defecation capital of the world that's led to more than one hundred, thousand deaths a year we went to India to take a look at this problem and one potential solution in new line of smart. Toilets. Chang, this is your daily charge. With Ben Fox ribbon the daily charge regularly used to spend time writing on Amazon but earlier this year before the pandemic hit. We sent to India to look at smart toilets. Welcome. Ben, thanks for avenue so bad before we get into these toilets, let's let's define the problem with India facing how big is this open defecation problem in the country? There are a couple of ways of looking at it, but to the would bake it hopefully easier for people to understand it's about three hundred, forty, four, million people don't have regular access to toilets in. India. So that's more than the population of the United States, which is one of the most populous countries in the world and. To look at it as one in four people in India do not have regular access to toilet. So it's it's a huge huge problem that so so that context I mean. What did you find like? What? Like what? What a what are some of the solutions I guess specifically like what was solution you went to Goad India to see. Yeah. So I want to start by saying that open defecation isn't just an inconvenience. It's not something where it's just like uncomfortable to go to the bathroom outside I it literally, as you cited causes of death and disease, which is, which is why India is really trying to get a handle on this problem. There's this tiny startup. South of New Delhi called Garden Toilets Guard Means Dignity In. They're they're trying to be you know this new concept of a smart sanitation company in India so they not only created toilets that are built out of steel so that they Are More vandalism proof are easier to clean and can last longer, but they also added in a bunch of different real time sensors like the water sensors. Motion sensors so that they can actually make sure that they're still being operating properly and they still work in any maintenance problems. They're able to catch fix really quickly alter and degraded the system with Iot infrastructure where we are able to track it in real time how it's being made details have been used plus whether they are being maintained or not. In real time, we get to know if there are any malfunctions moreover, we are also able to track the user hygiene aspects where we get to know how many people have used the toilets, what percentage of them have washed their hands or whether they are flushing the it's not what amount of what is being used. So these other things that we basically tracking real time and it helps us build a strong connection with the community as well if we are doing comedy mobilization. We know what is the real problem of the government? Even if it is hand washing, we work with them very specifically towards hand washing. What it's actually like to be one of these facilities because you have an interesting way of describing it and it's very different when you're like outside looking in versus when you're actually in one of these, the toilet facilities. Yeah. So a lot of them look like what you would think a portable toilet would look like, but it's built out of steel. So those are those are there more basic models they also did this really interesting retro fit in a major convention center in New Delhi, and that was like a fifty thousand dollar project, which is a lot of money and. It looked like the inside of a spaceship that's how I described it. So it's all this like bright steel we walked in right when they just opened to the public and it's all this like shiny steel. The urinals are still a toilets or still the faucets or steel. It's it's really just a break up the industrial look of it they they went in they. Added these strips off off fake grass around it just so there wouldn't all be still but yeah, it's it's pretty looks kind of imposing like you walk into a bank vault or something like that, and you talk to us on the sensors of the tech that's embedded here, which is definitely not like the tech that you'd see in a normal smart toilet things like Sim cards. Talk about that like what else did you see? What else did they embed into these facilities toilets to make them smart and really smart and useful in this kind of environment bright. So some of the aspects that you wouldn't see in any normal American public toilet are these they attach the faucets and toilets Sim cards that allow them to basically do real time tracking off water usage toilet flashes. Hand watching all sorts of things like that. So number one, they're able to see if there's a maintenance problem if the toilet if toilet is blocked ran out of water, the other thing is also a health usage. So they can actually track if people aren't flushing the toilet or aren't washing their hands now granted some of these toilets, obviously our auto flash. By Some of that information at first I was kind of like Jesus sounds like a bit of a privacy issue, but it's all anonymous is number one and number two. It's actually really valuable from a perspective. So they actually go into communities and if washing is an issue than they work directly with folks with about hand washing so. Is kind of like really reimagining the concept of toilet as kind of this, this venue for a public health, and also when you in, you can kinda see they've also got various billboards and stuff like don't forget to wash your hands stuff like that. So all all these elements to reemphasize hygiene practices right and then you actually visited a couple of regular public toilets, right particular some near near some slums. What what are the described that scene in how that contrast with the toilets you saw? Yeah. So I went to a slum in Faridabad where garth toilets is based out of that was actually not that far from their co co working space and You know the toilets are from from CEO, Mayakoba He told me that those toilets had just been built by the government a year ago and they were already completely useless. They there were there were filled with feces Some of them had been vandalized some of them been locked up because they weren't useful anymore. The people in that neighborhood came up to us told us about the toilets. They're just like basically they're disgusting we can't use them. You know they're back to defecating in nearby field because you know if somebody wanted to use them they, they could contract diseases. That's how disgusting worse so. It was incredibly stark was one of the first things that I saw when I went to India and it was it was really Sad it was really sad to see that that's what people had to deal with than it was it was great to get to. Highlight some like an effort that potentially try to try to fix this problem and you follow the CEO amid how round for a couple of days in India as he showed you around here, they're facilities. What was that like? What was he like? So he's he's an interesting guy in that. You know if you think like an eel on mosque character who's like larger than life he's he's kind of the opposite. He is very mild, mannered and reserved. Doesn't doesn't crack a lot of jokes but what really kind of to wire to write about him was that he's this really idealistic person he gets really frustrated about the state of toilets in his country. He talks very tough very passionately about those things issue in the developing Rodney's Moss Olympic one means you would see the toilet, the sanitation facilities do get made, but the government also wants the products. But what happens is after months most of these. Energies and being dysfunctional, and that is largely because of the fact that these solid get vandalized easily because these are in the public space on community spaces and the fact that they do not get maintained regularly. Even, though you know she doesn't like he's not like bursting with all of this you know it's not like a three ring circus or whatever it. Still you know all of that, all of that passion is really built in about cow. He really wants to help people and it was fascinating to write about this story because he wants to help people with toilets which to me it's like something that people really think about they don't really care about. They'd rather just move on after using them and to him he spent the past five years really trying to. Make something different. Make it something better as I describing the story like a techie showcasing a thing of beauty.

India New Delhi Ben Fox Amazon CEO Chang United States Faridabad Rodney Vandalism
New York PD: 6-year-old boy among 5 people shot during Brooklyn J'Ourvet celebration

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:05 min | Last month

New York PD: 6-year-old boy among 5 people shot during Brooklyn J'Ourvet celebration

"Several of them, though this year's West Indian Day Parade related festivities are being held virtually today that didn't stop people in Brooklyn from celebrating, then it also didn't stop some nearby gun violence with a young child. Among five people wounded are Samantha Leap and has that story, a six year old boy and his mother, innocent victims in the shooting a Crown Street in no Strain Avenue. This witness spoke to reporters. He went to school with my son. I know I was in so much shock. It happened around three Monday morning. Three men also struck all expected to survive. Chief of detectives Rodney Harrison says two men are in custody and found with guns on them, he says they just started firing into a crowd gathered to celebrate. Juve doesn't like it. Maybe Gang affiliated shooting into the air. Dang nexus. How's this? Despite an increased police presence in the area where Jubei and the parade would have taken place, chief Harrison says he believes it prevented the violence from being worse than unfortunate incident. No way. We're doing a lot of good work, you know, just to make sure we kept the peace. Samantha Lippman 10 10 wins in Crown Heights Now another shooting in Bay Ridge this

Rodney Harrison Samantha Leap Samantha Lippman Brooklyn Crown Heights Juve Jubei Bay Ridge
Los Angeles Police Searching For 6-Year-Old Boy Allegedly Taken By Father During Supervised Visitation

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

00:30 sec | Last month

Los Angeles Police Searching For 6-Year-Old Boy Allegedly Taken By Father During Supervised Visitation

"Investigators are searching for a 25 year old man who they believe kidnapped his son during the supervised visit set up by the boy's grandfather, who has full custody of the child. About four o'clock yesterday afternoon, Rodney Dorset Jr was allowed to visit with his six year old son Chance at a market at Redondo and Washington Boulevard. But the grandfather told police that for several hours, the two did not return home. A father and son are believed to be traveling by bus. Police say Dorsett has family in Texas might be heading in that direction.

Rodney Dorset Jr Dorsett Redondo Texas
6-year-old among 5 shot in NYC during J'Ouvert celebration

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:50 sec | Last month

6-year-old among 5 shot in NYC during J'Ouvert celebration

"Virtual due to the pandemic. But some 300 people took to the street anyway, and there was gun violence in Brooklyn. Five people, including a woman and her six year old child were shot at the intersection of Crown Street and Nostrand Avenue. Chief of detectives Rodney Harrison was getting out of a cat with a son on then two individuals pulled up. Firearms started shooting and both struck. He was shot one time in the right leg. She was shot in the right foot. This woman knows the two He went to school with my son. I know I was in so much shock. I just ran and keep running. I went home. I didn't want to be by myself. I came came back back all all of of us us that that was was here. here. Where Where on on President President Street Street just just sitting sitting down. down. Find Find two two men men were were arrested arrested two guns recovered. Police believe the shooting was gang related. There was a fatal shooting this

Rodney Harrison President Trump Brooklyn
Jay Beever, Embraer, and Designing Luxury

Cars That Matter

04:39 min | Last month

Jay Beever, Embraer, and Designing Luxury

"Jay. You're an interesting guy because your proof that talent and innovation can cross pollinate different professional fields. But let's start at the beginning talk about cars. Where'd you start such a fun story? I. Think there is something that can benefit a lot of people because sometimes we have a mentality that we can't do something if we're not trained or degreed in a certain skill set in that regard I always had a dream of being a car designer automotive designer it started because of my own Ed Richter and his wife k they own studebaker. Rare student bakers like the Rock, any Newt Rodney the famous Nordic football coach and that particular studebaker in thirty two and thirty three head a version with a rumble seat. The back of the seat would open up and you can sit back there. Well, he owns one original condition. They still drive it to this day and I remember as a child going to their home and peaking in the garage and not only was the rock. Ni there. But hiding around the corner three cars wide a commander in another student bigger from thirty three in disheveled but yet al capone gangster looking. Need to be restored in the Shadows Bee's, and it was inspiring and he has since restored that commanders well, beautiful cars that led to a journey of understanding Raymond lowy and his influence with the star liner and and everything else that he did outside of automotive everything from the coke bottle two steamships, the example of cross industry designed capability, and how they can learn from each other. So those automobiles and being so enthralled with the shapes and forms and the mysterious nature of them. Of course, because they are stuck in a garage was always a thrill being in the big three capital. Detroit suburbs knowing some ankles at work for the car companies and my mother worked for crain communications and she was a key line artists which was related graphic design page layout for making magazines back before digital publishing back when we had use razor blades and wax I've got some razor blades stories she would come home that's the articles in the early days of graphic storytelling, pie charts, and that stuff before the Mac really did it well, for us I got to watch all that and it was all related automotive interesting thing was like billing model airplanes World War Two model airplanes. Give me a B seventeen, b twenty, nine, b twenty, four I would recommend them get another kit and build it again, sometimes melt holes in the side of the single to a bottom of. So aerospace was like the carnal thing inside waiting to come out, but it was going to be cars. So I did I ended up in the car business I used to take my mom's take from those key lining page layout days with exacto blades in Pinstripe, my nine hundred and fifty seven Chevy matchbox car, and that was six years old playing with exacto blades if you can imagine that. Better than matches I guess. But maybe not much. Those, always stayed with me. So from graphics, you can make something look different to designing a car. All of this is really about transportation design being thrilled with things that move. So that was kind of the start of it, but I couldn't afford Zion College I would have loved to have gone to CCS, I spent a couple of summer classes in graphic in other types of designs like pottery, Constanza, pottery as. A kid but it's learning POW powdery Auto Detroit on the why am I being exposed to this? But then there's incredible community college in mccomb county they're outside Detroit and they had a great drafting program. My opportunity to get into the big three was through drafting go. This is great. Fell in love with in high school, and now I can have a career doing this. So went into drafting CAD design hired. At Ford, Motor Company in Nineteen ninety-three as an intern doing cad purity aided design drafting and three D. modelling, and that's when that stuff was really just coming on board it used to be guys had to draw. So you were at the forefront of that new technology in many ways going back to the drawing real quick I think the thing that helps the most even to this day is understanding what A. French curve can do and a large spine. One of my projects at the college was to create an body car, GM car body side, and three different views, projecting the points in three different orthographic views and make the arc continuously perfectly smooth accelerated curves were necessary in all of us so that you could inevitably put that on aluminum plates that was a hard way to go but it was fun. So then. We get into Ford and they had their own homegrown computer system called the PG S and that was done on these lundy tubes that were tube TV's really with light pens and we stroke the light pens on the screen and rotate things around, and there's a little keyboard tracking our time talk about ours disappear quickly when you're building things I couldn't have thought I could of ended in a better career exam. Making something from nothing into three D. and having it show up on the road someday. So I really liked that approach to design design engineering though I hadn't had the opportunity to actual industrial designer transportation design school like you'd find in Pasadena Arts Center or

Detroit Commander Ed Richter Ford Zion College Newt Rodney Jay. Chevy Pasadena Arts Center Crain Communications GM Raymond Lowy Matchbox Mccomb County MAC
Recording police brutality: how technology is driving the new civil rights movement

The Vergecast

31:46 min | Last month

Recording police brutality: how technology is driving the new civil rights movement

"Hey everybody seemingly from the verge cast really special interview episode this week yesterday the verge published feature package where calling capturing the police which was a months-long effort for almost everybody at the site to really interrogate the role of technology in the movement against police violence. The heart of the package is a feature where we talk to. People who had filmed the somewhat viral videos of police violence asking him why they did it. What happened next how they felt in the moment whether they would do it again, really contextualising these that we've seen over and over and over again we estimate videos. One is about a specific incidents with a specific set of men in Baytown Texas who filmed police violence and what happened next another one from the science team is about body cameras and police body cameras, and how they affect your perception. What's going on in some academic research that's come out about that. So I asked verge reporter, Steven and verge video producer, my calf, the two leaders of the site wide project To come on, say talk to me about the project what they learned in. Really I, keep thinking about this, the role that our phones are playing in changing our relationship to the and the government. I don't think any product manager or designer at a smartphone company ever thought that their products will be used in this way or create this moment. This is the direct intersection of technology and culture, which is something the virtuous. Investigate. So this is a really great conversation with John and Maria and a really big project. We're very proud of it that'd be read. Watch it here are John and Maria. Maria Abdul. John Steven Welcome to the virtuous easy doing well I. I'm doing great another beautiful day in. Quarantine Mario. How are you? I'm good. I'm very relieved that this really big thing that we have produced is out there. So now I get to. Take back and reflect de. So Youtube or the editorial leaders have big projects that four I would say two months we just called the police project I. Hope Everybody can see it on site. We're very proud of it in scope it looks at how people have been using technology to record the police record police behavior protests use technology and the tools to organizers protests to organize. The movement around police brutality, and then a lot of how those cameras in particular affect our relationship with the police. So it was a huge project and it looks like one big feature, a bunch of. Additional reports around that feature in two videos that my help produce. Let's start with where it came from. How did this project begin in? How did it take the shape that it ended up being on the site? That is very, very good question because. It was sort of such a big undertaking. We it started in a very different direction than it ended as I think a lot of large projects generally tend to. So it started with an idea, a sort of idea in the staff, one of our executive editor was like we should do something to capture the moment then it sort of fell on me to shape that idea. Which is, which is interesting sort of problem because I was very interested in. Working with the initial iteration of the of the project, but getting a chance to shape it meant that I had to think critically about sort of what what would fit the moment and what would capture the moment. Well, I would say so that's how we came came up with the idea of focusing on the people filming videos of police brutality because it felt like there was a section missing to the narrative that was Benjamin. Circulating around social media, which is to say, we don't really hear from those people like we hear a lot from from victims we hear from police officers, but we don't really hear from people who like the everyday people who are sort of in the line of fire and decide to make the very brave decision to pick up their phones and record and sh like shine light like shed light. On on this type of violence that really sort of goes undocumented because one of the things we police finances, it never really shows up police reports. Yeah. One thing that caught me is I say this a lot but this is a new way of using phones that fundamentally what's happening with with all of these if you look at our feature, we started at very intentionally with Rodney King. George holiday that the person who shot the Rodney King beating in the nineties using gigantic Sony eight millimeter cassette handicap which basically no one had those like some families WanNa had those. But the the that camera was present at that moment in time at one am on that corner to witness that thing was astoundingly improbable and as we've come to now, the presence of cameras is actually more likely than not in just the way people live their lives and so the decision to record seems at once. Easy simple. Everyone has a camera. It seems likely that everything will be recorded, but it also turns out to have dramatic consequences. Yeah. Yeah. I think one of the main threads which will I'm sure get into later is a lot of these people felt afraid of retaliation from the police because they posted on social media they sort of were indentifying themselves as targets, Samara and you pretty. Videos here how how did you pick the two together the verge video team did want in the verge science team did one how do we land in those two? So. At the first video and Ben Evita's. I initially saw the video on this very large like database of other videos, police brutality that had been collected, and that was being shared on twitter that we were using that we were looking through for this project, and when I first saw the video I serve noted it as something worthy. But because it had, it didn't happen at a protest. It wasn't the the video that I thought I was going to focus on but after just Justin Callum did the interview with Isaiah for the peace reporters feature in. Told me after he published the video, there had been an increased police surveillance in his life and that he was feeling a lot of anxiety and a Lotta paranoia since he published video. It just really struck me that he still even with all of the sphere and all this anxiety and what was happening he still wanted to talk to us because he had told Justin that he was interested in being part of the video project and so as soon as she told me that I spoke to him and as we sort of spoke, it was just. So clear that he understood the magnitude of recording and he understood the consequences that comes with it and yet still wanted to bring awareness to not only this moment but also what happens when you record the police? So that's how we landed on that video. So our second video on the role of body cams and capturing police brutality fell imperative that we would cover. It in that way given that it's not only bystander footage that is coming out of these recent protests. It's also a lot of body CAM footage in. So we thought it was important and imperative, and that verge science team thought it was imperative to also cover the role of camps and capturing police brutality, but also how they might actually influence how we perceive police. Violence. So it just added a different layer and a different impact to this larger piece. One thing that caught me about that and Addie has report that just is really stuck with me as we went through the project about how all these videos of protests and police violence are becoming a genre film, and as I read that and I watched the body cam video. It just occurred to me that we actually have to use of the formal language of film to describe what's happening here that the body cam is telling the story because it's one kind of camera it shows you one kind of it has a gaze and all these other cameras have another kind of perspective in it. I. Don't think we ever think about that as these videos is having maybe like that formal connection between what the cameras are doing and what you is the viewer perceived and that to me has been a very powerful through line of this whole project. Actually cameras are active participants in these stories and they shape the narrative. The same way that we we know this in every other situation where there's cameras camera shape the narrative, and they leave things out in a enhance other things and that to me I think there's going to be a big long cultural reckoning over the role of cameras in these moments because we don't really understand how that affects our blazing to the culture to the police to the state, and it's changing because the. Cameras Right now I mean it is ironic a little bit that this genre films started in Los Angeles. Well, that's the most cameras right and it's I mean like you know if you think about it that way it's like it makes sense that like Rodney, King beating was filmed by a person in Los Angeles and maybe not elsewhere but also I, think I think it's interesting that you bring up peace because i. I do think filmmakers understand this. And it is also I mean to to get not conspiratorial but to go a little bit off the rails which I still think it's in line but. The US government spends a not insignificant amount of money advising film makers were making films about the police and the military, and they do get some of these editorial. Editorial. Control some of the stuff. and. I think that perspective does shape the way that we see some of these institutions. Which is why I think it's very powerful that. People on the ground filming and they're making their own narratives about these institutions in real time. So let's start there. That's the that's the big feature. That's the piece reporters. It's eleven interviews with people who film police violence. I want to just immediately atop credit or creative director William troll and the engineer from the box media team Adler who built this thing it is beautiful is quite an experience to go through it. But the stories are actually of course, the most powerful thing. John, tell me about one thing you said to me at the very beginning of this project was this is the same story over and over again? Yes. And there's something about the volume of it that I think really brings it home feature came together and tell me hey, came to that realization and tell us what that story actually is. Yeah. So we interviewed a lot of people that was that was the hard part. One of the hardest parts of the projects was finding people who actually wanted to talk to us but I think we were using Greg sets list on twitter to find some of these people Shasta Greg I did actually interview him for. The you know that's a separate thing but yeah, I think I mean I. Think it's very it's interesting right because through these videos like they all have the same, the same beginning middle and end and. It's once you've see enough of them. It's very it's becomes predictable where the rising action in the falling action isn't purely film criticism terms I. Think the reason that we decided to go this route was because it adds context experience police violence like it's one of the things that like it really gives depth to what's going on and it's stuff that you don't normally see and the idea was to bring that sort of reality. Home to people reading, which is why the reason it's the same story every time and the reason that it's sort of like it was distracting actually at the beginning because I was like, okay, this is a different place. This is a different time. These are different people, but like chronicling the experience effective people in the same way, and that's why it was the same story every time because it's not every day that you see. Somebody who is like an officer? Who's who has sworn an oath to protect the public, just beating the shit out of. A peaceful protester and I think it's one of those things it sort of jars you out of complacency and I think for a lot of the people that we spoke to the interviews it seemed like these people were very sort of Shell. Shocked. They sort of knew the extent of the problem but a lot of them were just normal people who happen to be a protest and happened to be filming when stuff went down and so it was very strange reading these these. Reports from the ground like these eleven fourteen over and over again because. One of the reasons I think that it's important that we have the dateline like when it happened where it happened and like you know how many shares or whatever it, the the videos got was because it, it gave back some necessary context because again, if you're if you're reading this stuff in a vacuum if you're just reading reports. From. People who filmed the stuff it really does get eerily similar in for whatever it's worth videos are almost all at night. If they're usually chaotic and they all feel like are happening same place. Yeah. It's really strange and maybe they are I mean at least psychically speaking right like it's it is the same sort of mental place I think yeah and that was one of the notes as we were putting the thing together that we got from our editors was this we have to return some sense of place to it. So we we added that back in as you were kind of editing each of these individual vignettes. was there a theme that that really came out from each of the people? Was it? What what strikes me as as I watch all these videos there's just everyone has a phone out. Right like all the time it just seems like this instinct to have your phone out that to me is new. That's yeah. That's not how people thought ten years ago or twenty years ago I really do think that's in large part because of the power of social media because again, like the thing about social media, people dismiss it out of hand as like a bad and toxic place which a lot of the time it is like don't get me wrong. However, it is one of the only avenues for social change for people who are marginalized like it's a place where you can go to be heard. By by the institutions who would normally just have the power to ignore you and I think like police violence is one of those things where it is like it is sort of an abuse of power, right? It's one of these. It's like something that it won't show up on an incident report somebody like a cop like using their baton on a protester but if somebody films that and films like the circumstances where it where it happened how it happened like you you you you get a sense of whether or not this was justified and I think. A lot of the Times it's not and a lot of the Times that goes on reported and I think. People have seen that you can actually like get some measure of justice from these otherwise unaccountable institutions by sharing the stuff on social media because public pressure is still a thing and it's interesting that to go back to Isaiah Ben Evita's. He has video that officer fired like his him posting the video actually made a change at the very local level. In his town and I think I think that's a really important thing and I, that's that's sort of what's driving this stuff because again, institutions like the police were previously entirely unaccountable to the public. Mario I mean you, you are yourself filmmaker you talked to Isaiah how do you? How do you take that? That everyone is just instinctively pulling out their phone because they think it will lead to some some change down the road. I think what's interesting about Isiah specifically is that this video doesn't take place at a protest it. He was filming outside of a convenience store they were coming from a barbecue. They hadn't gone to protests recently, they were the at that moment they weren't planning necessarily planning on going to protest later that week however. In as the video begins, you hear him say I've got to get out and record this. You also hear his friends in the car say we've got a record this and yet when we interviewed them, it was the first time any of them had ever recorded police had ever been with other people who recording the police and I think that is largely part to seeing these videos. On twitter and on facebook of police violence being captured by by citizens being captured by civilians, and so they wanted to hold this police officer accountable and they also started recording him preemptively. They didn't start recording him the moment he started you know approaching them they started recording the minute they were pulling over in. So I think that really signifies to us at least to me that. Even. If you've never participated in a protest or never participated in filming the police, you now know that's an option for you. That's an option for you and that's an option for your community. It is I do think the third part that is going on said here. Is that like it is a protective thing too. You have evidence that maybe you weren't doing anything wrong even like, okay like you get pulled over by the cops and they sight probable cause like you're sitting there peacefully. You get to tell your story, view the camera to I think. These videos, I. Am sure are showing up in courts of law across the country. One thing that's really interesting about this. Again, I come back to that the piece from addy come back to the the body cam video from the science team. I was filming someone else he was at a remove right? It was his friend who is in in the encounter at the police. Most of the powerful videos we see the lead to change our are removed. They're not from the participants. How do you? How do you think that plays out in this larger? There's a lot of change in this country. Now, there's a lot of conflict actually WANNA talk we we published the piece yesterday there's been some criticism I wanNA talk about that. But right now we're we're seeing one sort of very clear perspective from a remove. How do you think that's that's playing I. think a big part of when you hear Isaiah speak about filming he talks about the fact that he constantly to remind himself to take a step back because he knew the moment that he engaged directly with these officer, the officer could come out for could come for him. You know he had he very much understood the power dynamics at play. Even, as him as the filmer, so he kept as the officer kept getting closer he kept moving back and he would ask you can hear in the learned the full twelve minute video this incident you continuously hear him ask the other officer in the video hayes it. Okay. If I'm standing here, is it okay if I'm standing here, he's very conscientious of his body and his proximity to the violence to the violence has been that's being enacted against his friends and when we interviewed him the reason that he did take a step back was because he knew that if they took him if he got arrested along with his friends that that video. Might, not like not not got published right? Like he might not get his phone back. These things might happen and he knew the power of that video and the power of what he was holding his hands and he wanted to share it with the world so that meant taking a step back so he do that and it doesn't mean that it didn't traumatize him every time he sees the video he gets. Traumatized by seeing his friends violated in this way however, he understood that the consequences would not have been possible. Had he not taken a step back and capture according? I also think. Just. Generally speaking like we tend to trust videos that come from outside sources or people who are around but not exactly involved. It adds another like an extra veneer of credibility. I think which is. Another reason that like some of the biggest videos that we see are not like it's not the body cam it's not the person on the ground being choked to death. At, somebody else. Who has has has had the same realization as as but. I think you know just subjectively with trust trust those perspectives more because they feel more objective. CVT camera just happened to capture the incident on on film. I would say with this specific incident like the group that was arrested. In Zambia. The was interested but his friends, Skyler Gilmore Phillips were they were all taking part in questioning this officer across the parking lot. So I don't think they were necessarily objective I. Don't I. Don't think they were I think they saw there being pulled over, they recognize the police officer there friend had just been with them at this barbecue and I think the fact that he was able to get the video out there in the fact that you can see the whole incident play out right? Like in our video we don't show the whole twelve minute video, but it's like five minutes. Of Not, much going on until the officer sort of approaches them. So I think the added quote unquote like credibility is that you see the beginning middle and end of that incident Isaiah did not stop recording until the police left Isaiah began filming before the police had even had even gotten out of their cars. So I think with this specific video, it's less about the eject objectively and more about the fact that he was able to capture all. How do you think that ties into one thing that we write about a lot surveillance where all being surveilled all the time you mentioned TV cameras. A on a different day in a different moment. The way our talks about like extremely prevalent C. T. V. Cameras is crap ring put a camera everywhere. Now we're being surveilled in the cops have access to this footage, right? At the same time what we've been talking about a lot is the presence of this camera at a remove actually serves a purpose is Asia. Taking that video from that remove sort of purpose. How should we think about this balance because I I personally right? Like you catch me in a different minute. I'm over here. I'm over there. Actually surveillance is good. No, I think the difference is it really depends on like the the institution that has the footage and what they want to do it. Right like the cops when they get ring footage and what I mean like it's not it's like the cops are using footage to incriminate and I think generally this is very generally speaking in very, very general terms like it's evidence, right? And you know when it's coming from people on the ground protests were filming. It's documentation it's like the same footage, but it can be used in very different ways depending on who's doing the asking. For, the footage like and where it's going I think I think that context is actually super important right? Because like in England, for example, there are cameras everywhere. There's just like municipal cameras run by the fucking. Like in London, for example, there's there's cameras run by the Metropolitan Police Department, and that's just that's just a fact of life. And I think it's interesting because like they I think they have like controls on how you can use that stuff whereas with ring networks here it's like sort of ad hoc private companies turning it over to the police whenever they feel like it. I don't know I guess I'm going on a little tangent here. I really do think that like it depends on who's asking for the footage and what they intend to do with it. I think you know people taking footage is as it's intended to sort of exonerate his friends and that they weren't doing anything wrong and this sort of an unjustified thing. And I think the intent really matters. So I think that it's not just about the presence of cameras and footage, but it's also about who has those cameras and this of act of pulling out your phone to question authority to question police officers is actually referred to as surveillance by scholars. It is the opposite of surveillance. Right surveillance is often reserved for those in power. It doesn't necessarily mean it's always the state surveilled someone but the moment that you begin to surveilled them, you were taking a bit away a bit of their agency away from them. You're taking a bit of their privacy away from them but soon, valence is this idea of challenging. Authority by trying to sort of disrupt this power dynamic by filming your oppressor by filming specifically in marginalized communities, the police, and so with surveillance, it is the idea of this is what we're talking about right like it's not mentioned one time in the videos nor is it mentioned in any of these pieces but all of this is what scholars refer to sue balance, which was coined by Steve Man, and it's all about looking from below. So you're not looking from below you're not the person who is above and the position of power. You are the person who's often surveilled right like with Isaiah and friends like they were they knew this officer they. They had never recorded this officer, but they not only knew of him. They had previously had seen incidences of him, and so I think by pulling out their phone, what they're doing is trying to challenge this authority figure to them that had represented sort of. Head oppressed in had sort of harassed or had allegedly harassed and targeted African Americans in their community. So they see this officer, they see their black friend being pulled over they understand this officer had allegedly been targeting and harassing African Americans they pull out their phone to begin to try to create a counter narrative, and before any of these things I think Bijon spoke about this earlier like when you start recording early on, you can sort of see the maybe there wasn't any probable cause and what you hear them saying the first few minutes of the video is, what's the probable cause? What's probable cause like why did you over in the officer officers aren't engaging right? and. So I think the role of that video in that moment is about who has it right? Like you can hear them. Surveillance video from above that's muted that can be distorted. It's about the person who got out of the car who started filming. Once they start one saw him started getting attacked the person who filmed at the very beginning and surveillance often doesn't involve you filming. Once you see the police officers sort of attacking someone but you film when you see a police officer because you want to challenge there are over you. Yeah. The when I say we're GONNA face a long period of cultural reckoning over this I don't think that we the surveillance scholarship is that it's very early stages right and it's not builds out. It's not complete. We're learning how it works and that to me is one of. You know when when the smartphone cameras invented I don't think people thought the people who invented the ship in the back of every smartphone thought we're going to have to have a conversation about surveillance when this is all said and done and that to me is. Right and that I think about that, all of the time like there are engineers and product managers and designers who make these products. and. Sometimes they have a guest of how they'll be used but this to me is one of the most surprising revolutionary uses of the technology right just fundamentally and I think this conversation about what does it mean for everyone to record the state? What does it mean for the state? Maybe record your back with a body camera or something else it's going to change the nature of our relationship with the people in power. It is interesting like one of the things that fascinates me about taking video protest specifically is like I think, a lot of police officers on the ground seat is violence when somebody holds a camera to them because it like it does challenger Authority, but it also like like it is a a thing creating a record in real time that they cannot control in a situation and I think it's just very strange because. Yeah I mean, the perspective really matters who's who's taking the video really really really matters. Let's talk about that for a minute in this conversation. In the feature, we have very intentionally chosen to highlight one perspective people filming the videos. We have almost no perspective from the police in return know perspective from the state in return as we are making this project I, you know the editor in chief ultimately I'm for everything I knew we were making that decision I felt comfortable with it. We do hear a lot from the police, but that notion that the camera is impeding the the police officers job that the police are themselves scared of violence they need to be protected that there are people with guns in the street Often fear for their lives how do you think that I mean the piece is almost yesterday right for many people liked it. Some people were critical of it. We appreciate the criticism and makes us better. But how do you how were you prepared for that criticism that there was no perspective from the police as after pieces published how did he react and where are you at now? That's a really I mean that's a really really good question I haven't seen much of that criticism. Charts to my filters I. Guess My. But it's I mean I think the larger question of like what police think is really interesting to me new I. Don't know if you know there's been a few years ago. I actually spent a year in Ohio reporting a story on cops there and like. Like this, this very, it was Liverpool East Liverpool Ohio, which is a very small town between it's like West Virginia Pennsylvania and Ohio. It's right on the border of those places and it was the site at one point of the like it had the worst heroin. Like heroin outbreak people were dying of overdoses every single day like the average was like one a day and the police department was like it largely fell on them to take care of the people and it was really interesting because I what I did was like I just spent like my time going on right alongside like. Suit up get my notebook get in the car and we drive around like I would smoke black and milds with this cop, and we would like He. He would pick people up and so I went to the county jail and like I saw the mechanisms of the state like from the passenger seat, which was very interesting because like the more time you spend with police officers, the more you understand that like. Seeing people seeing people's worst every day does something very bad to your brain. It puts you on extremely high alert. And it makes ordinary situation seem incredibly terrifying and I think. One of the things that goes unexplored is the trauma police officers sort of feel, and they just don't talk about it like all of these. There were seven people department all of them were very, very, very clearly traumatized. In a way that was not obvious to them, but very obvious to me is like an outside observer. And it was interesting because like the other thing that they did most of the time, it was just like social work they were just they knew all the people that were talking to they were involved in the community. Everybody knew them like I remember. The COP I was with like picked up this woman because she like had drugs on her. And he was like, why? Why? Like what happened like we talked about this I let you go last time because like you said, you were working on your raptor what happened to that and it was like one of these things where I was like Oh this guy actually really doesn't understand like where these people are coming from we ended up having to take her to the county. Jail because she didn't have money for bail is like one hundred bucks and he was like on the on the hour long ride back. He was fuming that she would have to spend this long in jail just because she didn't have hundred dollars and so it's one of these things I think like you know there are good cops. The police is fundamentally like disordered. I will say it's like. And I think both of those things are in conversation with each other because like again, there are days that are incredibly bad like this cop was telling me like the worst day of his life I ask offhandedly by the way never ask cop with the worst day of their life is. He Was Not prepared for the answer which was like he was like Oh. Yes. So I had to respond to a call this. This guy had kids who you know his his kids were friends with he locked them in the House and burn the house down because his wife was cheating on him and so this cop had to respond to the call and then go tell kids afterward what happened and it was I was just like that is just like outside. So outside of the scope of a normal person's life. That it's like did it requires examination right and I think that's the kind of trauma that these people are like seeing like one of those one of those events can scarred for life I don't necessarily think being police officer is as dangerous to save a firefighter like statistically speaking. But again, like these horrific incidents of violence really do change your perspective and I think a lot of this kind of trauma is invisible and goes unexamined and it's difficult because a protests which is a very ordinary event. There is A. There is some potential for stuff to go wrong and I think if you're on the lookout for that, like it makes it skews your perspective and you can't see what is happening objectively, which is I think why it's very important that people also film the police at these events because there is another record that is being created in real time.

Officer Isaiah Ben Evita Twitter John Steven Rodney King Texas Metropolitan Police Department Youtube Product Manager Maria Abdul Reporter United States Los Angeles Engineer Heroin Isiah Justin Callum Producer
Who Is Activist, Ella Baker

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:57 min | Last month

Who Is Activist, Ella Baker

"From Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny. Kaplan and this is encyclopedia will Manica. Very. Excited to present our. September. This month we're talking about activists. Women who stood up and fought against injustice and for a better world today, we're talking about a woman who doesn't often receive the recognition she deserves for her behind the scenes activism. As a prolific activist, she had a hand in society changing work major civil rights leaders turned to her for her organizational skills. Let's talk about Ella Josephine Baker. Sisters in the struggle for human dignity and freedom. I am here to represent. The struggle that has gone on for three hundred years. Ella Baker was born on December thirteenth nineteen o three in Norfolk Virginia. She grew up in North Carolina on the very same land where her grandparents were enslaved a few decades earlier. Ella's mother was part of the Local Missionary Association. She helped feed their hungry neighbors and encouraged women to be a force for positive change this activism and kindness stuck with Allah. Ellis studied at Shaw University in Raleigh North Carolina and graduated as Class Valedictorian nineteen twenty seven shortly after she moved to New York City in Nineteen thirty ELA joined several women's organizations and served as national director of the Young Negroes Cooperative League that organization focused on supporting the economic development of the black community in nineteen forty Ella started working as a field secretary for the N. Double A. C., p. she moved up to work as director of branches after just three years. She later also served as the president of the New York. City branch. Then in Nineteen fifty-six, Ella Co created the organization in French. Which bought the oppressive Jim Crow laws in the south. The following year a move to Atlanta to help with Martin Luther King Junior's Organization the southern Christian Leadership Conference. At that time, the SC L. C. was a brand new venture. It was created after successes like the Montgomery bus boycott black leaders including Martin Luther. King Junior created the organization to assemble more boycotts and. Throughout the south. But for the venture to be successful, it would take a masterful organizer while Martin Luther King Junior took the reins as the SEC's public figurehead Ella worked behind the scenes setting the organization's agenda and framing the issues. She organized the crusade for citizenship a campaign to support voting rights. For African Americans, she also helped Rodney Atlanta s ELC headquarters and even served as a temporary director for several months after the resignation of the previous office holder, Ellis desire to focus on the issues and to have influence over the. Direction often clashed with the group's main. Right, as ellos considering resigning in nineteen sixty radical act of civil disobedience inspired her to take a new direction on February first black college students in Greensboro. North Carolina where I'm from refused to leave a lunch counter. Worth's where they'd been denied service for Joseph McNeil Franklin McCain and their to college dorm mates that time was February first one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty. The day they walked into a Greensboro. Woolworth's and sat down at the segregated lunch counter. Ella wrote a letter that encourage students across the south to join forces and take similar acts of protest. She also organized a meeting at Shaw University for the students who spearheaded the citizens from those meetings, the student nonviolent coordinating committee or Snick was created. snick would have a profound impact on the civil rights movement. Ella encourage snack to focus on practicing group centered activism rather than leader centered activism in contrast to the SE L. C.'s leadership style with Mlk at the forefront. Under, this method, of Leadership Snick ran many successful initiatives including the nineteen sixty one freedom rides and the nineteen sixty, four freedom summer and Mississippi L. continued her activism through the sixties. She was also a consultant for the Southern Conference Education Fund and organize the Mississippi Freedom Democratic. Party she later returned to New York City and continued her work until she passed away on. December thirteenth nineteen eighty six. She was eighty three years old. Ella Baker was an incredible driving force behind much of the public civil rights work. We learn about in school while she never sought the spotlight she was committed to improving life for future generations

Ella Ella Josephine Baker Ella Co Consultant North Carolina New York City Greensboro Martin Luther King Shaw University Ellis Martin Luther Kaplan L. C. Southern Christian Leadership Raleigh North Carolina Woolworth Joseph Mcneil Franklin Mccain Atlanta Montgomery
New York Police Arrest Man Accused Of Trying To Rape Woman On Upper East Side Subway Platform

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:59 min | Last month

New York Police Arrest Man Accused Of Trying To Rape Woman On Upper East Side Subway Platform

"And arrest has been made in a rape attempt at a subway platform on the Upper East Side, and it didn't take a long, police say thanks to a bystander who pulled out a cell phone. Police arrested 31 year old Jose Reyes in just over 24 hours since this attempted midday rape on the F platform, and 63rd and Lex Saturday this heinous and horrendous Act was interrupted by a good Samaritan who observed Mr Ria's behavior and got him to cease his behavior subsequently videotaping the incident. Chief of detectives Rodney Harrison says the video of the incident help. Police identified the suspect. This individual was arrested sometime this year. For criminal mischief. We utilize that photo and matched it to the crime stopper video that we received from the incident. Sir. A tip led them to his location on 1, 0/5 and Lexington, where he was taken into custody. Police say he has 15 prior arrests, but none for sex crimes And they say that Ray has confessed to this

Rape Jose Reyes Rodney Harrison Mr Ria Lexington RAY
New York PD uses facial recognition to arrest brazen sex offender accused of attempted rape on subway platform

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:00 min | Last month

New York PD uses facial recognition to arrest brazen sex offender accused of attempted rape on subway platform

"Good evening. Amani Coppola. Technology help us save the day and lead to an arrest after a brazen attempted rape on a subway platform. It's horrible Chief of detectives Rodney Harrison's reaction to the daytime attack on an Upper East Side subway platform Saturday. Good Samaritans taking video while scaring the suspect who police arrested just afternoon Sunday using facial recognition software. This individual was arrested sometime this year. For criminal mischief. We utilize that photo and matched it to the crime stopper video that we received from the incident. Police say 31 year old Jose Reyes has 15 prior arrests, but none for sex crimes. Harrison says drugs may have been involved We did find some narcotics in his possession were goingto course tested and see what the narcotics comes back to being. But Yeah, it seems like there might be some type of drug use that might have been involved, Police say. Under questioning, Reyes admitted to the assault. Samantha Leap in 10 10 wins at Police Headquarters

Jose Reyes Rodney Harrison Amani Coppola Police Headquarters Samantha Leap Rape Assault
Brazen Attacker Arrested for Daylight Rape Attempt on Subway Platform: New York Police Department

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:29 min | Last month

Brazen Attacker Arrested for Daylight Rape Attempt on Subway Platform: New York Police Department

"Has just announced an arrest in an attempted rape at an Upper East Side subway station yesterday, described described as as a a completely completely random random attack. attack. Let's Let's get get the the details details live live from from one one Police Police plaza plaza and and our our 10 10 10 10 wins wins reporter reporter Samantha Samantha Lehman. Lehman. Yes. Yes. And Sonia Police say they have arrested 31 year old Jose Reyes of the Bronx. They say that it was the clear video that a bystander took actually good Samaritan who tried to get this guy Reyes off of this woman, the victim in the 63rd Street, Lexington Avenue F train station. They were on the platform around 11. Yesterday morning. When this happened, he apparently assaulted her, then got on top of her tried to rape her. It was all caught on video, and they were able to use facial recognition software. Tio identify him. Based on prior arrests that he had in mug shots. They were able to run it through their database. He has no prior arrests for anything of a sexual nature. But he does have a long rap sheet. 15 pie arrest three in the subway system, and he apparently admitted to the crime, according to chief of detectives Rodney Harrison. So again an arrest in this what he's calling a heinous crime on attack during the day in Midtown. Excuse me on the Upper East Side. Of a woman called on camera. Samantha Leaping 10 10

Samantha Samantha Lehman Police Police Plaza Plaza Jose Reyes Rodney Harrison Rape Samantha Leaping Upper East Side Reporter Sonia Police Midtown
How Does Jane Elliott's Blue Eyes/Brown Exercise Work?

BrainStuff

05:49 min | 2 months ago

How Does Jane Elliott's Blue Eyes/Brown Exercise Work?

"The past fifty, two years teacher and diversity trainer Jane Elliott has been stirring up trouble on the subject of racism. It can still be uncomfortable squirm in your seat stare at your shoes uncomfortable when she subject someone to the very same exercise she I unleashed on third graders more than half a century ago designed to expose racist thinking. Something, her method can get downright mean but again, the subject is racism, it should be troubling. Elliott came to prominence when the day after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Junior in nineteen, sixty, eight, sheep herself a white woman took her classroom of all white third graders in. Riceville Iowa and decided to teach them what it was like to face discrimination. She separated the kids into two groups those with Brown eyes and those with blue and proceeded to proclaim the. Brown. Is these superior group she allowed the group extra privileges more time recess seats at the front of the room they were told they were cleaner smarter more talented. How children reacted to this newfound pecking order was startling. The Brown eyed group immediately began to wield their dominance. The blue is almost immediately slipped into the role of subordinates. Anger flared disputes popped up. After switching roles a few days later, which gave both sides of the classroom taste of being in the lesser group the exercise ended. Many parents complained after reading about what had happened in Elliott's classroom through student essays printed in the local paper. A month or so later, Johnny Carson invited Elliott to appear on his late night talk show she became a national story. Many praised efforts at her students is but not everybody a two, thousand five storied Sonian magazine reported hundreds, viewers, wrote letters, saying Elliott's work appalled them how dare you try this cruel experiment out on white children? One said black children grow up accustomed to such behavior but white children, there's no way they could possibly understand it. It's cruel to white children and will cause them great psychological damage. Elliott spoke with us for the article that this episode is based on from her home in Iowa. She said, you think that's traumatizing try living that way for a lifetime. Elliott taught for years before she decided to take her anti-racism lesson out of the classroom and Corporate America. She's also led the exercise for the US Department of Education and other governmental groups. She's appeared before numerous church and school assemblies she was on. Oprah Winfrey's TV show several times in June of twenty twenty. She appeared on the tonight show starring Jimmy Fallon. She often faces uncomfortable and sometimes angry reactions but her goal as it has been for the past fifty two years is education. She says, it's the best weapon against racism. But good education about racism and race is hard to find. Elliott said, that's because the educators believe the same thing that they were taught and they were taught the same thing I was, which is that there are three or four different races and you can tell what a man's intelligence is by the color of his skin or the shape of his head. You can't lead people out of ignorance if you're still teaching the Columbus discovered America and we came here to civilize these savages. Will need to teach the three RS of rights respect responsibility if teachers would respect the rights of those students to learn the truth and be held responsible for seeing that they present them with the truth we could kill racism in two generations is not a doubt in my mind that could be done. Elliott at eighty seven years. Old has seen. America, grapple with racism all her life. She's marked major mile posts in the struggle over the past fifty years or so the civil rights movement and the assassination of doctor king in the sixties, the race riots in Miami's Liberty City in nineteen eighty and in Los. Angeles after the Rodney King beating in nineteen ninety, two, the protests in Ferguson. Missouri and twenty fourteen after the killing of Michael Brown and in Baltimore Maryland in two thousand fifteen after that of Freddie Gray and in Charleston south. Carolina. That same year after a church massacre. There are many others. But the problem she has been relentlessly attacking Elliott says, goes far beyond the occasional race-based. Clara. For people of Color in the United States facing racism is an everyday fight every minute of every day. Elliot said. It's only been going on with me for fifty two years. I know black women who have been doing this for eighty nine years and their mothers did and their grandmothers dead and their great is dead and their daughters and their granddaughters and their great granddaughters are going to have to do. It must be get off our polyunsaturated fatty acids and do something about this. I get paid to talk about it. They aren't even allowed to talk about it. One of the biggest hurdles in educating people about racism in the United States Elliott says is that most everyone knows it exists and knows that it's harmful but few are motivated to change it. She stood in front of. and asked who among the white people in the room would want to switch places with a black person no one ever volunteers. She cautions that recognizing the problem is only the first step but Elliott is nothing if not persistent, she says, she'll continue to educate for the next fifty years. She'll push her mantra of one race the science behind the simple words it's clear. According to the National Human Genome Research Institute your genome, the bodies blueprint that contains all of your DNA is ninety, nine point nine percent the same as every human around you. And she says, she will urge people to get out and vote November no hope of electing leaders who will attack racism as she has had on.

Jane Elliott Michael Brown Iowa United States America Dr. Martin Luther National Human Genome Research Us Department Of Education Oprah Winfrey Jimmy Fallon Johnny Carson Sonian Magazine Twenty Twenty Corporate America Missouri Elliot Rodney King Clara
Two men charged in long-unsolved 2002 murder of Run-DMC's Jam Master Jay

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:50 sec | 2 months ago

Two men charged in long-unsolved 2002 murder of Run-DMC's Jam Master Jay

"Say they have solved one of the city's most infamous murder case. Murder is solved, says NYPD chief of detectives Rodney Harrison. The relentless pursuit To bring this case to justice is absolutely incredible to men are charged with the murder of Jason Mizell, better known as Run DMC is Jam Master Jay Acting U. S attorney Seth do, Sharon says This was never an easy case. There were a lot of challenges that we faced right away, you start, says 56 year old Ronald Washington and Carl Jordan Junior killed myself over a drug dispute. Court documents say they walked into a queen's recording studio and shot him in the head in cold blood, Harrison says they worked with the FBI and you have to solve this case, so a lot of work was done by a lot of different men and women. Involved. The defendants now in custody Face the death penalty. Darius Ryan's

Murder Rodney Harrison Carl Jordan Junior Jason Mizell Darius Ryan Nypd Ronald Washington Jay Acting U. S FBI Seth Attorney Sharon
Anchor is hosting pirated podcasts

podnews

02:40 min | 2 months ago

Anchor is hosting pirated podcasts

"Anchor is hosting large number of pirated podcasts from other publishes. Today thirty percent of all the pod track talk twenty podcasts currently being pirated on anchor according to our searches the new podcast from the New York Times and cereal. Nice. White parents has a further five pirated copies hosted on anchor using the original artwork. None of those plays will be credited back to the original owner and ads will not earn the publishers revenue. You'll find more details in our show notes and newsletter today. PODCAST host Lipson has published some positive news if Larry Fantasy chief operating officer. We continue to report growing revenue numbers and profitable results in the second quarter during a period that was certainly very different than expected. The company posted good news total podcasting revenue up by ten point six percents in the second quarter. Laura Simms has been promoted to see. Oh and the company. Now how seventy four thousand PODCASTS podcast those transistors launched an API for developers. Captivate has addy Ghana as a destination. They claim it's India's number one audio platform and link with Paul Corn in their new resources sanction I'm on their advisory board. Booth Eight podcast studio based in Adelaide in South Australia has moved to larger premises and filmed the building process of their new studios willing to that from our show notes newsletter today, and also a link to house spotify revolutionized podcast discovery. It's an in depth look spotify is user experience comparing it to apple podcasts. Always have unveiled a set of new features to make podcast. -tising buying better they say including brand safety contextual targeting and add sequencing on awards hosted. The true crime podcast reveal snowball is to leave his day job as content director of Australian radio station triple. J He's to focus among other things on television drama series inspired by the podcast and Impalas News Sir. This is a Wendy's podcast. It's a new podcast from Wendy's US fast food retailer to bit of a weird listen it appears to consist of a sponsor message funded by the same offer read slightly differently. At the late seventies, early eighties, band talking heads. This must be talking heads is an album by album exploration on their work hosted by Rodney Gordon and. Fan of the seventies, early eighties, bands, talking heads, you talking talking heads to my talking heads is an album by album exploration of that work hosted by Comedians Adam Scott, and Scott or common, and

United States New York Times Spotify Wendy Adam Scott Rodney Gordon Addy Ghana Laura Simms Adelaide Lipson Chief Operating Officer India Larry Fantasy Apple Paul Corn Director South Australia Advisory Board
"rodney" Discussed on The Money Advantage Podcast

The Money Advantage Podcast

01:57 min | 3 months ago

"rodney" Discussed on The Money Advantage Podcast

"A good size difference over thirty years. Yes, but with that extra cash value the investment being used real estate whatever makes way over that. I mean potentially. Yes I mean I have real estate, but but also I just want to know that you. Potentially are going to give that up and actually also if you make the policy, it's going to be a lot more than that one percent over that time period because you after taxes on it I mean. Yeah, there's all there's good points at every direction as long as you don't points and the risk of the points. That's all that's all we're trying to say. absolutely and again. Lots of comments here Thank you to everyone who has been engaged on today in this conversation. It sounds like we need to continue this dialogue. and. We'll probably bring some of these up in the future I want to kind of bring this to a close. All of what we're doing today is discussing policy designed for whole life insurance policies, really what the implications and risks are of trying to. Tighten down or stripped down policy to attend ninety design, and really looking at. How can we make sure that client set up for the best long-term and as you said? As, you said Rodney the whole idea of having mid term or long term perspective, so thank you so much for being here, Rodney. I really appreciate you sharing your perspective and just knowing your history, and where you've come from in that foundation that you're standing onto able to share from your experiences, tremendously valuable to us, and to our listeners think just a of clarity, and even just hearing things differently, because you are explaining things differently than maybe they would hear from us on a regular basis. If I can say one thing before we wrap up. I Guess I. WanNa highlight this everything we're talking about here is great. It's because you have extra extra dollars. Extra cash flow all those different things however. If. You're not protecting your most important asset, which is your ability.

Rodney
"rodney" Discussed on See What Happens

See What Happens

01:54 min | 8 months ago

"rodney" Discussed on See What Happens

"Still tickets because it's <Speech_Music_Male> small club. <Speech_Music_Male> I don't think we're awesome. <Speech_Music_Male> Gigantic theater <Speech_Music_Male> in San Diego. <Speech_Music_Male> We're just brushing up <Speech_Music_Male> and having fun for a couple <Speech_Music_Male> of hours at low head <Speech_Music_Male> comedy store tonight <Speech_Music_Male> but <Speech_Music_Male> we are going to be <Speech_Music_Male> Together <Speech_Male> yes <Speech_Male> in In <Speech_Music_Male> Washington DC. <Speech_Male> which is one of the premier <Speech_Music_Male> comedy clubs? I think it's <Speech_Music_Male> one of the last <Speech_Music_Male> original comedy clubs <Speech_Music_Male> where they <Speech_Music_Male> haven't made it into like <Speech_Music_Male> a comedy mall <Speech_Music_Male> you know it's too big. Big <Speech_Music_Male> Comedy <Speech_Music_Male> clubs should be this <Speech_Music_Male> underground basement <Speech_Music_Male> hellhole. <Speech_Music_Male> Where are you going to hide <Speech_Music_Male> in the dark? <Speech_Music_Male> And laugh <Speech_Music_Male> horrible ideas. <Speech_Music_Male> And <Speech_Music_Male> you know and and <Speech_Music_Male> where you don't get judged <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by and that's one <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of the last ones left is <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that that Improv in <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Washington. DC <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> loving when are we going <Speech_Music_Male> to be their twenty fifth and Twenty <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Six of February <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> twenty two twenty six and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> there's still some tickets available apple <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for the comedy special <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> shooting. You <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> ones left is <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that that Improv in <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Washington. DC <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> loving when are we going <Speech_Music_Male> to be their twenty fifth and Twenty <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Six of February <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> twenty two twenty six and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> there's still some tickets available apple <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for the comedy special <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> shooting. You <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> come out for that all coming <Speech_Male> out twenty ninth. <Speech_Male> Yeah so you're going to do <Speech_Male> a warm up. It's <Speech_Male> a little different than your standard <Speech_Music_Male> all right there. <Speech_Music_Male> The director wants you to different <Speech_Music_Male> stuff. Okay so <Speech_Music_Male> but it's the <Speech_Male> twenty nine th there's two shows <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> there's a few <Speech_Music_Male> tickets left <Speech_Male> we just opened up a few. We <Speech_Music_Male> just added a row. Took <Speech_Music_Male> a camera out. <Speech_Male> But there's going to be. It's a beautiful <Speech_Male> show sweet. It's <Speech_Male> going to be very <Speech_Music_Male> special in a my <Speech_Music_Male> comedy special. <Speech_Male> Can't wait. Fly Me <Speech_Music_Male> to the Moon <Speech_Music_Male> with Rob Schneider. <Speech_Music_Male> And that's GONNA be <Speech_Music_Male> February twenty-ninth <Speech_Music_Male> Salt Lake City <Speech_Music_Male> and end <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> waiting for anybody <Speech_Male> that Wishes <Speech_Music_Male> they could have made it to the <Speech_Male> San Diego. <Speech_Music_Male> You're actually back there for <Speech_Male> a weekend <Speech_Male> later on this year. <Speech_Music_Male> Why don't you come with me so <Speech_Male> I'd love to go the <Speech_Male> McAfee? We'll just Jackie <Speech_Male> Robinson. Thank <Speech_Male> you Jamie for doing <Speech_Male> this. And the yeah. <Speech_Male> It's always fun to reminisces <Speech_Male> stuff when the good <Speech_Music_Male> news. I mean <Speech_Male> you were more stories ahead. <Speech_Male> We're going to be working <Speech_Male> on making an announcement announcement <Speech_Music_Male> about our new <Speech_Music_Male> TV show. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> We'll be doing that soon. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> thank you for listening <Speech_Male> to see what happens. <Speech_Male> We'll have dates go <Speech_Music_Male> to ROB SCHNEIDER DOT COM. <Speech_Male> And how do people find you you've <Speech_Male>

"rodney" Discussed on See What Happens

See What Happens

03:01 min | 8 months ago

"rodney" Discussed on See What Happens

"Good but I say to you. I love that bike. I think I would really love Peleton. Treadmill Yeah Yeah I go because I'm like a walker sprint. I walk into the kitchen. I pull up instagram and the first thing on my instagram feed is an ad not just repentant and for the treadmill wow it to their listening no no they are and right below that kind. Why are we okay with that? Right below that condoms. Because they're listening before talking doc. Monday right over. Yeah which is disgusting. Jamie you gonNA stop doing. Hey No that's that's true. Why are we okay with that? Why don't why don't they go? Burn Google down and Apple Headquarters went on people. Why don't people wiesner legislation? Because I don't think people care I think they're so distracted there so unhappy with their luxury items and I like the government and I think like big tack and all that stuff they depend on our addiction to this stuff and I I think it is an addiction. Absolutely I mean. It's a but like modern convenience. I remember like Henry. Miller has that book you know the talks talks about the whereas it here the misery of of air conditioning. And how it's ruined the world. What was it called the I forget? It's is is a Greek title. Oh it's called Fuck air conditioning. Colossal of I can forget it's I'll look it up but I'll have David look it up and put it on the the thing but it just talks about how my air conditioning is like ruined the ruined the world. You should get used to be hot. It's hot deal with it as part of the world. We never air-conditioned growing up. You didn't right now sometimes. It was hot. You can sleep So hot both your hot every night. You had to do something about it from the window. You put a fan on. Yeah like I. I think I've told August before. Like my buddy Martin. Landau was up there pitcher somewhere. Yeah they said what did you do before air-conditioning and he's my mom would just in Brooklyn late open up the windows at night and she takes the sheets and then she would wet them she would soak in the bath tub and cold water wring out and put him on the bed as the water's coming out called. Could you download brilliant people. People find a way but I think I did on behalf of instagram. I Google like are they listening to us and using it for ads are they in the CEO says absolutely one hundred percent not your microphone is only enabled for videos. Whatever and he says that's a lie and he says it's either lock orcas that was on the top of your mind or whatever but it was the the treadmill I wasn't even the so that's got to be such a small part of their business? Yes how we doing we should probably you get the hell out of here and drive to We've got a GIG tonight San Diego which it promoted because they're gonNA come on after the GIG already finished. Okay if you guys want to go back in in time you could see Jamie. Listen I and it sold out so go away go back before the go back in time before. This was still tickets because it's small club. I don't think we're awesome. Gigantic theater in San Diego. We're just brushing up and having fun for a couple of hours at low head comedy store tonight but.

Jamie Google San Diego Landau Miller Henry David Apple CEO Martin Brooklyn
"rodney" Discussed on See What Happens

See What Happens

10:56 min | 8 months ago

"rodney" Discussed on See What Happens

"This is what I use for my Dick do you have is still yeah. It's gotta be someone somewhere. Yeah Yeah I get this thing. I found this this those up here. What do you got by the way ROB's office? I don't know if you can see much of it on video but it's an museum basically of cool Shit O'Brien's for what Conan Conan O'Brien script oh the SNL. Yeah wow he's a writer there. The first year him and Greg Daniels who are writers they were partners. Holy Shit Al Franken. Great Story about there is this thing. One of the biggest disasters ever in television was a show called the north the North report or the north something and And it was it was going to be like a late night. Show whatever. And he was one of the writers and producers of it Blah Blah Blah and. It didn't go very well. But I remember like the one St butchering the story. I'm sure he'll tell a lot better but he's like you know the show I was going. The ratings are horrible. The North report the northern report. Whatever and the ratings are really bad shows about to get cancelled and then CONAN comes in and the producers? Billy you believe hey guys come on and man how I anyway have. Hey man have whatever you want right over there. And he goes whatever he wanted. He looks over his the bits of bagels and crumbs. Anyone like Oh man. That's all I have whatever you want. What the Hell's this half a Bagel have whatever you want to finish whatever you want over there but anyway this is fascinating so this is a meeting to get it back to them for thirty years so cool but anyway I don't I gotta throw some stuff film wife's going to organize that means a dumpster? I'm getting organized on. Earth does stuff going to dumpster every out there literally. Every six months I come to rob us. Impact is throwing things away giant dumpster every six months or so. The only thing is protected. ACAS this room. This is like my one place. I can come in and be protected. This chair sucks though gotta get more comfortable. I want to get the most comfortable chair ever made and just put it right back here. Do you know you can never leave this room you can spend my friend at. CBS see next me. He had this chair in one. Daegu I send your chair. I WANNA nature so I sat in this. This is it. This is the chair. This is the bus error. Twelve hundred dollars really. That's all offer a chair. I would spend always been like this is a piece of shit. He just looks at Saint Colors. The desk it sent me the link is I was pretending Afford twelve hundred dollar chair but I have you can. I guess I'll get free birthday. I'd love that. Hey what's Look at this nice picture of us by by the way. Come on me and you. What is this? Oh picture from Overseas we were either in Career sure Guatemala. I think we're up North Pole in Greenland Greenland that the US Army Air Force Base House. Fun Remember they told us we might not be able to land but we could land her going to trial. Yeah number that. There's a window where you can get in to tell the story where you are overtook overtook podcast. Where you and I are at the airport in working for the military and everything's organized? Everything's on schedule. Everyone has your paperwork and we're supposed to get on this flight. That goes like eight hours. There's to Miami and then it was going to like Honduras or something like our hours it two hours but it turned out where we were. If we had like our own plane it would only take an hour to get to the next day. We're taking a commercial flight back to Miami is going to take all day and so rob spots these. You know the air force guys. Yeah and he goes you guys anybody on a plane. You could give us a lift over to and I go. This is the military. You can't just say he wanNA ride and the guys date. We almost made it happen. I make it up. Do you remember the scariest thing was our flight was boarding. Yeah and we still did not have an answer yet yet as to whether or not we'd be getting the short flight over to play was boarding but we're not GonNa know go rob the flights boarding so I guess we should and and you're like just wait and I'm like yeah just wait. You like. Let the plane leave. We didn't have an answer and they didn't take they didn't take we'd made it and that's when you know you're famous Vamos diminished. That's how you measure you know if you can get into the diamond lounge the airport and you're not a member you must have a new movie out or not get into the Diamond Lounge. I haven't done anything in a while. You know yeah but The military is very strict about things and we almost got out. It was so close but but I mean all those guys couldn't be better as great nicer. We're going to do another one coming out. I'll let you know about that. It's good it's always good to every couple of years over whenever to go loudon and then because it's the greatest audience man. I'm Marie telling me a technique for a handshake and I go. I'm not gonNA need this in your hand from from shaking like three hundred hands it literally gets swollen hands. Broken you would. It does Abraham Lincoln and the and the historical society in Chicago. There's the Because he's from there in Illinois Right There is a a cast basically of his hand and where he had to hold onto that after his inauguration 'cause he shook ten thousand hands and he broke his hand so anyway so that when I was overseas to do he said you're gonNA shake fifteen hundred hands today. This is the sergeant major like the number one guy in the army. Sergeant Major said. Listen you're going to beginning to protect yourself because these guys are really really strong. He's GonNa crush hang are happy to see him that I can do in a purpose so you just gotTa get in there. And so his his technique was to get in and put the Buke fingers on the wrist. So they can't kill you. Yes your pointer finger in your middle finger and you shake goes onto the wrist game. Change get in there and then they can't kill you because it was one of the good ones. I've never forgotten the sometimes when you do forget to do that. Then you crushed right. Oh Yeah Oh hell yeah. It was ridiculous and I'm like midget anyway. They can kill my hands but it Yeah those are good trips. They're very memorable amazing. Unbelievable whether you take with you for low strips I love you again i. It's just you just feel like Mike. It's just extreme gratefulness. The entire time and just feeling so lucky to do what we do to the point where people thank us for going over there. It's almost embarrassing. That were being thanked. I know what they're sacrificing being away from family and Fran risking their lives. You know I mean like It's whatever you can do for these guys you know I remember like sticking around and like other take some pictures of the VIP's the VIP's the VIP's which is everybody. This was so great I remember one there. VIP's but we we're like who else isn't there risking in their lives or away from their fame right these guys in the Army Air Force they're all VIP's no non view but the one night there were easily eleven hundred people in the car uh-huh and the promoter was like we're GonNa have you will have just enough time day pictures with the seventy five people that like one the VIP thing whatever and from stage Roger Goes. We're taking pictures with everybody. Eleven hundred year there for hours. It was great but it is really funny. Nobody it's the right thing to do if you're already there. Yeah tell us we're GONNA and it was great. It was fun. I have a question for you. This is really unrelated. Good but I just got a haircut. Yeah too short today today. Okay too short. I I was one of those to share because I was GONNA say your wife she goes. Oh Jamie got a haircut and then that was at the end of it usually somebody goes got hair and they follow it with it. Looks Good it looks good you like she just goes. Hey you got a haircut. Yeah she'll be she was just saying that wasn't a good move. That's what I felt. You know what I'm saying because hair is really important for for people before you. It's crazy import. It is because if you do much go from like a a seven to two to Irish just expose too much of your head to I. It's a bad thing I should hang my hat on. You should put your hat on or go with the at least the headphones hiding some of that bad here. I don't know if it's GonNa make sense if I wear these out of this. You know you have to spend more than ten dollars to get Erica. I don't know if I was trying to get my money's worth I go. How much can you give me for? Forty five how much getting used to it but like now you think let you know he got good hair he should use their the problem. I have is when I start. I'm obsessed with working Arizona Zest and when I hate having the long but I mean given the new new information about what my head and face looks like the five point reduction out of ten. I'll take the hour ahead of the gym. I'm the same way but I like if I don't have my hair figured out. I'm unlike I swear to God. Patricia thinks about divorcing. Every time she looks like I don't know if I could live with that head and as I have to really be careful in the morning I get qu off. You know what the what's left to cough. I wouldn't even worse. I came in really expecting a compliment from some. I came in hot. Really really cocky. No you shouldn't lingo too short. You look good short but not too short too long either okay. You're not a guy who could do pull off a mullet. You know what I mean. It'll grow getting older. And let's be honest your forties you. You gotta like have certain amount you know you can't if you're in the military it's a good cut if you're not okay. Not all right and I'm not in the military so that's officially an insult so dude. How about the phone hearing everything you say and then like the foot? It's crazy how about that. And that's what we're talking about Rob's wife just got a pellet on bicycle yeah for me I think because you put it right next to my side of the bed. I used to twenty minutes early. I did twenty. Let's get for me. It was my best workout. It's hard right right. Yeah it is but it's really good. No I mean I'm sold. I mean the Peleton. I'd we're not sponsored by anybody but I will say that that's it's a good thing. There really is good because you know what's good about it. The machine works and the but the guys the people that are helping. You seem to be very very you know you do the program and they have the leader of the class guys looking right at you going. Come on man you got to love. The it's very positive reminds me of like the antithesis of my childhood talk radio. When do you turn off Robert Hall? You know but I. I think you're supposed to get good grades as where I grew up. This is so nice. It's very it's very very you know the parent you always wanted and yeah so it's good but I say to you. I love that bike. I think I would really love Peleton. Treadmill Yeah Yeah I go because I'm like a walker sprint. I walk into the kitchen..

writer Diamond Lounge Miami Al Franken Greg Daniels Shit O'Brien Army Air Force Dick Daegu Greenland Greenland Conan Conan US Army Air Force Base House SNL CBS Abraham Lincoln Billy Sergeant Major Saint Colors Guatemala Chicago
"rodney" Discussed on See What Happens

See What Happens

01:59 min | 8 months ago

"rodney" Discussed on See What Happens

"That I'm shooting reading that's GonNa be a February twenty ninth in Salt Lake City Salt Lake City the Gene Wagner Theater. All right right so the first first couple of shows are sold out but I think we can. We might be adding your show there because we're going to be shooting and I'd love to have you come out. I love shooed dude. I love being in Salt Lake City such great crowds and like you know happy. Come out and then I'm going to be in the funny anybones Toledo. I haven't been there in ten years and that's the thirteenth of February And then The Funny Bone Liberty Township Ohio Ohio which is a great little room basically basically Cincinnati there and that's The fourteenth of February and the fifteenth of February. Okay Nick and then Mark Ridley's Comedy Castle Royal Oak. I've only been there one time about five. Six years of your Royal Oak. That's GONNA be February sixteen and That's GonNa be one night right. No wait a minute one night. Yeah one nine Grin Improv. Rally rally. I'll be in February twenty first twenty. Second Hi Madeleine and And that'll and that and then that's it. Also the twenty thirty every Sunday show the degree. And then I'll be with you in Washington. DC DC Improv. Twenty four and twenty twenty a Tuesday awesome greats okay. You're listening to see what happens. podcast you can do it and we're back we're back CASO Rodney. gave me this after he passed away. My gave out all the pallbearers is so this gift is really nice. Rodney signature on this glass enclosed shoehorn. And he said.

Salt Lake City Salt Lake City Comedy Castle Royal Oak Salt Lake City Bone Liberty Township Ohio Ohi Gene Wagner Theater Rodney Rodney. DC Toledo Cincinnati Madeleine Mark Ridley Nick Washington
"rodney" Discussed on See What Happens

See What Happens

06:35 min | 8 months ago

"rodney" Discussed on See What Happens

"Do Dick Jokes and I do jokes that are but I said maybe we have you ever sold out show you know with the headliner. Maybe you try some new material or do some stuff. That's a little more challenging where you can grow and use this packed audience and is it. Should I say that and waste my time or does he. Is He gonNA appreciate it or is this guy always going to be insulted or hurt his feelings. I remember this guy. You showed me a set list. It was just a picture of his Dick so anyway I said So did you say I said No. I'm not GonNa say and then at the end of the night I did. I was leaving so you know what you know. And then he said there's maybe not. Do you know the last five minutes on your Dick. You put a packed crowd tissues the crowd. I used to like it because you never know what's going to happen to you. View opened up for somebody. So you know I opened up for like you know Jerry Seinfeld Dana Carvey and then like you know Dennis Miller in the a day and then you know then because I opened over Dennis Miller and I did really good it was clean and good material. He recommended for Letterman show. Wow so like and then I got a Saturday and I live so holy Shit. Dennis Miller gift to comedy besides still being a great comedian. Unfortunately like you know anyone who slightly conservative you don't go along with the Liberal Intelligentsia L.. Jhansi the murder. You even Bill Marr. It was extremely too liberal for me in the sense of just not really Being Open minded to like the other side of the coin You know you just get excoriated right And but Dennis this is still brilliant and is really always been really funny and just I mean his stuff was well I mean just I mean he would. He would really leap manufacturer his bits and his and the way that he would his wording and and to create his own voice which is a very unique voice in stand up and you know harder hardest have a unique voice in stand up and he had it and still has it. I saw I worked with You know last year and he was ridiculously great very current and awesome and So you know. I was very lucky and so so anyways I said that the guy you never know. That's very true. You never know what what want you never know but I would I would try out material and And I also do my you know if you have an audience. That's when you get to really tell if it works because you know most the time when you start now you're working in some shady played people you don't know what's really working. Oh absolutely he kinda helps you wait till it's packed Friday and Saturday okay. Well this really does work You know for sure so anyway anyway did say something and then you know what he said to me. While I was doing that material I was thinking I shouldn't be doing this. Material is a great answer. Yeah so at least he was honest about also also like you know. I think it's important because the great comedians and I mean this. The Great Comedians were always great to the other comedians. Who They thought? We're going to have the chance to go. Oh somewhere like literally like Dana carvey maybe the most generous nicest comedian that you can ever work with. And and definitely the most talented guys next Robin Williams the most a successful comedian Debra Commodity San Francisco. Those two guys were so good they found other guys like me. They wouldn't let me. There's gotTa be another guy like Dana Carvey and that's how I got discovered But this guy you know the seminal advice he would offer to as other comedians like I remember I moved to. LA DROVE DOWN TO LA together. And we're staying is apartment. He was he's doing some tells Dana Dana Carvey and we're as a why isn't this guy the biggest star as the most most talented comedian. San Francisco's hilarious. You know before he was famous he was selling out every Sean San Francisco. This guy was incredible characters and everything and they just you know Hollywood. Hollywood doesn't necessarily know how to use people Saturday. Night live was perfect for him but I remember like thinking to myself before that he got on some. TV show. NBC was playing a helicopter pilot. And they said we're we're GONNA be funny but they only let it be the last two minutes of the show. He's in a helicopter avenue. Bits you know this other guy I forget it was called and it's called Blue Thunder something Mike that and I just remember it was like such an amazing thing I said is that if this guy struggling the most talented guy to come out of San Francisco go but what the hell am I worried about right then. I should be struggling absolutely right. And it's good to know that you know to like there's this it's tough it's tough and and It of course he's went on to become one of the greatest the performance ever in the history Saturday night live but like senator way going back to that like you know those clubs in those opportunities you have. You never know you know what I do for you. I don't know if this is the writer. The wrong is the right thing. I guess now that I'm thinking back. I opened for you you at Nazareth College at a better. I'd never met you. We met for a few seconds. I went up on stage and before I went up I was like what jokes would rob schneider like. uh-huh that's legitimately what I did. I water my Mo- anybody can kill. Anybody can get lost but I remember going just in case he watches. Like what are the weirdest weirdness. Most clever jokes I have. You heard that did so much better than me that night. Man You murder. No you did great and But I just remember memorized like this is a guy who writes juncture forms jokes and you reminded me of like one of my favorite comedians. That I that I started with. WHO originally from Seattle my buddy drake say there? was you know God rest. The souls passed away now but Got Actually Yeah February fifth. Yeah it was I think-i you need March third. Two thousand three passed away but anyway he just he was a joke Smith he would just form jokes and just like making a compact have a good beginning middle end very logical progression. Do you remember a favourite Drake's Oh God is so many of them. It's like my My wife thinks surname nosy. At least that's what. She keeps scribbling in her diary. Isn't it pretty good job of it and Isa Lisa and stuff like that. I like jokes that only he could do. It's like that only like like is in other words it's like his voice like clubs my girl. I said my girlfriend's I. What do you WANNA do? I WanNa do you WanNa do really you WANNA go. Fuck that girl in the skirt over there and We're gonNA take quick break. We're GonNa talk about work done. Thank you for joining us on this.

Dana Carvey Dennis Miller San Francisco Dick murder Bill Marr Hollywood Sean San Francisco NBC Jerry Seinfeld rob schneider Letterman LA Isa Lisa Nazareth College Seattle Robin Williams senator writer Mike
"rodney" Discussed on See What Happens

See What Happens

10:07 min | 8 months ago

"rodney" Discussed on See What Happens

"So so anyway As I remember I WANNA like. Sometimes I get a little bit start mumbling like I do sometimes and he looked at me and said whatever and so anyway so we're we're we took the flight out we go see him and Rodney go see him. Perform onstage. We'll get great seats since packing. You know and it's like a Saturday night or whatever and he murders in the middle of a SEC. I've got a couple of friends out though some terrific young comedians. Adam Adam Sandler Rob Schneider. Hey great the heavy air boys and hey I got a lot of jokes. So what And then after the show we go up to his You know he's got a suite at the top of the hotel like the headliners right. And he's up and of course you know his Dick's hanging out throw he's got the rope and the Dick always and then He stole that from him so anyway. So we go up to the top of the room and then Rodney. He's very wanted to make sure that he was still current. You you know that he was still that his stuff and so the way he would ask questions. So how does he act what you guys think. What did you think it was square? That was Was it the nineteen forties vernacular. You know forty food was at square. Was it not hip and then you know Tarantino and also. He was smoking smoking at that time. Smoking pretty strong marijuana and Tarantino was already baked at that point looks over to Rodney and he says he's already think boys was he did. Did you think it was square and Tarantino didn't understand the question or didn't understand the context of the question and he looks at riding. Hey man he could not have been any square. Wear on your the square EST man. I'm telling you it could not you the epitome of square. If you look square you'll be like that was it man. The Square is unbelievable and Rodney was shaken like even at the wrong way with. He did Rodney. We're like what a Fox this guy as Roma's and I had to jump in and go. No no no no no no. He didn't mean that square. You mean like you didn't mean that in the square like not a hip way right and thank thank. The squiggly sobered up realizing that the guys failings the Great Rodney. And it's no no no man you on square this. You couldn't have been less square nat Nat Square at all me and I mean like Whoa I. And that's that's what they brought him. What the Hell is going on with this guy anyway and then jut appetite appetite wanted to go and gamble? Because we're in Vegas you know this is like twenty years ago. He was a young guy. The young ish guy at the time youngest of all of us in though we WanNa go gamble in Vegas stories that come on Rodney come on. Let's go gamble gamble. And he said Hey I'm GONNA lose and he's come running. How do you know you're GONNA lose said look at me? Do I look like like a guy who's GonNa win. I'm a loser. Look at me and says come on. Let's just go down. Let's go down so anyway. He he agreed he puts on some shorts. which is like a it just a gift to hide the decorating? And then he What's on like Like a little half robe or something like what do they call those things. It's like a little Japanese. He's Wro but whatever they call those come on Japanese robe. I duNNo. Okay good you but anyway so then we go downstairs and he wants to play craps so we play craps and I swear to God the dice when he rolled the dice then even hit the other end of the table. They didn't enroll Canadian. Throw them soft they just they just can't you know he's got his energy in the dice and like he he lost he said I'M GONNA lose five hundred bucks on. I'm going to go to bed and that's what I said. Are you going to. How do you know you're going to lose you know? And then so we're GONNA says the crab he rolls and like and then just craps out and then he rolls and then craps out and I will come on. Give him the dice again. He's GonNa crap crap that he lost five hundred bunch like literally like I don't know it was less than ten minutes and he looked at me what I tell you. I'm a loser. I'm going to bed what I tell you. Kimono Komo money yeah. He wore a little white kimono with shorts yet white shorts. And you know this old guys who were there pull their socks up. Yes you know because when you get an older you know you think about when you're younger you don't pull your socks all the way up. You know scheme slid down right and someone go no socks these days. I know I'm never going to be one of those guys. Who are those little hidden hidden socks? Yes do you know. I don't. I can't be friends with anymore if I do not do that. That says to me anymore. You treasure your friendship. Okay no I do not wear those. I don't like I have a problem. That says a lot about a person. If you're hot. If you wearing those all saw it says you are. You're hiding something something you're cheating and lying life about something and that's not that's not good. You can't wear those if you're a guy if you're a girl I get it you know I have a question. Yeah so in the store you had said he was curious because you guys were sort of the young guys comedians and supported us and he wanted to know my hip. Whatever if you ever have that because I definitely do when when there's like a young dude on the show? Yeah and they're super hip just a couple ages type of thing sometimes. I want plot that approval from them. Do you ever feel that at all. I you know I do watch some of the young guys I think support. I'm at Chris. Rock called me a few years back and we're talking and he said he was telling the He's watching a young comedian. It was really really popular now and he said I get it. He didn't say thought he was hilarious. I I get it but you gotTa Watch what the young kids doing get an idea of that and I agree. You know to see what's happening. I mean like when you and I saw a Chapelle like four or five five years ago God. That was seminal for us because you know I think he was at the top of his game and then like just to see him incredible destroy and also just the challenge in audience and do it on a Wednesday night. I do too ours in San Francisco is incredible. I mean I didn't realize you could do that. I remember watching him and thinking. I don't think I do the same job Ah what you realize when guys like like that and then Chris Rock I would put in the same category and Bill Burr and Louis. CK I would say like people go to see him. It's it's almost like In this very secular world that we live in. It's almost like they people are going to see them for some sort of soothsaying. You know they're looking you for wisdom almost like a and I'm not saying almost it is like a religious experience in the sense of they really do want to You know Ah have some connection to something so I don't say that like it's like I think it is. I think people seem to you know like especially back in two thousand fifteen sixteen whenever ever. They go to see him because there was so much. There's so much noise in the media and there's so much stuff out there and the and the you know how do you say when they see guys like Dave Chapelle and Chris Rock's please make sense of the world for us. He started talking about marriage and how to make a relationship work and I was so I couldn't wait to hear what the solution or or what you hope for that nugget of what and then he will give it. Yeah he was talking about was beautiful he was talking at that time. This is like four or five years ago so it was still new at the time talking about comparing the African American experience. So what black people go through to trans people go through and who has it worse and it was just such two wonderful You know look at such an interesting thing that you and I would never spend our time probably doing right right and a great perspective. Take my God so anyway I mean I I don't know he's he's still just incredible but Yeah so but no. I don't know when I see the young young guys I mean truthfully like I would say. Stand up comedies. Different than I would say staying or or we should say is different than a lot of other art forms or different than athletics. Athletics in your twenties. You're at your best will say that like it's in my opinion and you can correct me if I'm wrong or if you if you think differently because I'm not wrong wrong a lot is that if you it's like it's similar to like an opera singer like a male tenor if they don't they don't get to their best until learner mid-forties what I'm saying like PA Barada. It just takes a while that chest barrel out and whatever it takes you know not in your twenties in your thirties forties by that time you're like forty four for bom your at your peak and I do feel like it takes twenty years. You know as a stand up the early hit into that fifteen twenty years it really is no shortcut hundred percent though. I think absolutely I will say I totally agree. I will say when I worked with this dude in Vegas. He he was just so clever and original and funny and it. It made me question my set like really take a look at my side and I found myself getting almost jealous and so I did. Was We totally get along and actually actually asked him. I go do this where I was watching you and I find myself getting a little jealous. 'cause you're like this young and I go. I would like to pay you to watch my set and tell me what you think. My my best late night set would be so kind of turn it around right where it was like A. Yeah and then he was like dude. Don't pay me I WANNA ask you about this shit with acting with whatever it's just having this great that's nice fourth. That's coming from a place of being secure guy. Don't you think you were not that secure like fifteen years ago. Definitely no I. Wasn't that secure. Yeah Yeah three years. I feel like it's really changed. I mean I do feel like like the other night I was performing into place. We did two shows on a Monday. 'cause I'm working on new comedy special and and thank you for every little tag you've given me on this special know how your names on there. It's going to be in the you know for sure. But like the There's the opening comedian and and I said who is in in Denver Nice Guy. I'm sorry I forget his name and he did really well but like I just don't think like and Addison should I not say something because he did like five minutes on his Dick and I said like you know may be and I said I.

Rodney Chris Rock Dick Vegas Tarantino Adam Adam Sandler SEC Kimono Komo Rob Schneider Athletics marijuana San Francisco Dave Chapelle Denver Fox Addison Bill Burr Roma Louis
"rodney" Discussed on See What Happens

See What Happens

10:54 min | 9 months ago

"rodney" Discussed on See What Happens

"Did Yo-. Yeah you do both and your future. It's a Shitty last. It's hard to everyone. I Know Schneider. Ryder isn't exactly like show-bizzy. But you know like Lenny Bruce's real names Leonard. Alfred Schneider the legendary Comedian Lenny. Bruce but there was. I was just this comedian. There's a magician. I went to school with who graduated few years before me. You know like when he graduated like four years before he's like three years before I was like a long time. Yeah Oh yeah a murder. He's a magician changes name to mark harden and I thought like Isn't this James This is name like Jim Videos or something you know and and I think he made the and I thought that was so phony but now I realize that's a good idea. Tom Cruise is going to get more attention for like You know who's that guy named Tom. Cruise as opposed to like Tom. Schwartz do you think there's another name Bernie Schwartz. It was a guy. Tony Curtis I mean if he would get Bernie Schwartz. Who knows what happened he would have never been Tony? Curtis now why did Mark Hardin. And if he was he had the pool to choose from any words any names what made him pictures of regulating. It was hard I mean Dini. He went for it. Yeah I think so hers Angel. Yeah I mean that's that's not real name right I don't think so. What is Chris? Angel's real name to great great question. Yeah Google it maybe Montes best joke a lot of people. Just call him con artist. Yeah 'cause making good good Monday though I liked it hovers whatever that trick is oh yeah it's on the Internet you can look it up. I'm looking up Chris. Angel's real name. Okay Eh buzzing her thing what is it. Christopher Nicholas Seren tacos really seren earn tacos. Yeah that's a horrible name. It says here. He began using the stage name Chris Angel when he heard about his real name. Okay celona sense. How much are you willing to change your life for show business? That's what really comes out to like you know I don't know I mean I really do you think like if I were to change by name but that would have been better. Would you have gone with it. Did it ever occur to you to do that. Bernie Schwartz you'll Bernie shorts this okay. I don't know what I'd do. Rodney Dangerfield he's he that guy. Jack Roy I mean tell you made huge difference changes name. He was already like you know. Comedian back then and then like I don't know I forget the story but it's a good one and it's really good. That especially telling stories on podcasts. That I don't know the story. It is something that he changed it before it was like a carson or something right because he wanted it to be well somebody said mission. Change Your name and Blah Blah Blah and that was back in the fifties or so I think it was like in he open. We're putting on Carson with something like. Hey you're going to get a fake name get a fake name. If you'RE GONNA make up a name make up a name and it was great because Rodney You can really He's one of those guys that like. I mean I was one of the honors of my life to be the Paul Bear. One of the pallbearers. At his yeah. He's took a shine kind to me when I was a young comedian. He's one of my Fa- I never knew this. He said he came up to me in the eighties at Hurricane. Really funny very original. Hey you WANNA hang out. I got some girls I got some wall. Let's hang out. I don't know one hundred percents Irvy's at blow but I'm pretty sure he did and Anyway Guy's a legend. Where did you first meet him? I met him a comedy club and it was he jacker Rodney. No no no. He was riding in the fifties. I'm not that old. You fugger anyway. No but yeah and it was just like the legends hanging out with like well seeing Rodney. He's performing La back back in the eighties. sweatpants he literally just go up. In sweats. You know look like you know like you literally just got out of bed and then I did. I did some animated thing and and I did it because he was doing it. And then I did it He did it because I was doing it. That's what he told me what side anyway. But he was like an hour late and then the limo arrives because they sent a limo those house he gets out little wearing a robe every time. You saw Rodney you saw is Dick I matter we once saw robotic really. I've met him one time as backstage vegas every time anyone ever saw that you saw dick and anyway so he comes out of the US. I go does Rodney out there. And he's like he's he's an hour late Minnesota. I didn't care I was just happy to see him right anyway so I go out. Ah He's not getting out of the LIMO. He's just in there. It's like it pulled up and then it's like okay here okay. He's here he's he's yeah he's out he's out there and so I go out there and I go. I opened up the door he goes. Hey Rob how you doing. Hey Pal it's always a hurry pile and good man. He said And he didn't make any effort to get out of the LIMO. I said Hey man. I'm glad you're doing this. Hey as are you going to get out. You're GONNA come in. And he said yeah why not. So he comes comes in and it wasn't like it was some I forget what animated it wasn't like a top flight one you know and And we weren't doing pixar everything you know some forgettable thing and so he comes into the booth and start doing this you no and we're opposite we're doing it you know at least in the same room doing this thing and if some he's playing a rat or something you know you know like an playing a rat you know as one waist fucking stupid things and the director starts taking this way too seriously the director this woman comes in and says Rodney we like you to sing it oh by what we know saying the part saying it and he just looks at me so it's down to this a singing rat fifty years of show business now this is the low and I just think Oh my God Rodney Anyway so he said I'm not doing that I came in here you know twenty five thousand bucks get in get out that's what I'm here you want me to get out knows it good for him no yeah anyway he was funny you know I went and saw him out in Vegas and the Ed Hey I got a lot of jokes great there I got a lot of jokes I remember two hundred jokes how many guys that come on now hey I I miss him. I love that movie. I don't know why the guys he calls me once in a while your buddy. Oh Yeah Harry Basil. That's right but then I email I text them. Go like what's going on with with that movie. And then India never hear from them but I I really WanNa make that move because I think Rodney's his stories ridiculously great story and if anybody anybody hasn't heard of you know if you don't know Rodney Dangerfield where the hell Ya been but just go on that Biography and see the life that he led that biography from beginning to end novels unbelievable. It's you hope your life you know can come out like his was and he had a really tough time he literally like stopped. Here's like Joe Deangelis at the guy I can't but like literally like his wife died of cancer and he stopped show business. Okay here's the deal. He told his when you're GONNA move on the House. You're going to be like the mom and I'm going to be the DAD. And then he went to work as a Aluminum siding he did alone him citing until the kids got into college then went back into this show was but truthfully when he got on. TV back in the In a late sixties on the the big the big. Show the Ed Ed Sullivan show. which was the biggest show Sunday night? That was the show. America stopped and watched that you would have like you know. Eighty million people. If there was like the Beatles would watch or you'd have like a you know an off night thirty five forty million people want to show fifty million and so that was it once you get on that show you are in you know and so he did get get on that show but you can just see you. When he was he was still like in his late thirties or early forties? He just looked it just looked like a longshoreman. Like a guy who was On enforcer red tie well this before he found out Marino became rodney okay and then And then but by the time like you know a caddyshack came around That was like you know. He's softened up. Became this old guy old stiff guy he basically as you know. The shoulders was on the shoulders of the knees. And the head and the eyes popping out you know but Anyway I got on how got on. That was my I love. I'm a huge huge. Ronnie Fan. Met Him one time. Backstage with Harry. Basil Yeah and he's in. The ROBIE is watching out for some movie. He was working on on robe. Dick Yeah and I remember at that point. I realized the difference between the Headliners Green Room and the openers green room because he had like this beautiful full giant rumors spread with food food. Sometimes puny shrimp into Harry's dressing room and it was just the the tales from Guilani. Trump was different. I may have told the story on this podcast ready but like we flew out to go see Rodney was Adam Sandler and it was Gwen Tarantino and Jutta Patel and me and I forget but Tarintino came game in his pajamas and he didn't bring any close with them. We're going to be staying overnight right. He doesn't he's leaves in his pajamas and he just just like in the whole time. He's GonNa come back and it's pajamas. And so not exactly like a very small plane. Not Not the guy you want the coming back the same clothes and that's all I'm gonNA say anyway so we go see. Rodney Rodney smokes pot. You know he's been and I. I had dinner with one time. And he's like he's depressed and I went. This is an odd question and I said did the I don't know I mean like why are you depressed my whole life. I've been down. Yeah my whole life. I've been down. I've been smoking audits. Why is smoking pot for the back smoking pot for thirty years? The only reason I'm still alive. Wow.

Rodney Rodney Dick Yeah Rodney Dangerfield Bernie Schwartz Chris Angel Harry Basil Lenny Bruce Tom Cruise Alfred Schneider Tony Curtis murder Ryder mark harden Hurricane Ed Ed Sullivan Christopher Nicholas Seren Google Minnesota carson
"rodney" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

09:01 min | 9 months ago

"rodney" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"To the Rodney Anderson radio show with Rodney himself welcome back to the show everybody we talked the first segment today and you could always go to Robbie Anderson dot com and listen to our podcast of our show the first segment was regarding divorced people refinancing or buying homes Candace when it comes to divorce segment number two was talking about yet in cash out refinances and how so many people are turning to us for cash out refinances to get out of credit card debt student loan debt home improvement at four oh one K. debt IRS debt medical debt the list goes on and on and then we went to segment number three campus segment number three was regarding should you are should you not refinance and we did a whole list of questions that people ask us over the last week of should I or should I not refinance and that is on there as well and then section number for right now in segment number four we are going to talk right now about boomerang buyers coming back into the market because a lot of people have had financial difficulties in the past during the financial crisis where they had to go file bankruptcy where they had short sales they have foreclosures and all that in so many of those people have re establish their credit and now they're back into the market because once you own a home once you've lived in the home he normally don't want to go to an apartment right I mean have you ever said I'm excited about going to from home to an apartment I had to do it when I went through a divorce yeah was it fun now it wasn't like a step back I went through what I went through a divorce and I didn't lie not like a mad out what so ever so look home ownership is a big deal to a lot of people but if you've had financial issues in the past it's have you come out of those issues and are you smarter than you were before are you making sure that you're not going to be a statistic again bankruptcy statistic a foreclosure a short sell anything like that so I want to go through first of all bankruptcy rules Candace because I think it's very important for people to go through these things and for us to go through to help people out sure because I had a client husband wife called me the other day and they were buying about a five hundred thousand dollar house and they wanted to put five percent down and they have a chapter seven bankruptcy and it was three and a half years ago well there's several types of loans that are available for them and at the that price point there were three types of loans potentially what is called a VA loan which is for military veterans and I'll go through that the second about their part number two was an FHA loan but the maximum FHA loan in Dallas County where they were looking at buying was four hundred and four thousand eight hundred dollars okay so we couldn't do an FHA because they were buying at five hundred and they want to put five percent down but in order to you FHA they would have put ninety six thousand dollars down right so that kind of threw it out an FHA recently racer loan limits up which is good news for people especially when they come out of bankruptcies and I'll get back to a moment conventional loans or loan amounts that are up to five hundred and ten thousand four hundred dollars is a conventional loan limit nationwide now and five percent down so on a conventional loan so you think you're looking at all the alternatives FHA to really out for them because they don't have the ninety six thousand dollars to put down conventional would be out temporarily for them because after chapter seven bankruptcy they have to have a four year waiting period okay so I asked the client are you military veterans and they said by the way we are we never thought about vis a vis A. only requires two years after chapter seven bankruptcy and they had re establish their credit their credit scores were six fifty and so they could go and get a VA loan and they would have known that because many people that are military veterans never even think about there be a lot of time right so they were able to but conventional is four years after chapter seven FHA it's two years after chapter seven VA is two years after chapter seven so that you can see everything is completely different and when you pick up the phone and call we're going to walk you through the whole process of watch loan is best for you now for example if you had a foreclosure in the past FHA is three years VA is two years conventional is seven years so we're not trying to we're trying to go through all the pipes alone options that we have available for you but a lot of that can limit do you on what price range you can go by sure so here's what I tell people if you had financial difficulties in the past and you re establish your credit where you have good credit now then pick up the phone and talk to us before you go out and find a house because what I don't want you to do and so many people do as the email us and are they call and say I went out and found a six hundred thousand dollar house but really at that time they could only qualify for FHA so we couldn't do alone for them but they've already found the six hundred thousand are all right so what I tell people is it's always important especially if you've had credit issues in the past no matter what they are always pick up the phone and call us to get pre approved up front Amy just called me just the other day and she's one of those it she said I'm paying off my debt Rodney my credit sucks that's what she said that's exactly what I said now that socket it has a couple things on your head which he said I'll try to pay off my credit card debt because that's what hurt my score and I said no it's not a me I said you have three small medical collections on your credit report to are paid off and what has a balance about fourteen hundred dollars I said these are the three items that are hurt in your report and a lot of people don't know they assume something certain their score and she's I compared all my all my credit cards and I'm like that's not going to help your score a whole lot in this situation I said here's what you need to do and we I walked her through how she needs to call these collection companies and how to try to get those negative marks on her credit report removed yeah many people won't remove credit repair marks from the negative credit marks from your credit report but sometimes and many times these creditors we'll remove if you talk to them the right way if they provide documentation to you stating that they'll remove it many of these people will remove these medical collections medical is unique than any other collection accounts in the two thousand eight I took a bill to the United States Congress regarding medical debt in medical collections on people's credit reports that testified in front of Congress about this and so the reason why I bring that up is I know the subject inside out and upside down when most people call lenders they don't talk about the medical that how to get it removed they'll just charge a higher rate or sticking a certain type alone and so I walked Amy through that and she was picking up the phone and call it does collection companies but every single day we have people that haven't small medical that's on their credit report and what happens is that when you go to like a credit karma are you go to an online me those don't even show your medical collections but mortgage fight goes scores used medical collections and so we walk you through how to talk to these companies and to see if they will remove it off the credit report because once Amy had those items removed off of their at its core was going to jump by about eighty points wow that's a lot of money yeah it was a lot of the savings yeah and that's the things that people never think about up front they get online they look at some scores online and then all of a sudden they get a mortgage score is completely different now like what the heck right and so I always tell people make sure when you're going to buy a house we look at your mortgage score it and if you had issues in the past regarding your credit and don't assume your credits perfect every single day I see people that my credits perfect and we pulled the credit report there's something on there there's a thirty day late payment on a credit card there's something that goes on there and according to fight go one thirty day late payment can drop your score as much as eighty to a hundred and twenty point wow one medical collection all it takes is one simple phone call to get pre approved what they're buying or refinancing at one eight hundred express that to one eight hundred three nine seven seven three seven seven or you can always go to Robbie Anderson dot com pick up the phone and give us a call we talked today about divorce in segment number one segment number two we talk about cash out refinances and help so many people are turning to us for those segment number three we talk about should you are should do not refinance in segment number four we talked about.

Candace Rodney Anderson Robbie Anderson
"rodney" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"rodney" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"Paid for by Rodney Anderson with supreme lending we now return to the Rodney Anderson radio show with Rodney himself like to welcome everybody back to the show we just talked about military veterans and with VA loans and veterans day coming up on Monday we're seeing a big push for people buying homes in use in their VA loans were seen a big push for military veterans refinancing homes that are at five and a quarter five and a half for five and three quarters or even more on the interest rate but now I want to hit the home buying market because I read a report the other day that first time home buyers coming into the market there are going to be eight point three million home first time home buyers coming into the nation wide market between two thousand and twenty in two thousand and twenty two so when a three year period of time they're looking for eight point three million new first time home buyers in one of the things I will tell you is why you see so many first time home buyers coming into the market because a report just come out the other day that since our it since two thousand and twenty apartment vacancies right now are at their lowest level since two thousand and twenty so think about that apartment complexes are being busting at the seams the apartments are rented like crazy and what is that because it causes apartments rates to go up in a lot of people are sitting there going heck for what I'm paying in rent I can go out and buy a home okay and so we're seeing a lot of that so we're seeing a lot of first time home buyers what some of the recommendations that you could make to people on first time homebuyers because we deal with a lot of this right now city we do and we do have a first time home buyer program that only requires a three percent down payment as opposed to FHA with three and a half percent it's sometimes we can save money on rate and mortgage insurance when you stick with that conventional products and a lot of realtors like conventional offers verses FHA so if you can get in for less money on a product that's more desirable for you that's a really great opportunity one thing I do recommend win your first time home buyer don't try to do this transaction over your phone make sure and give us a call and car about twenty or thirty minutes to spend on the phone with one of us so that we can really talk you through all the moving parts that go along with buying a home for the first time it's the biggest financial decision of people's lives and there are lenders out there that are telling people just do it all on your phone you can do your own application you can put your own credit right through the phone you can do all the stuff this is a huge commitment guys you have to have somebody that you trust that you can ask questions too so my biggest recommendation for first time homebuyers carve out the time take the time and work with somebody that really is looking out for your best interest yeah and one of the things that you want to do is you're not going to just go invest two hundred and fifty thousand dollars in the stock market by just you know just on a whim not talking to people not getting educated all that the one thing I will tell people is you know when you're out there buying that first home I'll never forget when I bought my first home he was sixty seven thousand nine hundred dollars okay but I was scared I was married at that time my wife and I were scared at that time we didn't know anything we got put on the wrong loan product I've been worked for a mortgage company in the bank at that time got put on the wrong loan product I should have been on an FHA loan they put me on a conventional loan on a digestible rate mortgage but we we didn't care they just they sold you payment that's right and that's what people do a lot of times in you need to know the ins and outs because you're making a huge commitment and you don't not want to make a mistake on this commitment because you don't want to be a foreclosure down the road you don't want to buy too much house but most importantly it's really important that you get fully pre approved out front because you want to sure that you know what your.

Rodney Anderson sixty seven thousand nine hund fifty thousand dollars thirty minutes three quarters three percent three year
"rodney" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"rodney" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"To the Rodney Anderson radio show. Rodney danger questions on mortgages credit money and more your questions will cost you nothing from the refi revolution financial hottie of the week we make sure you're a part of the show to speak with Rodney right now call one eight hundred express it's the Rodney Anderson radio show folks hand here's Rodney. all righty welcome everybody and welcome to the show and happy weekend everybody today on the show we got a lot to cover we're gonna touch touch on the housing market whether people are buying homes in the five things you must know before you go out and purchase a home also today on the show did you know that the average bicho score has hit an all time high yes credit scores are improving for a lot of people will discuss the fight go score how it really works and what credit score you need to know when it comes to your mortgage fight go also we'll talk about credit card interest rates yes they're doing one thing there hit an all time high and so we're going to talk about the best ways to get out of debt and we'll also talk about DTI do you know what a D. T. I. S. well we'll discuss that in a whole lot more when it comes to the show will also be taking a lot of your list your questions and those Lister questions could come to us by phone at one eight hundred xpress during the show or even after the show or you can always email us during the show when you go to my website Roddy Anderson dot com and you can email us your question as well with me is always run the sound or on the boards producing the show co host in the show our director of marketing with me every single week Candace but not as here Candace welcome to the show thank you Rodney good morning good morning to you and you know a lot of people Candace are in the market to either buy a home or refinance.

Rodney Anderson Candace Roddy Anderson director of marketing Lister Rodney.
"rodney" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"rodney" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"Show. Rodney takes your questions on mortgages credit money and more your questions will cost you nothing from the refi revolution to the financial hottie of the week. We make sure Europe part of the show to speak with Rodney right now. Call one eight hundred express it's the Rodney Anderson radio show, folks. And here's Rodney already good morning, everyone and welcome to the show works. I did to be with you for the next hour and today on the show, we're going to talk about retirement dreams of getting your house in order before you retire. And then we're going to pay you back on that talking about retiring your mortgage before you retire also on the show condos it's the new hotspot of housing, and we're gonna talk about people buying condos. What you need to know. When all the inside information, we have a program called the recast program. I call recasts mania in what is happening right now. If you find a house that you want to go by before you put yours on. On the market. We'll talk about that. It will also give you protesting your taxes. What you should know before you do it, and the and the things that you need to get in line before you do it here by the end of may another topic. We're going to cover today, it's protesting your taxes and making sure you have the perfect amount of exemptions on your property and the right amount of exemptions on the property. We'll cover the five reasons to refinance. And then also are you buying a home how using a realtors changing in the pitfalls to watch out for?.

Rodney Anderson Europe
"rodney" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"rodney" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"Rodney Anderson radio show. In Dallas, northbound forty five and I thirty a collision blocking the two left lanes and shoulder right now, you're backed up to Overton in grand Perry. Westbound thirty just west of loop twelve that accident is just about ready to clear the backup is it was a long back, but it is on winding now. So that would should be clear any minute now in Dallas westbound six thirty five at Preston. That crash is still blocking the two right lanes. Also, the shoulder and the exit ramp the backup is passed. Seventy five I'm Sherry Rogers on your twenty four hour traffic leader for NewsRadio. Ten eighty Carol. The contest rules. Go to Carol d dot com slash rules. I'm Pete Thompson from the consumer team damaging storms hit North, Texas and blue nail roofing is here to help. Here's Eric Thomasson. Owner of blue nail roofing at blue male. We're here to help families in North Texas that have been impacted by the recent storms through the month of April. We're offering a thousand dollars off an impact resistant roof, upgrade impact resistant, roofs, stand up much better to future hailstorms and can save you money on insurance to call us at blue bail. For more information on this one thousand dollar discount. Remember at blue nail or your one stop for all your storm repair and home improvement need for more information on the one thousand dollar impact roof discount. Call blue nail at four six nine seven two six two one seven six.

Dallas Rodney Anderson grand Perry Sherry Rogers Pete Thompson Eric Thomasson Carol Overton North Texas Texas one thousand dollar thousand dollars twenty four hour
"rodney" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"rodney" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"We now return to the Rodney Anderson radio show with Rodney himself. Welcome back to the show. So how much money should you put down when you're buying a house? It's a question that we always receive a lot of people just assumed that when I sell my current house, and if I'm upgrading to another house, I have to put all the money down from the sale of my house to the new one, and we hear that all the time every single day probably three to four times a day. And it's a big misconception that so many people have. So you know, what happens is we have people that call us all the time that let's say they want to buy a four hundred thousand dollar home. And they're like, well, I'm netting about one hundred thousand dollars out of my sale of my home. So I wanna put it all down or that automatically goes to the new house. I hear that you they think it's an automatic you. So here's the real rule. Okay. If. You're an individual after two years you can net up to two hundred and fifty thousand dollars out. Now, there's an acquisition cost. It's not how much what the difference of what your check is that you got when you go to sell your house. There's an acquisition cost of what you paid for your old house. What to sales price was. So if you paid three hundred thousand four new sold it for four fifty and even if I'm the three hundred thousand you're put one hundred and fifty thousand down so your houses four fifty and you only a one fifty well, let's say you're getting three hundred thousand minus minus realtor fees. So let's say you netted two hundred and seventy thousand well as an individual, you would think well, I can add up to two hundred fifty thousand calculated it's calculated based on what you paid for the house, and did you physically gain two hundred and fifty thousand dollars. Okay. And the other thing is is if you improved your house, you can go and use. Acquisition cost of the home improvements that you put into the home. So for most people, they don't even fit into this thing, you're talking about capital gains. Yes. Okay. Just to be clear if anybody was. Where we were going. Okay. So under capital gains, you can net as an individual after two years you can pull out up to two hundred fifty thousand dollars out on a purchase without having to pay capital gains tax as a as a married couple. You can pull up to five hundred thousand dollars out coca with out paying tax am without having to put it.

Rodney Anderson fifty thousand dollars two years two hundred fifty thousand dol five hundred thousand dollars four hundred thousand dollar one hundred thousand dollars
"rodney" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"rodney" Discussed on WEEI

"Harrison and he's got the rings to prove dan schwartzman pro does alive together they're unstoppable this is deeply on nbc sports radio football night in america is rodney harrison dan schwartzman starts right now hour number two to safety blitz coming up later this hour we'll get to the questions that you've all been sending to rodney all week long twitter handle at rodney underscore harrison some good ones this week rodney will answer those a bit later on but new rules in the nfl and finally rodney it looks like david dressed what's a catch what's not a catch they've made it kind of a simple three step process as to making or determining guess what a catches and what's not a catch and that is that you know you have to make a football move you take the two steps you have possession and that's it rodney how's it after the game of football played like a hundred years we finally have more clarity now as to what is and what isn't a catch while i think the thing is just read it it says once you catch the ball and even if you go to the ground in the ball moves slightly before under the old rule that would have been an incomplete pass but now they're saying it's a catch and it is is simplified i mean the dez bryant cats calvin johnson and even the kid not jesse james yeah jesse james pittsburgh steelers all those would have been deemed catches so now it's a little simpler but i mean look at all the time we wasted look at all the big plays what if those plays would have been enforce as catches it would have changed the course of possibly who's in the super bowl all these different things so man it was disappointing that it took such a long time.

america rodney harrison dan schwartzma nfl david football jesse james steelers dan schwartzman nbc twitter dez bryant calvin johnson hundred years
"rodney" Discussed on 1070 The Fan

1070 The Fan

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"rodney" Discussed on 1070 The Fan

"I rodney we move on it is the big sunday night game on nbc football night america kicks it all off at seven pm with you with dan patrick with the coach as well amongst others indianapolis at seattle we broke down seattle's problems last hour well indianapolis heading in their rodney doesn't seem to be that you're confident this match up going the way that i think most people kind of look at when you look at the names these teams new because seattle's not the same team that were used to seeing of course they're gonna come on play extra hard and do all these things because it's a national televised game but if i'm in the and i've i'm jacoby percebt i don't i'm not intimidated by this defense because when i watched his defense yes they have great players but it's not like this is the best defence in the league and you can't be intimidate about a reputation by the environment the indianapolis colts they have a very young team and i think that's one of the things as long as they're not mentally and you'll see the may be the first five or six minutes of the game if they're intimidated if the environment is just too much for but i like i like the cold i like what they're doing they got a lot of young bbs they got monte davis coming back on this this week and they play man a man and they come after you russell wilson you'd better be ready to run brother or get rid of that ball because they're gonna come after you they don't care play tight mantoman coverage kind of very similar to the atlanta falcons by blitz a lot more they are going to come after him and we'll see what that often a line if i was if i were them i would be excited about playing against ross wilson but the main thing that you have to do keep him in the pocket and will you tackle him don't even go at his legs tackle his arm you almost have to treat him like ben roethlisberger because even when you have is lakes he can still get rid of the.

dan patrick seattle rodney indianapolis colts monte davis atlanta falcons ross wilson ben roethlisberger nbc indianapolis russell wilson six minutes
"rodney" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"rodney" Discussed on WEEI

"I rodney we move on it is the big sunday night game on nbc football night america kicks it all off at seven pm with you with dan patrick with the coach as well amongst others indianapolis at seattle we broke down seattle's problems last hour well indianapolis heading in their rodney doesn't seem to be that you're s confident this match up going the way that i think most people kind of look at when you look at the names these teams new because seattle's not the same team that were used to seeing of course they're gonna come on play extra hard and do all these things because as a national televised game but if on indy and i've i've i'm jacoby percebt don't i'm not a tip aided by this defense because when i watched his defense yes they have great players but it's not lie this is the best defence in the league and you can't be intimidate about a reputation by the environment the indianapolis colts they have a very young team and i think that's one of the things as long as they're not mentally and you'll see the may be the first five or six minutes of the game if they're intimidated if the environment is just too much for but i like i like the coats i'll i like what they're doing they got a lot of young bbs they got monte davis coming back on this this week and they play man the man and they come after you russell wilson you better be ready to run brother or get rid of that ball because they're gonna come after you they don't care they play tight mantoman coverage of very similar to the atlanta falcons but they blitz a lot more they are gonna come after him and we'll see without offense line if i was if i were them i would be excited about playing against ross wilson but the main thing that you have to do keep him in the pocket and will you tackle him don't even go it is legs tackle his arm you almost have to treat him like ben roethlisberger because even when you have his legs he could still get rid of the.

dan patrick seattle rodney jacoby percebt indianapolis colts monte davis atlanta falcons ross wilson ben roethlisberger nbc indianapolis six minutes