21 Burst results for "Rodger Ebert"

"roger ebert" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

04:46 min | Last month

"roger ebert" Discussed on The Big Picture

"Many movies as I have in other years. And when you're going back to catch up and being like, I need to do my movie education now or fill in the blanks. It's not the movies that are eligible for this draft that I went and made up on. So, you know, I have movies here and there that I've seen on some I even really love that I've seen several times that are eligible, but not that many. So it's going to be interesting. There are drafts that we do where when we look at honorable mentions or things you were thinking about putting in wildcard. I was like, I've been like, wow, there's 30 movies here. It would just be great if we could just draft. It was almost like, oh, if we just went back and it's like, none of the movies drafted before are eligible. Now redraft. But this is actually like, it's strange because there is a whole world of movie watching that's like, this isn't good, but I'm entertained. And that is what I'm trying to put my finger on. That is exactly what I'm trying to upend in myself, which is forget about everything that we know about what won the Academy Award, what won the box office. What did Roger Ebert like that year? Let's put set all of that aside. Let's think about what we saw or what we've since seen. And what we liked. And try to disentangle it from all of this other stuff. And this is actually a good year to do it because this was still like pre mass movie coverage on the Internet for the most part, at least I wasn't reading it. In a cooler stuff like that was around, but it was still an Entertainment Weekly culture. But it wasn't like you were like, here's the teaser, here's the trailer. Here's 45 descriptions of the plot. Here's interviews coming out a month before this movie drops, like you're fully aware of the product before you actually engage with it. I mean, I remember going to see a movie I was in Cleveland for a wedding. It was like the first wedding of my friends. And the day of the wedding, we had the whole day to kill, I'll just say, we went and saw a House of wax. And I was like, that's pretty good, pretty good.

Roger Ebert Academy Award Cleveland
"roger ebert" Discussed on Key Battles of American History

Key Battles of American History

03:57 min | 3 months ago

"roger ebert" Discussed on Key Battles of American History

"Some the color purple had the same kind of baggage, right? Spielberg was a big flashy director. He did the big movies, and this is a fairly big movie. I mean, it is a sweeping epic of a film, and a lot of people felt like a overdid it. That there was not as much nuance to the film, but a lot of directors are a lot of critics have said that it's underrated. And Jesus school and Roger Ebert both kind of said they liked the idea and they liked the story, but they didn't really feel like it got where it needed to go. But there was also a lot of interesting feedback about Christian Bale. I remember reading articles back then, you know, questioning, say, Christian Bale was remarkable in this film, and he is. But is it because he's a remarkable actor or because Spielberg had a reputation for being able to get really good performances out of kids. If you remember ET, I mean, they had some remarkable performance. Isn't there some good actors, but Drew Barrymore is really the only one who really had a huge career after ET. Henry Thomas is a good actor, but a lot of people were like, is it Spielberg? And was bail able to mimic what Spielberg was trying to tell him to do. And it turns out, you know, 30 years later, 30 plus years later, he really was a remarkable actor. 'cause he went on to be Batman, you know? He went on, he went on to be a really well regarded actor by the early 2000s. Yeah, and even though he's British, he has a terrific American accent he frequently plays American actors, not just in The Batman series, but there was hostiles and American psycho and what else? I mean, he's just done so many things. A younger role, he played Laurie in the Winona Ryder version of little women. Yes. I just saw that about a year ago or so. Ironically, ironically, he was a voice in Pocahontas..

Spielberg Christian Bale Roger Ebert Henry Thomas Drew Barrymore Batman Laurie Pocahontas
'Windtalkers' Focuses on the Wrong Story

Key Battles of American History

00:41 sec | 4 months ago

'Windtalkers' Focuses on the Wrong Story

"But the big problem is, yeah, there's no story is so all over the place and it's so misjudged in mister focus. The focus of the film should be on yazi and whitehorse. They are secondary characters in their own movie. And so Roger Ebert said that the filmmakers have buried the film underneath battlefield cliches and centers center of the stories on a white character played by Nicolas Cage. So this is an important story. And I think was intention was there. And the screenwriter's intention was there. But they didn't execute at all on the right story. And in the right

Yazi Whitehorse Roger Ebert Nicolas Cage
"roger ebert" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:22 min | 5 months ago

"roger ebert" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Songwriters and voices in the history of music and one of my favorite John prine stories is that Roger Ebert walked out of a movie It just went to a movie It was terrible He walked out of the movie he goes to see a singer songwriter at a local died bar and it's John prine So his column the next day is not about this terrible movie that he saw was about John prine And that kind of launched prine's career into the mainstream but incredible story that had the time to take to tell that story here on here and now on WAB And the reason why we have that kind of time to tell that kind of story And that way with so much sensitivity and heart is because of your sensitivity and heart that you show when you become a supporter of public radio And right now we are asking you to do that We're in our spring I'm getting a little choked up because that was so moving Thank you Emil And also just a reflection of I think why we all love working here so much and coming to you to invite you into support this great work is this is how it happens Your support your generosity is what you hear That's why you hear so much humanity and those stories is because we are supported by humanity and that's you right now calling 6 7 8 5 5 three 90 90 or online at WAB dot org slash donate I'd love to hear your John prine story too When you make a contribution leave a comment there I got to tell you I love hearing some of my favorite musicians talk about who their favorite musicians are And I love Bonnie raitt That was actually a gift to myself I made a donation to the station so I could go see Bonnie raitt and James Taylor and is one of the best concerts of my life So we'd love to hear your story too when you make your contribution 6 7 8 5 5 three 90 90 And when you do you help us plant some trees in Atlanta Another reason to feel good about yourself at WAB dot org slash donate Hey this is Peter sagal Like you I want to live a life entirely free of having to make any decisions My emails will be sent by bots flowers and nice notes delivered automatically to my wife So I can just contemplate the mysteries of existence That's why I am a sustaining member The donations get made automatically each month while I just float my.

John prine Roger Ebert prine Bonnie raitt Emil James Taylor Peter sagal Atlanta
"roger ebert" Discussed on Cinemavino

Cinemavino

03:54 min | 7 months ago

"roger ebert" Discussed on Cinemavino

"This is as close to an R as you can get without going over the top. Definitely not a kids movie. No, it is definitely not. My character was like, oh, can I take my 13 year old son? And I was like. I mean, maybe? Yes. I don't know. That's tough. How mature is your 13 year old? That's the main thing. Like, yeah. Yikes. I mean, because if you're thinking like, if you go back to life and Joel Schumacher Batman, those are almost safe for all ages. Yeah. There's almost no real violence in those. I think you could show those to kindergartner and be fine. The Michael Keaton Batman, those are probably a little more hard PG. The Batman. Yeah. It's like you might be middle school to be safe from that. Those are pretty darpa. Christopher Nolan is definitely PG-13. Christopher Nolan's definitely PG-13. But his are definitely like a Christopher Nolan PG-13, where it's like, it's heavy. It's just dark and kind of dense, but this is like, this is some stark content. It's violent. It's very frightening. Messes with you. Fronting the psychological way, even. Beyond the line. I like 7. You kind of leave it feeling like you take a piece with it when you leave. Yeah. And it was like without giving anything away. I summarized this, I think, talking to you guys where it's like the ending is the movie is very bleak and it ends on a note that's slightly less bleak. Yeah, yeah. So take with that what you will. I remember Roger Ebert reviewing the movie 8 mile Eminem and he was saying like, over the course of the movie, it's such a bleak movie in Eminem is such an in such a bad place in that movie. And the best thing you can take away at the ending is that he's in a little bit less of a bad place. You know, that's kind of I thought about that watching this where it's like this is such a dark, dehumanizing experience. I mean, it really is a mirror image of the Joker with Joaquin Phoenix where it's like it's such a grim film. And then at the end of it, it's a little bit less grim. And it's like, you know, for superhero movie, it's like, is that what we look for in our superhero movies? It's like, you look for triumph or you look for like, no, it's not quite so bad. Well, and in The Batman mythology is always that Gotham is a very dark city. Yeah. And it's always going to need The Batman, but at the same time, it's dark because it has The Batman. Yeah. So I think there's a lot of that of the city imprinting on him, him and printing on the city. You can't really escape that relationship and a lot of comics and TV shows really whenever he has to deal with other heroes. You kind of lose that piece of him that you see his relationship to the city and you see what he is as just a stand-alone character. But yeah, I think this movie did a really good job of talking about his relationship with the city, the darkness within it, the darkness of himself. And I don't think it dwelled on his mental health..

Christopher Nolan Joel Schumacher Batman Michael Keaton Roger Ebert Eminem Joaquin Phoenix
"roger ebert" Discussed on That's a Thing?!

That's a Thing?!

06:03 min | 1 year ago

"roger ebert" Discussed on That's a Thing?!

"Yeah Wh what was the critical reception I think that Why sent i sent you. An excerpt from people mostly liked it or thought polices popcorn entertainment. Whatever But i did send you. We should link to the pauline kale. She was not impressed. Hard to impress. Pauline kale but she just thought like this is. Yeah you also sent me some siskel and ebert reviews. And the general sentiment i got from like those cluster of reviews was like. Why is this movie trying to be a scary movie and it's like the complete opposite. I couldn't it was too flashy and it was. It was like a scary movie. And i'm like well. Yeah this is especially a problem. That roger ebert. Has i think when you look back at his reviews like he's just a man that doesn't like horror movies but it's his job to review so he's in this kind of purgatory like you could just say it was a horror movie and i'll fill in the blank Let's kind of part of what i like about being in the horror. Fandom is all of the paradoxical overreactions. you have two things after awhile. I'm not gonna do. It extended tangent about the rodney eighties. Fits that this had which you did not notice. I was normal. But two things i do want to note one. Is that for a good portion of the movie. Diane's wearing this like weird scarf fest thing that looks like a worm on strength. The second thing. I want to point out is that robbie's sleeps in baseball cap. Which is why i guess. It's like comfortable comfortable but sometimes little kids just get attached things. Yeah but also. It's not like i think he always does. He's just he's dressed as like a little baseball player and he puts on his baseball cap and that he takes a sleep. Such a weird costuming decision. The bangs are very intense on on Carol and robbie and i would describe robbie's haircut overall as bowl cut plus molin. Yeah yeah i can show you figure my brother with the exact same. I love it Also they did give lush lashes a woman of large head which is fine but they did give her the glasses hair combination. That would make the largest like okay. I believe this woman is very smart. Because i today yeah. I'm not kind of light note. Do you have any other. I just want to say that. I was reading up an and this movie was responsible for the creation of the pg thirteen raiding united states which we don't actually have here in canada. We have what we call fourteen a which is similar. But it's because the the Mpaa originally rated the movie restricted. Which means that you had to be Sixteen eighteen to not get in to see it and spielberg through a feds and said no do it again but didn't make any changes. Apparently to the movie and because of the politics of all of sat they got the the board overturned it from being restricted adult to parental guidance. Which means that you could see a movie as long as your parents were okay with her. Not even not even like okay with it but just like you might wanna think about whether that's appropriate. So i sent you an article about a person who was nine and saw the movie in the theaters and was extremely traumatized by and after that the rating system invented something called. Pg thirteen in canada. We have this fourteen aid. That is just says like little kitchen. See this but teenagers would be okay on the other hand. None of that matters. Don't matter at all because you guys. Just watch whatever stuff on shock sites when i was casually browsing the internet and sixth grade than anything that was in this movie and i turned out. Great and having you had not enough. Parental guidance i think is the thing is the author of my own nine so that was a quote unquote scary movie all right. I hope that everybody has a very nice halloween. And that you watch actual scary. Should i recommend a bunch of scary movies in the show notes. Yes yeah and but make them age appropriate like truly age yet. I'm an age. Just say whether. They're like who just put warnings. Yes okay. i'm not gonna watch any of them unless one of them is the cabinet of dr calgary. I liked yeah. Okay like movies that were scary to people in nineteen o three because my.

pauline kale Pauline kale robbie baseball siskel molin roger ebert Diane Carol lush Mpaa canada spielberg united states cabinet calgary
"roger ebert" Discussed on Six Degrees of WTF

Six Degrees of WTF

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"roger ebert" Discussed on Six Degrees of WTF

"I have not seen it probably since high school. Okay okay don't terrible. It is terrible. And i dragged my husband into all of these. There were a couple that he was like. Okay i am putting my foot. I'm like no. I'm watching that. This was not one of them. This was one that i think. It's probably going to be pretty bad but there might be some fun. Scares or something great to hell. I will never get that hour and a half back that i spent artist movie. And here's what shocking on rotten tomatoes sixty. Seven percent creeks our audience critics. Oh sixty seven percent as the score. Wow yeah that makes no sense to me at all because this was seriously so so bad. And i'm double checking just to make sure that i am right that it was movie. Seven percent forty five percent for the audience score erker. Luckily roger ebert to not like it so he said you know. A movie is in trouble when what is happening on. The screen inspires daydreams had lasted through the first real and nothing had happened now. I was somewhere in the middle of the third rail and still nothing happened. It was a really seriously slow. Yeah got it took forever like a one point. I was like how much time is left because nothing has happened. And i it was like we'd already been watching. Forty five fifty minutes. Can't remember any of the kills in the movie. The only memory. I have is her driving the car at the end. Yes with a monster. The looked like he was in a bad shave down. Where wolf suit from party city on the roof of the car. Yes that's certainly goes through him. Meals him Yeah and then she just like yes. Well if i didn't she like lay her head down on it and like the horns going and everything. And i'm like honey you're not unconscious damn horn and then she finally like gets out the next morning..

roger ebert
"roger ebert" Discussed on SpyHards Podcast

SpyHards Podcast

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"roger ebert" Discussed on SpyHards Podcast

"He just picks it up out of the bag puts it to his mouth and eats it and they cut from fourteen different angles in spanta thirteen seconds. Thirty two seconds. I saw. I almost feel like i'm having a seizure. When i'm watching his movies. I will say the second one is more competently made them the third one for sure and and something good about the second one you know how roger ebert said no movie. No good movie is long enough in. No bad move is too short. That movie was like the perfect links for like ninety minutes or ninety five minutes or whatever it is is. I can deal with a bad movie. That's ninety minutes. I'll watch them nonstop just last night. Going to watch the charles bronson film assassination because it's eighty eight minutes. I ended up not watching it. But that's the sort of thing. I will totally diving some terrible but at eight minutes. Sure why not. Yeah i mean there like seventy five minute movies that sock in like ninety minute comedies. And you know. I think i land logged it on a letterbox. Not that i even do that that often. I didn't write a review or anything but even like one and a half stars for those active taken. Felt like that was fair enough for that. It was interesting things to some extent. I mean that the most interesting thing about it is that like It's got some cool ideas. And i dig on what on did with it. He's just the wrong person directed. Yeah or anything. I have another question for you. You do the mission. Impossible podcast for you. Tackle mission impossible tv series in the movies the entire franchise and i'm really curious doing the taken films. Do you regard them as spy films out. Really not not as such the definitely like they. They tease it. A little bit there. Spycraft in that's what's really cool about is more taking the influence of borne movie and applying it to like like i said a sixties era revenge Seventies era feels like death. Wish like the first though at least in the first one. I would even say that the later two ones do still feel kind of like that except for the third one which is just the fugitive keesa Loses everything interesting about fugitive. But no i don't regard them as five films in my head if i'm reaching towards taken one or lord forbid masochistic in decided rupees.

roger ebert charles bronson
"roger ebert" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

The Next Picture Show

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"roger ebert" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

"I i remember like when i was a a young critic watching movies and reading his reviews how often We would run across something lake. His blue velvet fever. You saying that the it wasn't very sexual or violent enough or a nine and a half weeks is a movie that he kind of slobber over a way i thought was a little unseemly. I'm not surprised that he loved this. I mean you know it's it's barrier breaking and surprising in the story is great but it's it's also like a good movie for you know. Good old pervy. Roger ebert side while to provide a context. It opened in one theater. I believe on the sixth of october proper opening was the thirteenth a debuted at number eight but in terms of unsavory content. The number one movie that week and and for four weeks in a row was seven. The number five movie that we also a financial flop but also provides a little context. What people are watching was jade which was his A nasty film as this but not nearly as smart traced debuted effectively at number eight behind to die for its third week ahead of the big green in its third week it was it was not successful so i'm kind of wondering why i guess a good point compared to here's why would people goes feel comfortable going to see seven but not this. I'm honestly baffled by that question. Say that people had been weaned a bit on serial killer movies. I mean You know i think you know it sounds so lamb said had already happened when already been massive cultural phenomenon and seven a bear star sciences without leagues at that point bigger star So those those two factors alone are pretty significant. And there's kind of a pulpy feel to seven. I mean there's there's there is kind of a sense that fisher and company are trying to give us a oblique vision of modern rain drenched urban landscape. But like but. I think there's something more real about the future that strange as is trying to predict the chaos that we were all kind of feeling might becoming as the millennium turned. There's something weirdly even though it's not more disturbing film than seven there's elements of it that feel more real and maybe a little bit more disturbing on that in that sense. Yeah i remember thinking it was kind of funny at the time that it. Would you know this all happen next five years. But i think actually kinda works for. Obviously this is not the future we got but it is so close to the one thousand nine hundred ninety five ish version of america that feels a sharp critique because of that this is going out on a limb a little bit but i can't help but wonder if part of that dichotomy is that you seven is in a way a kind of they're kind of like overlay of misogyny to it. You know the. I'm thinking about things from the the big detail of how it ends to smaller things like Women getting freight to death. Which i mean if you're horrified by the rape and murder in strange days. I don't know how you can let the knife raping in seven go by..

Roger ebert lamb fisher america
"roger ebert" Discussed on Channel 33

Channel 33

03:15 min | 1 year ago

"roger ebert" Discussed on Channel 33

"All right david in the notebook dump. We are joined today by brian. Raftery excellent movie writer author of the best year ever. That is a book and now the autour behind a new long form ringer podcast gene. And roger about the iconic seminal movie. Arguing duo cisco neighbor ryan. Welcome the press box. Hey thanks for having me. This is really fun all right. So you're gonna see that. David and i have very big memories. Very big takes about cisco nieberg as artifact of our youth but for people who may be a tad younger than us. How would you describe cisco neighbor to someone who never saw the show. Wow you know. I think it's it's it's the it's the way you everyone who's young argues now accepts in person and the arguments end after five minutes in their only about movies but they're also about how everyone deals about each other. I mean they were like you know for people my age. These were the first to this. Was the first conflict i saw in popular culture was gene cisco and roger ebert arguing with one another because when i grew up watching tv. You didn't see these kind of big fights. You didn't see the grownups get outta control on television and every week. Jane's has gone rodrigue Would sit down. They would have five sometimes six movies they go through them for about three or four minutes each and they were longtime rivals became tv stars together and they had all this kind of beneath the surface tension. When they talked about you know movie like an icon of from someone like me. It was when i when i first started watching. I was really young. I mean the seven or eight. I think i just like watching. Like grown-ups fight on tv When i got older. I you know cisco uber for a lot of people including myself. This was sort of in the pre internet era. How you learn to think about movies. I learned. I heard the word cinematography. On cisco neighbor for the first time. I you know i realize you disagree with someone and still remain civil with them through cisco so they were. They were remarkably influential on people my age in terms of popular culture and thinking about it. But what kind of funny now is that. I'm still seeing young people's chairs cisco ebert youtube video. It's like it's like they're still. They haven't read movies in twenty five years and they're still relevant what they think about aliens or platoon. People are still discussing. Today it's true. You know funny the way that you talk about how they kind of shape the way that we think in. There was a sort of monoculture just in terms of the way that we learned film criticism. What struck me reading and listening to your podcasts. So far is how my perception of them. When i was a kid was is exactly the same perception. Everybody else had to write that. There was a sort of like monoculture perception of siskel and ebert. That i wasn't just i had a favorite or whatever but so describe their contrasting personalities a little bit again for the uninformed and and this sort of well film archetypes. They occupied themselves. I think roger ebert who i think because he obviously lived longer than gene and had a very big. You know sort of twitter. Imprint passed away in. Who's better known. I think but he is a little more of a film scholar at times. A little more softspoken whereas gene. Who love movies but was sort of I guess he could be a little more persnickety..

cisco Raftery roger ebert rodrigue roger brian ryan david David Jane youtube siskel ebert twitter
"roger ebert" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"roger ebert" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"Loved as i am i never ever ever sought and it is true that you know home. It's hard to be what you can't see. And i used to read these personal blogs. And i used to read these essays that women wrote one of my favorite pieces of writing in the entire world. Is roger ebert writing to his wife. Chaz on their anniversary and in that he says she is the great fact of my life. Roger ebert said his wife a gorgeous not small brilliant black woman was the fact of his life and i wanted to be for somebody not everything not somebody. They lived for but at the end of their life. I wanna be that period. I wanna be a statement. I wanna be a great fact in their life. It's my favorite like five minutes of the start of the public. I guess i should do. The formality like ashley. Welcome to the show. Thank you for having me there. Were definitely just keeping all of that. How conscious is that for you. Like i guess very but thinking about yourself as a younger person and that audience for your work now. I'm extremely conscious of that. I think because as a kid the thing i felt most acutely was dismissed or silenced and.

Roger ebert Chaz ashley
"roger ebert" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

08:15 min | 1 year ago

"roger ebert" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"The great film critic Roger Ebert wrote this review of one of my favorite movies wet Hot American summer that was a parody of The, uh Hello, Mother. Hello. Fatah's song. Yeah. And Roger Ebert. For all his many gifts. It wasn't the world's greatest parodist. But yeah, like the point of it was that, uh, that this movie was just totally execrable was just really, really horrible. And I remember feeling so betrayed by that review when I saw the movie, and it became one of my favorite films, and I was thinking of that, as I read The New York Times Review of MacGruber. By a O. Scott, who's a wonderful critic, really insightful, brilliant critic who opens essentially with the question, and he literally asked this question. Why does this exist? And then I was also struck. It continues along those lines, questioning why a movie like MacGruber would have come into existence. Later on, he says. Kristen Wig was your was your co star in the film, Kristen Wig is one of the funniest people alive. Mr. Forte is not, uh, Wade gains extra poignant right now. I disagree, but it gains extra points with the with, you know, style guide formality if the New York Times referring to us, Mr Forte, but yeah, like MacGruber was really brutally received, I will say. I thank God my I I will wait. Go. Go ahead. What I was gonna say is my my friend Jordan. God bless him, saw the movie in in an early screening a pre release screening and said, Oh, my God. MacGruber is so funny. You have to go see MacGruber and I went and saw MacGruber and I cried with laughter. I was one of the funniest one of the most laughing I've ever done in the movie theater. Um, but It was a box office bomb and just probably broadly, poorly reviewed. Not universally. But broadly. Oh, I would say. I would say I would argue that okay, Um, certainly There were a lot of places that he gave it horrible reviews, but there was some very good reviews from respected critics. Uh, you know, Peter Travers loved it, and I can't remember the other people, but I would say I wouldn't I was actually happy that it was not skewered as much as it could have been, like, you know, you go to rotten tomatoes and you know there's Catholic Mothers Digest or whatever, that's reviewing it, and that's part of the 100%. It's like, well, you know. Yeah, Of course. Of course. This is not a movie for that. And I am I was raised Catholic. So so I knew specifically that I knew I knew this was not for my Catholic brethren. You had tried putting a celery stick in your butt at Sunday school? Yeah, and found that it did not fly in That context is certainly certainly that you know that the, uh There were bad reviews and I understand that I Love the movie and proud of the movie. And I think that, um I I would say that I think a lot of the people Who reviewed it. You could tell who wasn't going to give it a chance in the first place you'd go through and you go. Oh, this person never was going to give you a chance. Or maybe didn't even watch it or like you just There were so many things about you could you know they would make a joke about you know, why would you? Do you know? Something about how Review it in a way that made it seem like it. Was these. The SNL sketch where the the movie had nothing to do with the sketch. So it's like, Wait, did you do you see the movie? This was not This repetitive ramp of explosions over and over again. I don't know. You know, people can review it how they want to. And you know a O Scott review it? Yeah, sure. Fine. I don't know. You know, I disagree, and And I don't I I don't know that I would have trust in his reviews of comedy movies, uh, to be honest or or you know, and it's fine Reviewed if that's how you feel, that's fine. Um, he was wrong. I think he's wrong. But you know what? I know. I wrote the actual movies, So it's certainly going to. It's definitely gonna be up my alley because it's all revere dumb stuff to a O. Scott. You're wrong on that one. Jesse Thorn from NPR say so that I'd want to sit next to him at a dinner party. It sounds like, you know, you know, he doesn't sound like a fan. Yeah, but I imagine that having that having that kind of deeply mixed reception to the film, uh, is in a way in its own way, galvanizing. Like I also thought Don't know. Anchorman was very funny. I don't know what is a good example of a well reviewed, uh bridesmaids brides, maids very well reviewed. Super funny. I also thought it was super funny. Uh, bridesmaids isn't as important to my personal identity as MacGruber is, in part because MacGruber was divisive, just as like. I don't know. I love both the movie babe and the movie Babe Pig in the city like both. Those are two movies that I really loved. Um, but you'll hear me talk a lot more about babe pig in the city because it was Reviled by many, and I think unfairly, so I think it's just as wonderful as baby. Just different. Um, is MacGruber kind of like your rush The band? Yes, it's like they're using you feel like because there are some people who are super pro it. Some people are very anti. So you're like it gives you it. It's a real thrill, but I imagine that when you make a movie like that, what you get is, um you know, certain people, certainly avoiding your gaze in the immediate aftermath, But many people like texting you and saying, Look, I saw him a groover. It ruled. You know what I mean? I I will for sure we do not. Or at least, you know, I don't want to drag your man John into this, but my I've always thought like I'm not trying to Make something for, you know. For everyone. I'm trying to make something that I would want to see. There's something that I would like, So you know, certainly it makes sense that a ton of people wouldn't like it too. But you know, I I feel like when you Don't you know if you water it down and try and not watered down, But But if you try to try to think too much about Oh, this joke wouldn't work because some people might think this is gross ordered, you know, And you think too much about what people might not like. Just go through, Make yourself happy. And if you're doing that the product is going to show how much you like it and and I don't know it. Does that make sense. I feel like I'm doing a bad job of Of putting words together. Well, four day I am so grateful to you for coming to be on Bullseye. It's It's something I hoped could happen on the show one day for years and years and years, and I'm such a fan. I'm so glad to. This has been great therapeutic, and I appreciate it. Thank you. I, uh You know, it is fun to come here and talk about extraordinary too, because I love that movie. Good news. Well, when MacGruber, the television show comes out, we're planning an hour long special. I'd love to come back. This is great. The support of our friends at National Public Radio..

Roger Ebert Jesse Thorn Jordan Peter Travers babe pig in the city Kristen Wig John 100% Wade National Public Radio both NPR Bullseye Catholic Mothers Digest Babe Pig in the city SNL Fatah two movies O Scott first
Iconic Theaters in California to Close Over Pandemic Losses

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

01:53 min | 1 year ago

Iconic Theaters in California to Close Over Pandemic Losses

"The pandemic has cost us a lot, but the hope that someday post vaccine we would return to our favorite places that hope has carried us through the hardest parts of these last 13 months. Well. News came this week that the iconic Arclight cinema and 58 year old Cinerama Dome in Hollywood would not be reopening post pandemic. In fact, the owners of ArcLight Cinemas and Pacific Theater said none of their locations would be reopening. Post Cove it. That's right. No more ArcLight caramel corn or movie pore size glasses of wine. Joining me to remember these theaters, particularly the iconic Hollywood location is Christy Lemire. She writes for Roger ebert dot com and Who hosts the podcast breakfast all day, and she's our regular one of our regular and most beloved film critics on Fridays. Hi, Christie. Hello, my friend. What a sad day it is. I know, And we have all spent so many glorious hours at the arc lights, especially the one in Hollywood. Talk about many, and yeah, from your perspective. So it's funny when you're a film critic, especially if you're a freelancer like so many of us are like you don't have an office, right? You watch movies at your house or you right at your house, and so going to the Arc light on a Monday night to see a big studio release, and all your fellow critics were there, and there's a buzz in the audience as people who love film You know, it's It's like going to your favorite office but also your favorite watering hole and there's such a great energy the minute you walked into that lobby with just the job. Soaring feelings and the huge marquee with all the times and the big clock, and you felt like you were walking into a cathedral of swords. And yet there's also a very intimate sense of community because you could go and have a bye deep beforehand or have a glass of wine afterward and talking about what you have just seen

Arclight Cinema Cinerama Dome Arclight Cinemas Pacific Theater Hollywood Christy Lemire Roger Ebert Christie
"roger ebert" Discussed on Dyking Out - a Lesbian and LGBTQ Podcast for Everyone!

Dyking Out - a Lesbian and LGBTQ Podcast for Everyone!

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"roger ebert" Discussed on Dyking Out - a Lesbian and LGBTQ Podcast for Everyone!

"I don't know what they were doing without wig. Plus the bra. Yeah the broadly trick. All of us out like nothing. She didn't have to do nudity. You could have just like shot around. Yeah yeah nobody was expecting for there to be like exposed titties and and happiest season but like most of us have an arm that we can cover up with delaying the corner. You know like daytime soap opera has if they can navigate having people be partially nude. Yeah i twenty happiest. I always check the roger ebert review of and i had an for happy a season and one and a half stars man. Let's see what rotten tomatoes has. I can't believe i haven't actually. I looked up a couple of views and like there was one. I don't know if it was like variety or vulture was saying that if they're going to try to move away from the formula like a super hetero normative Christmas romcom like then completely break the formula and not was vulture. I saw that okay. Yeah it was easy either break or just one hundred more of these movies so we can get it out of the way and just of all. Yeah i mean not to say. I actually don't read a lot of critics anyway anymore but has an eighty five percent on rotten tomatoes. And i'm like but have to remember who most critics are right there mostly straight white brain. So yeah they might think they write off just moving like you got one guys like. What are you complaining about. Yeah like i could like hear that in your heads. And i'm like yeah but we do have like that's the thing it's like. We have a right to have this opinion. And hopefully you know. Hopefully we there's a lot more on. And i'm still waiting for the there's still hasn't been leaguer. Great like lesbian mainstream modern yup. I wouldn't say that. Imagine me and you that i wouldn't. That still would classify that as art house in me like that like i think it was. I actually forgot a who made it was. It might have been bbc involved okay. I'm not sure but it wasn't an american movie okay. So i wouldn't classify that i'm trying to think of other examples..

roger ebert bbc
"roger ebert" Discussed on Feast of Fun

Feast of Fun

04:46 min | 2 years ago

"roger ebert" Discussed on Feast of Fun

"Like bitches. You're on your own very true and that kind of sense you have to if you if you want to know something you have to take the effort and research and look at it and find it. Yeah you know. And it is definitely beyond the valley of the dolls definitely is as a camp gem. That's worth checking out for sure. If not just about dan lewis. Yeah i hope any of your listeners. That are listening. Aren't dissuaded by the news that there's a transphobic element. Because you know. I think it's fascinating to go back and look at at cinema for both its homophobia and it's sexism misogyny and it's transphobia over the years. I mean i think. I don't be put off by that. You go and seek it out in watch it and also i think there's an interesting psychology and we've talked about it on the podcast. Many times I know but what you know that many of us who are older. We're actually attracted to these characters. Billy i actually really you know what i think about it. I often identified and was fascinated with queer killers. You know and and zemun was completely fascinating to me. You know in in really the queen of the character even though inequity rage the queer rage at the end. Oh my god it is it is. It is the manson story. That's the finale of that film is is the inspiration from the charles. Manson sharon tate. You know murder spree And it's just fantastically fascinating and opulent in bizarre and horrific and one of the best original films and the fashion is just to die for and die for roger feel like the The the secret. The revelation was tat was sort of put in at the last minute. It's because it was really. Yeah roger ebert. Dvd commentary that that he just came up with that of the last minute just to have some big boom revelation but a lot of people who are fans of the film say that the dialogue hints at the secret earlier on roger ebert and the dvd said nuts. Not the case. It was just a coincidence And i think he might have even talked about how the the manson murders were added that this had been something they've been working on for years. I could be wrong about that. But fausto i was going to ask you if you knew One of the cameos in the film that i think is so interesting. Is that in zeman's party in in the second act of the film where we're introduced zemun and he. He runs in any looks at his party and he goes. This is my happening. And it freaks me how you know the woman who is wearing the black catsuit very sexy. That's haji from faster. Pussycat kill kill is in one of the Isn't she wearing one of the women costumes from the old batman tv series. I'll i'm not sure about that but it's very similar. You know yeah. I believe i believe that costume is the same exact wardrobe piece from the tv show and a lot of i was reading. Also a lot of set pieces from beyond the valley of the dolls. Were also used for myra breckenridge. Oh wow hey there's now we've got to.

zemun roger ebert manson dan lewis myra breckenridge sharon tate Billy murder fausto i zeman
"roger ebert" Discussed on Feast of Fun

Feast of Fun

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"roger ebert" Discussed on Feast of Fun

"I have done Beyond the valley of the dolls reunion event and at the time when we did it got it had been over ten years ago now i was able to get Three of the stars of the film. erica gavin marcia. Mcbroom and John lazar who played zemun and at the time there was a blu ray celebrating the anniversary and it was a big big deal that the guy who played harris had actually agreed to participate on. It was one of the things you know. He hadn't done anything for all those years Twenty something years probably at that point But i don't think he's done anything sense either so he's pretty much disappeared. I'm trying to find. And i've found on a message on a blog pop addicts Pop culture addicts. Somebody said that they were able to write. They left something on a message board a few years ago when a young woman responded and so the david. What's her father and he just you know. Thank you for your kind words and stuff like that. But he didn't want to be associated with the film wasn't interested in being in the limelight at all. But the thing about this movie to is value the doll shares Start sharon tate and they re released it after she was murdered And then of course beyond the valley of the dolls also deals with like these celebrities getting murdered two and so i think maybe with that whole helter skelter thing going on around that time too. And also you know spoiler alert. The movies very transphobic and that the the killer the murderer the bad person is a is a trans man now is that is that been verified by roger ebert in the script that it because we see the revelation is that the killer opens up his shirt and reveals that he has brass And a lot of people watching that film it was that he was a man who's transitioning to being a woman in the script..

sharon tate harris John lazar roger ebert Mcbroom
The movie of the year is here: Boys State

The Big Picture

06:46 min | 2 years ago

The movie of the year is here: Boys State

"Sean Fantasy. And this is the big picture conversation show but the best movie I've seen in twenty twenty. That movie is called boy state. What is boy state? Well, it's a documentary. It is now available on Apple TV plus and I thought it would be appropriate for us to just talk about this film which I think is fascinating and incredible document of life in twenty twenty in many ways. Specifically, the way that we engage with our political system Amanda I wanted to talk to you about it because I know that you like the. Film as well. We're GONNA. Talk a bit about what boy state is the institution, and also what this movie isn't how it captures it but what did you make of it off the top see you saw this movie at Sundance as did our colleague Noam Away and you both raved about it and I didn't get to see that sundance so I caught up with it about six months later with all of the expectation that goes along with you guys being this is the best we've ever seen I was wrapped. This is A. Very documentary that is about each. Summer Camp Robert Graham, and we'll explain the program a bit more. It's Kinda complex. I still have some questions about how boy state the Summer Camp Program works but whatever. And I was just completely in Michigan. It's one of those documentaries where you're like I can't believe you got this on tape and also I can't believe that you've got this on tape and also it speaks so profoundly to the moment in which I'm watching it even though it was filmed during the summer of two, thousand and eighteen. Yell leader in this episode, and you can hear a conversation with me and Amanda mcbain and Jesse Moss the filmmakers behind the movie and they explained a bit about how they captured what you're describing, and there are several moments in this movie that will make you say this is must be scripted. This can't be real. I mean in many ways it seems. Like archetypal narrative, dramatic movie making, but it is very real and boy state. The institution is very real. So what is boy state? It's it is as you say, it's a sort of a summer camp. It's a, it's a summer leadership program I assume you as a as a high achieving young person. You must have been a part of some some programs. Like this I get sent to Arts Camp I. Never did the Politics Camp I did have to go to girl scout camp once even though it wasn't a girl Scout, but this is sponsored by the American Legion and I only really interacted with the American Legion. In that. Sometimes, we had our middle school dances at an American Legion clubhouse. Okay. So the American Legion does sponsor this program they nominate High. School Juniors and they come in the interview and they talk about their idea of the country and patriotism and the idea of public service that means to them, and it's essentially a training program for politicos aspiring Politicos, and that's a fascinating thing growing up I went to basketball camp. I was an aspiring. Professional Basketball player unfortunately I am incredibly slow and can't jump and can't shoot. So that's that was never going to happen for me, and for some people at boys anger, there is a girl state as well. We should say that you know in in most states in this country, they offer this program. There are a lot of people who aspire to kind of public service or at least to get a a sort of a sense of civic duty, which is not necessarily the same thing as public service. And this has been happening since nineteen, thirty seven. And the. There is a long list of famous and accomplished alumni in boys and girls stayed more specifically boy stated won't probably won't surprise people to hear. Just a shortlist of incredibly well known people who participated in this program includes Bill Clinton Dick Cheney. Justice Samuel Alito James Gandolfini my boy. Roger Ebert. Michael Jordan. Tom Cotton. Rush Limbaugh Cory Booker. So you know luminaries or lowlights depending on your point of view of the world. This is quite a quite a list of people there and the program itself is kind of interesting. So essentially, I, feel like we're talking around specifically what it does, but the programs vary by state but in Texas where this movie takes place participants are divided into two groups. The federal and the nationalist and what are the what are these two groups have to do and and how does that set up the Phil Do a lot of things but the film follows the political campaign aspect of boy state and boy state is a week long program in Texas and kind of the climactic event is an election for governor of the state, the boys state of Texas. So these two parties, the federalists in the nationalist, which by the way just already casts a quite a shadow over the whole. The. The documentary because they really they adopt these names as teams, and so they're yelling about being federalists and nationalists and anyway. At they elect. Party chairman's they they kind of do a platform that we should talk about the platform they have primaries and they each eventually select one nominee for the governor's race, and then at the end, there is election and one governor emerges. So you know approximately eleven hundred boys participate in this process, and that means that out of large groups. One two three people have to merge and the reason that this movie happened and the reason that Jesse and Amanda sought to identify a handful of people who'd be significant to the process in the given year that they were shooting is because in two thousand, seventeen Texas boys state legislature voted to secede from the Union and that if that doesn't some American politics in the trump era I don't I don't know what does the fact that it was your teenagers decided they needed to succeed from a program which is already imaginary. Is Perfect, we should note that two thousand seventeen was when the state legislature of Texas successfully voted to see from union. It is apparently a emotion that came up for several years but this time both bodies ratified this action, and of course, that is a an ongoing dialogue in the state of Texas. In the true American experience you know there are many Texans who would like to not be a part of this country maybe not many there but there are certainly some we know that that's the session is an ongoing conversation in some states. Around the country. So the point is, is that boy stayed in many ways reflect the political system or does it? It's I think the nature or nurture question here is essential to this movie and what makes it so fascinating and even when I talk to Amanda and Jesse I, think that they were unwilling to put their thumb on the scale to say what were they felt it lived or died but as I said, this movie is just exceptional and

Texas American Legion Amanda I Basketball Apple Sean Fantasy Robert Graham Amanda Mcbain Amanda Sundance Michigan Cory Booker Jesse Moss Justice Samuel Alito Roger Ebert Bill Clinton Dick Cheney Michael Jordan Tom Cotton Noam Away
"roger ebert" Discussed on Unspooled

Unspooled

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"roger ebert" Discussed on Unspooled

"I. Mean I think we've really kind of talked about. Does this movie belong on the list I think if you're going to twist my arm because I know where you already feel about it. I you know I, 'cause. They came in going absolutely. This bonds enlists the quintessential cowboy film I think there are better versions of this. I'm going to say take it off the list, but keep it high in your heart. Because I do think is actually a really wonderful beautiful film and I think we've told the story of continue. Tell a story. You know if it's Logan. unforgiven you know the story still stands in. You know and I think. Visually is what's kind of edging me to that Direction I. Think we've done it a little bit better. Visually Yeah I know there's a lot here to love. Agreed I am all onboard always for films that question who we hold up his heroes, and why and I think this film does that so beautifully? But I'm ready to hear. Who Never has the whole done in the first place? Even if the movie makes fun of him, holding guns, I'm ready to get out of the wild west movies like this. You know there's a lot of euros in this country who aren't represented in films like this is a lot of here. That here was takes a lot of different forms. And now I guess the question is. How is this movie received? We know that it became a flagship of the studio, but where people into it. Yeah, everybody loves it. I couldn't actually find a negative review of this What it is instead that I wanted to read is from a positive. You written much later when this movie came out by Roger Ebert. What he what he here is. He just poses a lot of questions to the audience. He says he's still wrestling with what Shane is and what it means and I thought that was so interesting so.

Roger Ebert Logan. Shane
"roger ebert" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"roger ebert" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Hang on okay okay all right as well Leon is with us we've got our Friday features and we're doing and we got more straight out of context coming up right here on WGR let me give you some whether it's gonna be a warm weekend let me just explain that today clouds and some some they'll be milder high of about seventy two but cooler near the lake tonight partly cloudy mild low of fifty seven Saturday cloudy spells warmer humid these creep up morning shower possible but there's a better chance of scattered thunderstorms in the afternoon high of seventy apical near the lake for Sunday the warmest and most humid day of two thousand twenty two date a mix of sun and clouds much warmer noticeably more humid a high of eighty six upper seventies on the immediate like short and then Monday was Memorial Day and Tuesday clouds in a bit of mixed sun warm and humid clusters of thunderstorms possible Monday high of eighty two Tuesday's high eighty four currently sixty degrees at o'hare at fifty nine at midway and a fifty three at the lake front right here on seven twenty WGN okay which is straight out of context continues after this Richard for box arrived on the Friday show jazz legend Ramsey Lewis joins us members of the great Roger Ebert plus we've got things to do in the Memorial Day weekend Friday morning on seven twenty refresh your home at Macy's Memorial Day sale with furniture and mattress supervise just in time for summer like in all weather seventies outdoor dining set only nine hundred ninety nine dollars and make even more room for the family with the rally five piece chaise sectional sofa now just one thousand eight hundred seventy nine dollars plus a big on close outs from Sealy serta and Beautyrest going on now at macys dot com and select stores see macys dot com slash stores for locations saving some sound clearance prices exclusions apply.

Leon WGN Richard Ramsey Lewis Roger Ebert Sealy
"roger ebert" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"roger ebert" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Will Saini interview that she met him when he was nine my check and also I think you told us well it gets too needed to tune in at nine thirty five you can hear Dionne Warwick it's gonna be great so now here's the bad this is fine we're just trying to lighten up here have a good time I loved as a kid Siskel and Ebert at the movies member gene Siskel and Roger Ebert thumbs up thumbs down guys lan well let's let's give the background of how this came up okay we're talking about Hempstead where I live there gonna have some drive in movies and the the first one's going to be in port Washington isn't it's Goonies which I don't ever remember seeing from the eighties but you went on online and saw the Siskel and Ebert both gave it three out of four stars right right and that's what brought up the name Cisco neighbors I'm just doing your set up of what why you were talking about him off Mike today well they're managing lands on top of something credible had nine o'clock that's the amazing thing he was taken to Joe Biden drug okay kids if they just get on with your Cisco the academy so Siskel and Ebert they and there is some outtakes okay when they would do promos you know and they have to say coming up at the movies is we do you know and sometimes the chatter you know in between our segments is funnier than some of the stuff we put on the air so I found a couple of these out take them Natalie has one I found another one too that we can use a little later in the program but here Siskel and Ebert and they're just yet they're taping promos for the show so that just kind of goofing off now I if you listen closely where they got right Genesys gene Siskel as drunk here he is totally drunk sounds like you yeah right here's the clip the forecast is for members of the movie is the science fiction adventure robocop.

Dionne Warwick gene Siskel Roger Ebert Hempstead Mike Natalie Saini port Washington Joe Biden Genesys
Playboy art director Art Paul, 93, and photographer Art Shay, 96, have died

After Hours with Rick Kogan

01:28 min | 4 years ago

Playboy art director Art Paul, 93, and photographer Art Shay, 96, have died

"It would be hard to imagine fuller lies in those led by arch and art paul to giants of the art world who died within hours of each other saturday morning both of them had been ill archie was ninety six art paul was ninety three so they had had very fruitful lives and very influential lives art shay was a photographer who died in his home in deerfield surrounded by some of the two million or more photos he had taken through his life he was there for most of the prominent events of the twentieth century met many of the century's most important people john fitzgerald kennedy merlin brando martin luther king gwendolyn brooks ernest hemingway carl sandberg james baldwin ann landers and roger ebert was roger who once set of arts photography that it quote shakes you up up sets you down gently pats you on the head and then kicks you in the ass art paul was sitting in an office in the loop he was born on the south side raised in rogers park was incredibly talented at sullivan high school and received a scholarship to the art institute he then came back went to the institute of design was freelance illustrator and designer with a little tiny office.

Archie Paul Shay Deerfield Ann Landers Roger Ebert Rogers Park Art Institute John Fitzgerald Kennedy Ernest Hemingway Carl Sandberg Sullivan High School Institute Of Design