9 Burst results for "Rockford Public Schools"

"rockford public schools" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"rockford public schools" Discussed on WGN Radio

"WGN's Jenna Barnes in a statement, Mayor Lori Lightfoot and CPS CEO Janice Jackson say this vote affirms the strength and fairness of our plan, which provides families and employees certainty about returning to schools and guarantees the best possible health and safety protocols. Under the agreement, pre K and Cluster program students will return to Chicago Public schools for in class learning Tomorrow. Kindergarten through fifth grade returns. March 1st six through eight grade returns. March 8th. Still no agreement on a return for high school students. Rockford Public schools Far northwest of Chicago, has a method to entice teachers to work in its district. It helps pay for their housing a school board. They're just yesterday agreed to continue that program. $750 per month. Stipend and Matt said occur is chief human resource officer for Rockford Schools for Ah, young teacher, a young professional to, you know, have a have a solid career good paying job, And then at the very beginning, we offered to help out with some rent assistance. You know, we're hoping that those are the types of senators that again get him to Rockford programs just entering its second year, they'd hope did it fund the stipend for up to 10 teachers? District officials there say due to the pandemic, it's so far being provided to four indoor service at Chicago. Restaurants and bars expands tomorrow, owners can increase it to the lesser of 25% capacity or 50 people per room or floor. 15th Ward Alderman Raymond Lopez tells WGN's and the plant as he hopes people take advantage of that celebrate Valentine's Day this weekend up your restaurants out there struggling for round Chinese.

"rockford public schools" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

05:53 min | 1 year ago

"rockford public schools" Discussed on WGN Radio

"The tri state. And then again from Costner getting into downtown. I'm Vicky Cuckoos Ian from the Idot Traffic center, reminding you to drive responsibly. It really is a matter of life or death. You little Kobe 19 cases are soaring. State health officials announced 11,600 new cases of the virus yesterday. Along with 37 additional deaths, officials say more than 5500. People in the state are hospitalized currently with covert 19 related illnesses. 514 of those are on valid ventilators. Wanting to state health officials. Those people are occupying nearly one third of all ICU beds in the state. Total of about 585,000 people in Illinois have tested positive for covert 19 since the pandemic began. The death toll is nearly 11,000. Since the pandemic began. Chicago continues to see troubling trends when it comes to covered 19, Here's Chicago health commissioner, Dr Allison our wedding we're seeing about 2400 cases a day early in the summer, we were seeing fewer than 200 cases being diagnosed per day where we've seen just in the last month. Our cases go up five times are hospitalizations go up three times our deaths go up three times, and the biggest problem is that we've seen no slowing of the Increase our what? He says the city is ready to distribute any amount of Corona virus vaccine and table to get once the vaccines approved. She estimates the city will initially received about 150,000 vaccine doses. Are but he says that won't even cover all of the city's health care workers. Former Secretary of Education in Chicago Public Schools CEO Arne Duncan has revealed that he contracted covert 19, He told WGN he first developed symptoms 10 days ago, and it was a wake up call you honestly it's you, like a ton of branches like you've been run over by a truck or something for me was like one day I was fine The next day. I was pretty Pretty flattened and to your body egg fevers, coughing. From general exhaustion. Duncan says his wife and son also tested positive for the virus. He says he shared the experience to encourage people to take the virus seriously into skipped large gatherings for Thanksgiving. Five year old boys in the hospital after a stray bullet came from outside into his home on the Far South side. It happened last night in the 200 block of West 115th Street. The child was playing on an iPad on his living room couch when he was hit. The bullet was fired from a passing vehicle outside. The shooter has not been caught. Rockford Public schools will soon go kids will go to Northern Illinois University for free. That story from WGN's Ryan Burrow. Watford City Council members have unanimously approved a proposal giving any Rockford public School student with a G P A of three point or higher free tuition at Northern Illinois University. The city would chip in $1.5 million a year in scholarship money. Now the proposal still needs to be approved by and I you and the not for profit group Rockford Promise which would manage the scholarship fund. City of Rockford, says 40 students have already applied. Ryan Bro, WGN News workers from 11 nursing homes threatened to strike next week unless they're given raises. They want higher base pay and hazard pay. That's in line with long term workers across the rest of the state. If their demands are not met nearly 700 S C. I u healthcare workers could go on this strike on the picket line on Monday. Most of the facilities that would be affected are in the Chicago area. Now we WGN sports. Here's David and the Bears knew how important last night's game of the Minnesota Wasit chance to snap a three game losing streak. Keep them above 500 sent them off on their bye week on a positive note, they accomplished none of the above. There's defense once again gave them a chance. But their offense could not get the end zone and in 1913 loss to the Vikings. On the way after Nick Foles was carted off Monday night is a tough dude and he was in a lot of pain. And when you see that you feel for him just because you know, or you don't know how how good or bad it is officially a leg or hip injury for fools, which means Matt Maggie might be forced to go back to Mitch Robiskie following the bye week when the Bears play the Packers in Green Bay. And quite frankly, after the Bears managed just 14 yards with fools in the second half Monday night, it's probably time to go back to your risky anyway covering the Bears. Adam Hogue, WGN Sports NFL Network reported this morning. Foals does not have a major injury, though he will have further evaluation bears only touchdown on Cordero. Patterson's 104 Yard return to the second half kickoff. The Bears five and five of the trip to Green Bay after the bye week. Dave INNIT WGN school now, the forecast from the WGN Chicago Weather Center, here's meteorologist. Morgan Cult Meyer. Good morning, We start out your morning hours, with once again temperatures into the lower to mid thirties. Most of us near the freezing mark this morning between about 30 and 34 degrees. Winds are coming in as high is almost 20 MPH this morning and they'll cover right around that 10 to 15 MPH range Today early wind chills in the teens and twenties winds. Gust is highest 25 MPH through the afternoon out of the northwest. Highs only make it into the lower forties, but we'll keep mostly sunny skies. Overnight lows into the Upper twenties and Chicago and cooler in the suburbs from the WGN Weather Center. I'm working Coke Meyer 32 at the Lakefront 32 in O'Hare 33. At Midway. It's 32 this morning in Bartlett. Now we w g and business Here is Orient Samuelson. Good morning where, um, red screen on Wall Street this morning after setting closing highs yesterday, the market giving it back today. Because of concern over the covert 19 situation at the moment. Dow Industrial Average down 405 points.

WGN Bears Chicago WGN Weather Center Northern Illinois University WGN News Morgan Cult Meyer Rockford Public schools Green Bay Idot Traffic center Arne Duncan Rockford Chicago Public Schools Costner Illinois Rockford Promise Rockford public School Nick Foles Watford City Council
"rockford public schools" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"rockford public schools" Discussed on KCRW

"Set record sales proceeds from Powerball tickets to scratch offs contributed $731 million to public education. Translates to more than 10% of the state's funding for school district's, but their seats don't look nearly as good this year. With more strict reopening guidelines, Sales have plummeted and revenue is nosedive nearly $90 million during the pandemic. Victor Matheson teaches economics at the College of the Holy Cross in Massachusetts, where he researches sports in the lottery, So we do know roughly nationwide money from lotteries. Plus other gambling constitutes about 2% of all state budgets in the country as a whole, So that's not huge. On the other hand, it's as much as state's generate from For example, ST Tobacco TAXES it alcohol taxes, 45 states and the District of Columbia run lotteries. More than half of state lotteries funnel a portion of their revenue into education. 14 completely devote their lottery money to public schools and scholarships. In fact, in North Carolina, they even call it the North Carolina education. Lottery officials talked. The more than 10,000 students received free pre K last year, thanks to the Lotto. Schools in that state are now projected to receive about $30 million of less than what they expected from the lottery. The pandemic lottery dip in places like North Carolina, Illinois wouldn't normally be a huge loss for public education. But Matheson says, since it's happening at the same time as the recession, it's a small but irreplaceable amount. The drawing up of lottery funding Is just symbolic of drying up of all sorts of other types of revenue sources that state local governments and schools all depend on. Jeff Craig is superintendent of the West Aurora School District, located west of Chicago. He's feeling a bit of whiplash, he says. Just before the pandemic he was planning to add resource is all those boulders are now in a filing cabinet because it's not something we can talk about for years to come. Now. Now, Craig is trying to figure out how to pay for additional costs things like sanitation, protective equipment and ensuring the emotional health of his students. Been trying to calculate all the losses add up quickly. Michelle Yaar is the chief financial officer at Rockford Public schools. Overnight. We went down $20 million which is very significant. With less money from the lottery and a predicted drop off property and corporate taxes. School systems may have to start making tough decisions about klutz very soon. Depends on how long this recession will last. So hopefully this is ah, one year dip, but it is not looking like it. I mean, I would I would expect we're going to have a hard couple of years to three years. Based on what's what's happening. Many school officials are hoping for federal stimulus money to help them bridge the funding gaps. But bridging those gaps will rely in part on people being able to stop by the gas station to buy a lottery ticket for NPR news computer modeling.

Victor Matheson North Carolina Jeff Craig Rockford Public schools District of Columbia Holy Cross NPR West Aurora School District Massachusetts Chicago Michelle Yaar chief financial officer superintendent Illinois
"rockford public schools" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"rockford public schools" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Lottery set record sales proceeds from Powerball tickets to scratch offs contributed $731 million to public education. Translates to more than 10% of the state's funding for school district's, but their seats don't look nearly as good this year. With more strict reopening guidelines, Sales have plummeted and revenue is nosedive nearly $90 million during the pandemic. Victor Matheson teaches economics at the College of the Holy Cross in Massachusetts, where he researches sports in the lottery. But we do know roughly nationwide money from lotteries. Plus other gambling constitutes about 2% of all state budgets in the country as a whole, So that's not huge. On the other hand, it's as much as state's generate from For example, states back Oh, taxes it alcohol taxes, 45 states and the District of Columbia run lotteries. More than half of state lotteries funnel a portion of their revenue into education. 14 completely devote their lottery money to public schools and scholarships. In fact, in North Carolina, they even call it the North Carolina education. Lottery officials talked. The more than 10,000 students received free pre K last year, thanks to the Lotto. Schools in that state are now projected to receive about $30 million of less than what they expected from the lottery. The pandemic lottery dip in places like North Carolina now you know, I wouldn't normally be a huge loss for public education. But Matheson says, since it's happening at the same time as the recession, it's a small but irreplaceable amount. The drawing up of lottery funding is just symbolic of drawing up of all sorts of other types of revenue sources that state and local governments And schools all depend on Jeff Craig is superintendent of the West Aurora School district, located west of Chicago. He's feeling a bit of whiplash, he says. Just before the pandemic he was planning to add resource is all those boulders are now in a filing cabinet because it's not something we can talk about for years to come. Now. Now Craig is trying to figure out how to pay for additional costs. Things like sanitation, protective equipment and answering the emotional health of his students when trying to calculate all the losses add up quickly. Michelle Yaar is the chief financial officer at Rockford Public Schools. Overnight, we went down $20 million which is very significant with less money from the lottery and the predicted drop off property and corporate taxes. School systems may have to start making tough decisions about cuts very soon. Depends on how long the recessional last. So you knowwho play. This is ah, one year dip, but it it's not looking like it. I mean, I would I would expect we're going to have a hard couple of years to three years. Based on what what's happening. Many school officials are hoping for federal stimulus money to help them bridge the funding gaps. Bridging those gaps will rely in part on people being able to stop by the gas station to buy a lottery ticket for NPR news. This is NPR news, and it is coming up on 7 43 on this Tuesday morning on DVD. Here's Joe with an overview of bay area traffic conditions. No new problems of the last 10 minutes or so. And it's starting to get better in most locations, even 6 80 south bound still pretty heavy through pleasant and down the same old gray, but nothing like it was earlier, 84 West Still some stop and go west of Isabel. Past the G plant, but not solid all the way to 6 80 anymore like it was the right on Highway four. Westbound is just heavy over the will pass had a ladder in the road near leverage. But apparently that's not an issue anymore. Eighties improved also early from the earlier crashing or cutting just a little heavy. Neighbors barely backed up it all. Joe McConnell for traffic support comes from San Matteo Credit Union. Today, Support for a D comes from Comcast business offering Internet voice and video solutions designed to help businesses maximize performance.

Victor Matheson North Carolina Jeff Craig Joe McConnell NPR Rockford Public Schools District of Columbia Comcast Holy Cross West Aurora School district Massachusetts Isabel San Matteo Credit Union Michelle Yaar Chicago chief financial officer superintendent
"rockford public schools" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"rockford public schools" Discussed on KCRW

"Set record sales proceeds from Powerball tickets to scratch offs contributed $731 million to public education. Translates to more than 10% of the state's funding for school district's, but their seats don't look nearly as good this year. With more strict reopening guidelines, Sales have plummeted and revenue is nosedive nearly $90 million during the pandemic. Victor Matheson teaches economics at the College of the Holy Cross in Massachusetts, where he researches sports in the lottery, So we do know roughly nationwide money from lotteries. Plus other gambling constitutes about 2% of all state budgets in the country as a whole, So that's not huge. On the other hand, it's as much as state's generate from For example, ST Tobacco TAXES it alcohol taxes, 45 states and the District of Columbia run lotteries. More than half of state lotteries funnel a portion of their revenue into education. 14 completely devote their lottery money to public schools and scholarships. In fact, in North Carolina, they even call it the North Carolina education. Lottery officials talked. The more than 10,000 students received free pre K last year, thanks to the Lotto. Schools in that state are now projected to receive about $30 million of less than what they expected from the lottery. The pandemic lottery dip in places like North Carolina and I will know I wouldn't normally be a huge loss for public education. But Matheson says, since it's happening at the same time as the recession, it's a small but irreplaceable amount. The drawing up of lottery funding Is just symbolic of drying up of all sorts of other types of revenue sources that state local governments and schools all depend on. Jeff Craig is superintendent of the West Aurora School District, located west of Chicago. He's feeling a bit of whiplash, he says. Just before the pandemic he was planning to add resource is all those folders are now in a filing cabinet because it's not something we can talk about for years to come. Now. Now, Craig is trying to figure out how to pay for additional cost things like sanitation, protective equipment and ensuring the emotional health of his students. Been trying to calculate all the losses add up quickly. Michelle Yaar is the chief financial officer at Rockford Public schools. Overnight. We went down $20 million which is very significant. With less money from the lottery and a predicted drop off property and corporate taxes. School systems may have to start making tough decisions about cuts very soon. Depends on how long this recession will last. So hopefully this is ah, one year dip, but it is not looking like it. I mean, I would I would expect we're going to have a hard couple of years to three years. Based on what's what's happening. Many school officials are hoping for federal stimulus money to help them bridge the funding gaps. But bridging those gaps will rely in part on people being able to stop by the gas station to buy a lottery ticket for NPR news. I'm Muslim.

Victor Matheson North Carolina Jeff Craig Rockford Public schools District of Columbia Holy Cross NPR West Aurora School District Massachusetts Chicago Michelle Yaar chief financial officer superintendent
"rockford public schools" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"rockford public schools" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Translates to more than 10% of the state's funding for school district's, but their seats don't look nearly as good this year. With more strict reopening guidelines, Sales have plummeted and revenue is nosedive nearly $90 million during the pandemic. Victor Matheson teaches economics at the College of the Holy Cross in Massachusetts, where he researches sports in the lottery. But we do know roughly nationwide money from lotteries. Plus other gambling constitutes about 2% of all state budgets in the country as a whole, So that's not huge. On the other hand, it's a CZ much and states generate from For example, ST Tobacco TAXES it alcohol taxes, 45 states and the District of Columbia run lotteries. More than half of state lotteries funnel a portion of their revenue into education. 14 completely devote their lottery money to public schools and scholarships. In fact, in North Carolina, they even call it the North Carolina education. Lottery officials talked. The more than 10,000 students received free pre K last year, thanks to the Lotto. Schools in that state are now projected to receive about $30 million of less than what they expected from the lottery. The pandemic lottery dip in places like North Carolina in Illinois wouldn't normally be a huge loss for public education. But Matheson says, since it's happening at the same time as the recession, it's a small but irreplaceable amount. The drawing up of lottery funding Is just symbolic of drying up of all sorts of other types of revenue sources that state and local governments and schools all depend on. Jeff Craig is superintendent of the West Aurora School District, located west of Chicago. He's feeling a bit of whiplash, he says. Just before the pandemic he was planning to add resource is all those boulders are now in a filing cabinet because it's not something we can talk about for years to come. Now. Now, Craig is trying to figure out how to pay for additional cost things like sanitation, protective equipment and ensuring the emotional health of his students. Been trying to calculate it all losses add up quickly. Michelle Yaar is the chief financial officer at Rockford Public schools overnight. We went down $20 million which is very significant. With less money from the lottery and the predicted drop off property and corporate taxes. School systems may have to start making tough decisions about cuts very soon. Depends on how long this recession will last. So you knowwho play. This is ah, one year dip, but it is not looking like it. I mean, I would I would expect we're going to have a hard couple of years to three years. Based on what what's happening. Many school officials are hoping for federal stimulus money to help them bridge the funding gaps. But bridging those.

Victor Matheson North Carolina Jeff Craig Rockford Public schools District of Columbia Holy Cross West Aurora School District Massachusetts Chicago Michelle Yaar chief financial officer superintendent Illinois
"rockford public schools" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"rockford public schools" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Translates to more than 10% of the state's funding for school districts, but their seats don't look nearly as good this year. With more strict reopening guidelines, Sales have plummeted and revenue is nosedive nearly $90 million during the pandemic. Victor Matheson teaches economics at the College of the Holy Cross in Massachusetts, where he researches sports in the lottery, So we do know roughly nationwide money from lotteries. Plus other gambling constitutes about 2% of all state budgets in the country as a whole, So that's not huge. On the other hand, it's as much as state's generate from For example, states back Oh, taxes it alcohol taxes, 45 states and the District of Columbia run lotteries. More than half of state lotteries funnel a portion of their revenue into education. 14 completely devote their lottery money to public schools and scholarships. In fact, in North Carolina, they even call it the North Carolina education. Lottery officials talked. More than 10,000 students received free pre K last year, thanks to the Lotto. Schools in that state are now projected to receive about $30 million of less than what they expected from the lottery. The pandemic lottery dip in places like North Carolina now, you know, I wouldn't normally be a huge loss for public education. But Mattson says, since it's happening at the same time as the recession, it's a small but irreplaceable amount. The drawing up of lottery funding Is just symbolic of drying up of all sorts of other types of revenue sources that state local governments and schools all depend on. Jeff Craig is superintendent of the West Aurora School District, located west of Chicago. He's feeling a bit of whiplash, he says. Just before the pandemic he was planning to add resource is all those boulders are now in a filing cabinet because it's not something we can talk about for years to come. Now. Now, Craig is trying to figure out how to pay for additional costs things like sanitation, protective equipment and ensuring the emotional health of his students. Been trying to calculate all the losses add up quickly. Michelle Yaar is the chief financial officer at Rockford Public schools overnight. We went down $20 million which is very significant. With less money from the lottery and the predicted drop off property and corporate taxes. School systems may have to start making tough decisions about cuts very soon. Depends on how long this recession will last. So you knowwho play. This is ah, one year dip, but it is not looking like it. I mean, I would I would expect we're going to have a hard couple of years to three years. Based on what what's happening. Many school officials are hoping for federal stimulus money to help them bridge the funding gaps. But.

North Carolina Jeff Craig Mattson Victor Matheson Rockford Public schools District of Columbia Holy Cross West Aurora School District Massachusetts Michelle Yaar Chicago chief financial officer superintendent
"rockford public schools" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

06:33 min | 2 years ago

"rockford public schools" Discussed on WJR 760

"Back to business back to school some people already and some people right after Labor Day put school superintendents from across the great state of Michigan in detail how the lack of action by the legislature on K. through twelve of budget is hurting kids as schools re opened their doors for the new school year we're gonna talk about that with doctor Randy Lima Papa Wayne recess superintendent who's on the other end of our line right now good morning doctor last twenty five years Michigan has seen the courting to your superintendents and yourself the least growth in school funding in the nation and the unique needs of the students will only continue to go on met without a state budget and a bold plan to invest in the resources in our kids so save you on the record tell me what's going on here well you know we're we're getting ready for school to start everybody is of course excited at that time of year and a lot of excitement you're in a local schools a lot of uncertainty also as our local school districts are local school boards really don't know where they're at in regards to what kind of resources they're gonna be able to provide for the students have used as you highlight it yeah we are looking at a budget moving into this year that we're pretty excited about that was proposed by the governor because it really took recent research that was completed over the last year and a half it was done by a group of not part of the Republican Democrat school people not will people that really identify the types of things that we ought to be investing in if we want to improve the cheapest you're less you get very frankly all you know that we're struggling here as it relates to how are your and so they identified a a bold way to identify the resources needed to make sure that all students if you're being that and we were excited that the governor's proposal actually started to move us toward the goals that were identified in this research and you mentioned also that the that the investor issue get identified research done by the university says the other we're really at the bottom in the country as of late and what we've done in the last twenty years so we thought this was an opportunity really change that near to change an environment start to put resources back in the area that we don't make a difference in our student achievement well we're anxious because here we are school starting summer school district started this week actually and we don't have we don't have an answer to really what the resource that could be available for local school districts yeah and and doctor I think everybody can understand them and relate to the fact that each day that goes by without a budget is just another day of uncertainty for the schools which hurts the students Mike Scheibler a a from Rockford public school superintendent is said that now there's agree with them and nobody likes indecision and and the confusion and really just to uncertainty nobody likes that to going into their job none of us would so where do we go from here what Yongle that the legislature will get moving and very quickly and get resolved we understand that this is the year of the release of the budget there are a lot of old old will that are on the table and so it's taking its time to split government get that done but you know it it is there are no excuses now I'd have to get done now we have to get a budget play our school districts plan all summer long make sure that the right school yeah because they don't have a specific game plan in regards to how what the resources are there are a variety of things Roger that they have taken either dipping into the reserve fund I'm not really using our or other position I don't think that's I I can't happen now because of the answer he that's got to add we we we need to get a budget in place so we can make sure that we have all the resources that we possibly camp will be put into a class what kind of an increase are you saying from what the governor has proposed what was she looking at it approximately five hundred billion dollars old bull and out one of the ways that that happens is that the general line will take care of dollars that have been taken out of the school aid fund over the last eight years variety of different things that you should never be paid for out of the school budget at the state school budget and so by doing that five hundred million dollars actually starting up formulas which came out of the research that was done over the last year to hang out that would they are still in hiding at higher eat you gave this a resource excellent said everything from you know what are your last five whole foods you should have what kind of after school teachers have what kind of professional development for teachers those of the thing is you're proposing a budget that school districts will start to be able to reinvest that and that's what we were excited about we're looking at that oppose a little over three hundred dollars per student at every school district yeah I and I see that if for example her planned triples the number of literacy coaches statewide which obviously would be a great thing I guess the whole question is how do we pay for can we pay for it a can we maintain that right funding it separates after yeah and of course you know I don't know if it is then that we have to we get the best yeah they're they're struggling we're starting to fall behind other states in the country and we have to make this investment in our kids in order for them to be key you know the target that we suffer that well we wish you good luck and we hope that there will be some activity in Lansing that to get this done to remove the uncertainty obviously of passing a responsible budget is something that we've sent them there to do and we'd like to see that happen I hope it all works out Dr absolutely Sir you have this morning sure Dr rand the Lima Papa Wayne resa superintendent and lived there you can't blame them they want a budget the lack of a budget is hurting their ability to do what they have to do as we had in the school some schools already there and all of the rest of them coming together right after Labor Day this Wednesday August twenty eighth at six twenty three hi Annie hall Sir Tom Ford.

Michigan five hundred billion dollars five hundred million dollars three hundred dollars twenty five years twenty years eight years
"rockford public schools" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

08:59 min | 2 years ago

"rockford public schools" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"This statewide still to come cursive, writing is required to be taught in schools. But will kids use it once they're out of class report on that it's on the way. Up next politicians are known to vote. The words in the reconcile to stir patriotic feelings, but nearly thirty million acres of US farmland, or held by foreign companies, and that's a steep increase from just two decades ago and one that has ringing alarm bells and many farm communities, and from Hervas public media Rene wild has more on that when the stock market tanked during the last recession foreign investors began by a big swath of US farmland. And because there are no federal restrictions on the amount of land that can before known it's been left up to individual states to decide on any limitations Texas's kind of a free for all. So they don't have a limit on how much land can be owned, you look at Iowa and they restrict it no land in. Iowa's owned by a foreign entity tie Higgins is with the Ohio farm bureau. Ohio, like Texas also has no restrictions and nearly half a million acres of prime farmland are held by foreign owned entities companies from the Netherlands, alone have purchased sixty four. Thousand acres for wind farms, one of the main reasons that we're watching this type of issue is because once a foreign entity buys up, you know, however many acres, they want Americans might not ever be able to secure that land again. And so once we lose, it may lose it for good every acre of productive farmland that they convert over is an acre of land, no longer produces food, and since agriculture and food production contribute, twenty million dollars to Ohio GSP that loss is felt from the state level all the way down to rural communities. Ngelo Huffman is a six generation farmer this farm in the northern part of the state has been in her family for almost two hundred years. Right out my back door here. Chinese-owned Smithfield foods, the largest pork producer in the world has recently bought out, a couple of grain elevators, basically extracting the wealth out of the community to be fair US firms and corporations. Also invest in overseas. Agriculture owning billions of dollars of farmland from Australia to Brazil, but the Smithfield food by out has really raised concerns with American farmers as part of that two thousand and thirteen sale. A Chinese company now owns one hundred and forty six thousand acres of prime US farmland, the money that those elevators used to make a stayed within the community today. The money those elevators make will go in the pockets of someone's thousands and thousands of miles away. Even those farmers that have buildings and a raising hogs for SM. With field. They really just become tenants on their own land. This is going on across America. Joe Maxwell is a fourth generation farmer from Missouri. He and Huffman are part of the organization for competitive markets. An advocacy group of farmers and ranchers across the nation. He says Ohio will continue to see an influx of foreign investment as other states. Put restrictions in place. So when they're looking for investments in the US and agriculture or house, a great egg state, and you don't have any restrictions like others. In the central part of the state tractors are busy planting this year's crops nationwide. It's Canadian investors who own the most farmland here in Ohio. It's Germany was seventy one thousand acres, Jon trimmer manages thirty thousand acres of corn and soybeans for German, investors. He's been working with German families who want to get into US agriculture since the eighties. They started to buy land in Iowa and Minnesota, but the right one they started in the past state laws, we were restricted foreign ownership, instead, they turned to Ohio, but trimmer, says there is a misconception about foreign owners that they aren't good. Neighbors are good stewards of the land. What he sees is a growing divide between older family members who still live on the farm, and their children, who have no interest in the family, business and want to cash out the land the last two farms. We bought here through owner her and her brothers and sisters. Herited from their mother. And none of them wanted to farm. None of them have an interest in farm with a median age of US farmers at fifty five many face retirement with no prospect of family members willing to take over the national young farmers coalition anticipates that two thirds of the nation's farmland will change hands in the next few decades. So in states with no restrictions to cap for ownership. It's likely that lots more of it wind up in foreign hands. I'm Renee wild in Ohio schools are putting more emphasis on stem education, but that doesn't mean they're leaving the liberal arts skills behind chase Cavanaugh has this report stems stands for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, and educators at all levels are encouraging students to study subjects much of this has to do with the economic growth of Silicon Valley and the higher salaries that jobs in the tech sector can provide exposing students to these more advanced subjects can start as early as elements and middle school. Becky Griffith is an instructor at north. Illinois university's digital convergence lab. She runs a video game coating camp for elementary and middle school girls. They to draw their characters can create a story board thinking critically that way, and then as well as coding and making their game run. But campers use an engine called gamemaker to translate, their ideas into software, Amelia, one of the participants describes the art, she's creating for her game, basically you're squid trying to get through a maze in undersea in the enemy is an anglerfish camp, draws on many different skills, such design, art and coating. It also introduces Amelia and others to concepts like, revising code stuff, you got to workout and other things that might go wrong activities like this camp show, how different elements interact, and how to apply different areas of knowledge, but now, teachers are also emphasizing skills that one would regularly use in a professional setting in the coating camp. For example, group, work is a common site. It also extends into the school year, Dr. How salt us is the special programs director at Rockford public schools. Her purview includes the systems, steam academy with the a standing for arts. It's all very collaborative so working with others, having to compromise and collaborate have into communicate what you really want really need in order to get the job done and deliver. What your initial idea is? Those are all the soft skills that start I think, with a steam focus that's the lens that is emphasized even more in higher education courses, judge McCurry, is the dean for arts, communication, and social sciences at Kish walkie college. He says, employers want career candidates to have a strong set of the soft skills. The ability to communicate well in spoken language, or, or written language debility to work collaboratively in a team the ability to think critically and to analyze problems knowing, how to research knowing how to find information to examine and assess the information and know what's, what's good information. Many of these skills can come from a standard liberal arts curriculum, but curry says students of stem can also expand their horizons. In unexpected ways he gets the example of Steve Jobs, taking a college calligraphy course, understanding print faces type fonts and the importance of visuals in communication. And that, that went right into his development of the graphical user interface that apple became famous for educators want students to develop the critical thinking and knowledge base that comes from a liberal arts, education. They also hope to encourage the kinds of Steve Jobs, moments that can come from studying outside one's major. Doctor, Judy ledger, would is acting dean of northern Illinois university's college of liberal arts and sciences. She says one way to encourage the study is by requiring a certain amount of liberal art classes to graduate, but this can be less effective. If students already took advanced placement college courses in high school that certain number of students would come in, in their gen, Ed classes, they would say, oh, I like that history class. I'm now I'm gonna major in history or I like that anthropology class. Now I'm gonna major politics because they've take. Taken that the AP class, a don't, regardless of how stem students are led to liberal arts courses curry of kittiwake college says, if it's a subject, they enjoy the students will expand their studies, once they taste it. They realize that these liberal arts areas, the arts sciences, social sciences humanities, they're not broccoli their ice cream, and they're delicious, and they just want more of them, educators, hope this, and solid, grounding and soft skills lead to well rounded students at all levels. I'm chase Cavanaugh. Each week statewide brings you reports and conversations from in and around Illinois.

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