25 Burst results for "Rockefeller Foundation"

COVID-19: The Great Reset Theory With Clay Clark

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:04 min | Last month

COVID-19: The Great Reset Theory With Clay Clark

"January of twenty twenty. I already had a copy of this thing called the rockefeller plan and for people. That don with the rockefeller plan is you can download it. Time to free. America dot com. Or you can call it this book. Covert nineteen the great reset written by klaus schwab certificate of vaccination idei. I knew of this stuff in two thousand and ten okay. I knew event to when i knew about it. But i was weak and terrible and i need to repent. I was politically correct january. Two thousand twenty. And i the lord was calling me to use all my skills and to seek first the kingdom of god and all these things will seek. God i and i'm going. I don't know you know. Know millions of listeners. And i don't know that i should speak out about it but i knew five things eric that i needed. I needed to tell everybody. i knew. In january of twenty twenty that the models to the two point two million americans will die. Those are false. The tests are falsely calibrated to inflate the number of cases three cove nineteen is one hundred percent treatable using tonight ivermectin hydroxy clerk when for the buyers kobe. Nineteen was made in a gain of function laboratory in wuhan. Were they take fresh never frozen fetal tissue from a baby and they mix it with naturally occurring credit tissue to increase the transmissibility pathogen. And i knew that the cove nineteen back scenes were actually created before the copa nineteen virus was on the scene. And that's the last thing you said is the only thing that i'm confused by. So let's just put that aside for a second but you know if what if any of what you said if fifty percent of what you just said is true. I just think it's. It's so astonishing that we're living in a time when the information that you just said which i know most of that i can know already is true. I have got questions about a few of those things. But the point is the idea that we've come to a place where it falls too radical go-getters like you to sound the alarm because it sounds like stuff we would make up. Doesn't it that that that the bazillionaire rockefeller foundation. We do like mr burns from the from the simpsons like there's nobody that evil. There's nobody that's horrible but there

Klaus Schwab DON Wuhan America Eric Bazillionaire Rockefeller Foun Mr Burns
"rockefeller foundation" Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"rockefeller foundation" Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

"So we're tracking data and driving a response that data driven the tools exist to do that the science exists to do that. We need the leadership to come together and take advantage of this moment. So we have a much brighter future. Your energy is still so good even though all of this is when you get those moments said and I'm sure you do when things are like. Where do you go to sort of rejuvenate yourself? That's a great question. I mean I'll say in these last six months, I've had a number of those moments where you're just like looking at what's happening and thinking, how could this be happening in our own country or why is this? Effort we put in place ten years ago, being dismantled in a moment when it's most needed and I guess my personal answer that question is I go to friends and mentors who have inspired me for decades feel very fortunate that my career I've gotten to work with some super amazing scientists that are just always looking out at the frontier and are really optimistic and they every now and then share with me their worldview and it it is really uplifting or I talked to people who've been there before and who remind us that. was created during a recession that we think it's dark moments now, but Lbj took off his right after Kennedy was assassinated in one of the darkest moments in our history and had a fierce determination to pass Syria civil rights and voting rights legislation to make America more inclusive I. Know From my own experience that I've seen the courage of young girls in Afghanistan that somehow had the. And the capacity to go to school when their life was threatened to do so and I saw the United States partner with the Afghan government and put eight million girls in school. So I've seen it happen and I feel like if we can do it in Afghanistan if we can do it in Haiti if LBJ can do it after such a tragic moment in our history, we can use this moment to. Reassess our ambitions and try to make the world more equitable, more fair and more inclusive. Will Rise thank you. Thank you so much for sharing so much and for sharing. So many of your ideas and your insights are really appreciate it. Thank you for having me this. Great to be with you. And now, a final word from our sponsor hub spot. What.

Lbj Afghanistan Afghan government Haiti United States partner Syria Kennedy America
"rockefeller foundation" Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

07:28 min | 1 year ago

"rockefeller foundation" Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

"Into the poorest parts of India, and we've proven we can provide electrification on an almost commercial basis to those customers and those types of innovations will I think helped transform the face of poverty around the world if we're bold today if we treat this crisis as an opportunity to lift people up who are being pushed down. I know you're also expert in the food supply worked at the Department of Agriculture the pandemic initially sparked food safety fears here in the US, something for hard to find. What things were exposed this year about our food supply or supply chain or is the US version of this really just emotional and the real food issues are globally. No the real food issues are definitely in the United States I. Mean One thing I find amazing I've learned this over the last few years that even though I went to medical school and theoretically I was taught nutrition, you know when you look at the biggest chronic disease causing problems in the United States diabetes cardiovascular disease how much of that is caused by are deeply unhealthy diets and the reality is covert has. Exposed that people with diabetes cardiovascular disease are far more far more likely to have a negative outcome from episode of Covid Nineteen. We've also seen frankly big changes in how Americans eat the shift from restaurant based eating to home-based eating has reduced. The amount of animal protein meats dairy milk that's consumed in the average American family's diet, and that's probably a good thing in the long run from the perspective of long term health. But we've also seen some really disastrous short-term things. I mean thirty million American kids depend on school lunch for a non trivial part of their nutrition, and that's been very, very difficult to make sure that those kids are getting those school lunches. We supported communities around the country with all these great partners on school feeding to make sure that schools could still be distribution points for food packages that could go. To kids homes and often include a little for their families. Early on in the crisis, we saw huge lines at food pantries around America and that coincided with a big drop off in donated food, which mostly came from restaurants as the restaurants were closed and you got a sense for just how many people in America unbelievable in America are on the edge of hunger are on the edge of not getting. Enough food on a regular basis. So we have some real issues in the United States that require leadership and persistence to solve, and of course, anytime you see a big spike in poverty and a drop off and economic activity globally hunger is one of the top consequences violence against girls and hunger are like the two consequences I have seen whenever something bad happens whether it's in earthquake in Haiti typhoon in. The Philippines are drought in East Africa or a war in Afghanistan. It's something that I. Think as political leaders and just as human community, we should come together and say, no one should have to go hungry and no one should have to fear for their health and safety in this era. In this age, you mentioned violence against girls and women are you seeing rising numbers in that in this Cova Time? United Nations has issued an estimate that for every six months that the world is in some form of scattered lockdown. There are thirty one million cases of gender based violence, domestic abuse, and otherwise that are additional to the baseline around the world. So it is a tremendous issue. It gets much much worse at times of crises I saw it firsthand you mentioned the. Haiti earthquake people lose their homes and the people are most vulnerable right away where young women and girls and we did everything we could to protect their safety but was extremely hard and some. I. Carry with me today because I know when there's a crisis, they are often the first to suffer, and frankly the global community usually gets to that issue way too late. There's so many things that we've talked about here Rajon it can feel a little overwhelming. What do you feel like is at stake in this moment. If you look at the recovery from the two, thousand, eight financial crisis. We had a steady but slow recovery in the. United, states. But at the end of the day so many people felt that they were excluded from that recovery on the right and the left of American politics that I think it has torn our country part I think led to a sort of populist anger on the right and a occupy. Wall. Street type of anger on the left and I think that has been bad for our nation in terms of our ability to bring people together look clearly at the future and build a more inclusive. Economy and I think the same is true globally. So I think a lot is at stake in this moment. I think this is a much, much more devastating crisis than the financial crisis of two, thousand, eight I. Think it's very likely that if we don't step up and lead in this moment, if we don't say we got a knock it and make sure that every vulnerable community in America is prioritized for both testing contact tracing and the vaccine period if we don't step in. And say we need a big global collaboration to protect emerging markets emerging countries from covid nineteen as it starts to explode in parts of the developing world, and frankly if we don't come together and say, we should spend a non trivial part of our GDP in a massive global recovery effort that is inclusive for everybody and protective of our climate. If we do not do those things now I think we wake up ten years from now in a world that is staggeringly more unequal. That is on the precipice of climate disaster, and at that point we're looking at addressing a set of challenges that are just too hard to overcome. And it just doesn't have to be that way. It does not have to be that way and one of the things I love about getting to be at the Rockefeller Foundation is we get to be on the cusp of innovation. Science and Technology and see the inventions that are making a different future possible. If you told me twenty years ago could you electrify the whole world and make sure billion people who live in the dark have electricity and the chance to pull themselves out of poverty? The answer would have been no, you couldn't do it. You just couldn't do it. You had. To depend on too many governments and utilities and coal fired power plants. Today, it is cheaper and more effective to just provide everybody distributed solar energy. Similarly, it's possible today to build a system where as soon as you're positive of covid nineteen anywhere in the world, it goes into a central repository and everybody can see that positive case in real time. So we're tracking data and driving a response that data driven the tools exist to do that the science exists to do that. We need the leadership to come together and.

United States America Haiti diabetes covid United Nations India Philippines Department of Agriculture Rockefeller Foundation Rajon East Africa Afghanistan
"rockefeller foundation" Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

08:06 min | 1 year ago

"rockefeller foundation" Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

"Listening to this podcast, our business people, entrepreneurs, running their own businesses, and I'm curious what you think an employer's responsibility is in testing right now. To be honest. It's very hard as the CEO of a private institution. In my case, the Rockefeller Foundation to tell other CEOS you should not be protecting your own workforce is and you should somehow turn yourself into a government that looks after the public health needs of the nation overall. That's just not something that I think is a scalable solution what I do. Think companies can do is first and foremost put in place. The right kind of physical safeguards would you called prevention earlier and I do think companies that are unable to do that should put in place appropriate testing protocols so that they can use these new types of tests to keep their workforce relatively safe but there is a line between that and the dinner parties. And you know we got, we have to prioritize schools. Gulnara. Communities as a country, which is why concerted federal action is so important. There are a lot of folks who feel frustrated by the uneven actions or disparate actions of different leaders. People don't necessarily know who to trust who to follow. You are interacting with, say a lot of governor as a lot of mayors. Are there certain folks who you would say are worth emulating certain companies or governors or mayors like who's doing this right? Well, I think there are so many that are trying to do it, right? Larry. Hogan was the head of the National Governor's Association the Republican Governor of Maryland. I think he's very much trying to do this. Right? Eric Garcetti critic mayor of Los Angeles very forward thinking and trying to. Get this right they're probably fifteen other mayors and governors. I could mention both including Gina Raimondo and Rhode Island and Mayor Suarez. In Miami I think the challenges they're not necessarily able on their own to move the market I mean Maryland's a great state, but it's also a small state. So putting the governors together and saying, let's buy together that can move the market working with the Rockfeller coalition can help say, okay what kind of technology? What's the product profile? We need six months out we need something with a five minute turnround, a five dollar cost and easy to use construct and something this entirely point of care. Now, let's go after that. You mentioned technology early on. There was a lot of discussion about contact tracing APPs and that these for GonNa, solve some problem in this that doesn't really seem to materialize. It's an execution problem was that a conception problem I think all of the above I think the reality is someone with a telephone and a clipboard is probably initially pretty effective, and then once you get the telephone clipboard system. Working. Then you can go to really great automated APPs. We are seeing in universities that we work with including Yale University of Illinois Stanford, and some other places we're seeing the integration of software and hardware come together so that you can have an automated system in a community like that. That says, okay, there's a positive here. Therefore, it feeds into the system, the head of the university gets to see. A dashboard and understand their real time case load and prevalence and incidence and the public health officials in that context can then react very quickly and efficiently. So we are starting to see those things but you're right that there was a lot of hype early on, but you can't get to that point if you don't have the testing regime down this is why we focus on this those systems. Are Sort of useless. If the way you get a test is you drive someplace you pay a couple hundred bucks you get a test result in seven days, and then you're supposed to go into a software tool and answer questions about who you might have had contact with last week. That's not contact tracing. That's just and it's just too late. It's crazy even if it works perfectly, it's too late. Human recall doesn't work that. Well, in that setting trust issues become intensified the farther out you get from the moment you know you're positive. There's all kinds of reasons why that doesn't work but at the end of the day, covid nineteen is not just been a health crisis. It has illustrated the deep inequities in America and around the world by the way, and I think often in our darkest moments, we reach for the stars and I think we can actually do that here and emerge from cove it in a way that we just build a much more equitable and much more effective economy. Y- are there silver lining opportunities here with covert I? Know when you were a USA ID and you helped respond to the Haiti earthquake you pointed out despite the losses that there were some opportunities that you were able to uncover. Are there silver linings you see out of this difficult moment? Well, there are I mean domestically, I see a tremendous opportunity to that we have very high unemployment we have broken infrastructure we know that we're now. Going to have to continue to put trillions of dollars of fiscal stimulus into the economy, we can use that fiscal stimulus to do everything from create green jobs to build green infrastructure to rebuild a public health infrastructure that prevents this from ever happening again and ensures that we protect those that are most vulnerable. I. Think on a biotechnology side, the areas of science in testing in vaccine. Development and frankly and therapeutics I think that's going to unlock. A whole new area of therapeutics that will have relevance to a lot of diseases over time, and this will have reinvigorated biotechnology in the United States. For sure when I look globally, one of the most damaging things that most people don't realize is covid nineteen is estimated to push four hundred, twenty, five, million people back into extreme poverty over the last two decades more than a billion people have moved out of subsistence poverty. This is going. To cut that almost in half and we're going to unwind a lot of progress. So on that I think we need a new global Marshall Plan to come together as a world and say, let's make sure as we rebuild. We rebuild in a way where everyone is included in everyone has access to the opportunity to lift themselves up and I'm even optimistic on that front because of the confluence of new energy technologies and new strategies for providing. Station and mobility and connectivity to some of the poorest communities in the world. So we can be very successful if we stay optimistic and if we're bold and if we're creative in this moment. And those that drop-off off in rising out of subsistence. It's not directly a healthcare issue. It's the second order like economic impact from the dislocation from Cova it's both I mean right now you can look at some places say the state of Maharashtra in India, which has one hundred and twenty million people in a twenty to thirty percent testing positivity rate that is incredibly consequential or you could look at African economies seven eight years. Ago Six of them were amongst the ten fastest growing economies in the world attracting global investment, and with a very bright outlook from a growth perspective growing regularly at seven eight percent per annum. Now, living through a commodity price collapse and an economic collapse that has just stopped progress in its tracks and move things backward. There are still about a billion people in the world who. Get up every day and don't have access to electricity there no lights in their homes. There's no ability to plug something and there's no benefit of using power tools and doing everything from farming to small localized labor work. So we have to solve that the rockfeller foundations actually invested in a billion dollar collaboration with Totta.

Maryland Rockefeller Foundation CEO Eric Garcetti Miami Rockfeller coalition Gina Raimondo Los Angeles National Governor's Associatio Mayor Suarez Totta Larry Yale University of Illinois St Hogan United States USA Cova Haiti
"rockefeller foundation" Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

08:07 min | 1 year ago

"rockefeller foundation" Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

"I'm Bob Sathian and I'm here with Brezhnev's Sharma president of the Rockefeller Foundation Raja's joining us from his home in Washington DC as I asked my questions from my home in Brooklyn Rush. Thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me about. Like many leaders, you came into twenty twenty with well thought out plans and then the pandemic hits and everything up ended. When did you realize that this was going to be a very different year and how long did it take? You had a new plan a new revision in place. Well. The Rockefeller Foundation has for more than one hundred years worked on health and public health, and in thousand nine, hundred eighteen we were part of the response to the pandemic influenza that took place then. So we actually had a team in place that has a lot of expertise on how to address pandemic threats and. Threats all around the world I'd save in mid to late February, we felt. So strongly that this was going to be a multi year global threat that we actually restructured our health team, we brought in a leading global expert on this type of pandemic Dr. Jonathan Quick and by mid to late March, we had put in place a major new hundred million dollar program to address covid nineteen and its consequences in the United States and around the world. So Sir feels to me like they're four pillars to covert response. There's prevention there's treatment there's vaccine development, and then there's testing and tracing. You, guys chose to focus on this fourth point and I'm curious why that of these areas was the one that you felt like you can have the biggest impact on or you felt was most. The. One thing we've learned in combating every global pandemic threat for more than one hundred years is you have to have a data driven science-based response and that's easy to say and everyone kind of nods and yeah that sounds right and then you say, well, what's the data that you need at your fingertips and the single most important data point is who's positive. When are they positive? Where are they and how do we make sure they don't contaminate others. That's the key question to ceasing transmission of pandemic threat and I learned because I oversaw the West African response to the crisis when I served in the Obama Administration that we sent bioterror labs into small West African countries and we flew blood samples by helicopter to those labs in order to get the time to confirm positive down from eight or nine days to four hours. and. When we did that all the other stuff you mentioned start to work once we knew who was positive all of a sudden you could take that person out of the chain of transmission. So when we saw in early, February through late March that America had made almost no progress at all in identifying who is positive where we realized that if America didn't get on top of that fast, we'd been a much worse place. So that's why we focused initially on testing. And in West Africa, you're describing this, you train thousands of people in tracking and tracing. You got this response time down as you said, from eight days to four hours that was twenty fourteen in West. Africa, why has it been so hard to do it in twenty twenty in the United States. Gosh so many answers to that question right but the reality was we had heads of state. We could work with Ellen Johnson was a Nobel prize winning president of Liberia. Time all of her people to not shake hands. We replaced handshakes with elbow bumps and more importantly people listen because we enlisted community leaders to ask people not to hug and kiss and wash the bodies of the deceased. That was a way you pay respect in the culture there and it was also the primary form of transmission. We enlisted everybody local tribal leaders, local medicine men, and. Women we trained as you point out eleven, thousand local community health workers and deployed them all over West Africa and we did it in data driven science based way and I look back and I said well, could America. Have done that yes we're a diverse country. Yes. Parts of Florida are different than parts of Washington DC or Seattle or Tulsa Oklahoma but at the end of the day. Every community has community leaders. Every city has a mayor. Every state has a governor and head we all come together and said, you know this is not a political issue. We're all in this together left and right rural and urban white and black religious and atheists everyone's in it together and whoever your community leaders are. We're going to list them in an. Effort, to get everyone to wear masks to get everyone to social distance and frankly to get everyone to get access to a test. So we know you're positive and then you take yourself out of circulation for two weeks. Had all that happened with the spirit of American sacrifice that were facing enemy here this would have had a very, very different course of progress. So, you didn't see that community activity happening, and so you decided to step in and create your own coalition and try to do it yourselves basically I. Mean we have tried from the beginning to work with all forms of government but you're right we created a coalition of about thirty cities states tribal nations in our country. We looked particularly for vulnerable communities, the African American community in Baltimore, the native American Community Navajo Nation. Very diverse Hispanic American communities as part of Los Angeles, and we said, how are we going to get testing tracing behavioral change messaging to those communities at scale and so we put one hundred million dollars into that, and it has transformed what we know about testing about tracing in about enlisting people in effective behavioral change through our country. For a lot of folks there has been a inability get tests or not understanding which test they could get or feeling like it takes too long to get the results back from the test I. Know You made it a priority to try to amplify the number of tests from the spring until the fall how has that trajectory gone? Are We on track? Are the same test? Now is the test we were trying to get back then Well I'll just say people ask me my optimistic or pessimistic twenty, twenty, one and Covid Nineteen, and my answer is actually I am optimistic and the reason I'm optimistic is in part the vaccine but mostly because of progress, America's about to make on testing in part because of work we did but really an extraordinary collection of experts and partners around the country coming together back in the spring. So what we do then well at. That point in time we said, let's create a national strategy for America on testing brought together former democratic and former Republican officials. We brought together scientists and industry. We brought together investors and major manufacturers of testing equipment and came up with a consensus plan to get from what at the time was about five or six, hundred, thousand tests a week to thirty million tests a week when we put that number out there by the way. A lot of people said we were just thinking this incorrectly and it was not feasible. But what we were staring at was lockdown that was costing America almost four, hundred, billion dollars a month almost all of the burden of that pain and suffering being placed on working American families, essential workers, minority in vulnerable communities and unemployment at a rate. We haven't seen since the Great Depression. So we felt no, we can afford this and we. Should do it. The plan costs one, hundred billion dollars..

America Rockefeller Foundation West Africa United States president pandemic influenza Washington Dr. Jonathan Quick Bob Sathian Africa Brooklyn Rush Nobel prize American Community Navajo Nati Ellen Johnson Brezhnev Obama Administration Baltimore Liberia
There's a push to name and rank heat waves

Climate Cast

03:26 min | 1 year ago

There's a push to name and rank heat waves

"Hurricane names have been around for decades the weather channel names, winter storms. Now, one group wants to name heatwaves to boost climate change awareness and help cities prepare for extreme heat events. Kathy Buffet McLeod is director of the Adrian Rockefeller Foundation Resilience Center at the Atlantic. Council it's a nonpartisan group working to foster global solutions. Hi Cathy. Welcome to climate cast. Hi, Paul Thank you I know that your group is working on naming heat waves and discussing that with the world meteorological organization and Noah. How is that going? Well, we're collecting expert opinions and will be forming a scientific and technical panel to ask those critical questions of how do you define a heat wave and how would we get to a naming convention that we could all agree on. We may need to pilot naming heatwaves before we go global, which is our ultimate goal. But the key thing we see the naming initiative as a gateway to other. Interventions that help reduce heat and protect people and ultimately save lives and it's hard to solve a problem that people don't know about and so I we need to communicate and we think that naming a heatwave is one of the very best ways that we can do that in what ways do you think naming heatwaves would change the way we talk about them. What's the payoff there? Well, if you think about Floridians and I was in Florida for thirty plus years, we've built a culture of preparedness and prevention around the impacts of hurricanes, and that name gives it the weight and it lets you know and the media uses it to broadcast how serious this is and you need to act to protect yourself and your loved ones. Heatwaves. Kill more Americans every year than floods, tornadoes, hurricanes, and all other weather disasters. I. Think a lot of people are surprised by that. How can cities mitigate the threats posed by heat waves? Well, cities are extra vulnerable because our cities are largely built with asphalt and materials that absorb heat an emanate, the heat at night, and so the urban heat island effect is making cities even hotter. And sometimes as much as fifteen seventeen degrees hotter and a lot of those solutions are natural solutions like planting urban forests and those are known to to cool and absorb pollution. But the naming of the heat waves is the gateway as I said to get out the door and attract the attention. It's necessary to how dangerous this risk is. I can see the benefits and drawbacks to naming. Yet another weather phenomenon right I mean we name hurricanes the weather channel names winter storms could naming heatwaves contribute to an overload on whether messaging well, our intent is to answer that question with the very best experts at the table before we proceed and so we all share the goal of communicating this risk and ultimately protecting people and saving lives and so will get to that answer. And certainly, be asking those hard questions of does this do what we wanted to do, and where's the evidence base to support that, and so I'm GonNa come back to you Paul with an answer to your question. After we get to work Kathy, buff men McLeod with the Atlantic Council thanks so much for sharing your perspective on climate cast today. Thank you very much for having me.

Kathy Buffet Mcleod Paul Hurricane Adrian Rockefeller Foundation Atlantic Atlantic Council Director Cathy Florida Noah
Governors To Work With Rockefeller Foundation To Improve Virus Testing In U.S.

All Things Considered

00:13 sec | 1 year ago

Governors To Work With Rockefeller Foundation To Improve Virus Testing In U.S.

"Federal government still has not created a national Corona virus testing strategy. But a bipartisan group of governors just signed on to work with the Rockefeller Foundation to implement a national testing and tracing

Rockefeller Foundation Federal Government
"rockefeller foundation" Discussed on Trumpcast

Trumpcast

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"rockefeller foundation" Discussed on Trumpcast

"To say <Speech_Male> some <Speech_Female> some negligence <Speech_Female> that caused <Speech_Female> the deaths <SpeakerChange> of people <Speech_Female> in certain states <Speech_Female> that that <Speech_Female> I. <Speech_Female> Think. We <SpeakerChange> if <Speech_Female> you you know. <Speech_Female> They were <Speech_Female> calling in they were <Speech_Female> calling a <SpeakerChange> demo side <Speech_Female> Damn <Speech_Female> aside. Oh <Speech_Female> God. <Speech_Male> All right. We're <Speech_Female> to the point where there's <Speech_Male> Democ side in <Speech_Female> the united. States <Speech_Female> but it sounds like you <Speech_Female> have some hope about the six <Speech_Female> day plan and that there <Speech_Female> may be a <Speech_Female> plant states that <Speech_Female> can can <Speech_Female> establish other <Speech_Female> plans <Speech_Female> with the with the <Speech_Female> Rockefeller Foundation and <Speech_Female> related related <Speech_Female> groups <Speech_Female> at least for <Speech_Female> testing at least as far <Speech_Female> as testing goes <Speech_Female> right <Speech_Female> there are these billion <Speech_Female> dollar and multi-million <Speech_Female> dollar donations <Speech_Female> to the 'cause I know Jack <Speech_Female> Dorsey of twitter gave <Speech_Female> a billion dollars. <Speech_Female> I. Wonder <Speech_Female> I don't know quite <Speech_Female> where all that's ended <Speech_Female> up. <Speech_Female> But it seems like <Speech_Female> the Rockefeller Foundation. <Speech_Female> Right. Now <Speech_Male> is our most <Speech_Male> promising <SpeakerChange> hope <Speech_Female> I mean you <Speech_Female> know it is hopeful <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> that they <Speech_Female> are competent <Speech_Female> experienced <Speech_Female> people <Speech_Female> who are <Speech_Female> doing the right <Speech_Female> thing and are <Speech_Female> being recognized <Speech_Female> by <Speech_Female> state governments <Speech_Music_Male> as doing <Speech_Female> the right thing. <Speech_Female> So all <Speech_Female> of that is promising <Speech_Female> but <Speech_Music_Female> I, do think <Speech_Female> that without a <Speech_Music_Female> coup ordinary <Speech_Music_Female> aided federal <Silence> response <Speech_Female> and now <Speech_Female> we have school <Speech_Female> reopenings <Speech_Female> <hes> <Speech_Female> we are headed <Speech_Female> into a Flu <Speech_Female> Season, where <Speech_Female> how are <Speech_Female> you going to <Speech_Female> distinguish <Speech_Female> between who <Speech_Male> has the flu and who <Speech_Male> has covid Nineteen <Speech_Male> Nieto only <Speech_Male> way to do that as drug <Speech_Male> testing <Speech_Female> I this <Speech_Female> to me <Speech_Female> where I sit, <Speech_Music_Female> it's not looking <Speech_Female> very promising <Silence> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> but the fall <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> the <Speech_Female> month on all of <Speech_Female> our minds certainly <Speech_Female> trump castle but I think <Speech_Female> everyone's mind <Speech_Female> is January <Speech_Female> when there's possibility <Speech_Female> of some vaccines <Speech_Female> and better <Speech_Female> yet a <Speech_Female> possibility of <Speech_Female> other more different <Speech_Female> leadership. <Speech_Female> Even, <Speech_Female> if that's unspoken <Speech_Female> by Regime <Speech_Female> Sean his team <Speech_Female> I think <Speech_Female> you know <Speech_Music_Female> the best we can hope for <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> someone else. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Catherine, even <Speech_Female> as a contributing <Speech_Female> editor at Vanity <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Fair, her recent <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> article is called <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> how jared Kushner <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> secret testing plan <Speech_Music_Female> went Pouf into <Speech_Music_Female> thin air. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Thanks so much <Speech_Music_Female> for being here Kathryn. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Thanks for having. Me <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Was a lot of fun <SpeakerChange> talking. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> That's <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> it. For today's show. <Speech_Music_Female> What did you think give <Speech_Music_Female> us your five-star reviews <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> on Apple podcasts <Speech_Music_Female> or wherever <Speech_Music_Female> you listen to us, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and then <Speech_Music_Female> come to us on <Speech_Music_Female> twitter gathered <Speech_Music_Female> round I'm at <Speech_Music_Female> page eight <Speech_Music_Female> show is <Speech_Music_Female> real trump cast. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> You're navigating <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the Internet <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> wilderness pointed, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Tuck into <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> our information <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> bastion and <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> join slate <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> plus go to <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> slate dot com slash <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> trump <SpeakerChange> cast <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> sign up <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> all these new services <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> scatcherd, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> whatever <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> those are thirty five <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> dollars for what a <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement>

twitter flu Rockefeller Foundation Rockefeller Foundation. jared Kushner Apple editor Kathryn. Jack Dorsey
"rockefeller foundation" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"rockefeller foundation" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"That was averted. As bad as the families around the world have been, things could have been much, much worse. Unbeknownst to most of the world 30 years before the population bomb and the limits to growth through published, a few groups like the Rockefeller Foundation began working to figure out how to expand the carrying capacity of agriculture. And they were successful, thanks in large part to a man raised on a farm in Iowa named Norman Borlaug. Or look had been hired by the Rockefeller Foundation to oversee their research station in Mexico, which was established with the Mexican government to find ways to improve wheat. It's difficult to think of any kind of work. That sounds more boring than improving wheat. But boy log managed to do just that. He improved wheat and today He is widely and frequently credited with saving the lives of a 1,000,000,000 people who would have otherwise starve to death without it. Borlaug's high yield wheat and an improved type of rice that was developed at the same time at another research station in the Philippines could triple the amount of grain a single plant could produce, which means that farmers could suddenly get three times more grain from the same amount of land. So both the food supply and the income of much of the world's global poor increased dramatically in a very short time. Which means that the world was saved. Between 1970.

Norman Borlaug Rockefeller Foundation Iowa Mexican government Mexico Philippines
Coronavirus is a totally different disaster for philanthropies to handle

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

09:16 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus is a totally different disaster for philanthropies to handle

"Darren Walker. Thank you very much for coming back to the PODCAST. I'm happy to back on them. So you're every year you send out a New Year's letter in this in this year's letter was entitled how we move forward during the year ahead and in it you decry how we're losing ground on a whole host of issues that democratic values and institutions remain in retreat as a quote from the letter. You also say in the letter quote. This is a time to step up not check out a time to reenlist. Re-engage and reconnect. And you ask a question that is pretty remarkable given where we are right now you wrote quote what new crisis needs to befall us before we together are spur to collective action is covert nineteen that new crisis that will spur collective action. I hope it is. I hope that out of this horrific calamity. We can emerge a stronger nation. A more empathetic people a society where we realize that we have a shared destiny that we realized that our future is one future a future that is dependent on our willingness to act as one our willingness to engage as one and our belief in the idea of equal status them. You know you have been either in your role at Ford or your previous role when you're at The Rockefeller Foundation. You've been a part of many calamities. Both Mother Nature created and manmade I seem to remember there was Detroit bankruptcy there was a new orleans rebuilding after Katrina up. Have you seen anything like this? That we're going through right now. There has never been anything like this virus to hit the world. There's never been a a calamity of this scale and scope and intensity and every crisis I've been involved in where there's been some terrible act of God or whatever you WanNa call it In in it usually place based in some part of the world there is some terrible thing ebola or so Nami in Southeast Asia and the rest of the world can rush to help because the rest of the world is stable prosperous and doing very well generally speaking and this case the entire planet is on edge the entire globe is impacted by this Kobe. Nineteen hours there is no place on earth where one can seek refuge from this and believe that you won't be impacted and so the question for us is. How do we respond in a circumstance that truly does require that we build a consensus that Necessitates a global response not just a response at the country level and particularly response that recognizes that the inequality that we see in the world and in our society will be exacerbated by this corona virus crisis. If we don't as we design how we get out of this and we work through this we are paying attention to the inequality that existed before this virus hit us. We're going to actually make things worse for the very people who are most vulnerable and most at risk. I WANNA get into a little bit deeper into that in a moment but as president of the Ford Foundation. Correct me if I'm if my memory is failing me here but you have a major presence in India and just recently. A India went on a national lockdown. We're talking about one point. Something Billion People on what? How does that impact the work? That Ford does while in a country like India. Our work is focused on civil society and strengthening civil society supporting the rights of women and Dulles Indigenous People until those communities are absolutely impacted because these lockdowns basically impact their ability to earn a living. And most of these folks earn a living As garbage pickers as day laborers people living off of cash and so they are absolutely impacted but on the other hand it's important that India as a nation have a uniform standard way of approaching. This and I think the prime minister has done that. Interestingly we also have an office in Beijing so our China office closed in January as a result of the virus hitting Beijing where we have an office and Within days our office closed. What's very interesting? Is that this week. Our office in Beijing opened. And so we've got a reopening of an office and the a ten offices of Ford in other parts of the world are all closed now so we have this almost this this reversal and so in some ways. What we've seen in our office in Beijing May Portend Our future in that. That office was closed for ten weeks before was able to be reopened and we'll see if We follow a similar pattern here in the US. So let's dive into what you said Just a moment ago about you know how we design the response to Covet. Nineteen will determine whether the societal issues that countries were dealing with before. Kovac's nineteen whether they're exacerbated and I don't mean this as as a partisan question but it is it is a question that has been lurking in my mind. I sort of troubled. By the fact that the United States is not in the forefront of leading in terms of responding to cope with nineteen can can the United States can nations get past this without concerted driven fact based Response from leadership leadership is essential here and the importance of leadership has never been more elevated And felt at at at at anytime in my lifetime than this moment. We're in most certainly the work of global organizations like the WHO is essential and working with them on global strategies and global approaches. Is the only way we're going to actually Get on the other side. If you will I I I don't think it's a secret to say that the US has not sought leadership in many global fora the traditional Seats at the head of the table that we assumed and that we championed global ideas The this is not a part of who we are today in terms of and I think something we have to really consider Do we want the United States to be a a global leader a global organizer a global. Convener I believe we do. I believe it is in our national interest for the US to be engaged in the world and to set a standard and an example of excellence of Democratic Participation Of OF COLLEAGUE SHIP.

Ford Beijing United States India Darren Walker Ford Foundation Rockefeller Foundation Southeast Asia Reenlist Ebola Detroit Dulles Prime Minister Katrina President Trump Kovac China
Whats behind Jeff Bezos $10 billion climate plan?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:28 min | 1 year ago

Whats behind Jeff Bezos $10 billion climate plan?

"Jeff as pledges ten billion dollars toward climate solutions. We have questions from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying digital economy. I'm Ali would. We don't have many details yet on the basis Earth Fund the ten billion dollars that Jeff Bezos pledged last week to address climate change but it is by far the largest philanthropic commitment that isn't from government and other investors in climate tech and solutions will tell you that while we need. Climate policies will and unity. We also need a whole lot of money. Jayco is managing director of the private equity firm. The Light Smith Group which focuses on adaptation technology and. I asked him where this ten billion dollars fits in the landscape of climate investment. Yeah so ten. Billion IS A big number. How you apply. Ten billion can dramatically change the scale capital. That actually is moved As a result. So there's a few initiatives like the Rockefeller Foundation's and Macarthur Foundation's focus on something. Catalytic capital where small amounts of concessional investment or even grant funding Can reduce the potential or perceived risk for commercial investors and encourage them in much larger scale to come in two different new investment strategies. They're this announcement was met with a lot of skepticism. And a lot of you know sort of Monday morning quarterbacking other things that Jeff bezos could do or should be doing. Do you think that's fair? I'm an all of kind of guy and so I think right now. If you really take the climate change problem seriously and I think we all should we face an enormous and potentially existential challenge to The way that life Operates here so I applaud this commitment and the scale of it is something is designed to signal that kind of seriousness. Would I think would be great? Would be to use it not simply just to double down on everything that we have now but to be thoughtful about how could mobilize even more funding. How could actually support targeted kinds of innovation? How could actually particularly support? I think The disadvantaged populations in developing countries out to. They're really going to be to the chin. Here I WANNA ask you about priority setting. What I'm curious about is whether this amount of money by it's sort of Sheer Hampton weight has the potential to create almost like a Softbank Effects. And so what? If as I said I'm going to use this fund for cricket meal would then a bunch of other things get neglected and cricket meal would take off if I could wave a magic one with ten billion? I would say that it should be done over a number of different years and then you should pick a variety of strategies where maybe half of it you double down on everything. That's working best right now just accelerated and then I would take a bunch of it and try to think about exactly what you're talking about. Which are are there one or two really important? Longshot ideas or longshot areas or areas of really important focus where this could have a dramatically important effect. Jayco is managing director of the Private Equity Investment Firm. The Light Smith Group BEZOS and Amazon. Haven't given any more information about how the Earth Fund will work but Bazo said on Instagram. That he expects to start making donations this

Jeff Bezos Jayco Earth Fund Managing Director Light Smith Group Private Equity Investment Firm ALI Rockefeller Foundation Bezos Macarthur Foundation Softbank Effects Bazo Amazon
"rockefeller foundation" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"rockefeller foundation" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Arizona to hear my interview with Raj Shah from the Rockefeller Foundation. Brief history lesson a funny thing has happened in the board of philanthropy over last one hundred years when John Rockefeller set out to create the Rockefeller Foundation sounds like a pretty good thing. A lot of people actually thought is idea with pretty bad. A great president with the name of teddy teddy Roosevelt said something along, the lines of no amounts of charity with a fortune can make up for the misconduct required to achieve the fortune hundred years later, we're sort of getting have that same conversation. People are beginning to criticize philanthropy gifts because it might reflect some misdeeds needed to make that money. And the guy who's in, in the hot seat today has to kind of manage that conversation. He happens to represent the Rockefeller Foundation. Rod shop. We start with history. Now we're gonna do some math. Okay. Calculators out the US last year Americans gave four hundred billion dollars to charity at the same time, there's, there's more private foundations than ever probably more press releases than ever about good work, people are doing. American inequality. Forty year high, you can walk around New York, San Francisco see that something's wrong. What's not connecting? Well, I thanks for having me teddy. I'm excited to be here because we're very committed to the idea that the tech sector can do a tremendous amount more to lift people up who are locked out of prosperity and opportunity. The premise of your question is absolutely right. We live in extremely unequal, and frankly, inequitable times if you were born in the fifties and sixties in America, there was a ninety plus in fact, unless your last name was Rockefeller. There was.

Rockefeller Foundation John Rockefeller teddy teddy Roosevelt Raj Shah Arizona US president America New York San Francisco four hundred billion dollars one hundred years hundred years Forty year
"rockefeller foundation" Discussed on Bytemarks Cafe

Bytemarks Cafe

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"rockefeller foundation" Discussed on Bytemarks Cafe

"Out of hundreds of ideas that came out of the community, and then those were sort of vetted, and, and prioritized until we got down to forty four so the forty four that are in the strategy are sort of the ones that really rose up and seized the community imagination about how can local government really help when we have federal government, pulling back and not focusing on climate and not protecting us. How do we have local government step up? And these are the forty four ways that they. How did you give me an example, how this community group was facilitated because I I'm aware of bringing people together and it was a facilitated event exercise. People would idee eight come up with what was the process by which you. So we did it a couple of different ways. I mean, I think what we try to do is get outside of the normal, you know, let's have a public meeting, let's get some, you know, you know, boards up and put stickies on it. The first one we did is we use technology. There's a thing called many meter. It's kind of like live, sift, which is a local product here, and essentially, you can have people on their smartphones, and they can rank stuff suggest stuff. It's on a live screen, it's happening. So we did essentially live polling neighborhood, boards and places, and really got people to tell us on their phone. What they thought and prioritize things and rank them up. So we used that we also used a game. We actually developed a whole game around climate action planning, and that worked out. Really, well too. So we basically had groups of people decide which of the things that they would do. I so whether it's transform their transportation, get into an electric car or hybrid or whether they would ride a bike or whether they'd put solar panels on their home. What's the first things that they would do? And then we got a sense of where the priorities are in the community. And so, what are the implementations that we would have to do at the city and county to make sure they're able to do those actions? So we, we actually had games with timing and people had to place tiles on, on a board. So we've been trying different stuff. I think it's fine. We get feedback some people, you know, they like the more serious way. And so we can accommodate that. But now, some people want to express themselves in other ways, we tried to incorporate that, now you said that you went to neighborhood board, meetings, what were generally the composition of the communities that you would bring in for some of these facilitated meetings. We're also was different. I mean when you go to neighborhood board you're going to get, whoever the community is that shows up there. You know, we did a ton of rotaries. We did a ton of outreach. The different business affinity groups, but we wanted to do as we wanted to get a good mix. And so, in the end, we came up with, you know, about a quarter business a quarter, nonprofit a quarter government, and then a quarter of folks that were retired and students, and that sort of thing we think that was pretty reflective of the population. We did a lot random outreach, and we got a lot of random responses, but then they'll started to get honed. And, you know, the one thing that would that the Rockefeller Foundation that helps support this work they've worked in a hundred cities around the globe..

Rockefeller Foundation
Castbox integrates with Waze

podnews

04:12 min | 2 years ago

Castbox integrates with Waze

"Box has announced integration with ways of popular navigation service drivers canal. Listen to their favorite podcasts on cast box while navigating to their destination with the ways app in New Zealand. One in three people listen to podcasts every week. That's according to figures, released by RN's Ed and asked. The figures also claimed that listening has doubled in the past ten months, the Google podcasts. Create a program has announced then you round of teams who will be participating in the program, including six independent podcast production teams from Brazil, India, Spain Lebanon Columbia and the US podcast movement, have published their full speaker shovel. The event is in mid August in Orlando and Florida in the US, and we'll be there. The organizers have also announced twenty scholarship recipients, lipstick and via. Final sponsoring these society culture and advocacy track ensuring a place for diverse voices to speak at the conference. They tell us the company has fourteen podcasts. Mckellen have released May's top US podcast, advertisers, ZipRecruiter is still number one pod. Track have also released May's top US podcasts, the proprietary opt in data claims that the daily is at number one this American life at number two and stuff, you should know is it. Number three, US radio broadcaster MS communications has invested in undisclosed amount into Los Angeles based sound that brands branded podcast company radio. Public are working to expand less in American podcasting. Partnering with a podcast platform in Chile called sue Bela radio NPR and Edison. Research unveiling their new smart audio report on June twenty fifth two o'clock eastern. You can register for the free webinar in a link which you'll find episode notes and. Our newsletter. It'll be presented by Tom Webster and Joe superman post production company resonate recordings have an answer. Sister company, black mountain media, which will focus on pre-production aspects of podcasting. Sanchez content creation and development of new shows the company's first podcast is culpable in partnership with ten to foot TV further to our recent mention of the new Pushkin industries podcast for luminary UK podcast. Producers chalk and blade contact us with the news that they are producing a total of three shows for Pushkin this year too for luminary and a further title for the Rockefeller Foundation. The company is also working with other US networks, marshal Louis from wondering has been interviewed by music ally. This really is its own medium. He says of podcasting audio boom, is to spend four million dollars on new podcasts. According to a piece that we discovered in prolific London today. One voice one. Mike is a new. Film documentary about the rise of podcasting. It'll be released on Amazon prime on international podcast day September, thirtieth, and it screening at festivals before then we link to a trailer today. Spotify watch since the company released the your daily drive playlist in the US, both NPR news now and Pierre is the world audio segments feed snappy title. Both went to the top of the top podcasts chart on the service. The daily was already there multitude live is an event for you in the bell house in New York City, it's this Friday night, and they'll be showcasing segments of their most beloved shows and trying out new live only formats, and we mentioned a bunch of new podcasts today. It's almost as if we had four hours to go through our Email, isn't it blinded faith? New podcast from voice works and social chain the CBC have lodged chosen family. Their first long form interview podcast, the bunnies podcast is. Back from the luxury retailer with a new host journalist and activist, nor tag ary bleeped is all about censorship. And some of the times when people have been censored, and when they fought back and sides door from the Smithsonian MPR X has kicked off a new season, looking at the museum, and that's the

United States New Zealand NPR Marshal Louis New York City ED Google Ary Bleeped Orlando Rockefeller Foundation Pushkin Mckellen Chile Spain Lebanon Columbia Amazon Brazil Los Angeles Pushkin Industries London Spotify
"rockefeller foundation" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"rockefeller foundation" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"But in order to purchase the virus, you need to be a member of a research facility or a nonprofit, which only further supports the Rockefeller foundation's claim that. Their ownership of the bias is only for scientific research purposes. But if they admit they discovered the virus and are willing to sell it to anyone with research, credentials. Who's to say the Rockefeller family itself wasn't behind the outbreak on. They clearly have the means to unleash Zeke virus into the world, and they might have the motivation as well. Either to further their secret depopulation agenda or to make money off the samples. They're selling through the ATC, but there's no evidence to twenty sixteen. Zeke outbreak was anything more than a tragic coincidence, officially the outbreaks started with a tourist contracting, the illness in French Polynesia, and then traveling to Brazil, where they were bitten by a mosquito, which then bit more people, and transmitted the virus from their more importantly, if the Zeke of virus were part of a depopulation agenda. It wouldn't be a smart move as Eka rarely kills anyone in facts. In that case, let's turn our focus back to a more fatal disease. Cancer. If you believe in the Rockefeller, depopulation agenda, this conspiracy makes perfect sense, cancer kills about twenty thousand people per day worldwide rocking up almost eight million deaths per year and the easiest way to decimate the world population is by simply sitting back and letting cancer run its course, of course, this theory relies on the assumption that a cure for cancer exists, in the Rockefellers have enough money to pressure, the FDA, and big pharma into keeping it off the market as we just discussed in theory. Number one, it's highly unlikely that anyone Rockefeller or not would be able to coerce the entire global medical community into high Shing up, something so groundbreaking and so potentially profitable. But the Rockefellers have something more than money if the new world order is really in the works, they could bribe scientist and big pharma executives with the promise of power in the new globe. Government or with the threat of imminent death, if they don't pay this is one of those claims it's impossible to prove or disprove, but at the root of it, there's absolutely no evidence to support the idea that cure for cancer exists, or that a shadowy cabal is threatening global on college. Researchers into silence. There are claims from conspiracy, theorists that no Rockefeller has ever died of cancer, given the size of the family that does seem strange, but the act of not dying of cancer isn't enough evidence to prove that the Rockefellers are hoarding the cure as an extremely wealthy and powerful family..

Cancer Rockefeller foundation Rockefeller French Polynesia high Shing scientist Brazil FDA
"rockefeller foundation" Discussed on Pod Save the People

Pod Save the People

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"rockefeller foundation" Discussed on Pod Save the People

"How does it property values because if you can say to other people who are, you know, wanna move into the district look at our amazing public schools where the foundation that raises all this additional money for these fantastic additional services than the real estate agents proclaimed this as one of the ways in which the public schools are basically sort of you know, a bit like a private school environment. But with the tax deduction forgiving available for anyone who wants to help out that is fascinating. What's it like, a nonprofit and a foundation are there differences there? Yeah. So American laws, really bizarre. I found out in defining a nonprofit sector, so we have something called a tax code which defines what public charity is. And in the tax code language. That's a five oh, one C three public charity, and there are five oh, one C four, social advocacy groups, and then a whole blizzard of other five, oh, one C sixty seven c ten c twelve all of these are nonprofit organizations the ones that were most familiar with called five one onc- threes public charities. Those are the museums and hospitals and PTA's or PTO's with attached to schools or foundation, the private foundations of the world the Gates Foundation the Rockefeller Foundation. The Ford Foundation are also classified as five oh one C three private foundations, but it's all part of the same tax code. And of course, what separates a foundation from nonprofit. Is that a nonprofit is is..

Ford Foundation Gates Foundation Rockefeller Foundation PTA
N.Y. sues Exxon, says it lied to investors on climate risks

Morning Edition

02:21 min | 3 years ago

N.Y. sues Exxon, says it lied to investors on climate risks

"About Exxon refusing to write down the value of its fossil fuel assets that are still in the ground two sets of books. One. Incidentally that. They were keeping. So that they understood what reality was and another more nuance three hours. If you will for the investment public the allegation really is that the company is not as big as it says it is. And it's not worth as much as it says, it is Exxon declined to comment to NPR but released a statement that said in part, these baseless allegations or a product of closed door lobbying by special interests, political opportunism and the attorney general's inability to admit that a three year investigation has uncovered no wrongdoing. Exxon Mobil has moved to thwart the investigation by attorneys general in three states, alleging it's a conspiracy involving the Rockefeller Foundation. Tort lawyers. Environmentalists said democratic Agee's Michael burger is a professor at Columbia law. School who specializes in climate change law burger doubts Exxon. Conspiracy theories are going to hold up in court. This is about climate change. It's about the risks that regulation poses to the fossil fuel industry over the next half, century or more. But this particular complaints is about corporate fraud at the end of Wednesday's trading on Wall Street.

Exxon Exxon Mobil Michael Burger Rockefeller Foundation Fraud Columbia Law Agee NPR Attorney Professor Three Hours Three Year
New York Sues ExxonMobil

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:56 min | 3 years ago

New York Sues ExxonMobil

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from internet essentials from Comcast. Connecting more than six million low income people to low cost high speed internet at home. So students are ready for homework class graduation and more. Now, they're ready for anything are the energy giant. Exxon Mobil is accused of misleading. Investors and shareholders analysts about the cost of climate change to the company's bottom line, New York's attorney general Barbara Underwood is suing the company for defrauding shareholders and NPR's. Wade Goodwin has the story. The lawsuit doesn't hold Exxon Mobil liable for helping to create climate change. It accuses the energy giant of misleading. The investing public about how global warming was affecting the value of the company's fossil fuel assets around the world, what the attorney general is essentially saying is you kept two sets of books. Thompsons Ello is the director of finance for the institute for energy economic. And financial analysis and former New York state comptroller Santillo says the allegations are about Exxon refusing to write down the value of its fossil fuel assets that are still in the ground two sets of books one in certainly that they were keeping. So that they understood what reality was and another more nuanced reality, if you will for the investment public the allegation really is that the company is not as big as it says it is and it's not worth as much as it says, it is Exxon declined to comment to NPR but released a statement that said in part, these baseless allegations or a product of closed door lobbying by special interests, political opportunism and the attorney general's inability to admit that a three year investigation has uncovered no wrongdoing. Exxon Mobil has moved to thwart the investigation by attorneys general in three states. Alleging it's a conspiracy involving the Rockefeller Foundation. Tort lawyers environmentalists and democratic Agee's Michael burger is a professor at Columbia law. School who specializes in climate change law. Burger doubts Exxon's conspiracy theories are going to hold up in court. This is about climate change. It's about the risks that regulation poses to the fossil fuel industry over the next half, century or more. But this particular complaints is about corporate fraud at the end of Wednesday's trading on Wall Street. Shares of Exxon Mobil were down about three percent. Wade goodwin. NPR news Dallas support for NPR. And the following message. Come from circus. Oh, crystal a frozen playground of world-class ice skating and stunning acrobatics. See it live at Capital One arena from December fifth to ninth tickets

Exxon Mobil Exxon NPR Wade Goodwin Attorney Michael Burger New York Comcast Rockefeller Foundation Thompsons Ello Capital One Professor Barbara Underwood Santillo Director Of Finance Fraud Comptroller
"rockefeller foundation" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"rockefeller foundation" Discussed on The Takeaway

"And so you have really shifting funds from existing federal programs towards this infrastructure investment and is far below web will be necessary for any state or city to to do they infrastructure work that is necessary to really change i'm the current landscaping the us i'm i i think it's also problematic because there's a major shift in terms of regulation of deregulation towards really creating more tolls on existing highways and byways in a way that's really gonna create more inequity and less ability for those individuals in within the united states of low income moderate income to to get to those jobs and opportunities than necessary to achieve the american dream john any thoughts on that i think as i was loons who earlier i am a little bit skeptical of that only two hundred billion of public financing is going to be able to mobilise six and a half fold of that i do think that the us does have one stretch the china does not have at least one and that's that we do have access to large amounts of institutional capital and zina there are large pension funds and other investors who i think would like to be involved in projects that are going to generate a return for them is there any fear of expanding too quickly i don't think we have the risk of going too fast in the united states a and i do think there's a happy medium look i know singapore which is one of our one hundred resiliency these at the rockefeller foundation is i think doing it the right way that they're building at the right pace and doing it with the degree of environmental in human sensitivity with there they are a model i think in in asia i'm and i think there's a lot that we can learn from them in terms of how they're doing infrastructure investment both in terms of how their finest and also how the design and build it out and when i think about infrastructure again i think about like terrible commute into and not just me i mean new yorkers have i think our.

united states china singapore rockefeller foundation asia
"rockefeller foundation" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"rockefeller foundation" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"You know i met there that why no road their lowering france sat in a conference in istanbul each so me on this there's any side like bulls will you're my biggest tidal your dis spearation for my low you know i like while descending credible you know we sure that the shafts in two thousand seven dna we are like much more than the sum of our recipes exactly on and you are indeed being listened to nowadays even though having server i still feel like when we talk about food waste there's a lot of voices from from say different entrepreneurs different researchers and engineers do you think ships should be hurt even more i think so but i think they are right now if you think about that rockefeller foundation said that this is the most interesting project of the last years and you know they give us a big grant to study the opportunity to replicate everywhere this kind of project for think that the obama they so me and lara to just to discuss a because a is very interesting enough foods climate change or michelle more about healthy food so he's too topic of what we are doing an hour project as i said amir to promote the book bread is gold or the the movie that come out from there that analyses the in net flakes and distribute by net drake said scold theater of life are like the idea of a transfer our knowledge to the volunteer said fight ways of amir to promote this because we believe in this cause because we are we dedicate time and creativity to this 'cause we all sometimes we have something in the fridge for example we are about to throw away so was all your main tips on actually new doing something good from those ingredients you know we have a dialogue with the free refrigerator every morning we opened the refrigerator and we use whatever we have usually is like local usually is a season.

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"rockefeller foundation" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:12 min | 4 years ago

"rockefeller foundation" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Major cultural institutions under named rollover initial courses a problem the sort of reputational management thing is has always been a problem the rockefeller foundation the ford foundation these these major charitable entities which are seen by as essentially sort of purveyors of a social good their money originally comes from industries which at the time and dense since then have been criticized for variously labor problems environmental problems economic problems so each a really difficult question how do you as a as a charitable institution manage the the reputational risk erzen new york times ed looking at this balance given the fact that is is it an article saying this is terrible this innovative the'de likes of the whichever us since teaching should really look at take a long hard look at themselves or is it just saying this is something that the world needs to be where the times in the way that the times usually does is very restrained about it at short of providing the uh the context without poking too deeply i mean that the the way in which they refer to the to the rockefeller foundation and the ford foundation suggest that they've done the sort of the due diligence and looking at the fact that large concentration of money even dogs with a charitable disposition tend to have come not from sort of blameless enterprises but from things that did have at best controversial contacts so it has e the it's funny because the new the times as an american paper has a very bright line between is reporting and its editorial i think if this report had been in a british paper if it around the guardian it would have been much more hardedged it would have been much more sort of air editorially um apparent in the new york times it's it's very it's very restrained to cool come head of the new york times jacob packie less thank you very much for joining us a monocle 24 still to come on today's globalist get get the latest business news from norway and in a moment we ask why nato a keen to keep the secretarygeneral jens stoltenberg in the job stay with us.

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"rockefeller foundation" Discussed on Forbes Under 30

Forbes Under 30

02:00 min | 4 years ago

"rockefeller foundation" Discussed on Forbes Under 30

"Everything afloat i mean you're traveling i imagine every month every week to a new country well business model is but so first of all it's it's not that i'm travelling around our team is travelling every even though it is true that last week in another country and run andhra teammates were in another country so so really all of heart all of our programmes run by local teams and local teams and no the culture and millions can build a networks on the grounds will we provide them with what they need to actually run those programmes but the business model today is is coming from two sources number one is philanthropy so general grants general donations that help us support the organization and number two is contracts so we get contracts with groups like the city of denver we just had a contract with rockefeller foundation to take on the issue of urban poverty those are contracts that we get in order to to run specific programmes and specific issue areas so those two income streams our business model and what does your daytoday look like your role with uncharted minal did today is predominantly about fundraising on and so i spent a lot of time talking to two funders are talking to potential partners who would like to hire us to run specific programmes and also participating along with the team in our strategy and our vision for the future this another philosophy villamor you subscribe to which is that if you don't ask you don't get can you tell me but any surprise responses you've had for mass that may be seem farfetched all man that's a great question we've we've learned that especially from our partners at poor impact that's that's an organization has raised two billion dollars and their fundamental strategy around fundraising is to works just ask.

denver rockefeller foundation andhra two billion dollars
"rockefeller foundation" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

49:26 min | 4 years ago

"rockefeller foundation" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"rockefeller foundation" Discussed on Green Connections Radio -  Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"rockefeller foundation" Discussed on Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

"Let's say i'm in a community and i think we all are frankly but who realizes despite the political wins that climate change is real and we're seeing sea levels rise and were fed up with the with the weather swings at center and we know that we need to do something locally now i realize that all cities in all towns are not created equal of depends on where they are topographic late frankly i imagine liz you sort of said before but if you were going as saying to somebody who's fairly new with this what are the top three things that you can think of to say a how would you look at this to figure out what to do and be what would be the the top three things that you think pretty much every community needs to do and you're thinking about water management brag now eight hundred nine hundred making about now thank you for clarifying i'm thinking back resilience climate resilience in general okay let me after tea for climate resilient fan storm water i think the answer first form water is a little more comfortable stepping back for resilience in terms of you're asking how communities can begin to address these honorability linked the very first thing that cities and communities can do is try to understand their vulnerability than the that and so we're about to and if he ate up platform partnership with the rockefeller foundation 100 resilient for these program and you know that that program filty brazilian th officers at one hundred thirty th round the world and the very first thing that they have to do is to set a resilient strategy which categorized their strengths and weaknesses looking beyond called.

liz rockefeller foundation climate change
"rockefeller foundation" Discussed on Climate Cast

Climate Cast

02:00 min | 4 years ago

"rockefeller foundation" Discussed on Climate Cast

"You know kelly a really glad you brought up the hundred resilient cities initiative by the rockefeller foundation that is a terrific initiative and it's it's called subsidies to make the 10 percent pledge to pledged ten percent of their annual budget to resilience every single year if they do that they will be able to design cities that are in fact a much more adaptable to climate change this could be bangkok a flood proofing at city from its chao phraya river it could be copenhagen which is already a developed many green measures rather than gray infrastructure measures we heard about this earlier creating parks to direct the flow of water rather than bigger pipes but the flipside is if we don't invest in resilience we could see tremendous cost so look at 2050 several decades out a sandy like event in new york city would caused ninety billion dollars in economic damage because of the greater economic exposure and because of sea level rise from climate change so there's a stark choice cities face verona as we look at other parts of the world are we behind in the us on the way were adapting to climate change in some ways we are uh some cities look at rotterdam for example have much more experience adapting and end up being inventive with the ways that they adapt to for example a flood risks and other cities especially in the developing world are gonna feel the brunt of climate change there will be flooding in bangladesh there may be disease outbreaks across south america and so in some sense though cities really have their work cut out for them at yet it states cannot afford to be complacent we will have our share of impacts at home weather in the gulf coast for example in florida and we absolutely need to be preparing now and we need to be learning from other cities this isn't a competition everybody's in this together great discussion today oh you to kelly milliman with the city of minneapolis tsa an varuna sivaram with the council on foreign relations thanks so much for joining us today thank you.

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