35 Burst results for "Roche"

"roche" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

05:20 min | Last week

"roche" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

"And i think you just have <Speech_Male> to explore <Speech_Male> these things in a very <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> open minded <Silence> way. <Silence> I <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> did <Speech_Male> create a page <Speech_Male> on the or <Speech_Male> cam group <SpeakerChange> website. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> it's or cam <Speech_Male> o. r. <SpeakerChange> c. a. <Speech_Male> m. group <Speech_Male> dot com <Speech_Male> and under the <Speech_Male> education <Speech_Male> page. <Speech_Male> There's a <Speech_Male> tab called <Speech_Male> understanding money. And <Speech_Male> i kinda just <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> collected a whole <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> bunch of links in <Silence> <Advertisement> there that are <Speech_Male> things <Speech_Male> like my big <Speech_Male> paper on understanding <Speech_Male> the modern monetary <Speech_Male> system i <Speech_Male> linked to the <Speech_Male> dalai <Speech_Male> came out with a <Speech_Male> phoenix video. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Back in two thousand <Speech_Male> thirteen called. How <Speech_Male> economic machine <Silence> works and <Speech_Male> there's a link <Speech_Male> in there too like <Speech_Male> bill ackman's <Speech_Male> video on everything <Speech_Male> you need to know about finance <Silence> and <SpeakerChange> thirty minutes <Speech_Male> in. There's <Speech_Male> so much to <Speech_Male> learn. there's a link <Speech_Male> in there too like <Speech_Male> bill ackman's <Speech_Male> video on everything <Speech_Male> you need to know about finance <Silence> and <SpeakerChange> thirty minutes <Speech_Male> in. There's <Speech_Male> so much to <Speech_Male> learn. <Speech_Male> I think one of the <Speech_Male> daunting things especially <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> with macro <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> econ and <SpeakerChange> macro finance <Speech_Male> that the <Speech_Male> more you learn <Speech_Male> the more <Speech_Male> you learn how <Speech_Male> little you know. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Music_Male> if you're not open <Speech_Male> minded. And you're <Speech_Male> really. I think <Speech_Male> sort of you <Speech_Male> know politically <Speech_Male> driven <Speech_Male> into certain <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I think you just <Speech_Male> expose yourself <Speech_Male> to the <Speech_Male> potential that you're gonna <Speech_Male> end up being wrong about <Speech_Male> big big things <Speech_Male> you need to be more <Speech_Male> open minded <Speech_Male> and just <Speech_Male> really <Speech_Male> curious <Speech_Male> have this voracious <Speech_Male> appetite to try <Speech_Male> to understand <Speech_Male> other people's <SpeakerChange> perspectives <Speech_Male> because <Speech_Male> there's almost always <Speech_Male> something useful <Speech_Male> even <SpeakerChange> all <Speech_Male> of the people's views <Speech_Male> that you disagree with <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> his usually <Speech_Male> some rationale <Speech_Male> you might <Speech_Male> think i'm the biggest <Speech_Male> issue in the world. <Speech_Male> Prac- <Speech_Male> guarantee you. There's at least <Speech_Male> some <SpeakerChange> little bit <Speech_Male> of rationale <Speech_Male> in the way. <Speech_Male> I'm approaching <Speech_Male> the world for my <Speech_Male> specific perspective <Speech_Male> in that. <Speech_Male> There is rationale <Speech_Male> for away <Speech_Male> that everybody sort <Speech_Male> of navigating the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> world in <Speech_Male> efficient <Speech_Male> market hypothesis <Speech_Male> believer. <Speech_Male> But i do <Speech_Male> believe there is <Speech_Male> at least <Speech_Male> shades of gray <Speech_Male> in the <Speech_Male> idea of efficiency <Speech_Male> in that you're <Speech_Male> better off <Speech_Male> trying to understand <Speech_Male> why <Speech_Male> people <Speech_Male> either promote a certain <Speech_Male> theory or the things <Speech_Male> that they're teaching <Speech_Male> because there's usually <Speech_Male> tidbits a truth <Speech_Male> in there. So i think you just <Speech_Male> have to be in <Speech_Male> really open minded <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> try to <Speech_Male> really understand <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> all of these different <Speech_Male> theories from all <Speech_Male> of these <SpeakerChange> different <Silence> <Advertisement> perspectives. <Speech_Male> Well <Speech_Male> colin in. <Speech_Male> Thank you <Speech_Male> as always <Silence> coming here on. The show <Speech_Male> would <Speech_Male> also like to give you <Speech_Male> the opportunity <Speech_Male> to tell the audience <Speech_Male> where they can learn more <Speech_Male> about you proud. <Speech_Male> Capitalism <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Advertisement> and group <Speech_Male> yes <Speech_Male> oh pragmatic. <Speech_Male> Capitalism is my <Speech_Male> blog. It's kind of <Speech_Male> just where i have. <Speech_Male> You know over the course <Speech_Male> of the last <Speech_Male> ten fifteen <Speech_Male> years. I've just sort <Speech_Male> of you know vomited <Speech_Male> all of <Speech_Male> my <Speech_Male> knowledge. <Speech_Male> Stupid ideas <Speech_Male> onto <Speech_Male> the website. That's <Speech_Male> pract cap dot <Speech_Male> com p. r. <Speech_Male> a. g. c. <Speech_Male> a. p. dot com. <Speech_Music_Male> I've <Speech_Male> listed a lot <Speech_Male> of different <Speech_Male> pages over time <Speech_Male> again. There's <Speech_Male> an education tab. <Speech_Male> Their recommended <Speech_Male> reading understanding <Speech_Male> money. <Speech_Male> I have some research <Speech_Male> papers on their <Speech_Male> very <Speech_Male> top of the page. There's <Speech_Male> a you know <Speech_Male> a new here. <Speech_Male> A welcome mat <Speech_Male>

bill ackman phoenix colin
"roche" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

03:58 min | Last week

"roche" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

"Can we really consider future earnings being almost cruel and earnings today because of the low interest rate and how should we as investors look at devaluation between your value earnings now and then gross stocks. And let's call that later giving this way of discounting back with something very close to zero. It's always kind of confounded me. That the way that i think people tend to run they think of the equity risk premium is something is being least highly impacted by the discount rate with a zero percent interest rate. A lot of people would argue that the equity risk premium basically the premium that equities deserve to earn over bonds is vastly superior than it is when interest rates are high end. You know to me. I've always found that. Using interest rates as the kind of central component of evaluation metric can be misleading because interest rates are a function of future inflation expectations. So i would say that. I prefer to use the term. The equity inflation premium that when interest rates are low. It really means that inflation is low in that future. Inflation expectations are low. So the fed for instance they have interest rates at zero because they expect inflation to remain really low. Inflation was to rear its head in the next few years. The fed would start raising interest rates over time to try to get ahead. Try to create more demand for money by getting people to basically earn interest rate. That makes them want to hold more money in essence to kind of oversimplify things so to me. This really isn't about interest rates. This is about really understanding. What is the future rate of inflation going to be in. There's no ironclad rule that says that when inflation rises in let's say interest rates rise correspondingly. There's no ironclad rule that says that that equities have to earn more or less premium inside of those environments. I mean if you were an investor in zimbabwean corporations when they're inflation was raging out of control in zimbabwe in central bank was raising interest rates while no one was talking about an equity risk premium in that environment. You know. The rate of profit is for most corporations inside of an environment like that because your economy is just being completely ravaged by the rate of inflation. That's going on in so we kind of have this privilege of in the united states having. You're not just low inflation but very stable inflation where we have a great amount of predictability so to me to kind of answer your question. I think people would be better off looking at inflation rates in the future when you make an interest rate that of any type you're really making it. Inflation vetted if you think that inflation is going to remain low in the next five ten years while you're really making that the fed is right basically that the fed is gonna keep interest rates low in that you're not gonna really see a high rate of inflation and if that's the situation than well all the trends that have been in place basically for the last twenty years are going to continue. Values can to continue to be terrible versus growth. Us domestic economy probably continues to outperform foreign stocks. Just especially on a domestic currency basis and real assets. Do okay ish versus everything else. So if you believe in the opposite if you believe that inflation is going to be higher than you you go out and you kind of diversify into all the things we talked about in the previous segment but to me interest rates kind of confused the whole narrative because the interest rate is just set based on what the future inflation expectations are going to be.

fed zimbabwe united states
"roche" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

03:14 min | Last week

"roche" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

"You're listening to i. Ip today show. We have a good friend. Colin roach with us cullen has managed hundreds of millions of dollars for the past two decades and is always wealth information. Doing the two thousand eight financial crass collins private investment partnership was up fifteen percent for the year. He's the founder of permitted capsule. Listen the author of multiple investing books and regular guest on bloomberg and major financial news outlets on today show talk about inflation. The state of the economy whether there is a rational for stocks trading fifty times earnings. So with that. Let's go ahead and get started listening to the investors podcast. Well we study the financial markets and read the books that influenced self made billionaires the most. We keep you informed and prepared for the unexpected. Show your host bro dozen today. I'm here we won. A good friends a started billing. Thank you so much for joining me here today calling. Thanks for having me on so call it. Let's jump right into the first question and that christian is about monty supply. What you previously set you on the show is that it doesn't tell you anything that the money supply is going to grow. Because that's just an aberration reality of the way restructure debt based financial system and. You also said that the amount of deposits and the amount of loans are always going to grow in the long term so going into this really also to preface this conversation with you. Could you please elaborate more on that. And how the money supply impacts the economy so obviously money is in extremely important component of what goes into the economy how we measure ablation and things like that one of the problems that i have with for instance. Some people might be surprised to hear. This used to be pretty strict adherence of the austrian school of economics. Kind of coming out of college. I read a lot of of my z's and hayek and i think that one of the problems. I eventually ran into working in the financial industry and working specifically with a lot of bankers and people that were literally the money creators in the economy. Was that the austrian. School defines inflation as an increase in the money supply. And i started to find this problematic because if you look at the money supply over the course of history it basically always expands over any really long time horizon..

Colin roach cullen bloomberg collins austrian school of economics hayek
"roche" Discussed on Slate's Working

Slate's Working

06:52 min | Last month

"roche" Discussed on Slate's Working

"First off June before we actually talk about the interview. I just wanted to say. Thank you for asking our guests about hammond song. I think i should out myself here. I was the one who said it's one of the most perfect songs. I was the one who demanded you. Ask them and i actually teared up a little when you were talking about it with them. So thank you so much for bringing this perfect song into the interview and to our listeners. You are so welcome. It is a perfect song. You know the funny thing about it though preparing for this interview. When i knew i would be talking to someone who's where it was had been so meaningful to me for many years. It was really an odd experience because it got me to look at songs. That was super familiar with it. I could like sink on cue. Even as i hadn't heard them for many years and i always knew that that song was amazing. And as you said on the album. There's this amazing guitar solo from prague hero robert trip but i never really like engage with the words. I would sing along with them without really thinking about it. So imagine my surprise to learn that it was literally about. They're going to hammond hammond louisiana and their parents wearing that it would put them on the wrong track. That's kind of crazy. And yet it is so utterly italy roaches ish. Yeah it's great that it's so rooted in something kind of quotidian but through of leaving out a couple of details and through the power of the melody it becomes about anytime you feel longing for someone who you feel like is making a life mistaken. I think that's a pretty universal human experience if you care about someone there's going to be some memorial like you're fucking up your life. Don't do that and that song. Really really summons it. I think this is our first guest so far. Who is collaborating with a family member. I mean we had jessica blanket eric. Johnson who are husband and wife but here it's mother and daughter and that seems like it should or could be so fraught but for them. If seems to feel very matter of fact what what did you think about their collaboration. Oh i was so envious of their relationship and also of that collaboration which seems to be one where they have absolutely total trust and feel able to just like share ideas and give feedback on those ideas without holding back From the site. At least there's like a gilmore girls quality to their relationship. I mean says he was young. When lucy was born and they were on the road and generally in like cheek by joe proximity and then i hadn't really realized what an intimate act. It would be to like right words to your daughter's music or sing lead on your mom sung. There's something really lovely but that yes absolutely. I mean it's one thing to we're going to put songs that we each wrote together on an album and other to bring someone else's idea of a bit of their sold sold their life exactly. I really appreciate it as i do. Whenever this happens with our guests with how forthright they were about the life of touring musician. We think of that life as as somewhat glamorous even if the glamour grubby stills sparkles in the moonlight but actually being a touring musician and particularly a touring folk. Musician is a hard job. You're traveling all the time. You never know how good a venue or audience is going to be. It's not actually that fun a lot of the time. No i agreed at. I guess it's one of those things that you only do it. If you are absolutely like addicted to it that there's nothing else you would rather do because you know any job that involves travel there only fun like when you're fully absolutely rested when your health is perfect. Which doesn't happen after the first three days and adding on top of just general stress of travel like the extra stress of stuff like well the venue before. We'll i get paid. Will anyone by the merch that i'm schlepping from time to time. Can i find a vegan hotdog by all of that stuff. Makes it just really really hard line of work so yes. I was very relieved that they were so honest about that. Yeah another thing. They were both very honest about that. I was really struck by was the different origin stories for this album for this project that for lucy. It's well. It's easier for me to write if i have a deadline right like i have something if i have to write then i'm going to write. Which is something. I very much sympathize with so it's writing comes out of a sort of logistical reality. But then for suzzie comes out of an emotional reality. She's writing from emotion and for her particularly. It's a real rage at the anti-feminist backlash both of donald. Trump's election and the response to me too and that that anger fueled an album. That is this beautiful. I was really struck by. Yeah you know it's funny. It was kind of jarring to hear that maggie roach died on the day of donald. Trump's inauguration. I knew that she had passed away. I haven't made that exact connection with the timing and for songwriter. Who so driven by events and emotions knowing that clearly it was bound to lead to this burst of creativity so it makes perfect sense. Do you feel like you hear those two different origin stories in the album itself. No no i certainly would never thought that. Lucy kind of wrote that song on deadline. Never that would never hurt me. Which of course as it should be. But i don't think i really did with soci- sung's either because i guess we always connect to certain songs and the songs that i connected to were. Were in a different vein. I absolutely love swan. Duck song which we spoke about which is about lives changing dramatically in unexpected ways as we get older and continually changing or jane which is just beautiful love song by mikey roach or the great version of factory girl which i perhaps not well from before for me. Hear as a me. Too sung even though clearly. That's exactly what it is. So since she said that. I absolutely recognized it but that was not how i appreciated it the first time around so if our listeners hearing this interview now want to go check out the album. What song would you start with. What song would you be like. Listen to this. One is at swan song for you. It is You know as i said in the interview. It's kind of a silly song. Your it seems that way at first and then actually you realize not tall silly and also quite silly and so it it to me that like represents something that's absolutely integral to the roaches vibe. Absolutely right it's like dear. Mr selleck when she says when she talks about waiting tables and then i've been waiting for things to come. True would not.

robert trip hammond hammond joe proximity hammond lucy prague suzzie louisiana jessica italy maggie roach eric Trump Johnson donald mikey roach Lucy jane Mr selleck
"roche" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

04:28 min | Last month

"roche" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"What to goldman sachs experts and leading thinkers have to say about trends shaping markets industries and the global economy stay informed with the latest insights from goldman sachs on the economic market implications of covid nineteen available on their podcasts gs dot com slash covid nineteen or on any of your favorite podcast platforms. Who are you what do you do. And how do you know each other. Well i'm lucy wainwright roach and i'm her. Mother was your my name. Is suzie wrote. I have been anyway before. The pandemic a touring musician. A writer performer songwriter. The artists god. I've done it all. You have amazingly The two of you released an album at the end of october called. I can still hear you i. I have what might be a dumb question. Is it very different to sing in two part harmony as you most do. I know there are other people singing on the album. But you know when it's two years in two part harmony as opposed to three part harmony that you sign for many are susie. When you're performing with your sisters. Mike and terry in the roaches. Yes it's very different. Because in three part harmony you're always defining the court you're singing and in two part harmony. The third note of the chord is variable. Stop at the garden snake black and so you can sing two parts without completing the cord if that makes any sense so you're very aware of that when you're writing i mean when you're writing your writing a song are you thinking of the harmonies that will kind of surround the notes that you're writing or to what extent into extent is it so instinctive here harmony parts when i'm writing. I guess it's just because i've been doing it that way for years but i don't know what what would you say about that time. I mean i. I would say that if i'm writing i'm just relieved that i'm writing somehow and just do whatever happens. Don't think about anything at all if possible until afterwards. I'm really curious like can you talk about how you begin to write a song. How'd you get into the right mood. Well it could happen at any time. You know it really could happen when you're walking around the street or it could happen if you pick up your guitar or if you're listening to somebody else's always looking for the possibility though that it may happen you lucy. Well i agree that sometimes hearing something else or being somewhere or just picking up the guitar. We'll do but one of my very non-romantic avenues towards writing is when you have to write something. That's a good wait to have to start. That's an interesting mood to kick things off. In what circumstances do you have to write some well. For example on this record. I had made a record the year before and i didn't have any new songs and i wanted to contribute a song at least a song to this record and i don't know if that would count as having to but i set out to write a song for this record but i had no idea what it would be. And then in retrospect it seems like obviously it would be the song it was. That's the funny thing. Is that even though you feel like you're doing almost on assignment at some times it sort of magically seems like it was meant to be somehow if you're lucky to so can you remind me which song you wrote for this album..

goldman sachs lucy wainwright roach suzie susie terry Mike
"roche" Discussed on Slate's Working

Slate's Working

02:24 min | Last month

"roche" Discussed on Slate's Working

"-tarian susie. We are meghan. Terry assoc- roach don't give out our ages and we don't give our numbers give out. Sometimes our voices give out but not our ages and are full members are number silly but like very delightful. You know lucy. Wainwright wrote is the daughter of soci- roach and musician. Loudon wainwright the third. And she grew up on the road with her mom and her aunt and as will here even though she thought she was going to become a teacher and she trained as a teacher. She has been working as a professional musician for her whole adult life. recording and touring solo and also appearing with people. I m mostly and the indigo girls and with lots of family members part from working with her mother which she's done a bunch She's also performed with her sister and brother from another mother. Which is to say martha wainwright and rufus wainwright who are themselves the offspring of two great musical dynasties since their mother was kate mcgarrigle another folk singer who signed beautiful close harmonies with her sister. Anna and susan lucci just released an album together called. I can still hear you amazing amazing. It is funny that you say that thing about them being classified as folk but not always feeling vote because one sign of that is that the roaches. I m the self titled one is produced by and has electric guitar played by robert trip. Who is of course. The man behind king crimson and the electric guitar solo on talking heads remain enlighten. You a prog rock god but he produced this beautiful beautiful very funny folk albums one of my one of my favorites before we get to the interview. We should mention that slate. Plus members will hear a little something extra from your conversation. You tell us a little bit about that yes. We talked about how the pandemic has affected their work. And i also learned a lot about the roots of the roaches christmas album which is called. We three kings and which i think for a lot of people is the ultimate signal that the holidays have arrived listeners..

tarian susie Terry assoc Loudon wainwright kate mcgarrigle meghan Wainwright roach martha wainwright lucy rufus wainwright robert trip susan lucci Anna
Using Snaps To Package Old Software

Ubuntu Podcast

03:36 min | 2 months ago

Using Snaps To Package Old Software

"Roche whose economically employees on public cloud as written a blog post about using snaps to package old software also and i can relate to this you know. Usually we espouse the virtues of using snaps to get the very latest bleeding edge versions of stuff. Well it can also be a good for preserving things like old software that you still want to be able to run. And philip is examples of old software. And there's plenty of good examples of this lightning. Shutter for example was Basically abandoned the screen shows software and was kicked out the archive. Many districts like debbie and unlike a boon to have requirements software. To be well-maintained before it's allowed to stay in the archive and some of the software booted out the archives. So a user who's running one version of debbie and upgrades after six months finds some of their software disappears because he's no longer maintain longer available. And so this highlights the fact that you can repackage existing software up to keep it working because even if you upgrade the operating system the snap is bill of core which runs across any releasable into. It means that it doesn't matter. If you upgrade your less you still get to keep your applications that you installed on the previous versions. So i thought is quite cool. 'cause i i do this. I like to preserve software. Like this. And i know we hear a lot about you know people who like fast moving rolling release destroys the all the latest stuff as fast as it can come in but it's it it's a failing of sort of desktop lennox to not be supportive of old software. You know there is lots of software. That's come out over time that you know some of its proprietary and you simply can't install and run anymore so it's a valid property of snaps to be able to preserve that old software and continue to use. I've i've not published it for obvious reasons. But i've made a snap of a debut. Read nine the my wife uses because it supports the secure form signing thing that she has to use as part of her rollers volunteer in the library. Yeah i've i've i've made a couple of snaps of old games or software. That's hard to build and it's good to keep it keep it around and some of gotten a few hundred installs people out there. Who who like these things. Some of them somewhat academic. there's a snap of mosaic the web browser and composer but then that's software preservation. You it means that you can have an example of that software and you can say this is a piece of software history and you don't have to go and dig out your thinkpad running windows ninety five to be able to show it to someone right or open source stuff. You could build it. But then you discover the the things have changed in dc and you can't build it with a modern have to go and get an old version of g. Say which then you need these old libraries and they conflict and you have to do it in a container to pollute your system and he just gets hard and so. That's why i quite like doing. This is because it allows you to preserve this old stuff. So yeah i. I relate to that blurs

Debbie Roche Philip DC
National Amelia Earhart Day with Wade Roush

Podcast Gumbo

03:13 min | 6 months ago

National Amelia Earhart Day with Wade Roush

"Hey Paul it's weighed rouch. So July twenty fourth is National Amelia Earhart Day and I guess what I'm curious about is how Amelia herself would feel about the way she's remember today I mean it seems like she's famous mostly for disappearing into thin air and only secondarily for being the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic which all seems Kinda backward to me. On the other hand, she's seen increasingly as a feminist icon which seems like might please her. So I'm just curious how historians and biographers think earhart would have regarded her own fame. Thanks. Wade given that I've never been confused for an historian. I'm one of those people that thinks about Erhard the way you've described above. So it's nice to be given a little nudge of history and hopefully I can return the favor. For my first recommendation, I, found a podcast called. Erhard which hopes to shed some more light on Earhart by interviewing guests. In this episode, they interview Abigail Harrison who is commonly known as astronaut. Abby. As part of the interview, Abby Talks about how a millionaire heart is an inspiration. They also talk about the marsh. And stem as well as our work as an aspiring actress not. Today's guest is weighed Roche host of the soonest podcast which helps us understand were technology come from and how we decide to start or stop using it. It's that understanding that allows us to be more intentional about the kind of future were building together. Soon Ish covers a lot of ground from bridges to virtual reality to the voting process. One episode that struck me though was way talking about quitting facebook, which is something I grapple with constantly On the episodes page description we'd outlines multiple years were facebook failed us and he finally had enough. Here in twenty twenty facebook continues to fail enlarge ways and I wish some of the tech support groups that I am a member of would find another service. So I could get off facebook myself. For last recommendation wait went above and beyond he's given three podcast recommendations and a youtube channel that are about the weird byways and. In no particular order they are. The. Constant. The right stuff the wrong way. Ninety nine percents, invisible gander international airport. Should this exist boom the return of supersonic flight. And Amy Sheera. Titles Youtube Channel VINCA space. A link to all of them will be in the show notes. For today's extra hot sauce. I just WanNa add that Wade is one of the creators of the Boston based podcast collective called hub-and-spoke. If you've been listening to this podcast since the beginning you'll know that Charles Gustin was my second guest ever who was the host of ICONOGRAPHY, which is part of hub and spoke.

Amelia Earhart Facebook Erhard Youtube Abby Wade Gander International Airport Charles Gustin Abigail Harrison Boston Roche Amy Sheera
NFL players release video calling on the league to condemn racism and support black players

KCBS Radio Midday News

01:02 min | 8 months ago

NFL players release video calling on the league to condemn racism and support black players

"Sports former English soccer star and current coach Liam Roche senior has published an open letter in the guardian to president trump thanking him for quote unwittingly becoming the most influential U. S. president in history for all the wrong reasons and in the process being a catalyst for long overdue social change throughout the world me time Super Bowl MVP Patrick Mahomes in more than a dozen other NFL stars have sent a video to commissioner Roger Goodell asking him to admit publicly that he and NFL owners have been wrong in trying to silence players from peacefully protesting racial inequality and police brutality not part of that video but enthusiastically supporting its content is cold GM Chris Ballard and we have to end social injustice and racial inequalities we have to end the police violence against our black communities you know black lives matter I don't understand why that's so freaking hard for the white community to say black lives

Liam Roche President Trump Roger Goodell Chris Ballard U. S. MVP Patrick Mahomes NFL Commissioner GM
Azar says Trump administration aiming for 300 million vaccine doses by year's end

Face the Nation from CBS News

08:10 min | 8 months ago

Azar says Trump administration aiming for 300 million vaccine doses by year's end

"You we're going to go now to health and Human Services secretary Alex ETS are he joins us from HHS good morning Mr secretary Marty Marty good to be with you again great to have you operation warp speed which is what the White House is calling this Porsche to have a vaccine by the end of the year three hundred million doses is the promise can you be clear here is the pledged that all three hundred and twenty eight million Americans will be able to get a shot in their arm by the end of the year Wilmar let's be clear that's a goal and you know I think the Gretzky's once said that you fail to achieve a hundred percent of the goals you don't set and so it's not a pledge it's a goal of what we're gonna mobilize the entire U. S. government private sector to achieve what happened is you know these drug companies and vaccine makers they all said it's going to take this amount of time because they're using their traditional approaches yes you do phase one phase two phase three trials in sequence then you do manufacturing well what the president said that's not acceptable so what we're doing is bringing the inefficiency out of the development process to make the development side faster to get to a safe and effective vaccines and at the same time we're gonna scale up commercial size manufacturing and produce hundreds of millions of doses at risk they may not pan out they might not prove to be safe and effective but we'll have it so we could begin administration right away you said hundreds of millions of doses that is not the same thing as saying hundreds of millions of vaccines ready to be administered to the American public you said this week that the entire American population could receive vaccines by January that's the goal can you that's a hundreds hundreds of millions we have hundreds of millions of people SO three hundred million is the goal and by January that we would set whether by one or multiple vaccine candidates ought to be able to have let's let's focus our energies on actually getting those vaccines developed S. one to set expectations for the American people because clearly you can have a lot of people wanting this vaccine will it require booster shots are you short two three hundred million doses is sufficient well those are great questions Margaret that's actually going to be part of the development programs that do you study is the is it a single shot do you have more of multiple with a booster what type of immune response do you get here that's why you don't go into battle with just one target here so we had a hundred candidates originally we've narrowed it to fourteen and we're gonna keep narrowing that down to maybe four five six that we really place the big financial bats behind and drive on and we might actually have multiple vaccines some of appropriate for different populations in different settings as we said as we see the data gets generated here president trump said on Monday we have prevailed on that same day may eleventh all twelve of the different models that the CDC uses projected that there will be over a hundred thousand deaths by June first how can the administration say we've prevailed when you see a death rate climbing like that what will Margaret as you remember the president clarified that in response to a question that by prevailed he met with regard to testing by building that really novel comprehensive private public sector diagnostic system here in the United States he did not mean the disease burden here and he would actually cutting clarified that you could never speak of prevailing or or success when there's even a single death every death is tragic the disease burden here has been here and across the world has been has been horrible we work to minimize that we believe that our actions to delay and and and and and and flatten the curve saved hundreds of thousands of lives that otherwise could have been lost but but that's still nothing to revel in in terms of any loss of life is tragic for the president or for any of us in the public health world absolutely but given that some of the states are starting to reopen parts of their economy and there's a lag time of sometimes two to three weeks before you see the virus show up how what how much of a sense do you have about whether re opening is re infecting the populace at large weld these will be really important questions Margaret for us to study drug comprehensive surveillance system so that's why a critical part of re opening has been influenza like illness surveillance another hospital admissions surveillance as well as syndromic testing of a symptomatic individuals especially in high risk communities and that's what actually what's going to be really helpful with this federal system in the approach the president's taking of having each state taking a localized decision it's gonna give us really good data you know we don't know what risk of re opening and in other words just yet but you are going to be monitoring it is what you're certainly well we certainly will we'll be monitoring but we've seen some initial instances of states like Georgia that have reopened Florida that's re opening that we have not seen but again it's still early days we think the tools are there and it's also important to remember you know this gets set up as a health versus a consummate kind of conflict it's actually health versus health we see we see in suicidality we see reduction in cardiac procedures cancer screenings on pediatric vaccinations there is a real very real health consequences to the shutdowns that must be balanced against as weak as we try to reopen this economy and move forward absolutely whistleblower Dr Rick bright is going to appear on sixty minutes tonight he specifically names you and his complaint as having downplayed the catastrophic threat the last time that you were with us here on face the nation was March first and at that time you told me what your viewers need to know is the risk to the average Americans remain low do you stand by that I mean do you take responsibility for any missteps you might have so taken so Margaret I think if we found the entire clip that on because I was using words only the doctor found G. Dr Redfield Dr shook at doctor medicine EA would tell me to say in the would repeat publicly also I believe what I said is the rest of the average American at this time remains low but that could change rapidly we always were I was always focused on warning that the situation could change that at the moment the risk was low to any individual American so I stand by that in the sense that that's what the public health people where I don't make this stuff up I go with what felt she and Redfield and shook it and Massenet and others does say because they're the public health experts certain certainly but they report up to you the CDC has been blamed for failure and mistakes with testing do you take responsibility for that so we were confronting a situation that's completely novel there is never been a national immediate testing regime across public and private sectors we have had to literally build this from the ground up Margaret that's what should folks don't quite understand here is that the CDC's role is to develop a an initial fairly low throughput public health test that health labs will what will do for initial diagnosis but then we count on the private sector actually to scale up these high throughput large task capacities and that's what we've done in historic time you know these tests normally takes six tonight any for any problems that the CDC has admitted to having had we wanted to see what problems that the CDC have the CDC had an issue as they scaled up manufacturing of tests to get them out to about ninety public health labs there was apparently a contamination at an end stage there on the third party re agent that never led to false negatives or false positives bought that prevented some of the scale up for a couple of weeks but that was never going to be the backbone of testing a broad mass testing in the United States market that depends on the companies like Abbott and Roche and thermo Fisher hi I just want to cover your calling Peter Navarro has said that the CDC let the country down given the CD well reports up to you do you take responsibility for that what do you think about that I don't believe the CDC let this country down I believe the CDC serves an important public health role and what was always critical was to get the private sector to the

Alex Ets HHS Marty Marty White House Porsche Secretary
New 100% accurate COVID-19 antibody test approved for use in U.K.

Michael Brown

00:32 sec | 8 months ago

New 100% accurate COVID-19 antibody test approved for use in U.K.

"It could be a game changer in the fight against covert nineteen as an antibody test gets approval in Britain health officials here confirmed a new test that can tell if you had the virus is one hundred percent accurate government scientists have carried out independent evaluation of the new blood test developed by the Swiss pharma Roche detection of antibodies could help indicate if a person is gained immunity against the virus the idea is if someone is tested positive then follows that they could potentially go back to work knowing they're unlikely to get it

Britain
"roche" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

Coffee House Shots

10:23 min | 8 months ago

"roche" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

"Coffee. How SHOTS SPECTATORS. Daily Politics podcast. I'm John Connolly and I'm joined today by James Precise and Katie balls say is some good news after Public Health. England approved a new antibody test developed by the Swiss pharmaceutical company. Roche which is apparently a one hundred percent accurate and it will show who has had krona virus James Stars. We've had these different antibody test before for example Porton down. How is this one? Different and Is it a bit of a Game Changer? So different about this. Is it scalable this? It works on a blood sample in kit. That's in nearly every hospital liable. Research live in the country. So you can't do a launch number of these tests and process the results of quickly which is obviously good news so all the way through being told. Oh the antibody test game changer. That was based on two ideas. One that a very large population might had grown of ours and not even realized it because they'd been atheist matic and the second hope was that one you had it. You definitely couldn't get it again now. Both of those hopes of taking a knock in recent weeks first of all. It seems like that even in London. It's only in the low double digits. Number of people have had the virus. I'm in the second thing is there's still no certainty on all over. Wherever having had it gives you immunity throw ably does and then the general easy to be the more seriously you had it the more immunity you have. But we don't know how long I mean he lost. One of the constant problems with people is really out and it's brilliant cover story last week in dealing with his virus is because it is a new virus. We simply don't know the answer to so many questions because we can't say how long the immunity last because no one had grown of ours for twelve months the maximum length of time people have had it. Venue is is five and so there's just so much that we don't know about this virus and Katie. How these tests them to use an immediate prospects. Are they to be parceled out people yet? Request one. So as an stands at the governor's in negotiations to get these tests. I think in some reports just German government have already good so while they've been approved and this is not something that is preferable in the government is going to use going forward dating. Wrap the point where they are about to immediately be road. I I think in terms of what can be used for so one thing which from the beginning they really wanted antibody tests for is if you think about health work unable to work because they have corona virus symptoms and things having an antibody test was show he had previously could make it easier to hugh can what with honorable. And you can go back into lack when these things happen. I think. Secondly there's much more controversial idea of immunity certificates. We know that when the government has discussed and there are several reasons if it will complicate just giving people an a certificate and saying go back to work or go back to normal life fastly because ultimately is not one hundred clear what level of immunity having Karuna virus previously gives you that still something. That's being looked into and in their concerns that this is going to be to a situation. Where sage so degree advising the government intense scientific advice they've raised queries over whether immune to certificates would be a good idea. Even if you could argue that they would be effective in taking your back to work because you could create a two tiffs -iety could also incentivize people to get. Ill now depend partly on government support and things like that but if it is the case that people have immunity certificates in a position to go for new jobs as they come up and those who don't have these tickets can't clearly not an ideal situation. I think something which would be quite controversial to bring in James in the magazine this week. You mentioned about that. We probably need around five hundred thousand tests today to do a proper test and trace capability. Do you think this test today will will help with that? What these are antibody test. It's hell you have hantavirus in the past. Not who currently has the virus was spiracy debating about how? What level of testing capacity? You need to make testifies work. Some people think that if you had hit two hundred thousand tests a day by investment is the government's target then you all that other people think that if you're going to properly lift the lockdown you need the capacity Hoffman test today because what you need to be able to do is swoop in there was a spike in a place say Bristol. I just has huge amounts of people in our area to determine how big the outbreak is so the government having failed to ramp up testing earlier in the process there is now a desire to develop a really large testing capacity. But I think that going from two hundred thousand to half million is going to be very difficult. The government has exceeded one hundred thousand tested. I done one hundred twenty six thousand today but getting from one hundred twenty six thousand to five hundred thousand is a is a big ask and Katie. In other news the Onassis released some days today. Which suggest that the number of people who currently have corona virus is much lower than expected. A The data we should say was outside of hospitals and and CASS settings. How do you think this is GonNa Affect the government's strategy? At the moment the data out today shows zero point. Two seven percent of people in England have infection on average in the wider community. So again we already knew that. The epicenter of this epidemic at I clearly hostile cases but more recently care homes have seen a sharp rise in the number of cases and that is ongoing even having forced to the very real prob- live but ultimately community transmission. Is the thing that we keep hearing about in towns of lockdown easing? And I think that this number a willing to agree. I think it could provide. Some reassurance is on the the rate and community is fatty though but ultimately comes down to the number because that's the government has decided to navigate everything free now we've also had some interesting data today about the regional differences. You know queen some across the country and on number said London is thought have an number ran zero point four but as much higher in the New England in the north of England and also the cyclist. Nestle tree around zero point eight. So I think that that per week gives us more of a sense because we're thinking about in Thames of anything above one is when the government would think it was not possible really to have anything going on other than a full lockdown. I think that getting a sense of what we're going to be ABLE TO DIV is probably easier to look at that. Just because is the government's preferred metric but already getting a sense of regional differences and the Lobos Johnson wanted the whole United Kingdom to move together. This is the week that has hit several stumbling blocks not least because of the devolved ministrations having some slight differences not huge our differences and in different parts of the United Kingdom. And I think going forward we know that the government is prepared in the future. There's a flare in one specific area to have restrictions placed in that area rather than the whole of the UK if they can get this APP to what but that and things like that. So I think the regional variations are very interesting thinking about what's going to be coming in the next few months. Do you think James will be difficult for the government to lift? Lift measures nationally. Then if if it is higher for example in certain regions so tubing's going here I've eaten. The regional man's are very opposed the idea of a localized policy of lifting within England. Because their view is if everyone sitting in Manchester or Birmingham sees footage on six hundred news. Everyone in London heading out. Because the lockdown has been eased fervor vava and the rest of the country it will become increasingly hard to police the locked up the second point in a way more interesting than the regional. Odds is always the free ours policy. Which is you need to know. What the Arisen. Community or the arisen hostels on the ours in caverns because in some ways if the number is being pushed up by hospitals and cow. That is a different problem from the all number being a high in the community and you. You might have more room to ease the lockdown given that you can for example isolate care homes if the are is very low in the community but being pushed up by the number of infections in hospitals and cavs but for the owns. Give you a proper number. We probably need to be more community testing than we currently are and any sense. Katie of Y Y. The infection is so sort of out of control in in hospitals if it's implied the The number of cases is very low in the community that does just that sort of in hospitals. This is becoming very difficult to control why I think it depends. I mean ultimately is going to be higher in hospitals because that is where everyone bids serious symptoms of Carina viruses going. I think the fat is there in. The community is in part because we have been in lockdown several weeks so there just hasn't been a situation of meeting many people in our day to day life which means is not transferring in the way it had been going about normal life. I think in terms of hospital at infections interesting state admissions Phoolan into a record low level. There's definitely concern. I think have hospitals aid. Want to go to hospital. Because they're so busy with corona virus patients at the burden bowls. Who think some who worried that if you go if you go to hospital you sounded very high. Johnson Contracting Carina Virus. Mashes all being him? Beige is one of their complicating factors. Here thank you. Thank you James. And thank you.

government Katie balls England James London James Stars John Connolly James Precise United Kingdom cavs hugh Onassis Bristol CASS New England Manchester
FDA approves Roche for COVID-19 antibody test

Atlanta's Morning News

00:26 sec | 9 months ago

FDA approves Roche for COVID-19 antibody test

"The FDA fast tracks emergency use of a Swiss coronavirus antibody test Roche CEO Severin Schwan says it's ninety nine point eight percent accurate I've never seen such a level of collaboration within the industry it and took care of it alright I go like this this is this is really a fantastic test can determine whether a person is gained immunity more than two hundred antibody test of flooded the market but the FDA is only granted this kind of approval for

FDA Severin Schwan Roche CEO
The Latest on Testing

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

10:12 min | 9 months ago

The Latest on Testing

"When you were a kid. Did you ever make one of those pinhole cameras? Were you cut a little hole into a piece of cardboard and then look through it on some ways. That's kind of how we're looking at the corona virus nowadays through a tiny little window part of the reason. We haven't been able to get a bigger picture because this is a new corona virus and we're learning as we go along. We have also had inadequate testing across the nation so the inability to know the true extent of this outbreak becomes a major barrier in terms of getting the country back to work. We need clear vision and so far we haven't had that. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction. There are currently only two types of corona virus tests available in the United States. Because I'm a healthcare worker. Who still takes care of patients in the hospital? I've had both of them. I'm GonNa give you a little poke over Uruguay. Don't okay. We're all done it. Okay early on there. Were some significant delays in testing and there was also the release of a flawed test. Which really put us far behind since then there have been a lot of unauthorized on validated tests. Which have flooded the market the most common and most accurate test we have is called a PR test. A polymerase chain reaction tests. Now that's the one that detects whether or not someone is currently infected with Kovic nineteen. It involves a saliva test in some cases or more commonly a nasal swab. Cnn's Brooke Baldwin referred to it as a brain Taylor so that gets sent off to a lab where the genetic material is extracted. And because there's such a small amount of genetic material it is then amplified. That's the polymerase chain reaction. If all goes well results usually come back within a few hours but it can take a few days if you have to send it to a lab somewhere then. There are the antibody tests. Those are the ones that can determine whether or not someone has had cove in nineteen in the past and might have some immunity to it now. Those involved collecting a small blood sample either through a needle in the vein or three blood spot sample. But here's the problem. Antibody tests have not been consistently accurate. There are a lot of bad tests out there and it's still unclear how much those antibodies might protect you from the virus in the future. When you're testing for the virus the biggest problem would be having a false negative. Why because you would think that you don't have the virus and then you might go back out into the community into a nursing home into a hospital and potentially infect people with the antibody test which you really hoping to avoid is a false positive. Then someone might feel that they have the antibodies thus feel that they are protected. Go out into the community to a hospital to a nursing home and spread the virus so with the diagnostic virus test. You really have to reduce false negatives with the antibody test you really have to reduce false positives. The promise of the immunology test to find out we have. The antibodies is huge. That's Kevin Delay on senior fellow at the University of Southern California's Schwarzenegger Institute for State in Global Policy. The institute supports test sites across Los Angeles. This can influence policymakers at the local state and federal level. That can actually inform us. When it comes to social distancing if I'm immune in scientifically I've been proven to be immune then I can re enter the workforce and I could play a bigger role and make sure we're safe for a company called Roche announced that it received emergency use authorization. Eu A for an antibody test it claims is more accurate than most Roe says. It has already started shipping. Its new test to leading labs around the world. Here's Rosillo Severin Schwan. It's really special. Because it is so accurate. It's it's almost perfect. Accuracy and allows us is to really reliably test whether a person has been infected by the corner virus or opt irrespective of whether you had symptoms or not now. There's another kind of tasks they could be useful here. It's called an antigen test again. The test for the virus is the PR or diagnostic tests. The test for the antibody is called a serology test. And now the antigen tests look for a protein on the surface of the virus. You may have already had one of these if you've ever had a test for strep throat or the flu. Here's the problem. A reliable antigen test for the corona virus isn't yet available in the United States. But the hope is that will soon have something that works kind of like an ad home pregnancy test. Were a test strip. Would change color detail if you might have the virus. Frederick Nolte is a pathology professor and the head of Corona virus testing at the Medical University of South Carolina. Antigen detection has been part of the diagnostic landscape for a number of years and it has a number of appeals. It can be done relatively quickly. it's inexpensive. It can be deployed in a number of clinical settings outside of the laboratory near the patients but the chief concern with it has been the sensitivity and they low sensitivity means a high false negative and with high false negatives people feel that they don't have the virus and they go back out in the community and potentially continue the spread so how available. Rpcr antibody tests to the general public is probably the question. I get more than any other as of Monday. Johns Hopkins University's Kovic Tracking Project was reporting over seven. Million people in the United States have been tested and they mean the diagnostic or PCR tests in this case but again the initial rollout of those tests was fraught with problems and that caused major delays in the country's early response to the pandemic. Those problems are being addressed now but there are still supply chain shortages the PR requires certain transport mediums reagents and yes nasal swabs and those things have been in short supply but just last week. The mayor of Los Angeles announced free diagnostic testing for all of the county's residents because we know the ten million residents county need that it's critical for US opening up in the future. That's Mayor Eric. Garcetti on CNN and we wanted to be the first big city in America to take the advice of doctors around the country saying you have to find the silence spreaders. This is a silent killer that people without symptoms who can spread. This are critical piece of knowledge in order to open up in the future and in New York City mayor. Bill de Blasio says the city will produce its own cove in nineteen tests kits in partnership with Three D. Printing Company. We realize we had to find another source. Global Market wasn't working. There weren't sources around this country that were reliable enough so we decided we would make our own and this has had been put together very quickly. So we're really an uncharted territory. Creating these tests kids in New York City again. It's these nasal swabs that have been in such short supply in so many places around the country. Now there are also plenty of antibody tests floating around that have not been reviewed or validated by the FDA. The agency said Monday that it was tightening. Its policy to keep unproven and even fraudulent tests from entering the market. It's been a big problem in one. Study of twelve antibody tests. Four were shown to deliver false positive results more than ten percent of the time. Remember if you're testing for. Antibodies and you get a false positive people may incorrectly. Assume they now have the antibodies and are protected and then go out into public and keep spreading. You really want to get that false positive rate under two percent as low as possible. Really the future could lie in at home. Testing Antigen tests would be the easiest to mass produce for home use but again like I said we don't yet have a reliable antigen test for Kovic Nineteen White House Corona Virus Task Force member. Dr Deborah Burke said this last month on. Nbc's Meet the press we have to have a breakthrough innovation and testing. We have to be able to detect antigen than constantly tried to detect the actual live virus or the viral particles itself and to really move into Antigen testing. If an antigen test is approved and mass produced it may serve as a valuable screening tool. But it's probably not going to replace the P. C. R. Saliva or swab tests when it comes to diagnosing Kovic nineteen the Antigen test in this case would be used to screen the PR test would still be the most accurate according to the Guardian scientists working for the US military have designed a PC test. That has the potential to detect the virus as early as twenty four hours after its contracted that could help stop infected people from spreading the virus before they even show symptoms and keep in mind. A lot of people never show symptoms but can still spread the virus. It's another promising maybe and remember this. Testing does need to go hand in hand with contact. Tracing once you find out who's infected that person needs to be isolated and then everyone who has had close contact with that person needs to be traced and sometimes those people need to be quarantined as well test trace and hopefully treat

United States Corona Virus Task Force Los Angeles CNN New York City Dr Sanjay Gupta Rosillo Severin Schwan Roche NBC Johns Hopkins University Brooke Baldwin Uruguay Bill De Blasio Dr Deborah Burke Medical University Of South Ca Guardian EU Kevin Delay
FDA approves emergency use of new coronavirus antibody test

Wayne Cabot and Paul Murnane

00:09 sec | 9 months ago

FDA approves emergency use of new coronavirus antibody test

"Roche's antibody testing received FDA emergency use authorization yesterday the pharmaceutical company says it will provide tens of millions of tests

Roche FDA
Boston Area Pizza Shops Offer Meals To Those In Need During Coronavirus Crisis

WBZ Morning News

01:03 min | 11 months ago

Boston Area Pizza Shops Offer Meals To Those In Need During Coronavirus Crisis

"Radio well at least there's comfort food right and that takes on a whole new meeting these days for a pizza shop in Wilmington the story from WBZ TV's David way at TJ's pizza in Wilmington owner a lot of growth is giving back pledging to provide food for school kids the elderly and others who could use a meal during the crisis I'll show you what we would call for the kids and the families with the travel much together this is what they teach at that church what we're supposed to do is love our neighbor and this is what our neighbors need right now meanwhile at the Roches restaurant intermezzo pizzeria Bolton will make the idea is the same people in the local community can contact them and receive a box lunch for a pizza we can't give everything but the ticket to give a sandwich too you know young boy and girl who doesn't have it during school is seems like a no brainer see this is the thing is we are being pushed to the limit increasingly and seemingly every day the people are now turning to good deeds and giving back to the community so that is encouraging

Wilmington Wbz Tv Bolton David Roches
FDA Grants New Coronavirus Test Emergency Approval

Squawk Pod

01:09 min | 11 months ago

FDA Grants New Coronavirus Test Emergency Approval

"After what many are calling a catastrophic delay testing capacity is finally ramping up for the current virus in the US diagnostics giant Roche saying it received FDA's emergency authorization for its high volume test for cove in nineteen. The systems can provide results in three and a half hours. Roe says it will have millions of tests a month available for use. And that's welcome news to those in the public health world who say we still don't know the scope of the outbreak in the United States currently reported cases stand at more than sixteen hundred with forty one dead worldwide cases exceeding one hundred. Thirty five thousand with deaths approaching five thousand. Almost seventy thousand people have recovered. According to data from Johns Hopkins and many are asking especially here in the. Us numbers grow. What this disease looks like and how long it takes to run. Its course that we do have some data from the. Who'S MISSION TO CHINA TO GUIDE US? The symptoms can range from none at all to severe pneumonia. Almost ninety percent of lab confirmed cases had fever seventy percent of dry cough eighteen percent shortness of breath and fourteen percent of sore throat. Eighty percent of cases were mild to moderate and mild cases typically recovered within two weeks. Those with more severe disease. It took three to six weeks.

United States Johns Hopkins Dry Cough FDA Roche ROE Pneumonia China
Seattle Company creates high-speed coronavirus test, gets approval from FDA

Mike Gallagher

00:17 sec | 11 months ago

Seattle Company creates high-speed coronavirus test, gets approval from FDA

"And new high speed coronavirus test has been granted emergency clearance by the FDA the latest effort to expand capacity to diagnose the fast spreading pathogens the test was developed by diagnostics giant Roche holdings and is designed to run on the company's automated machines which are already installed in more than one hundred labs across

FDA Roche Holdings
John Alite, the Mob's Enforcer

Kingpins

02:04 min | 11 months ago

John Alite, the Mob's Enforcer

"The year was nineteen ninety. Carol alight was terrified the security alarms at their South Jersey home bled while the family rottweilers barked for Roche. Ously worse yet. She swore she could see armed men hiding in the woods from the window. She called her husband. John in a panic. Twenty eight year old. John Alight the right hand man of John Gotti. Junior was away from the house when he received the call without so much as a second thought. He ditched his friends and hopped into his corvette. As a lights raced home. He wanted which of his many enemies could be off to him that night. The most likely seemed Tommy. Karate patera earlier that year karate had killed one of a lights friends over a twenty thousand dollar dispute. Rumor around town was that a light was next on his list when I got home. He snuck in from the back and grabbed a revolver and an Uzi submachine gun. He slipped into the dark woods and lurked toward the men waiting to ambush him instead. A light took them by surprise unloading the Uzi like an eighties. Action Star and after a brief firefight. The attackers fled. It was too dark to see that night but the next morning a light. Check the woods to see if anyone had been killed though. He didn't find any bodies he did. See plenty of blood. He knew a message had been sent a few days later a lights boss. John Gotti called a light to a sit down with Tommy Karate. Godley declared that their feud was over. No more fighting when the meeting finished on the two men had its world cars. A light turned and said to Tomi. Nothing settled I'm still GONNA kill Ya.

John Gotti Roche John Alight Tommy Karate Karate John Godley Carol South Jersey
"roche" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"roche" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"What this to. You sometimes. See your favorite show. It's one you want June. Never was of me. Haven't busy counting the season stack up the well and they and that's about Some things on say aren't survivable or advisable. They happy birthday heroin. But how do you? How STILL I could've gone thousands of feet above the oceans ground after the dark. Henny stern son another one more. Very say Hugging European turns from the some beauties views are never done is sort of dude a -able or and it's the million dollar highway on a snowy day. Sadly long stay he some things that how. Ya Se iron survivable or advisable happy guy. I loved you and how are still.

"roche" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"roche" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Call your girlfriend. Uh It's time you the is Say It's not You Owe John Kennedy. Something him man. explain it so therefore we can't the and make sense right now but you sir call your girlfriend friend time you give Say It's not Fall Jazzman it's GONNA be. The Laura is still make sense right now just friends and then you cool who jus-. Nah ooh. It's time you thank.

"roche" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"roche" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Of that all of mine and Hi are you on all into beached waiting on last chance. Rocket over. The board is no me and will Well we this wind the slightly never one never close your eyes and yeah the T. Spin as it begins to snow. You're careful that's not all it's watch a steal the souvenir Laura warnings in our as we are Reading Myla are you on each waiting on last chance rocket over the board. No me and boy Where are we so take a deep breath? Yoga added another chance. We will be back again. Comes around on any cloud moving suits in poker ways to their final to see the see. Ya.

"roche" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

13:26 min | 1 year ago

"roche" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Wainwright Road here in the studio today to talk about her life. Her career her family and her music. And maybe she'll sing a song for us. Lucy wainwright Roach. Welcome to design matters. Thanks for having me. Let's see I understand that you're a rapid eminem fan and even know every word to clean out my closet. Is that true that is true. No one has ever heard me sing it except for my mother considers singing it now. I don't think I can. I think that would take some real preparation. And and maybe I I might have to be overly exhausted to do darn tired today. When did you first discover EMINEM? And what was the allure? I just heard him on the radio. That song Mockingbird one of the songs about his kid and many of his songs are so heartbreaking and incredibly fit together. It's just jaw dropping to me and he actually reminds me of my dad. Writing was a little bit too. Which my dad I don't think would be into. I could see that when he talks about his family and his candidness both of their writing that I can. I can see wouldn't ordinarily thought that we never have occurred to me but I think you're right. Lucy you were born in raised in Greenwich Village Near City. Your parents split up when you were too. And I've read that you live with your mom. Says he wrote in a tiny one bedroom apartment where you had the bedroom and she had the living room. Your mom is said that while. It was often financially stressful. You never had the sense you were poor. Have you and your mom always been close? Yes my mom and I are really Enmeshed you might say and We talk most everyday and text a lot and we work together too so we sometimes tour together and we shared a hotel room when I was a kid and we share hotel rooms still. I can even imagine what it must have been like to grow up with. Says he roach as your mother? I've been a fan of their music. A Rabid Fan. I might say and I could probably saying many many songs on the spot. Not that I'm going to do that together. Cabin Song but I've been a fan of their music since nineteen seventy nine What is your favorite song I would say? One of my all time favorite roaches songs. One season I love that song so much for it. Just it holds up. Every with every passing year I relate to it more and more which I'm not sure is a great sign about me in general but the song is just like it's so good well. Their music is timeless. I think every single one of their albums still hold up. Yeah I think so. Do how much time do you spend with your dad? At this point in your life we also worked together. I opened for him sometimes. And then sometimes me and my mom and my dad do shows altogether so it kind of goes in fits and starts with the whole family so maybe I'll see him a lot over a space of a couple of months working then not that often. But he's in New York and so am I but we're both on the road so part of the thing about everybody is just that we're all you have to catch each other in the same city at the same time which is a little hard but my dad is very good at keeping in touch so he likes to meet for dinner and he calls. If I don't see him. We talk on the phone. I don't want to spend that much time talking about your family. Because I wanNA talk about you and your music and your life but thought it would be fun to ask you for one sentenced descriptions of your immediate musical family. And we'll start with ANA and Kate mcgarrigle each individual Well yesterday was or I think the day before yesterday was kate. Mcgarrigle birthday She passed away now ten years ago. This is more than the sentence. Okay a sentence. I didn't know her well. But if we'd had the chance to get to know each other I think we would have liked each other. And what about Anna Anna? I don't see her often but when I do. She's mysterious and lovely Maggie Roach the late. Great Brilliant Maggie Roach Oh One of the most brilliant and loyal people that you could ever know also really love cheese Terry Roach She is absolutely fascinating to talk to on any topic absolutely any topic. Yes and also just one of my all time. Favorite People Loudon wainwright the third. It's funny the thing that comes into my head is that I think he's a great dad which I don't think is Something that he's known for. I don't think people think that about him but I would say he's been a great dead to me. Sometimes that looks different than what you think. Mold absolutely Martha wainwright when her light shines upon new. It's the best feeling that there is Rufus wainwright. We are very different in our sort of way that we are in the world but he has this deep sweet sentimental thing about him that just keeps everybody very connected in the family and then finally your mom says he roach she almost always is exactly spot on with whatever she says or does there's so many things say out all of them. But yeah I I do have to say and I don't Brag on on the show but I have the noted distinction of having seen every single person that I just mentioned in concert really absolutely. It's like a collection of like cereal box toys. And you have them all but I have never seen you perform altogether other than the roaches right. It's everybody has been Solo. Well we have done that We went on a cruise altogether and performed on the cruise altogether. That was intense Didn't you also do that in when you were in Alaska? Didn't you all travel together? And then yeah. Take the audience son buses and trains with you. We did in Alaska. Yes we did that work. Did you pick people up along the way it was? It's this thing called roots on the rails These people run lovely people run run these things where musicians coming in the audience common. It's kind of an all expense paid trip and oftentimes. They'll be on trains for a lot of the time and even sleeper trains like one of the ones that I did. We slept on the train. The one in Alaska. We didn't sleep on the train. And it involves some buses as well and some boats so the audience came with us or maybe like forty five audience members and then me my mom my dad and my brother and my aunt Sloan. Martha couldn't come because her son was starting kindergarten and I with your grandmother selling CDs. She wasn't with us on that but she used to sell the CDs when I was a kid with the roaches but It was fun we saw Wales. I mean basically if I see a whale it was worth it and I did I tell you. At that time I was just a couple of years ago. I rented that when you were four or five years old that was when you first graced a stage was at the great bottom line nightclub in New York City where Rufus and Martha Wainwright were performing. Talk About. What happened they? They got me up on stage. I think it might have been a Christmas show or something a roaches Christmas show. Maybe and I got up and I was supposed to sing and I just burst into tears and my dad had come and get me off the stage. I remember that he came up to the edge of the stage in lifted me off the stage in my mom thinks that probably the whole audience thought that it was child abuse because there were like get up on the stage and then but I think I thought I wanted to do it and then I got out there and I was like Oh Jeez and we. You just shy shy. I was very shy as a kid. I did not Not Not with people close to me but but in school. I didn't talk and stuff really at all until about second grade. I had a teacher who got me to talk and then I just no no I talk incessantly. I understand you. I tried to play the guitar when you were about seven. We tried to teach yourself. Who was teaching you my mom and my aunt Terry My Aunt Terry was going to teach me and they got a left handed guitar. Because I'm left handed and I think she tried to teach me Old Macdonald on on the guitar and I just I just wasn't feeling it and we all gave up and then it wasn't until I was in high school. I started to play the guitar and I play the guitar right handed. I don't know if that was part of it. Like maybe maybe. I'm not that left handed or something in the but also seven young for the guitar because it hurts your fingers also in. I can play five chords on a guitar but I play with the right handed guitars. Well and I've tried to switch thinking that I'd be able to play better that way but I can't yeah me too same and also by the way five cords is all you need time. Neil young did it in three. Yeah but yeah. I don't have the gene. It's my biggest regret my life that I don't have that gene really. Yeah I just and one of the things that I really wanted to ask you and I ask every musician that comes on the show this question. How do you write a song? I often feel panic like I'll never write a song again so I'm a little bit in that phase right now and I also often have sort of a blackout about what happens when I when I write but that aside. I usually sit with the guitar and I'll either get something. I'm going to try that. I like or or some kind of melody that goes with it and up. Sometimes I'll get stand-in words that I just put in to like at the shape of the melody and the not replace them later. A thing that happens to me a lot. I'll get averse and of course and then I'll be like well said that and then I'll be like. Oh Jeez I have to finish this somehow and I. It's hard to get past that initial idea for me but oftentimes you go into a zone. I'm not even sure what happens but man. I'm so grateful every time it happens And it's especially great when you don't turn on the song that you just wrote. That's the thing that happens a lot when you hate it. Yeah like as soon as you do it. My mom says that it's like a cat who coughs up a hairball and then jumps back and looks at it like who did that you know. I think that's pretty good description. I'm it's hard to not kind of turn on your work. I think either partway through or afterwards. I mean after I've made a record I usually do not wanna hear it ever again It's that same feeling of somehow. It just presses your buttons in a way that other people's stuffed doesn't do you ever wants a song is finished. Ever go back and we write lyrics or changed the chorus or do anything to augment it in some way. I haven't ever done that. There's a song On My new record that I really like still miraculously but there is a lyric in it that I wish I had changed and I haven't changed it yet but I would say I I feel regret about about it So I thought well I mean maybe you you could change it. You know just because it's not the official recording. I could change it and show so I'm thinking about changing it because every time I get to that part. I'm like oh. I wish I hadn't well Joni. Mitchell and Stevie Nicks have changed lyrics. I've heard Stephen Exchange the lyrics to landslide. Which is sort of shocking and then Joni Mitchell is changed lyrics to Hegira with whoever is playing saxophone with her. Yeah no she'll say Michael Brecker or whoever your plane she started at. I think with Michael Brecker Yeah. I was listening to a recording of Joan Baez doing diamonds and rust recently and I was trying to play for someone this thing that I'd heard her doing show. Then I discovered that it wasn't in the original that she had changed something choose doing in performances but not What are the lyrics such? She changed the lyrics that she changed our. If you're offering diamonds and rust I've already paid. I've already paid is the original. But when I saw her do it more recently. She said if you're offering diamonds and rust I'll take the diamonds which I thought was very very change. I could totally get behind one of the things that I heard. Joni Mitchell. Say and one of her live recordings was that when you're standing in front of an audience and they ask you to play a song. She thought it was sort of interesting. That nobody ever asks a painter to repaint a painting. But yet we're always asking performers to Redo these songs that are part of our lives. Yeah and she jokes. Nobody ever asked Van Gogh to paint a sunflower again..

Lucy wainwright Roach Martha wainwright Maggie Roach Alaska Joni Mitchell Rufus wainwright Terry Roach New York City Kate mcgarrigle Michael Brecker Loudon wainwright eminem Joan Baez Anna Anna Neil young Greenwich Village Near City Wales Van Gogh hairball
"roche" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

06:55 min | 1 year ago

"roche" Discussed on WRVA

"Sign in for Roche and the Golden II on A. B. microphone first self owned today shows is ten and ten is from the great state of Wisconsin well the president of the United States was last night great to have you with us again well thank you mark gay tended to trump rally last night in in Milwaukee and it was a great rally but we managed to get very close to the stage problem within thirty feet in the air shot and there was a segment where the president was talking about Democrats and talk about immigration and some of the the Washington Democrats and some things that they do and I was doing a lot of yelling I'm still kind of course from it but I do have held up to the stage regarding the the Washington Democrats Tracy there're is president actually reacted to it well hope to me directly during his speech well that's great so he he heard your we he had you yelled traitors and then he turned toward you yeah he turned towards me and and he smiled and said holy he said traders and then he said it looks like you're having a great time Sir you look straight at me and pointed to me around the store and giving high fives and everything yeah that that's about a little more than halfway through his speech but okay I stood there stunned that said that's pretty good to to to to go to that and get that close to the president and he actually is singles you're at I only saw highlights from the speech last night it looked like he was in pretty good form just from the highlights rail heal completely electrified the crowd it was a great speech on the the venue was filled up to the rafters there were no empty seats at all so pretty well attended very well received the crowd was was really excited to see him and then he was he was in very good form last night you can tell everybody was enjoying themselves you know a lot of people are learning magnet has from wearing yeah wearing things but took awhile to get in and together because they had to be standing room only so yeah we were on our feet for probably about seven or eight hours you know what now but the line getting in getting the value and then then waiting for all the speeches so it it I I spelled it afterwards and filling it today so but it was a great speech it was that bill that send them that sends you see as some at U. thing Wisconsin's gonna be in the red column come election night in November I think it well I know the convention the Democrat convention is going to be here so we'll have to see how that affected by it down with the excitement that I saw last night among Republicans I think that he has an excellent chance of winning Wisconsin yeah that's good that's good and I don't think thank thank you for your call can I I don't think that anything the Democrats were discussing last night I was relevant to why Wisconsin I went for trump I tell you something else too for the next several weeks as primary season gets going is actual votes for a candidate a being cast all you're gonna see are on the cable networks is a a the Senate chamber out with various people talking about what this mine Ukrainian officials said to this mine a United States official and it's going to emphasize one of the key things that goal trump elected which is the huge disconnect between politics and the people that are on the one hand a denture trump trump go to come go to elected because too too many Republicans like Lindsay Graham the more interested in what's going on in Chad or Naija than in what's going on in Illinois or item that's it is simply not relevant to where people live there the idea that the politics is Justin unnecessary pretext in order for you to gamble and frolic in obscure corners of the world is not appealing to the masses that's so yeah you have that on the Republican side then you have on the Democrat side where they just talking about more and more niece demographics we saw it we saw it last night Elizabeth Warren I had to do the trans gender women of color thing is a sense the **** a there is no epidemic of violence against transgender women of color that raw those safe more safe than the general population if you'll just stay he says whatever the whatever they call them ahead for sexual six white male or whatever they call them now yeah you actually be safe if you transition into becoming a transgender woman of color but she's desperate Elizabeth Warren it's all gone south for her in the last few weeks and that's why she's reduced to playing this sexism card against Bernie Sanders he Donald Trump said at the rally that in fact he believes Bernie now you never know it from because when he gets in between the Democrats I this is just like monkeying around and put making mischief but he added he said he believed Bernie over Elizabeth Warren and why would you believe Bernie ever Elizabeth Warren about anything Elizabeth Warren lies about why she was fired from the school district she lies about being a Cherokee native she lies about the origins of the recipes she submits to the pow wow channel cookbook she says that traditional Cherokee recipe is as opposed to the Duke and Duchess of Windsor as a favorite day should love Pappy owned the fashionable Manhattan midtown eatery she lies about her son going to private schools so in any competition between Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders anybody else one when you Billy bunny anyway that was what the president suggested last night at the rally big breaking news day I impeachment trial well on the brink of the Chinese trade deals being signed Mike Cole Flynn has withdrawn his guilty plea lot a big news what covering it all mark Steyn for rush lots more still to come you are listening to the EIB network.

Roche
New York City spends billions on flood protection

Climate Connections

01:13 min | 1 year ago

New York City spends billions on flood protection

"In twenty twelve superstorm. Sandy wreaked havoc on New York. City's transportation system storm surge pushed a flood of seawater into vehicle tunnels rail yards very terminals and subway life. Hurricane Sandy. It was a big wake up call for the city that Suzanne de Roche. The city's deputy director of infrastructure and energy. She says after the storm subway tunnels and stations nations had to be pumped out electrical systems needed to be cleaned repaired and tested in some places. It took weeks to get up and running again as sees rise is and whether it gets more extreme. The risks from flooding only grow so New York is working to make its massive transportation system more resilient for looking at major major flood protection systems across the subway network the airports and articulate tunnels that go in and out of Manhattan for example. The city is installed huge. Flood Gates at the entrances of two tunnels. A steel floodwall will soon protect the coney island rail yard and the city's working on ways to seal off subway. Station entrances invents. It's a multibillion dollar effort Dorota says the next time a natural disaster hits New York expects to be better prepared

New York Sandy Flood Gates Hurricane Sandy Suzanne De Roche Deputy Director Coney Island Dorota Manhattan
Roche dives deeper into gene therapy with $1.15 billion Sarepta licensing deal

WBZ Afternoon News

00:15 sec | 1 year ago

Roche dives deeper into gene therapy with $1.15 billion Sarepta licensing deal

"We're watching shares of Cambridge bay Sarepta therapeutics after Roche agreed to pay as much as two point eight five billion dollars to gain rights to a gene therapy for a rare muscle disease outside of the U. S. an analyst at cantor fitzgerald sees that deal is a big win for

Roche Cantor Fitzgerald Cambridge Bay Sarepta Analyst
Roche dives deeper into gene therapy with $2.85 billion Sarepta licensing deal

WBZ Midday News

00:15 sec | 1 year ago

Roche dives deeper into gene therapy with $2.85 billion Sarepta licensing deal

"We're watching shares of Cambridge bay Sarepta therapeutics after Roche agreed to pay as much as two point eight five billion dollars to gain rights to a gene therapy for a rare muscle disease outside of the U. S. an analyst at cantor fitzgerald sees that deal is a big win for

Roche Cantor Fitzgerald Cambridge Bay Sarepta Analyst Eight Five Billion Dollars
Roche dives deeper into gene therapy with $1.15 billion Sarepta licensing deal

Bloomberg Surveillance

00:15 sec | 1 year ago

Roche dives deeper into gene therapy with $1.15 billion Sarepta licensing deal

"Also watching shares of Sarepta therapeutics up seven percent this morning after Roche agreed to pay as much as two point eight five billion dollars for rights to a gene therapy for a realtor muscle disease outside the US in an earlier than expected deal according to bark

Roche United States Sarepta Eight Five Billion Dollars Seven Percent
"roche" Discussed on Taking Care in Business

Taking Care in Business

12:15 min | 1 year ago

"roche" Discussed on Taking Care in Business

"This is taking care in business. A podcast dives into the topic of corporate social responsibility ability for many different perspectives host Kathy. potty Hayes is an expert in CS armed philanthropic giving and her co host. Vicki Wilson is the founder and CEO Bulletin Group A unified marketing company. That was also the first B. Corp Certified Company in Indiana Cathy Vicky became friends and equally passionate about CSSR when they first worked together several years ago join them as they talk about why it is always worthwhile to take care in business. Hey Kathy how's it going today. I'm good ed how are you. I'm great so I have a question. Okay when and where is the last place you volunteered. Oh my goodness it's GonNa make me seem seem like I don't care but I do. I'm probably second helpings. Okay Yeah I I recently volunteered. At goodwill our company was going to We usually volunteer somewhere every quarter and so we called up goodwill we said we want to do something. Tell us what to do. And it was really unique. They had hatice. Come in as a company. Just brainstorm ideas for marketing. Oh that's cool. Yeah it was really unique. We've never done that. Usually were you know doing something like planting planning trees or Working in you know cooking food or you know whatever so But that is I asked you that because I I love this mission statement. Our mission is to engage diverse communities to create vibrant public places helping people nature thrive You know What organization that belongs to I might do you think it belongs to. I'M GONNA go with keeping Annapolis Beautiful Ding Ding. Ding uh-huh there one of my favorite organizations in indy. For sure they have a whole host of activities that they engage in to help. Neighbors and nature thrive in Indianapolis. But today we're going to specifically talk about a program that many in Indianapolis participate in their custom day of service whether a company plants trees creates outdoor classrooms transforms vacant. Lots or picks up litter. Keep Indianapolis beautiful works with hundreds of companies to create a program specific to the goals and objectives of the participating companies to talk about this. We have Ashley Hanes from Keep Indianapolis Beautiful and Caroline. I'm sorry Carol pull's targeted P. U. L. S.. That's A. I had to ask her how to say that from Roche Roche. Indy is the North American headquarters of the world's largest are just biotech company and employs more than four thousand people who work together to provide insights that help people around the world manage and improve personal health conditions. So Carol is here to talk about the impact that the keeping an episode beautiful program has on the employees at Roche said they. So let's start with you ashleigh just kind of talking a little bit about keeping an episode beautiful and when and how The Custom Custom Day of service came to be all right. Well you did a really great job sharing our mission statement already Boils down to helping people in need your thrive in Indianapolis I mean. Do the variety of ways planting trees picking up litter creating green spaces. And we all do that through the work of volunteers. We have about fifteen thousand volunteers every year and Companies organizations that come out and do custody service with us are really big part of how it gets so much of our work done because has companies like Roche can bring a couple hundred people out on a single day and make a tremendous impact and that really has it's really meaningful for the people in the city in the neighborhood that were working in and accomplishing the work. That we're trying to do. So how does it work. If you WANNA custom of service well really you jus- is contact us at KABC and say hey I'm really interested in doing something with my organization to give back to the community. He really loved the work that you're doing. Seems like something that might be a good fit for us and it's a good fit for a variety of reasons. Sometimes just the sheer fact that we can handle when we kind kind of started this model of program. It was with Lily over ten years ago and we managed eight thousand of their volunteers on a single day. So sometimes it's just the fact that we can manage a lot of volunteers. Here's and we have a lot of work to do Sometimes it's that a company's mission or Sustainability Initiative really aligns aligns with the work that we do the work that we're doing and we're able to kind of help their employees out into the community to accomplish in real time. A lot of those. Those goals Inr also just able to take what an organization or a business wants to do kind of really customize that to whatever they need to do within the parameters of the work that K I be doing of course Oh so carol at your job at Roche. what what exactly is that. Because I'm guessing that it isn't it was probably in this space and it's not that you're you know an engineer or something like that that that is correct. I am the liberal arts. Major that works Rhode Way to represent professional stem So Yeah my job is I manage the corporate communications for Roshan Indianapolis and as part of that. I am really fortunate that I also get to do do all of our community relations and that includes our Roche gives back volunteerism program That involves all of our employees as well as any other Sponsorships ships or donations that we may given the community. So how many years has Roche been doing this particular program with with keeping up with beautiful. So I'm excited to I share that in two thousand twenty. It will be our tenure anniversary partnering with K. I. V. So we were already in the planning stages for that and we plan to do something a little bit more. I guess robust than what we've done in the past although what we've done in the past is fairly robust as well but I think we're looking to extend it for our tenure anniversary and maybe do something that's along the lines of a week long giving a program. Oh Neat do all four thousand employees participate. No typically said the four thousand employees about sixteen hundred of those are in the field a US So those are sales and also customer support functions About thirty three hundred or so actually work on the Indianapolis Campus and I would say that we typically have have Between two and three hundred people who come out to volunteer for the day of service It's one of those volunteer opportunities. Where the minute that it goes Out through our portal. We know within twenty four hours. We will list. Wow and we have Employees who year after year raised their hand to be team captains and we have A couple of executive administrators who year after year also offer to be kind of that hands on logistics expert for the volunteers on the site of Roche. So it's just one of those seamless events that K. I just makes so easy and enjoyable from start to finish that. It's just a shoe in in terms of wanting to do something that's both good for the community but also is a great way to engage employees. Sure so When you sit down and talk to Ashley or you're trying to put together sort of your custom day of service what are some of the goals like internally that you guys have I now I know we talk about employee engagement a lot but that can mean a lot of different things I right? We'll Roche is very committed to conserving and enhancing the neighborhoods woods where we live in Roche globally has been a leader on the Dow Sustainability Index for over a decade so environmental sustainability is a a core value. I guess you could say of Roche. And so when it comes to environmental sustainability. Were really looking at. What are ways that we can help improve proved the lives of people who live in the communities where we are and of course we also want the opportunity to be something that employees will enjoy And have an the opportunity to connect with one another and so For us because we're headquartered Just south of ninety sixth street in Marion County We looked typically weekly kind of around the surrounding neighborhoods so whether it's in Lawrence or whether it's on the Near East side those are areas that will typically look at first because we often often see need in those areas right and we wanna make sure that the communities around Roche are thriving That's very important to us to give back as locally as we can and then we also try to find places where we can have as many employees together. There are occasions with that number of employees where we have to split into different activities but we try and keep ourselves in at least one general location because it's really important for that sense of community. The employees really enjoy being able to see one another and to celebrate afterwards and really kind of reflect upon what we've accomplished and so for us us it's really about whereas the need. How does it align with kind of geographically where we like to focus and then what are those activities that we know will allow employees to really engage and work together So you're expanding to a week long for this tenth anniversary. Do you know what you're doing yet. We don't we've got some ideas okay. IBS put forth some different recommendations. So we've got to work with our leadership and and review those and kind of get their input input input and feedback but I think what it will involve is kind of a mix so we'll have kind of them were traditional outdoor day of service like we've done in the past past and maybe sprinkle in some things that would allow more of our campus for example some of our employees who work in manufacturing or the warehouse who cannot leave for for you know a whole day to go volunteer relooking at what are some opportunities we could actually bring to Roche. That may be only require an hour's time So somebody on a break bake or lunch break. Could maybe come over. So we're just trying to figure out. How do we engage as many employees as possible throughout the week? Yeah that's what I really liked about The the last volunteer opportunity we did as a company was that they thought outside of the box about how they could engage us in our specific talents. Rally rally. You know they're trying to do for you. Carol and Roche I'm sure that that's something that Ashley Your your team does all the time you get these phone calls and they WANNA customer service. I mean how do you make it a win win for everyone see no kind of Depends on what our relationship is with a company that we're working with kind of when they approach us an organization like Roche having such a long partnership we know what areas of the cities cities that they are really focusing because of the location To their campus so as we are identifying places where we're working in the city when we're doing are planning we already know we can have three hundred Roche. Volunteers that we know are going to be able to help accomplish these things in this part of the city. And it's become I'm just a really nice. I mean it's been almost like a ten year partnership of being able to identify places in practice to go and knowing that we really amazing volunteers and support to come and take care or that we do have Companies that will call us until like two months two months now we wanted to do a day of service and in those cases were. We're not able to do as much of the creative long-term planning and that's more of well. We already have this tree. Planting area identified as something that we you were going to be doing as part of this year's plan would you be interested in like your choice of these three places to plant trees Still do.

Roche. Roche Roche Roche Indianapolis Carol pull Ashley Hanes Vicki Wilson Ding Ding Kathy. potty Hayes Kathy B. Corp Certified Company Indiana Annapolis Cathy Vicky Ding US Sustainability Initiative Roshan Indianapolis Indianapolis Campus
Bert and John Jacobs Discuss the Evolution of 'Life Is Good'

How I Built This

24:51 min | 1 year ago

Bert and John Jacobs Discuss the Evolution of 'Life Is Good'

"Welcome back revenue which is which is great rate. You know you could start to see maybe a path towards towards real profitability. <hes> and i guess the the next year you really i mean you. You're still running his business by the way out of your apartment in boston that you guys share right <hes> the starts to turn a corner though because as we see that reaction in the street and boom we start thinking about distribution and hiring a sales rep and that that summer of ninety five the momentum starts rolling and debt was when you made your first higher as well i guess right that's right yeah. The <hes> cary sherman moved in upstairs cheers from us and became a friend and we just used to beg her when she got home from work to help us <hes> pack orders and help us try to organize the orders ars and <hes> she was a big help so we begged her to quit her job eventually and she did it. She could do things five times faster than us for one thing and then it became clear we needed the help pretty badly and she needed to take a leap yeah. We we had a friend over for dinner one night because he was pretty sharp and we asked him to tell us how much business we would have to do to be able to afford to pay carry <hes> seventeen thousand dollars which is what she said was the minimum the question to her was what is the lowest amount that you could possibly get paid to work with us and seventeen thousand dollars so he did the math for us and he said that we would have to do a quarter of a million dollars in business which sounded like a billion dollars yeah and we we did two hundred sixty two. I think it was two hundred sixty two thousand a a year yeah and that two hundred sixty two thousand was like that's to pay for all your supplies and everything and everything was not profit that is that is oh no in those in those roche revenue days we we would get prepared for died t shirts p._f. Dis they caught and we'd store them. We didn't have enough room for them in our apartment which store them in a bulkhead in the building and we had to put them in trash bags <hes> that were tightly wound up because it was moist down there and so a in any given day we would get a certain amount of orders we would be designing during the daytime in the afternoon and we would take those shirts down to new bedford. Get them died in the shirt collars. We wanted the next afternoon. We'd take those shirts out to a marlboro mass and to screen printers midland graphics screen printed t shirts and then <hes> by four o'clock drop them off at u._p._s. Whatever the orders were which was you know two or three retailers a couple of order and then we then we set up a trailer like the back of a eighteen wheeler container owner containers like permanently stationed next to our screen printer with their permission they had a dirt parking lot and for zero rent they because we were afraid to to get the overhead of a warehouse and so they let us was thirty dollars a month to rent the <hes> lease the container and end for zero dollars. They let us <hes> park it on their lot he because you didn't take the risk on on like a long term lease so you'll just let us a shipping containers are warehouse makes sense your we want. We wanted to make sure the revenue ran way out ahead of this needed a couple extension cords lighting and not a lot of ventilation in those containers but <hes> we cranked some of ninety five ninety six and it was kind of non stop twenty four seven how did you how did you get the trademark on it. I mean it seems like a very very common phrase. Life is good but you got a new trademark. How did that happen well. We failed five times. We were going to the boston public library at all you couldn't important attorney and we sent five applications and failed and then i went one night to play basketball and some guy asked me. Did i see you and your brother selling t shirts in front of the boston garden the other night and i said yeah and he said how's that going not so good but we have this great idea the eh i went on and on about what the concept was and that we're trying to trade market and then i realized that i'd been rude and not ask the guy what he did. I said what do you do for a living and he said <hes> trademark attorney and guy's name was bob pierce and i went and saw him two days later and convince them to do the work pro pro bono and he knew just what to do so we had to make a lot of changes we had to create hang tags and labels we the label in our shirt said jacobs gallery gallery so we switched the label to life is good and then we had to get affidavits from five different retailers who said that it represented a brand and by definition legally trademark denotes the source of the goods so there's when you just put a mark on a t shirt that's called ornamental but if people look at it and say that represents the source of the goods in some way then it's a brand so he did all those things correctly and i gotta tell you it's twenty five years later and and bob pierce still gets all our intellectual property business. That's amazing so you got the trademark on this phrase. Life is good as a brand and that's your you sort of you own this phrase phrase and you can use it as your business even the fact that you said it a few times during this podcast you owe us money got yeah. It was a it was a big day when we got it. We we still didn't really know how to run a business or what to do but it was. We knew it was a a valuable thing yeah. How did you guys divide up labor between the two of you like who did what who did finances who who did the art who to the delivery. How how did you guys who was in charge. Who was the boss older brother. The boss anything that involved brainpower pretty much fell on my side no seriously bur burden off he had more of a background coming out of school <hes> on the business side and he's a great communicator great motivator so he worked worked the phones a lot. I spend more time on the drawing table or like at the screen print shop or maybe packing up stuff but there's plenty of crossover birt's. It's very creative as well so it mixed pretty seamlessly over the years. I guess there was a turning point pretty significant turning point in nineteen ninety-six. You guys get a call from a pretty big sporting goods chain based out of indianapolis named named kelly ins or gaylon galleons something something like that yet galleons yeah. What was that yeah they were. They were actually in our opinion. The best sporting goods in the country <hes> their stores were incredible and yeah they they were open to a sales call and interested in the brand so they invited us to go visit them in indianapolis and we actually actually couldn't afford to fly out so instead we've just transparent with them and asked if we could piggy back when they came here would they come and visit us i would they didn't realize was that there was no life as good in that when they came to visit austin becoming to our apartment so they <hes> anyway a we made them prince spaghetti and rago sauce and we hung out and they they were on board and <hes> they placed the biggest orders is by far that we'd ever seen and they kind of put us on the map outside of new england. I think dick's sporting goods eventually bought galleons right. That's right and i i i don't know if it was apparent to them that the entire company in burt myself in kerry or sitting with them in our kitchen at dinner but but we did have a lot of laughs and then we got an in order and that was a huge step for us to suddenly be shipping two hundred and eighty eight pieces instead of twenty four pieces to a retailer so so once you get into galleons aliens was at just like a game changer i mean. Did you see your business just like skyrocket. It was a game changer because once he would happen was <hes> most of our business stan and now is a specialty mom and pop business so the mama pops will take a look at the big guys. Try to find brands. Sometimes that different <hes> retailers carrying galleons was kind of a model citizen that a lot of small retailers looked up to and so once we were in galleons we're in all these geographic <unk> graphic locations and there was great visibility for us so all of a sudden our phones were ringing like crazy from other retailers from other territories and so- galleys was probably responsible responsible for hundreds of new accounts over the next year or two and business really started booming. You know went from that. Two hundred fifty thousand six hundred twenty then we broke a million at one moment to the was just mind blowing t- thinking how do we go from having like seventy eight dollars between us three years ago. Two million dollars in sales was pretty mind blowing and we didn't have a concept of you know like what it meant to do a million dollars. I think we thought maybe we should retire knows wow we hit a million dollars. I mean i think we definitely stopped and sort of you know how to how to beer and kind kind of said wow man what what has happened but on the other hand was still in our apartment and you don't really look around and see any differences just a mad scramble we'll still but but i think yeah i think galleons an crossing not million dollar mark connor gave us the confidence to invest in a lease get the warehouse and and we hired a few people we i mean we we didn't even have a computer would do untold kerry who still works with us to this day by the way she actually owns five percent the business. He's a partner yeah but she you know she said to us. You really need to get a computer and both on our like oh. We're artists we. We don't want a computer and they so she needed to run the business. Why do we need a computer but she was right well. There's a lot of absurd of exchanges. We had this guy who had run champion the brand chair and wilson sporting goods and he was helping us out through his a sales up. You know we connected personally. Jay phillips god bless him. He was flying up phillies like an angel. We didn't yeah to get angel slash devil the best kind and he <hes> he would give us advice and direction and then he would ask us very basic questions like you know what he got on the books for next year. We're like what what what do you mean like. How do you plan how much product to make me. We like <hes> we just. We've been doubling for like the last few years. We figure you're on a double again. He's like that's a very scary way to run a business and he asked us what our assets sets where he's trying to get us off our personal off our loans because our our personal names were on the loan notes and <hes> he said we gotta. We've got change this. You know what do you got for assets. Burton are like we can get a mountain bike and we're dead serious. We didn't even know how to answer questions like think. I got that picture mom. We got a v._c._r. And he was just like dumbfounded. Looking at us like these guys are so so clueless spine shirts like i because i mean when i think of life is good. I think like <hes> going to ocracoke island. You know someplace. I like cape. Cod like you know you would life is good and it's the summer and it's easy to feel that way. Is that where the shirts were being solden like beach towns and places like that in the summertime. <hes> one of the strengths right away was that it wasn't one distribution channel. Oh so you're talking about destination resort which became important to us right away but sporting was really big. Two gift shops for people like you know around themes like home. Themes like you know love family gardening grilling all that kind of stuff so it really was <hes> oh the distribution was really spread out which which you know we didn't really i can't take credit for strategically planning that but a helped us a lot through the two years the economy has gone up and down and when you're in a single distribution channel it's hard to weather economic downturns but for us you know some would get hurt worse than others and we were always able to weather it because we were <hes> not too many eggs in one basket yeah there. It was so many different places for us to go in when the economy went down it would not all the channels will get impacted the same way i mean did you. I mean when you think think about <hes> a very simple phrase some very basic and not i mean your guess agreed artists no no no oh judgment but like very simple our work and it became this thing t shirts and and dinner plates and posters and things like what what are the things that i'm probably forgetting about recipes backs towels. I mean really doesn't you know it really just became you know what he's a good canvas to connect emotionally with people and in more recent years more things like video content and publishing books excetera which is extremely exciting to us but we're still most known for the t shirts. Did you guys. I mean you've been doing this now. Since really i guests since the late eighties rape on t shirts. Have you ever <hes> any part of of of of you guys want to sell it. You know sell it to a bigger her company and just kind of cash in 'cause you 'cause you've both of you become pretty well off from this tiny little t shirt business and <hes> <hes> you can. I don't know can do whatever you want. I think the reason that we're not interested in selling going. Public is what we learned. Learn from these customers that started sending us letters emails sharing their personal stories and they really taught us that optimism is most powerful aw in the hardest times and these are people dealing with chemotherapy losing loved ones and they'd say we all wore life as good t-shirts to the memorial service for my brother because that's the spirit with which he lived and we've got thousands of those letters and emails and people kind of <unk> opening up their whole personal lives to us because the emotional connection to the brand. They're the ones who taught us this and if we'd hadn't received those letters that may they have been appealing to us like yeah. We've been at this for a few decades but we want to spread that message as wide as we can because we believe in it more than anything anything else in the world am burt but what what are your thoughts on. I mean did did you ever consider find to sell the business well in a lot of ways. We really feel like we're just getting warmed up. It honestly feels like a startup today. We're we're like a twenty five year old startup where there's all these young people oh walking around that remind us of ourselves but are much faster and stronger and smarter and i'm not <hes> operating the business. I was as president and c._e._o. For a long time and we replaced me with a woman that actually came from our nonprofit side and she's killing it and you can tell pretty quickly oakley that she's about ten times the operator that i was and it's allowing me to dive back into the creative and i haven't been there in a while l. so we're really kinda back to where we started in the beginning. Hey let's design some t shirts but now we have a really strong balance sheet. We own one hundred percent of the business us and you know we have no intention of going public or selling the business we just wanna see you know how far we can take this in at some point figure out what to to do with the structure something creative maybe denisov to our staff. Maybe we can sell it to our customers. Something that enables the <hes> that will enable the best work of life is good to be done after john de gone so i mean. Do you guys feel like you grew up up with very working class home. I mean in the room upstairs with frost on windows and like you presumably today a a up. Both of you are doing pretty well. I mean you can you can live pretty comfortably. No no question about it yeah just to have our own home seriously not not to be too corny but that that's pretty cool and to be able to travel. It's incredible and <hes>. I don't think we would ever take that for granted to your what what is your i mean. What did your parents make. If your business your mom passed away <hes> a couple years go and then i can see your later. Your dad dad passed <hes>. What do they make of this. I mean this t shirt business at turned into something huge yeah they they loved it. I think they were proud of it and <hes> they really did do their part while we had our dysfunction growing growing up and there were times. Were you know right right up until the time that our mom passed away if she saw somebody in life is good t-shirt she'd run up to them and say my son's made it was embarrassing when your weather but <hes> our our dad got a kick out of the nuts and bolts of the business he always wanted to know the details els and he was so encouraging when bert ni- for that year and a half when we did live at home and we're still doing the van trips he always was. Just you know we'd roll in at three a._m. Some night how'd you do did you do. It was never what the hell are. You guys doing like your you know your college graduates like you get get your act together. There's no pressure on career. It was always how'd you do and that helped a lot and maybe maybe the interesting thing going full circle. Oh with our dad is that in the autumn of his life he he came out of that funk he really came out of the depression and he really became the a guy that we never knew that we see in those pictures you know before we were around and it's hard to say what that what caused that but as our business grew grew that house that we grew up in really fell to pieces and our and our parents while we were living just like you mentioned guy better and better along the way and we'd go oh visit our parents living in that same house falling apart so we decided to knock the house down and build them a nice new home and <hes> you know i think it was the first time in my father's life since he you know since he had all those kids that when people came to visit they had a place to sit down and at the he could be proud of his home and i think also where he felt like he was a failure he looked at his six kids now and you know we we landed on our feet all of us and he didn't screw everything up so i think he was a little easier on himself and in some ways this success of the business <hes> might help my dad you don't get over that hump and realized that if we're not failures he wasn't a failure and it was really cool to see him relaxed and and enjoying his grandkids and it was like it was like he in our mom were dating again. I mean they just like hang out and spend time and you know the who won away on some weekends and things they hadn't done that and you know thirty years i mean it just they were married for fifty six years and then the the last one believe it or not while it was tough with moms illness in everything they they had some great years now. Our mom said that too just before you know once she knew the cancer was was taking her life and there was nowhere to go. She said nobody should feel sorry for me. On the happiest i've ever been in my life you know part of that was i'm sure because because my dad had come out of the funk and also that she knew that that she did a good job with with our kids and they were all okay wow you know when you think about this crazy story going from t shirts up and down the eastern seaboard to sell them out of the back of van and knock on the dorm rooms to seventy dollars between you two you know a shipping container as your office and and the company today what it does reportedly almost one hundred million dollars in revenue years at about right that's right. You got about what almost two hundred employees today right pretty good. I mean do you for for seabird to you. When you think about the success of this company the attributed to your hard work and you brothers hard work or in your intelligence or do you think that a lot of it came from just luck law to walk. I think we we stumbled into something. That's much bigger than we are <hes>. I think we've been resilient. You know maybe more resilient than smart but it's a good good fifty percent ain't luck we right place right time <hes> two percent skill and then we've we've worked our asses off so that that's that's played a big factor factor too so you know maybe there's all those parts are equal and john how much of it because of like how much because of your hard work and your skill intelligence. I would say skill intelligence. Maybe twenty percent <hes> hard work another twenty eh and then brute strength. Maybe from me twenty so neither only in really the you got your answer there in that neither of us know hotter add up to one hundred percent and yeah just you know so until definitely not skill a lotta luck clearly no question that's john birt jacobs. Co founders of the life is good company for the way we know for a fact that at least one other t-shirts has traveled traveled all the way to space and twenty thirteen astronaut karen nyberg posted a video on the international space station and she was showing how she washed her hair in zero gravity and the shirt that she's wearing in that video. It's from life is good. It's a grinning girl who looks like the original jake sitting back to back with her dog and underneath. It says lean on me.

T Boston Kerry Indianapolis Cary Sherman Attorney Bob Pierce Marlboro Boston Garden Bedford Phillies Ocracoke Island Karen Nyberg Basketball John Birt Jacobs Dick Stan Jay Phillips Partner
As Climate Changes, Taxpayers Will Shoulder Larger U.S. Payouts To Farmers

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:07 min | 1 year ago

As Climate Changes, Taxpayers Will Shoulder Larger U.S. Payouts To Farmers

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from Google from Connecticut California from Mississippi to Minnesota. Millions of businesses are using Google tools to grow online learn. How Google is supporting businesses in your state at Google dot com slash economic impact when disaster hits U._S.? Farmers like the floods this spring in the Midwest tax payers end up paying part of the bill because of government subsidized insurance the U._S. Department of Agriculture now says as a result of climate change the cost to taxpayers is likely to increase in the future. N._p._R.'s Dan Charles has the story Robert Henry is giving me a tour of the land where he'd love to be planting soybeans right now near New Madrid Missouri smells kind of Raunchy don't. And the swamp yeah we're GONNA leave this. It's water as far as I can see covering this flood plain between the Mississippi River and the levees land where Henry normally grows crops thousands and thousands of acres curse and some of the based land in the world but he won't grow anything here this year even has a tractor and harvesting equipment still stranded on an island out in the middle of all that water but here's the good news he'll get a check from his crop insurance not as much money as he'd have gotten from soybean crop but enough to help and get by his better than going under you know most grain farmers by crop insurance. It's a good deal for them. The federal government pays most of the cost of the premiums in fact the federal government spends on average about eight billion dollars a year on crop insurance for farmers. It could be a lot more this year U._S._D._A.. Officials expect to pay up to a billion dollars to farmers like Henry who couldn't plant their crops. Farmers who planted crops but get poor harvests will send their claims in later Robert Henry's hoping that this year's flooding won't turn out to be a taste of the future night they global warming but I don't think so I think we're in a cycle of wet and and we'll cycle out of it and will be dragging their billions of dollars riding on whether he's right the scientists of course say the climate is changing and a team of researchers at the U._S.. Department of Agriculture just tried to figure out how it might affect these these crop insurance payments economist Andrew Crane Grosz led the project we used five climate models some of which are more optimistic and some of which are more pessimistic in terms of warming and precipitation change in general these models show a future forty or eighty years from now in which farmers harvest smaller amounts of the country's biggest crops corn and soybeans reductions and yield almost across the entire country that sounds bad and it probably is for anybody who needs corn and soybeans but for farmers the pictures. Is Different because that's smaller harvest sells for higher price to the degree that climate change lowers production it will increase the value because of basic supply and demand and the government has to pay bigger subsidies for crop insurance premiums. It's ensuring something that's more valuable also the model show more volatility more booms and busts so more farmer claims more government payouts for bad harvests now craned Roche is quick to point out. This is not really a prediction addiction. The models don't include all kinds of other things like how much of the corn and soybean crop gets exported so there's just a lot of stuff that we can't capture and that's why this work is only the beginning. There's a lot more to do on top of this is studies attracting attention though partly because the work may not continue at least not right away or within the U._S._D._A.. The U._S._D._A.'s Economic Research Service which carried out this study is getting relocated from Washington D._C.. To Kansas City Secretary of Agriculture Sunny produces.

Robert Henry Google Department Of Agriculture Federal Government Dan Charles Mississippi River Midwest Minnesota Economic Research Service Connecticut Andrew Crane Grosz California Kansas City New Madrid Missouri Mississippi Roche
"roche" Discussed on Channel 955

Channel 955

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"roche" Discussed on Channel 955

"Push each other put me puts me only me keep it plus they do yeah stone jj mascot twenty seven she's a got a last minute roche.

roche
"roche" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"roche" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Roche's you know why name him mark the boy and this recording is lee ellen jones he was thirteen at the time it was nineteen ninetythree and he lived in one of the most violent neighborhoods on chicago's southside a local public radio station gave lee allen and a friend tape recorders to make a documentary about their lives the music you're hearing by the way is part of that documentary and was called ghetto life one on one i'll see the ghetto every day this it was basically half an hour of this kid leeann thirteen years old and his friend lloyd this fourteen years old just walking through a normal week in their lives this is our story it was such a simple idea and yet in one thousand nine hundred ninety three this was totally new first person storytelling from two african american teenagers we before since first grade seven years his life i was interested in the idea of people having the chance to be listened to and tell their stories dave icee was the producer behind ghetto life one on one but he actually doesn't appear in the documentary at all because dave wanted leon lloyd to tell their own stories.

Roche lee ellen jones chicago lee allen producer leon lloyd dave icee fourteen years thirteen years seven years
"roche" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"roche" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Is a trump tax plan is because he saving billions of billions of dollars hey news paying those go is in putting them in his pocket and i show a thousand other people you you the money is coming from your pocket one hundred bucks at a time so they trump's greatgrandson could save is fields he screwed you all of these people that tell you these things all have plenty of tax attorneys not i've gotten accounted they have tax attorneys who handled their business for them danni roche is extremely successful and what trump wants to do with his money should be whatever trump wants to do with his money why is it so important that you have other people's money what is it about other people's money that you need it so bad tell me it's funny because you say this thing i love about when i talk to people who aren't into supplyside economics to understand the trickle down theory is you you you say trickledown economics doesn't work which you really wanna do is trickle down economics via taxes because you think that's going to work because the whole thing is they know what's best for you if you take away nothing from today show you will say oh chad's right about this government always thinks they knows what's best for you always we know what's best for you supplyside economics does not in the private sector does not work has an ever trickles down to the worker what does work is is going out and taking money from other people and redistributing it via our way of trickle down economics via taxes isn't it kind of the same theory why is yours works and there's doesn't oh because there's is actually stuff that's worked for yours is stuff that's take it your pretending to be robin hood but sometimes we forget that robin hood was a thief and yet never thought of it like that we'll think of it.

danni roche trump chad robin hood
"roche" Discussed on Double Toasted

Double Toasted

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"roche" Discussed on Double Toasted

"You see how for roche's these things are man to see how grist that they are i like that we're looking at at the kale you get over his way they chop that thing up to pieces any was still slow grassless another thing where the dipper limbs in those amoeba dare cities like it this might be familiar legos no this was this was amazing to see that we've seen the inaction before we cinemas armies we've seen them how they get to group together a number of people but this one right here just been as aggressive as it is that was one obscured me the most and just see how one is still ferocious by itself but when we talk about the beginning of the show and how it's a great set up because before the action comes in before he had a great depth before we have great seeds would dragons a love this whole thing the way people would come in and we head on we had all these grudges that we would see all these people who had the anger for each other all these past relationships it really set the tone because we know we know sirc's not one to be trusted and it just in plus is one they felt like a tarantino movie way any bank blow up at any moment gala took was one person doing the wrong thing yeah you know one person fires a gun in his in his going off and seeing how all this animosity was in once place will was in one space in one place along with the one who was setting it up who's the least trust it out all of them seriously it just set up the tone for the whole the whole episode where i was just on edge because i just couldn't tell where things were going to go with people and not only with the people attack each other but i couldn't tell if if alliances would be changed sure.

roche we cinemas tarantino