35 Burst results for "Roche"

"roche" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

04:44 min | 3 months ago

"roche" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

"You know what you have left when you sell a company is all of the real assets in everything that it's worth at a real level and so that's why the stock market is a wonderful inflation protector in the long term. I can't help but ask you calling with all this being said. How do you position yourself. It's getting harder and harder. I mean the obviously. I you know i own real estate. I own i own stocks and bonds. I think that you know it's interesting. People often ask me. Why own cash. In beyond in the quantities that i do in the i think people tend to have this hyper focus on purchasing power in generating growth in maybe on just a big impact but for me a lot of investing over an asset allocation over the long term is about creating predictability in and to me. That's the thing that's super interesting about. Cash and bonds in particular is that they provide you with a certain amount of principle protection that other asset classes just by definition don't commodities inequities in trend following strategies. And all this other stuff that we've been talking about real estate more so lately it can't provide you with the the principal predictability that things like cash and bonds. Do so you have to to me. Asset allocation is a it's a personal blending of the two biggest risks in the world which is purchasing power versus principal volatility in. You know it's a. I often call asset allocation a-. Temporal conundrum what i mean by that is that you have certain liabilities. Oftentimes that are fixed. Over certain periods of time that you have to be able to have acquitted for that that's why you know there's trillions of dollars of cash held in the world there's trillions of dollars of low yielding bonds in the main reason for that is that there is trillions of dollars daily of short term liabilities that people need to fund and people need daily monthly annual liquidity for these things and they need predictability for these things. And so when you when you look at it from a temporal perspective well. I like to think of the stock market. For instance is like thirty year. High yield bond if you were to own nothing but that thirty year high yield bond yield on average seven percent but it doesn't come close to actually generating that every year it some years. It does thirty five percents. Sometimes it does negative thirty five percents so there's periods where that if you think of the equity market like a long a long duration bon. Well that thing can provide you with a huge amount of principle volatility in the short term and that is a terrible way to manage your shorts from liabilities. You just can't do it. You need to koppelman with something else and so to me. It's just that It's very personal. Question in you have to measure for yourself what that asset allocation has to look like to meet your personal situation for me. I've kind of transitioned more so Part of my life where. I probably value principle protection more so than i do purchasing power protection but i also have a really unusual situation where i'm a business owner so i have the vast majority of my net worth for instance tied up in my company and so from a from inflation perspective. I would argue that. My corporation is by far my most important inflation hedge and so to me. I think that the more diversification you can build into all of this the better you are in the long run because you kind of can cover all of those bases in a more widely distributed way but personally if you asked me what are the most important inflation hedges going forward in the next twenty thirty years. I would argue for certain you want to be the owner of things meaning that to a large degree owning your own. Low streams is going to be the best inflation protection whether that's equities that are publicly traded..

koppelman
"roche" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

03:04 min | 3 months ago

"roche" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

"And what they end up ultimately doing with those barrels of oil so it is a corporation is really. It is a real entity i mean. You're you're basically buying to a larger degree. you're buying the real assets of that corporation. What those real assets are likely to be worth in the future and so that's why things like stocks they much more reflect the the real asset world than that just buying pure. Play like a commodity. Because you're getting an embedded inflation protection and that's you know kind of going back to my example of the house. One of the reasons that that houses ended up being at least fairly good inflation protectors over the long term is. Because when i for instance. When i bought my house is not the thing to the ground. But i was able to rebuild. I was able to reinvest in land..

"roche" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

04:36 min | 3 months ago

"roche" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

"You don't earn interest in an environment like this on on a deposit because there is no risk so the risk is fully christ in its fully accounted for and so to me you know to to make a long winded answer really short. I do not think it's possible to to find these interest rate differentials and really benefit from them without making future inflation prediction. And that's the ultimately what this comes down to a country by country basis. You have to look at the interest rates as a measure of risk in some degree in. You know looking at like turkey for instance. Would i feel comfortable buying ten year or thirty year. Turkish bond just because it has a higher interest rate will absolutely not because the risk of hyperinflation in that sort of situation is just through the roof and so the the interest rate reflects a certain degree of risk in that in that. And i think that you know from this is a really interesting. Theoretical concept from a country perspective because the interest rate does to a large degree reflect the credit quality of that specific country. And i think that you're a lot of what you're seeing in. The developed world where interest rates are very low is really a reflection that inflation to a large degree is a reflection that demand for that money is so high that the perceived future credit risk is perceived as extremely extremely low and you know from a country perspective the interest rate and the inflation rate to a large degree which they tend to correlate to a large degree over long periods of time it reflects the the credit quality of that specific country. And you know so. We think of sovereign government says being risk free but the reality is that a ten percent yielding sovereign bond is really for all practical purposes. It's like a junk bond. It's a really junkie bond compared to something like a ten year treasury which in today's environment even though it's yielding one point three percent the reason the that's like that is it's not just the fed to a large degree..

turkey treasury
"roche" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

03:42 min | 3 months ago

"roche" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

"It's just completely completely different than it was forty years ago and so a lot of that makes it so hard to to quantify in the they tried to do a good job with what they call. Donald adjustments in. I mean frankly it's just it's impossible to quantify the difference. I mean how do you measure the difference in the quality of of modern pain versus paint. That was made thirty forty years ago. I mean how can you put a number on something like that. It's just it's so subjective to some degree in the bill tries to do a good job of it it's just ends up being a super imperfect measure because frankly it's also subjected so yeah. It's it's interesting mainly because the going coming back to the real estate market is just housing. Stole complex so many great big factor that work into it that it makes it very very difficult to imagine that a lot of the current trends are going to change anytime soon. Let's him out a little here. We see in the news. You know we obviously the. Us inflation numbers are very prevalent..

Donald Us
"roche" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

03:35 min | 3 months ago

"roche" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

"Starting a project is easy. It's the finishing the project. That's so hard and when you're under a tight timeline. Sometimes you need extra help to get through the finish line. Five or business puts a world expert freelancers at your fingertips so you can get the project across the finish line and be proud of the work. Plus you'll get everything you need to seamlessly integrate your new team members into your workflow the biggest bottleneck for me at my business personally is usually graphic design. 'cause we only need that skill set very intermittently so instead of trying to source available graphic designer every other month. I simply use fiber business. I encourage you to also stop wasting time searching for talent and just leave it to five business. Their team of dedicated business success. Managers help match you with the best talent for your own team. No more endless guessing in interviews plus save and share your favor freelancers for future projects. It's a simple way to set your business up for success and win big and productivity and collaboration by the freelancers you need to give your next project. Just the boost. It needs to finish strong right now. You can sign up for fiber business absolutely free for the first year. Get one free year and save ten percent on your purchase of fiber business with promo code. Investors just go to fiber dot com slash business. And don't forget the promo code investors. You guys know..

"roche" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

03:22 min | 3 months ago

"roche" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

"Otherwise would and i suspect that that some of these underlying factors are not going to be so transitory. They're not. We're not gonna see kind of going back to what i was talking about earlier. I do not think we're going to see anything. Like the nineteen seventy s. This isn't really a bad environment. That's ripe for like stagflation. Something like that. Which was i mean. The seventies were really more so oil crisis than anything else. But i don't think we're in an environment where we're likely to see very high sustained to save ten percent inflation or something like that just because i think the secular headwinds are. They're so big. There's so much different this time around where you don't have. You have not necessarily a japanese type. A demographic issue in the development. But it's it's much more similar to japan than it is say like a baby boom situation or something like that where the population is growing pretty significantly in meaningfully but in addition you have all these other factors like the technological factor the globalization factor is. One of the biggest. I mean you could argue that. The world has never had so much accessible. Cheap labor in its existence and globalization puts a huge secular downward trend on inflation. And so a lot of these big macro trends. I think they don't necessarily put a A ceiling on inflation. But they make it very very difficult. For especially for policymakers to create a lot of inflation. And i think that the thing that is most interesting about the last eighteen months that you had this big huge policy response. I mean the. It wasn't really the fed so much it was mostly the us treasury. I would argue. That really caused a lot of the inflation because the government the treasury spent some treasury spent six and a half trillion dollars in the last twelve eighteen months. It's just the numbers are colossal. And so it's interesting because mainly going forward. Those numbers are not gonna continue. The we're likely to run trillion dollar deficits going forward. But we're not likely to run six and a half trillion dollars of spending year after year after year. And so you don't have the sustained fiscal tailwind that caused a lot of the inflation that we're experiencing right now and i think there's a lot of these things taper off. You are likely to see prices that look. The fed would call transitory. But that will end up. Probably not being as transitory as the fed. I think expects and so if you you end up with even inflation that's in the safe three and a half percent range by year end and let's say that that stains in the twenty twenty two. You could have a situation where the fed is getting pretty concerned about that sort of feedback loop where they start to worry about the snowball effect in essence of the of the price increases. Where you have something. That's a little more sustained. And so far from their target. I mean three and a half percent is is a pretty significant shift away from their target range of two percent that you could have easily rate increases. I think in twenty twenty two that starts to reflect the feds concerns about continued inflation. Let's take a quick break and hear from today sponsor..

us treasury fed treasury japan
FDA Authorizes Roche Drug for Severely Ill COVID-19 Patients

Hugh Hewitt

00:36 sec | 5 months ago

FDA Authorizes Roche Drug for Severely Ill COVID-19 Patients

"Very U. delicate S. Health officials position. have It's granted almost as emergency though the emperor use. does Another not anti want the Olympics body to go drug forward. to help And hospitalized New York patients never misses with the most an opportunity dangerous cases to screw of Covid its business 19. people The because FDA that's who Andrew has authorized Cuomo is. the Drug With Act little warning. camera They're shutting from Roche down to for go hospitalized cocktails patients who and are already that shutdown receiving steroid is drugs, leaving oxygen all of the restaurants and other in Manhattan measures to reeling fight Covid going 19. by a drink It's today actually from been a approved restaurant and for take arthritis it away if you're drinking and several person other diseases, They got but stuck it will help again inflammation, by Andrew Cuomo, which is who the driver governs of Covid as 19 though he has been drinking studies himself. have shown All by those adding to go this other cocktail. treatment. There is a reduced Don't go risk anywhere. America of Death a lot and more hospitalization. you you would show I had Time on was

Cuomo Olympics Roche FDA Andrew New York Covid Manhattan Andrew Cuomo Arthritis America
The Latest: US officials authorize the use of antibody-drug

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 5 months ago

The Latest: US officials authorize the use of antibody-drug

"U. S. health officials have granted emergency use for another antibody drug to help hospitalized patients with the most dangerous cases of covert nineteen the FDA has authorized the drug act Temora from Roche for hospitalized patients who are already receiving steroid drugs oxygen and other measures to fight covert nineteen it's actually been approved for arthritis and several other diseases but it will help inflammation which is the driver of covert nineteen studies have shown by adding this other treatment there's a reduced risk of death and hospitalization time was cut I Shelley Adler

Roche FDA Arthritis Shelley Adler
AI at Heineken, With Raam Roch Hai

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

02:00 min | 7 months ago

AI at Heineken, With Raam Roch Hai

"Have been thrilled to be connected with our next guest today. who is rahm roche. Hi hey who is. The engineering chapter. Lead at heineken. So high ron. Thank you so much for joining us on a i. Thank you for having me yet. Thank you so much for joining us and listeners. You know as ron said we were connected at our machine learning life cycle conference so you may recognize him from a panel there if you've participated but were so excited to have you on our podcast today. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners. And tell them a little bit about your background. And your current role at heineken. I would be happy to do that. I was start as early as i as can. I always liked shocking problems. If it's legos or reading or just to listening to france at it kind of made me happy. Dan naturally attracted to programming. i think programs are really abundant. That's in programming. Again you can solve a wide range of them so it's Tool after people would like solving problems as an eastern idea to join these ready army I was three years it structure in these viliami maybe a structural compared to other armies. But for me it was a quite a shock. And i told myself and event structure let's start ups startups a great You have quite the freedom to do what you wanted. Then you can care or so. A wide range of problems at it can be quite specific. So instead that i worked on visited systems on no no sequel that the basis going really zero to sixty Very quickly

Rahm Roche Heineken RON DAN France
A Brief History of Neuroscience

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

01:56 min | 7 months ago

A Brief History of Neuroscience

"So neuroscience. The study of the nervous system has had an interesting history of being both extremely old and extremely new Ancient greeks and egyptians went back and forth whether the brain or the heart was the center of intelligence and hippocrates argued that the brain was the center though this wouldn't gain traction until the roman physician galen proposed it It took until an understanding of electricity. In the nineteenth century before we could really understand the brain the experiments of luigi gala vanni and the electrical activity of the body pave the way for research in the nervous system for awhile. Neuroscience research was divided into different fields such as physiology anatomy zulu psychiatry etc David roche helped integrate these fields creating the neuroscience research program at mit in nineteen sixty two. james mcgowan established the first department of neuroscience at university of california irvine in nineteen sixty four and later major neuroscience organizations were created including the international brain research organization. Or i bro. because it's a bunch of bros. Working on brains at that could be like your pneumonic for it That was established in nineteen sixty one and the society for neuroscience was established in nineteen sixty which is known for its annual meeting. One of the largest scientific conferences in the world so we're gonna start with neurons aka the small stuff so adam is and again. This is all adams words. I i am not the data scientist or the neuro scientists in this situation. I am just. I am the female voice of adam. Large in this specific instance. Everyone so all my words are his words. Except when i do inside you'll know when that happens on many less syllables. Yeah it would be those. Those observations will be much

Center Of Intelligence And Hip Luigi Gala Vanni David Roche James Mcgowan Department Of Neuroscience University Of California Irvin Galen International Brain Research O MIT Society For Neuroscience Adam Adams
"roche" Discussed on RFK Refugees Podcast

RFK Refugees Podcast

04:19 min | 9 months ago

"roche" Discussed on RFK Refugees Podcast

"And he's gonna lean on that probably heavy this year and that you meals not going to be. On the periphery. So i think that you know you're right if it's not all it's a problem and i think it's going to be a problem and i think he'll be replaced in the summer if i had to bet but i think you meals going to get enough opportunities. And he has the mammal shoot like he. He would shoot with an opportunity last year rights. So look i mean where do you see him playing. Though i don't. I don't know i don't think it depends so much on how he wants to throw players out with the center. Backseat jewish i probably go. The four-man backline. I think he plays on the left side. I think it's possible. If if losada has wingers. I think that you you put you go to well. It's not. it's not legal in maryland. So i can't do. They are back but You would. i'd bet on on your meals. Well but i just don't know that that's going to be the system and if it's not an if it's too wingback. Where does your meal play because floor as if not not in the middle right back. He's taken that second striker spot so it's not available and he's not a number nine so i love the you meal shout i i said it before you said it as a could it be because it's just who who shoots and it's a meal but so i'll say i have to say all but really i think it's going to be a real which is a problem but i think my i'll guess arial he can still get six or seven goals coming back in. May i think. And i don't i don't know six hundred that's not probably probably not enough but it might put him in the running it might it's better than own-goal being the leading score true so we've got that angus wants to sort of a off dc united question angus wants to know about your craziest memory craziest..

six last year four-man this year seven goals maryland jewish six hundred losada nine angus second striker spot united
"roche" Discussed on RFK Refugees Podcast

RFK Refugees Podcast

02:37 min | 9 months ago

"roche" Discussed on RFK Refugees Podcast

"If you just even include the stuff that we went through and then he had other stuff going on included in that so you think now okay take a breath. Get healthy mourn. The loss of your family member get whoever you need into. The country have a full preseason. Let's go forward now. And the other thing. He got injured in preseason last year so he never was really got the speed and then they shut it down so i wanna give him a mulligan. United asked me for mulligans. I want to give him a mulligan for last year. But if he's not if it's the same as last year let's this. This whole conversation was was useless if he is playoff team and maybe maybe even higher expectations than that. I think that empathy though is a good is a good place to be when you when you're when you're a fan when you're in an analyst when you're looking at sort of the holistic view of the player it's important to know that stuff like you said Situation all that stuff matters if you're if you're miserable at home you're not gonna play well and the only problem for dc night. Is that when they invest when they break their own transfer fee for player in in an important offensive position and he doesn't perform the team is going to sputter up. they don't have. That's a huge huge miss. It's like reminds me of the guy auto for their first ep. That didn't work. That was a clanger but the problem is that that set team back for multiple here hundred. Yup team can't manage dean can't handle that sort of thing so i remember that i said some questions. I want to run through these real quick time. Events to go ahead at dribble past wants your latest thoughts on the this is not a quick question. Whoops dermal pass wants your latest thoughts on the dc united academy and how it fits in the dmv youth soccer scene. That is not a quick react question. Yeah it's not it's not I'll try to be as as quick as brief as i possibly can. I've i've covered this in my podcast. Pitch pass with charles bom we also i also talked about it with andrew dykstra a former keeper. Who now coaches or a club in prince william. County look dc. United has a. This is not gonna come as a shock to people who just follow the i team dc united has a branding problem and a lot of it for for for as far as the youth is concerned is the is the pay to play which they've done away with but i'm not gonna pat you on the back for your pressing announcement saying that. You've made it free for everybody when literally. You are alexa the last team to do it. I'm not going to give you credit for..

andrew dykstra United charles bom dc united academy dc united last year first ep alexa dc. william.
"roche" Discussed on RFK Refugees Podcast

RFK Refugees Podcast

05:09 min | 9 months ago

"roche" Discussed on RFK Refugees Podcast

"Talk about him as legacy. But it's exciting. Now we're gonna get somebody different. It's going to be awesome. And then the first wave of candidates came out and we were like really like we're just going to like we're turning the page from ben to chris armas like why don't we just keep ben if we're keep our legacy guy over somebody else's legacy guy so like they did a great job of lowering everybody's excitement for that so then when you got the second way he started hearing about pineda and i was like oh now that could be interesting and all that one away then it turned into a week and a half coach for twenty twenty one and then like no offence to chad. But like it really felt to me like chad's going to keep the interim title for twenty twenty one because we were getting close to the point where. I didn't know that we're be time to hire somebody. So when lozada's name came up same deal never heard of this guy who is he was feels like maybe they might be cheap out again but he is coming from europe and you'd probably have to make him a solid offer to get them out of europe especially when he's coaching in the first division of a of a major league so i was cautiously optimistic. Then i started following him on his socials. He's a great great instagram. Or that's a really only follow him on. he's a great instagram. And i started getting exciting. And they they as you said they struck on a gold mine by making him up for practices and obviously available to everybody which was also fantastic so they made them. I it was i saw and i was like happy to talk. Rfk refugees getting new coach. Before i feel like maybe you got him like your stuff landed before. Pablo and golf stuff like stuff. And i'm like wait a second. What's going on here so it was just a perfectly timed email. I think is all that was. Get a grip yet. So seeing him mic'ed up start hearing him talk about philosophy hearing them talk about how he wants to play..

europe ben chris armas Pablo lozada first division instagram a week and a half twenty first wave second way pineda one
"roche" Discussed on RFK Refugees Podcast

RFK Refugees Podcast

05:00 min | 9 months ago

"roche" Discussed on RFK Refugees Podcast

"I never been a fan since three to never waxed poetic about rfk stadium. Sure i know it's place and i appreciated its place but what what really solidified. My phantom for dc united was the united new england ribs semifinal eastern conference semifinal match which for a number of years was considered the greatest match in. Mls history so. It was a fantastic match full of a lot of goals. Pk saves it had everything but the biggest thing had had was the supporters lost their minds through the whole match. And look nats fans can come out and go. Will we got excited during the ploughs. Yes but not in the third inning when it was zero zero and there was four hits between the two teams not at that point as get close to the end of the game. We get crazy so washington football game football team same thing these people stood up and they sang and they cheered and they screamed for the from from before i sat down till as i was walking out and that is what made me a fan. So for as the move into audi field happened and you mentioned all the hunt stuff for them to go. Don't care when honestly for fifteen years you were hanging your hat on best fans and mls. Here's a picture by season tickets. Nothing about on the field. Just fireworks and torches in the stands is our picture because we don't have any identifiable players by season tickets for the crowd and the fans where you then to go. They don't matter to us and we're not being to consult them for anything and we don't. We don't need them. We want them to kind of phase. Those out that was. That's when i decided i'm not. I'm not going to be an apologist anymore. I'm going to be somebody who is going because at that point i was no longer in with the beer. Throwers but i know what i know that they are the heart and lifeblood of the club.

fifteen years two teams dc united four hits third inning zero washington three united new england rfk stadium conference
"roche" Discussed on RFK Refugees Podcast

RFK Refugees Podcast

02:46 min | 9 months ago

"roche" Discussed on RFK Refugees Podcast

"If we could just shout out kyle again had a dot com for a player in the mid two thousand and one that is still quote like volleyball is internet in the back all the things all the elements that the the the lucho lucio amelio singing and the singing in the locker room all the elements that came through. That were the fact that they're still living on some of the you know. Obviously like very online community still exists. It's a testament to the idea and the execution. Yeah and he had the perfect guy to do it. In bobby who was just up for everything and you know basically. He was a youtuber influence. Before that was the thing that you could monetize your. Bobby's thrilled that. He did monetize for so they asked me to do it. I eagerly accepted i. I only had one caveats and it was look. I know that. I'm going to be working on an official dc podcast. I'm not gonna obviously shit on dc united. But i'm also i don't wanna be in a situation where we've got to act like everything is hunky dory when everything may or may not be hunky dory. I'm not going to criticize the team just to criticize the team. But i also don't think that we should if we're going to do a podcast. We shouldn't shy away from being clear as to you. Know the form of the club what club can and can't do and and so on and you know they had to have some conversations and we went back and forth on it and they finally said okay. Yeah we'll we'll give you like a little leeway and we'll see what you do with it and if you go too far we'll lot the pull you back in but yes within certain reason. We'll give you some some editorial control over what you talk about. The i think the great thing about that show at the end of the day was a the access that we had be the fact that they didn't really us as far as a to'real stuff you know. Look we're ten years out from the show so i can kind of spill the t. Alright here.

kyle dc united Bobby bobby one one caveats volleyball lucio amelio ten years lucho two thousand youtuber
"roche" Discussed on RFK Refugees Podcast

RFK Refugees Podcast

05:59 min | 9 months ago

"roche" Discussed on RFK Refugees Podcast

US Health Officials Warn of Risk of False Positives in Widely Used COVID Test

Chris Krok

00:45 sec | 9 months ago

US Health Officials Warn of Risk of False Positives in Widely Used COVID Test

"U. S. Health officials are warning health professionals about the risk of false positives. With a widely used laboratory test for covert 19 and the flu footed no Drug administration issue the alert today for health facilities using Roche's Kobe's task for the corona virus and seasonal flu. The agency warned that the problems with the tests processing tubes could result in false diagnosis. And people who are not actually infected. Rocha's testing system is widely used to screen large batches of pay patient samples in hospitals and laboratories. The FDA recommends health workers test samples multiple times to assure accuracy.

Drug Administration FLU Roche Kobe Rocha FDA
Interview With Jason Lau

Bitcoin Radio

04:45 min | 10 months ago

Interview With Jason Lau

"Who everyone welcome back to reimagine twenty twenty four. I'm roche mirage car from mouse and i'm one of your host for this event We are starting with our halloween themed for this event four events. And that's why. I'm dressed like this. I'm so excited to be joined here by jason loud. The coo at okay coin. Jason thank you so much for joining us today and let's start off just by asking you know. How has it been for you and your team just coping with the whole virtual situation The past couple months. Hey rush thanks for having me That's this is certainly been a challenge right a challenging year for for most of us and has been no different for our team. We were based here in san francisco. And i think the most interesting thing about this year for us has been that we've actually expanded our quite dramatically over the past six seven months. Despite the fact that we none of us have been in the office. Our office has been closed. And we've had Last i checked was thirty. New people join us over this this time so with thirty colleagues teammates that have never met anyone else on our team So we we we very quickly transition to doing everything online as most of you know everyone else is doing And you know that that's been fun and challenging at the same time. Yeah that's actually a cool little fact to start things off because a lot of let's say traditional companies are trying to down size or they're all they're already going virtual so glad to hear that you being one of the crypto companies in the space are are hiring and expanding. I'm a little more on. That front. looks like okay. Corn has been up to a lot of different things especially when it comes to licenses and regulations. I've seen a great push in the in the eastern market and even in asia What can you tell me about the importance for you. All of the asian market. And do you think that will that will continue to see more growth there or Do you think that the us 'cause you said you're in san francisco do that in the us. Some things will be will be yeah On that note we even just sort of on our licensing and compliance teams. We've we've added a lotta people specifically because we are sort of targeting this global approach to regulations and licenses and and the like So on your on your question. Around what our efforts have been And sort of what regions were looking at we are we're regulating here in the us We're also regulated in europe The the malta regulators. Over there we last year I might be getting my dates wrong. But i think yeah last year earlier this year we got our license in japan and so that that was a process that took almost two years to to accomplish so Big props to the team there as well as Working on our licensed today in singapore. So we've got a whole bunch of things going on And i think the important is that Licensing one it's obviously the the law right. We have to comply with what governments and regulators are are putting in mostly consumer protection. But you know putting in place to make sure that there's a building of trust in our in our space and to it permits us to access And sir bill that that Userbase with the with the backing of these regulators and permission right So so regulation is super important and then as we think about that. Broadly like i mentioned we do service users globally so not no. I don't want to say one region is more important than another But you know our heritage stems from originally founded in In beijing in two thousand thirteen and so we do have a very strong user base and brand recognition in asia will always remain a key. Focus point for us. We mentioned singapore mentioned japan. But all the parts of asia to hong kong southeast asia are areas that we we we certainly have have users and continue to grow that area

Roche Mirage San Francisco Jason United States Asia Sir Bill Malta Singapore Japan Europe Beijing Hong Kong
Automatic Summarization

Data Skeptic

05:53 min | 10 months ago

Automatic Summarization

"My name is martin luther before and i'm a vc student at the university from saddam. Main research is focused on natural language processing and information retrieval. And i'm especially interested in how we can learn from humans and human cognition to improve our ai models before that. I did my master's degree in artificial intelligence at my bachelor's degree in mystic so liked to take the knowledge i also have from the back roads and the light microbes research everything. I've done related to natural language processing carries with it a sort of computer science bias towards it. I don't have your background in linguistics. What advantages does that give you in your approaches to natural language processing. It's quite interesting. We've seen the developments. From the early days. I would say wehrley Quite prominence when we wanted to model language greedy looks into specific linguistic structures. And at least things then we went into an era. Our people throw that away basically no linguistics of war Data only we only want to learn patterns from data and always see a bit of shift back again so people try to incorporate knowledge from linguistics into models with the idea that they come maybe learn everything from data per se or if we have named with knowledge that might gives an advantage if we decide like these are models that could work well for this task for example is a pretty exciting thing to see that we go back in the knowledge of marie slogan definitely there have been a couple of people who have taken a pretty provocative ver- extreme point of view on this and is ibm. Has this famous quote. Yes i believe Frederick djelic said every time i fire a linguist the performance of the speech recognizer goes up so i imagine that was a deliberately provocative statement to make in your experience. How have these communities actually overlapped in the community or p. community specifically we want to model language and that's basically what you also want to do linguistics. You want to model language and you want to understand language. You may not want to light produce than which so much linguists rather observe whereas from nlp perspective you might as well to produce but also understand that right. So i think as linguist. You have certain intuitions about language with everyone might have. That seem very obvious to you as linguists that other people might not find so obvious such as negation can be a hard province so for me seems very obvious because this is a trend See gwyn stakes but like from computer science perspective. Never thought about this. You might wonder like why does my mom before well these types of includes or questions or whatever you might not realize that it was about negation or something. That is yet wasn't really that long ago when people still seriously considered that we could solve negation with just a couple of handcrafted rules Exactly like there's more to that right. I think in order to understand what would work well or licensing doesn't work well yet. List acknowledged really comes in handy. Will your paper the caught. My attention is titled what makes a good summary reconsidering the focus of automatic. Summer ization now automatic. Summer is kind of interesting that by hearing it. Even if you've never heard of this fuel before. You kind of intuitively know what it's all about yet. There's still some open questions practically speaking you know. What does it mean to do some reservation. Could you perhaps give us a survey or overview of the various techniques is a great question. Maybe not so clear which is one of the reasons why we started to write this paper. But that said i can give an overview first of what is often perceived as the way to do it in the community. so i'm talking about texts. Summarize -ation right because Of video summer ization for example with for decoration. You often do. thank you. Take any input documents. Texts article for example news article or a bunch of news articles media articles. And you want to kind of get the gist out of this input and right leg few sentence summary about it. That is the majority of work that is done now. How is this done with anything. We've seen a little progress. They're so it started off with a unsupervised Graph based model such as text. Frank relax wrangler. Basically people make a graph of the input documents and then kind of see. What are the most important sentences Extract those now with the rise of neuro models. We see that there is much To sequence approaches. That people used first night with our anez. We see transformers. And bird and bird dyke auto spoken up in a community. And then you also asked about the evaluation. So how often do it is served few forms of evaluation so you have flake the firm and often people use a roche with basically check for lexical. So have your label. Summary like the one you know. It should be any kind of check out. Many words are in common with summary. I produced there. How many acronyms to make it more precise and then there's also some new metrics such as like bird scores in one that doesn't measure lexical similarity with router semantics clarity right because in this lexical similarity approach. If you have a word is kind of the same word as in the summary. That was the label. But it's not the same word out and you don't want that so you run our to measure semantic similarity so that's another type of scoring functions people use and then another way is with human evaluation though you would ask. People questions like which of these summaries is more fluent or which one more informative or which one has the best coverage these questions

University From Saddam Marie Slogan Frederick Djelic Martin Luther Gwyn IBM Frank
Biden's Cancellation Of Permit For Keystone XL Pipeline Faces Mixed Reactions

Environment: NPR

03:40 min | 11 months ago

Biden's Cancellation Of Permit For Keystone XL Pipeline Faces Mixed Reactions

"Now president biden isn't just focusing on the pandemic one of the first things. He did after his inauguration. Yesterday was to cancel a permit to build the keystone excel pipeline that pipeline would transported crude oil from alberta to the texas gulf coast would have entered the us in montana from their yellowstone. Public radio's kayla roche reports on the mixed reaction to the cancellation tribes and environmental groups. Here and in other states the pipeline would have crossed have been fighting the keystone excel pipeline in court for roughly a decade last year in a video by indigenous collective buffalo defense. Roughly ten for pet tribal members protested in northern montana. They lined up with their hands held up fists and repeated a lakota phrase. That's become slogan. For the movement against pipelines like the dakota access pipeline keystone excel. Johnny were drawing. Water is life. The canadian company behind keystone xl tc energy operates a pipeline which spilled thousands of gallons of oil in south dakota and twenty seventeen and in north dakota in nine thousand hundred activists and tribal members say the pipeline endangers water-quality bricks tribal land treaties and pipeline. Construction brings the threat of human trafficking. Biden's decision to revoke a presidential permit. Donald trump granted canadian developer energy in two thousand nineteen puts a heart stop to the billion dollar project. Among those celebrating was fort belknap indian community council president. Andy work a member of the onny tribe. I'm just really happy. I'm really happy. And i'm really thankful in south dakota the rosebud sioux tribal government. Join fort belknap. In suing to stop the pipeline. Rosebud sioux president rodney bordeaux was busy coordinating cove nineteen vaccinations. When he heard biden cancelled. The permit agreed victory. Hopefully that's the end of it but will continue to fight it we're gonna watch it but pipelines supporters are seeing the collapse of ten years of work. Tc energy which declined to comment for the story. Released a statement in anticipation of the permit cancellation yesterday and said it. Suspending further activity on the pipeline county commissioners in rural northeastern montana where agriculture is the dominant industry said they had been looking forward to the tax revenue which the state estimated at sixty three million dollars. A year extremely disappointed mary. Armstrong a commissioner in montana's valley county where very large county with very few people seems like a perfect place in Perfectly compatible with us montana. Republicans strongly criticized by an institution. But keep an excel has also been supported by democrats here. Including former governor steve bullock and senator jon tester yesterday tester said he still supports the development of the pipeline but with conditions he had encouraged the biden administration to meet with supporters and opponents before making a decision while the pipeline from alberta looks dead for now the premier of that province jason kenney yesterday pushed for consequences the canadian province of alberta invest in one point. Five billion dollars in the project in a statement. Yesterday kenny culver biden and prime minister justin trudeau to discuss the decision. However the us government refuses to open the door to a constructive and respectful dialogue about these issues that it is clear that the government of canada impose meaningful trade and economic sanctions to defend our country's vital economic interest canadian prime minister justin trudeau in a statement expressed. Disappointment invite is decision but acknowledged biden's choice to fulfil a promise. He made during his campaign run

Texas Gulf Coast Kayla Roche Northern Montana Montana Keystone Xl Tc Energy Biden Fort Belknap Indian Community South Dakota Rosebud Sioux Tribal Governmen Fort Belknap Rosebud Sioux Rodney Bordeaux Alberta Donald Trump Buffalo North Dakota Dakota Johnny
"roche" Discussed on Slate's Working

Slate's Working

06:52 min | 1 year ago

"roche" Discussed on Slate's Working

"First off June before we actually talk about the interview. I just wanted to say. Thank you for asking our guests about hammond song. I think i should out myself here. I was the one who said it's one of the most perfect songs. I was the one who demanded you. Ask them and i actually teared up a little when you were talking about it with them. So thank you so much for bringing this perfect song into the interview and to our listeners. You are so welcome. It is a perfect song. You know the funny thing about it though preparing for this interview. When i knew i would be talking to someone who's where it was had been so meaningful to me for many years. It was really an odd experience because it got me to look at songs. That was super familiar with it. I could like sink on cue. Even as i hadn't heard them for many years and i always knew that that song was amazing. And as you said on the album. There's this amazing guitar solo from prague hero robert trip but i never really like engage with the words. I would sing along with them without really thinking about it. So imagine my surprise to learn that it was literally about. They're going to hammond hammond louisiana and their parents wearing that it would put them on the wrong track. That's kind of crazy. And yet it is so utterly italy roaches ish. Yeah it's great that it's so rooted in something kind of quotidian but through of leaving out a couple of details and through the power of the melody it becomes about anytime you feel longing for someone who you feel like is making a life mistaken. I think that's a pretty universal human experience if you care about someone there's going to be some memorial like you're fucking up your life. Don't do that and that song. Really really summons it. I think this is our first guest so far. Who is collaborating with a family member. I mean we had jessica blanket eric. Johnson who are husband and wife but here it's mother and daughter and that seems like it should or could be so fraught but for them. If seems to feel very matter of fact what what did you think about their collaboration. Oh i was so envious of their relationship and also of that collaboration which seems to be one where they have absolutely total trust and feel able to just like share ideas and give feedback on those ideas without holding back From the site. At least there's like a gilmore girls quality to their relationship. I mean says he was young. When lucy was born and they were on the road and generally in like cheek by joe proximity and then i hadn't really realized what an intimate act. It would be to like right words to your daughter's music or sing lead on your mom sung. There's something really lovely but that yes absolutely. I mean it's one thing to we're going to put songs that we each wrote together on an album and other to bring someone else's idea of a bit of their sold sold their life exactly. I really appreciate it as i do. Whenever this happens with our guests with how forthright they were about the life of touring musician. We think of that life as as somewhat glamorous even if the glamour grubby stills sparkles in the moonlight but actually being a touring musician and particularly a touring folk. Musician is a hard job. You're traveling all the time. You never know how good a venue or audience is going to be. It's not actually that fun a lot of the time. No i agreed at. I guess it's one of those things that you only do it. If you are absolutely like addicted to it that there's nothing else you would rather do because you know any job that involves travel there only fun like when you're fully absolutely rested when your health is perfect. Which doesn't happen after the first three days and adding on top of just general stress of travel like the extra stress of stuff like well the venue before. We'll i get paid. Will anyone by the merch that i'm schlepping from time to time. Can i find a vegan hotdog by all of that stuff. Makes it just really really hard line of work so yes. I was very relieved that they were so honest about that. Yeah another thing. They were both very honest about that. I was really struck by was the different origin stories for this album for this project that for lucy. It's well. It's easier for me to write if i have a deadline right like i have something if i have to write then i'm going to write. Which is something. I very much sympathize with so it's writing comes out of a sort of logistical reality. But then for suzzie comes out of an emotional reality. She's writing from emotion and for her particularly. It's a real rage at the anti-feminist backlash both of donald. Trump's election and the response to me too and that that anger fueled an album. That is this beautiful. I was really struck by. Yeah you know it's funny. It was kind of jarring to hear that maggie roach died on the day of donald. Trump's inauguration. I knew that she had passed away. I haven't made that exact connection with the timing and for songwriter. Who so driven by events and emotions knowing that clearly it was bound to lead to this burst of creativity so it makes perfect sense. Do you feel like you hear those two different origin stories in the album itself. No no i certainly would never thought that. Lucy kind of wrote that song on deadline. Never that would never hurt me. Which of course as it should be. But i don't think i really did with soci- sung's either because i guess we always connect to certain songs and the songs that i connected to were. Were in a different vein. I absolutely love swan. Duck song which we spoke about which is about lives changing dramatically in unexpected ways as we get older and continually changing or jane which is just beautiful love song by mikey roach or the great version of factory girl which i perhaps not well from before for me. Hear as a me. Too sung even though clearly. That's exactly what it is. So since she said that. I absolutely recognized it but that was not how i appreciated it the first time around so if our listeners hearing this interview now want to go check out the album. What song would you start with. What song would you be like. Listen to this. One is at swan song for you. It is You know as i said in the interview. It's kind of a silly song. Your it seems that way at first and then actually you realize not tall silly and also quite silly and so it it to me that like represents something that's absolutely integral to the roaches vibe. Absolutely right it's like dear. Mr selleck when she says when she talks about waiting tables and then i've been waiting for things to come. True would not.

robert trip hammond hammond joe proximity hammond lucy prague suzzie louisiana jessica italy maggie roach eric Trump Johnson donald mikey roach Lucy jane Mr selleck
"roche" Discussed on Slate's Working

Slate's Working

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"roche" Discussed on Slate's Working

"I think lucy as you've mentioned you spent a good chunk of your childhood touring with With your mum and your aunts Was there anything that you experienced in that time that you really wanted to avoid in your career or something that you wanted to replicate when you committed to a career in music. Well things are a funnier. When you're with other people tour so i think one thing that i discovered going out on the road by myself which is a lot more of what my dad has done in his career. I do much more of that. Which is just yourself and yourself by yourself and it's not as funny as when you have future with you. It's also probably not as annoying in some ways because people don't get on your nerves but yourself gets on your nerves and that might be the worst of all and You know when something goes wrong like when when we're on the road together as a duo when something goes wrong it becomes funnier quicker than when you're alone and you just are in despair about a something going wrong or no one coming to the show or being in a terrible hotel. So i think it's a very different thing to be alone on the road or together but there are certain things that that are there no matter what like the sole fullness of being out out and driving around and and the connections that you make with other people who come to the shows and stuff and the those exist in both places but it is a pretty different thing that i didn't know a lot about until i did it by myself. Is this kind of the longest. The both of you have not been touring for for while you've been professional musicians. I haven't been home for this lying twelve years thirteen years. Yeah i can imagine. There are rooms that you've never decorated because it's okay. I don't use that room but we live in new york. No but i've been very amazed to find out how much more dish soap you use when you're home. How many more. I've actually finished containers of milk. Wish never used to happen. Because i was never home so yeah i think the fact that it happened to everyone and all at the same time you know within one day every gig was cancelled for everyone and that changes it from something. That's just totally personal. You know and. I don't know if that made it easier or harder. Like i think what lucy said. It's shocking Yes but there's something you know when things start to fall apart in bit by bit way. Sometimes we as humans think we can do something about it like well. I'll just try to do this to fix it. Or i'll just do this or especially when you're an independent artists trying to piece together your thing but this was so complete well. There's nothing i can do about that in a way. That was maybe a good thing because there was no scrambling to try to fix it. There's nothing to do about it. It's just done of you know.

lucy new york
Using Snaps To Package Old Software

Ubuntu Podcast

03:36 min | 1 year ago

Using Snaps To Package Old Software

"Roche whose economically employees on public cloud as written a blog post about using snaps to package old software also and i can relate to this you know. Usually we espouse the virtues of using snaps to get the very latest bleeding edge versions of stuff. Well it can also be a good for preserving things like old software that you still want to be able to run. And philip is examples of old software. And there's plenty of good examples of this lightning. Shutter for example was Basically abandoned the screen shows software and was kicked out the archive. Many districts like debbie and unlike a boon to have requirements software. To be well-maintained before it's allowed to stay in the archive and some of the software booted out the archives. So a user who's running one version of debbie and upgrades after six months finds some of their software disappears because he's no longer maintain longer available. And so this highlights the fact that you can repackage existing software up to keep it working because even if you upgrade the operating system the snap is bill of core which runs across any releasable into. It means that it doesn't matter. If you upgrade your less you still get to keep your applications that you installed on the previous versions. So i thought is quite cool. 'cause i i do this. I like to preserve software. Like this. And i know we hear a lot about you know people who like fast moving rolling release destroys the all the latest stuff as fast as it can come in but it's it it's a failing of sort of desktop lennox to not be supportive of old software. You know there is lots of software. That's come out over time that you know some of its proprietary and you simply can't install and run anymore so it's a valid property of snaps to be able to preserve that old software and continue to use. I've i've not published it for obvious reasons. But i've made a snap of a debut. Read nine the my wife uses because it supports the secure form signing thing that she has to use as part of her rollers volunteer in the library. Yeah i've i've i've made a couple of snaps of old games or software. That's hard to build and it's good to keep it keep it around and some of gotten a few hundred installs people out there. Who who like these things. Some of them somewhat academic. there's a snap of mosaic the web browser and composer but then that's software preservation. You it means that you can have an example of that software and you can say this is a piece of software history and you don't have to go and dig out your thinkpad running windows ninety five to be able to show it to someone right or open source stuff. You could build it. But then you discover the the things have changed in dc and you can't build it with a modern have to go and get an old version of g. Say which then you need these old libraries and they conflict and you have to do it in a container to pollute your system and he just gets hard and so. That's why i quite like doing. This is because it allows you to preserve this old stuff. So yeah i. I relate to that blurs

Debbie Roche Philip DC
National Amelia Earhart Day with Wade Roush

Podcast Gumbo

03:13 min | 1 year ago

National Amelia Earhart Day with Wade Roush

"Hey Paul it's weighed rouch. So July twenty fourth is National Amelia Earhart Day and I guess what I'm curious about is how Amelia herself would feel about the way she's remember today I mean it seems like she's famous mostly for disappearing into thin air and only secondarily for being the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic which all seems Kinda backward to me. On the other hand, she's seen increasingly as a feminist icon which seems like might please her. So I'm just curious how historians and biographers think earhart would have regarded her own fame. Thanks. Wade given that I've never been confused for an historian. I'm one of those people that thinks about Erhard the way you've described above. So it's nice to be given a little nudge of history and hopefully I can return the favor. For my first recommendation, I, found a podcast called. Erhard which hopes to shed some more light on Earhart by interviewing guests. In this episode, they interview Abigail Harrison who is commonly known as astronaut. Abby. As part of the interview, Abby Talks about how a millionaire heart is an inspiration. They also talk about the marsh. And stem as well as our work as an aspiring actress not. Today's guest is weighed Roche host of the soonest podcast which helps us understand were technology come from and how we decide to start or stop using it. It's that understanding that allows us to be more intentional about the kind of future were building together. Soon Ish covers a lot of ground from bridges to virtual reality to the voting process. One episode that struck me though was way talking about quitting facebook, which is something I grapple with constantly On the episodes page description we'd outlines multiple years were facebook failed us and he finally had enough. Here in twenty twenty facebook continues to fail enlarge ways and I wish some of the tech support groups that I am a member of would find another service. So I could get off facebook myself. For last recommendation wait went above and beyond he's given three podcast recommendations and a youtube channel that are about the weird byways and. In no particular order they are. The. Constant. The right stuff the wrong way. Ninety nine percents, invisible gander international airport. Should this exist boom the return of supersonic flight. And Amy Sheera. Titles Youtube Channel VINCA space. A link to all of them will be in the show notes. For today's extra hot sauce. I just WanNa add that Wade is one of the creators of the Boston based podcast collective called hub-and-spoke. If you've been listening to this podcast since the beginning you'll know that Charles Gustin was my second guest ever who was the host of ICONOGRAPHY, which is part of hub and spoke.

Amelia Earhart Facebook Erhard Youtube Abby Wade Gander International Airport Charles Gustin Abigail Harrison Boston Roche Amy Sheera
New 100% accurate COVID-19 antibody test approved for use in U.K.

Michael Brown

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

New 100% accurate COVID-19 antibody test approved for use in U.K.

"It could be a game changer in the fight against covert nineteen as an antibody test gets approval in Britain health officials here confirmed a new test that can tell if you had the virus is one hundred percent accurate government scientists have carried out independent evaluation of the new blood test developed by the Swiss pharma Roche detection of antibodies could help indicate if a person is gained immunity against the virus the idea is if someone is tested positive then follows that they could potentially go back to work knowing they're unlikely to get it

Britain
FDA approves Roche for COVID-19 antibody test

Atlanta's Morning News

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

FDA approves Roche for COVID-19 antibody test

"The FDA fast tracks emergency use of a Swiss coronavirus antibody test Roche CEO Severin Schwan says it's ninety nine point eight percent accurate I've never seen such a level of collaboration within the industry it and took care of it alright I go like this this is this is really a fantastic test can determine whether a person is gained immunity more than two hundred antibody test of flooded the market but the FDA is only granted this kind of approval for

FDA Severin Schwan Roche CEO
The Latest on Testing

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

10:12 min | 1 year ago

The Latest on Testing

"When you were a kid. Did you ever make one of those pinhole cameras? Were you cut a little hole into a piece of cardboard and then look through it on some ways. That's kind of how we're looking at the corona virus nowadays through a tiny little window part of the reason. We haven't been able to get a bigger picture because this is a new corona virus and we're learning as we go along. We have also had inadequate testing across the nation so the inability to know the true extent of this outbreak becomes a major barrier in terms of getting the country back to work. We need clear vision and so far we haven't had that. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction. There are currently only two types of corona virus tests available in the United States. Because I'm a healthcare worker. Who still takes care of patients in the hospital? I've had both of them. I'm GonNa give you a little poke over Uruguay. Don't okay. We're all done it. Okay early on there. Were some significant delays in testing and there was also the release of a flawed test. Which really put us far behind since then there have been a lot of unauthorized on validated tests. Which have flooded the market the most common and most accurate test we have is called a PR test. A polymerase chain reaction tests. Now that's the one that detects whether or not someone is currently infected with Kovic nineteen. It involves a saliva test in some cases or more commonly a nasal swab. Cnn's Brooke Baldwin referred to it as a brain Taylor so that gets sent off to a lab where the genetic material is extracted. And because there's such a small amount of genetic material it is then amplified. That's the polymerase chain reaction. If all goes well results usually come back within a few hours but it can take a few days if you have to send it to a lab somewhere then. There are the antibody tests. Those are the ones that can determine whether or not someone has had cove in nineteen in the past and might have some immunity to it now. Those involved collecting a small blood sample either through a needle in the vein or three blood spot sample. But here's the problem. Antibody tests have not been consistently accurate. There are a lot of bad tests out there and it's still unclear how much those antibodies might protect you from the virus in the future. When you're testing for the virus the biggest problem would be having a false negative. Why because you would think that you don't have the virus and then you might go back out into the community into a nursing home into a hospital and potentially infect people with the antibody test which you really hoping to avoid is a false positive. Then someone might feel that they have the antibodies thus feel that they are protected. Go out into the community to a hospital to a nursing home and spread the virus so with the diagnostic virus test. You really have to reduce false negatives with the antibody test you really have to reduce false positives. The promise of the immunology test to find out we have. The antibodies is huge. That's Kevin Delay on senior fellow at the University of Southern California's Schwarzenegger Institute for State in Global Policy. The institute supports test sites across Los Angeles. This can influence policymakers at the local state and federal level. That can actually inform us. When it comes to social distancing if I'm immune in scientifically I've been proven to be immune then I can re enter the workforce and I could play a bigger role and make sure we're safe for a company called Roche announced that it received emergency use authorization. Eu A for an antibody test it claims is more accurate than most Roe says. It has already started shipping. Its new test to leading labs around the world. Here's Rosillo Severin Schwan. It's really special. Because it is so accurate. It's it's almost perfect. Accuracy and allows us is to really reliably test whether a person has been infected by the corner virus or opt irrespective of whether you had symptoms or not now. There's another kind of tasks they could be useful here. It's called an antigen test again. The test for the virus is the PR or diagnostic tests. The test for the antibody is called a serology test. And now the antigen tests look for a protein on the surface of the virus. You may have already had one of these if you've ever had a test for strep throat or the flu. Here's the problem. A reliable antigen test for the corona virus isn't yet available in the United States. But the hope is that will soon have something that works kind of like an ad home pregnancy test. Were a test strip. Would change color detail if you might have the virus. Frederick Nolte is a pathology professor and the head of Corona virus testing at the Medical University of South Carolina. Antigen detection has been part of the diagnostic landscape for a number of years and it has a number of appeals. It can be done relatively quickly. it's inexpensive. It can be deployed in a number of clinical settings outside of the laboratory near the patients but the chief concern with it has been the sensitivity and they low sensitivity means a high false negative and with high false negatives people feel that they don't have the virus and they go back out in the community and potentially continue the spread so how available. Rpcr antibody tests to the general public is probably the question. I get more than any other as of Monday. Johns Hopkins University's Kovic Tracking Project was reporting over seven. Million people in the United States have been tested and they mean the diagnostic or PCR tests in this case but again the initial rollout of those tests was fraught with problems and that caused major delays in the country's early response to the pandemic. Those problems are being addressed now but there are still supply chain shortages the PR requires certain transport mediums reagents and yes nasal swabs and those things have been in short supply but just last week. The mayor of Los Angeles announced free diagnostic testing for all of the county's residents because we know the ten million residents county need that it's critical for US opening up in the future. That's Mayor Eric. Garcetti on CNN and we wanted to be the first big city in America to take the advice of doctors around the country saying you have to find the silence spreaders. This is a silent killer that people without symptoms who can spread. This are critical piece of knowledge in order to open up in the future and in New York City mayor. Bill de Blasio says the city will produce its own cove in nineteen tests kits in partnership with Three D. Printing Company. We realize we had to find another source. Global Market wasn't working. There weren't sources around this country that were reliable enough so we decided we would make our own and this has had been put together very quickly. So we're really an uncharted territory. Creating these tests kids in New York City again. It's these nasal swabs that have been in such short supply in so many places around the country. Now there are also plenty of antibody tests floating around that have not been reviewed or validated by the FDA. The agency said Monday that it was tightening. Its policy to keep unproven and even fraudulent tests from entering the market. It's been a big problem in one. Study of twelve antibody tests. Four were shown to deliver false positive results more than ten percent of the time. Remember if you're testing for. Antibodies and you get a false positive people may incorrectly. Assume they now have the antibodies and are protected and then go out into public and keep spreading. You really want to get that false positive rate under two percent as low as possible. Really the future could lie in at home. Testing Antigen tests would be the easiest to mass produce for home use but again like I said we don't yet have a reliable antigen test for Kovic Nineteen White House Corona Virus Task Force member. Dr Deborah Burke said this last month on. Nbc's Meet the press we have to have a breakthrough innovation and testing. We have to be able to detect antigen than constantly tried to detect the actual live virus or the viral particles itself and to really move into Antigen testing. If an antigen test is approved and mass produced it may serve as a valuable screening tool. But it's probably not going to replace the P. C. R. Saliva or swab tests when it comes to diagnosing Kovic nineteen the Antigen test in this case would be used to screen the PR test would still be the most accurate according to the Guardian scientists working for the US military have designed a PC test. That has the potential to detect the virus as early as twenty four hours after its contracted that could help stop infected people from spreading the virus before they even show symptoms and keep in mind. A lot of people never show symptoms but can still spread the virus. It's another promising maybe and remember this. Testing does need to go hand in hand with contact. Tracing once you find out who's infected that person needs to be isolated and then everyone who has had close contact with that person needs to be traced and sometimes those people need to be quarantined as well test trace and hopefully treat

United States Corona Virus Task Force Los Angeles CNN New York City Dr Sanjay Gupta Rosillo Severin Schwan Roche NBC Johns Hopkins University Brooke Baldwin Uruguay Bill De Blasio Dr Deborah Burke Medical University Of South Ca Guardian EU Kevin Delay
Boston Area Pizza Shops Offer Meals To Those In Need During Coronavirus Crisis

WBZ Morning News

01:03 min | 1 year ago

Boston Area Pizza Shops Offer Meals To Those In Need During Coronavirus Crisis

"Radio well at least there's comfort food right and that takes on a whole new meeting these days for a pizza shop in Wilmington the story from WBZ TV's David way at TJ's pizza in Wilmington owner a lot of growth is giving back pledging to provide food for school kids the elderly and others who could use a meal during the crisis I'll show you what we would call for the kids and the families with the travel much together this is what they teach at that church what we're supposed to do is love our neighbor and this is what our neighbors need right now meanwhile at the Roches restaurant intermezzo pizzeria Bolton will make the idea is the same people in the local community can contact them and receive a box lunch for a pizza we can't give everything but the ticket to give a sandwich too you know young boy and girl who doesn't have it during school is seems like a no brainer see this is the thing is we are being pushed to the limit increasingly and seemingly every day the people are now turning to good deeds and giving back to the community so that is encouraging

Wilmington Wbz Tv Bolton David Roches
FDA Grants New Coronavirus Test Emergency Approval

Squawk Pod

01:09 min | 1 year ago

FDA Grants New Coronavirus Test Emergency Approval

"After what many are calling a catastrophic delay testing capacity is finally ramping up for the current virus in the US diagnostics giant Roche saying it received FDA's emergency authorization for its high volume test for cove in nineteen. The systems can provide results in three and a half hours. Roe says it will have millions of tests a month available for use. And that's welcome news to those in the public health world who say we still don't know the scope of the outbreak in the United States currently reported cases stand at more than sixteen hundred with forty one dead worldwide cases exceeding one hundred. Thirty five thousand with deaths approaching five thousand. Almost seventy thousand people have recovered. According to data from Johns Hopkins and many are asking especially here in the. Us numbers grow. What this disease looks like and how long it takes to run. Its course that we do have some data from the. Who'S MISSION TO CHINA TO GUIDE US? The symptoms can range from none at all to severe pneumonia. Almost ninety percent of lab confirmed cases had fever seventy percent of dry cough eighteen percent shortness of breath and fourteen percent of sore throat. Eighty percent of cases were mild to moderate and mild cases typically recovered within two weeks. Those with more severe disease. It took three to six weeks.

United States Johns Hopkins Dry Cough FDA Roche ROE Pneumonia China
Seattle Company creates high-speed coronavirus test, gets approval from FDA

Mike Gallagher

00:17 sec | 1 year ago

Seattle Company creates high-speed coronavirus test, gets approval from FDA

"And new high speed coronavirus test has been granted emergency clearance by the FDA the latest effort to expand capacity to diagnose the fast spreading pathogens the test was developed by diagnostics giant Roche holdings and is designed to run on the company's automated machines which are already installed in more than one hundred labs across

FDA Roche Holdings
John Alite, the Mob's Enforcer

Kingpins

02:04 min | 1 year ago

John Alite, the Mob's Enforcer

"The year was nineteen ninety. Carol alight was terrified the security alarms at their South Jersey home bled while the family rottweilers barked for Roche. Ously worse yet. She swore she could see armed men hiding in the woods from the window. She called her husband. John in a panic. Twenty eight year old. John Alight the right hand man of John Gotti. Junior was away from the house when he received the call without so much as a second thought. He ditched his friends and hopped into his corvette. As a lights raced home. He wanted which of his many enemies could be off to him that night. The most likely seemed Tommy. Karate patera earlier that year karate had killed one of a lights friends over a twenty thousand dollar dispute. Rumor around town was that a light was next on his list when I got home. He snuck in from the back and grabbed a revolver and an Uzi submachine gun. He slipped into the dark woods and lurked toward the men waiting to ambush him instead. A light took them by surprise unloading the Uzi like an eighties. Action Star and after a brief firefight. The attackers fled. It was too dark to see that night but the next morning a light. Check the woods to see if anyone had been killed though. He didn't find any bodies he did. See plenty of blood. He knew a message had been sent a few days later a lights boss. John Gotti called a light to a sit down with Tommy Karate. Godley declared that their feud was over. No more fighting when the meeting finished on the two men had its world cars. A light turned and said to Tomi. Nothing settled I'm still GONNA kill Ya.

John Gotti Roche John Alight Tommy Karate Karate John Godley Carol South Jersey
"roche" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"roche" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Won't sign for Roche behind the golden EIB microphone let's go to Jason in Kensington Kensington Maryland that is using Sony balustrades have you with you all J. son well that doesn't sound like a Maryland accent told so what's up with that service yes seven Maryland yeah I got a couple of tall but I'm I'm kind of disappointed with the Republicans the judge just a bit you'll you'll from from Australia great Commonwealth of Australia where you're from an all sweet yes we need someone to portable yeah yeah yeah although that's the part of Australia that all the liberals won a slice off and float off until it gets stuck to Papua New Guinea over a a semi worry right and eggs Kathy turning from queens loads of politics it's a Maryland politics what's on your mind today I just kind of disappointed I mean that that the freeze again though the the the publicans were handed a pretty unique opportunity with the president was from the apps on was willing to sort of come in and keep the establishment give a good kick in the guts and run the ball up the middle of the any work from Anderson fire a handful the oldest of the stand rand whiteness she's gonna run the ball up women to be given many opportunities to go after these guys whether it's true false impeachment all this latest bloody stuff with the nope you cried and of course this other thing coming up with the crime of arson and Schumer of course and they just sort of sit on this I'm single what should we do yeah it's just it's so frustrating because I don't want to get on it for a week myself and just got a young family miss of the ministry the Democrats should be actually panned the Graham of the stuff yeah and and that Mitt Romney statement that he things I'm I'm a bit worried if we investigate hunter Biden at my toll look a bit political the Democrats you say you like about the Democrats but they know how to destroy your life in nothing flat if they want to and so with the George Papa Papadopoulos with the Rajasthan speaking of a judge who want to be called out in public with Roger stone with that Papadopoulos with all these guys my with Michael Flynn they just decide what we've locked on target so I looked on the site so on you you'll you come and go it's like one of those fellas whether the missile is flying around changing direction no matter what you do it stay long you and we're going to destroy your life in nothing flat and on the Republican side as you say Jason all we get is a bit of the oldest I grew weak tea type stuff about well yes we're looking into whether we might hold a hearing on somebody and then we might perhaps you know cold them as a witness and then we might and we will so we might see if we can get somebody to appoint someone to hold an investigation and then in three years time they might issue a report on that one actually be anything in a ripple but maybe the next report down the road is going to you're right Jason at a certain point you would like these you would like these guys just to just to make a serious effort at evening up the score of it Jason I never give a sucker an even break it's like you know they just you know the opportunities are there to be out of there you know the collisions and do the right thing but they just said that that the people are sort of living portion would be doing the right things of late to these dogs but they're not producing you know they just what they want to no no yo you were right and at some point people are going to get fed up with it all right as a said the Chuck Schumer thing he he did something absolutely disgraceful that should disqualify him from office Anning said he's kinda walked in about fifteen percent back today and that's going to be enough because the do nothing the.

Roche Jason Kensington Kensington Maryland Sony
New York City spends billions on flood protection

Climate Connections

01:13 min | 2 years ago

New York City spends billions on flood protection

"In twenty twelve superstorm. Sandy wreaked havoc on New York. City's transportation system storm surge pushed a flood of seawater into vehicle tunnels rail yards very terminals and subway life. Hurricane Sandy. It was a big wake up call for the city that Suzanne de Roche. The city's deputy director of infrastructure and energy. She says after the storm subway tunnels and stations nations had to be pumped out electrical systems needed to be cleaned repaired and tested in some places. It took weeks to get up and running again as sees rise is and whether it gets more extreme. The risks from flooding only grow so New York is working to make its massive transportation system more resilient for looking at major major flood protection systems across the subway network the airports and articulate tunnels that go in and out of Manhattan for example. The city is installed huge. Flood Gates at the entrances of two tunnels. A steel floodwall will soon protect the coney island rail yard and the city's working on ways to seal off subway. Station entrances invents. It's a multibillion dollar effort Dorota says the next time a natural disaster hits New York expects to be better prepared

New York Sandy Flood Gates Hurricane Sandy Suzanne De Roche Deputy Director Coney Island Dorota Manhattan
"roche" Discussed on Taking Care in Business

Taking Care in Business

12:15 min | 2 years ago

"roche" Discussed on Taking Care in Business

"This is taking care in business. A podcast dives into the topic of corporate social responsibility ability for many different perspectives host Kathy. potty Hayes is an expert in CS armed philanthropic giving and her co host. Vicki Wilson is the founder and CEO Bulletin Group A unified marketing company. That was also the first B. Corp Certified Company in Indiana Cathy Vicky became friends and equally passionate about CSSR when they first worked together several years ago join them as they talk about why it is always worthwhile to take care in business. Hey Kathy how's it going today. I'm good ed how are you. I'm great so I have a question. Okay when and where is the last place you volunteered. Oh my goodness it's GonNa make me seem seem like I don't care but I do. I'm probably second helpings. Okay Yeah I I recently volunteered. At goodwill our company was going to We usually volunteer somewhere every quarter and so we called up goodwill we said we want to do something. Tell us what to do. And it was really unique. They had hatice. Come in as a company. Just brainstorm ideas for marketing. Oh that's cool. Yeah it was really unique. We've never done that. Usually were you know doing something like planting planning trees or Working in you know cooking food or you know whatever so But that is I asked you that because I I love this mission statement. Our mission is to engage diverse communities to create vibrant public places helping people nature thrive You know What organization that belongs to I might do you think it belongs to. I'M GONNA go with keeping Annapolis Beautiful Ding Ding. Ding uh-huh there one of my favorite organizations in indy. For sure they have a whole host of activities that they engage in to help. Neighbors and nature thrive in Indianapolis. But today we're going to specifically talk about a program that many in Indianapolis participate in their custom day of service whether a company plants trees creates outdoor classrooms transforms vacant. Lots or picks up litter. Keep Indianapolis beautiful works with hundreds of companies to create a program specific to the goals and objectives of the participating companies to talk about this. We have Ashley Hanes from Keep Indianapolis Beautiful and Caroline. I'm sorry Carol pull's targeted P. U. L. S.. That's A. I had to ask her how to say that from Roche Roche. Indy is the North American headquarters of the world's largest are just biotech company and employs more than four thousand people who work together to provide insights that help people around the world manage and improve personal health conditions. So Carol is here to talk about the impact that the keeping an episode beautiful program has on the employees at Roche said they. So let's start with you ashleigh just kind of talking a little bit about keeping an episode beautiful and when and how The Custom Custom Day of service came to be all right. Well you did a really great job sharing our mission statement already Boils down to helping people in need your thrive in Indianapolis I mean. Do the variety of ways planting trees picking up litter creating green spaces. And we all do that through the work of volunteers. We have about fifteen thousand volunteers every year and Companies organizations that come out and do custody service with us are really big part of how it gets so much of our work done because has companies like Roche can bring a couple hundred people out on a single day and make a tremendous impact and that really has it's really meaningful for the people in the city in the neighborhood that were working in and accomplishing the work. That we're trying to do. So how does it work. If you WANNA custom of service well really you jus- is contact us at KABC and say hey I'm really interested in doing something with my organization to give back to the community. He really loved the work that you're doing. Seems like something that might be a good fit for us and it's a good fit for a variety of reasons. Sometimes just the sheer fact that we can handle when we kind kind of started this model of program. It was with Lily over ten years ago and we managed eight thousand of their volunteers on a single day. So sometimes it's just the fact that we can manage a lot of volunteers. Here's and we have a lot of work to do Sometimes it's that a company's mission or Sustainability Initiative really aligns aligns with the work that we do the work that we're doing and we're able to kind of help their employees out into the community to accomplish in real time. A lot of those. Those goals Inr also just able to take what an organization or a business wants to do kind of really customize that to whatever they need to do within the parameters of the work that K I be doing of course Oh so carol at your job at Roche. what what exactly is that. Because I'm guessing that it isn't it was probably in this space and it's not that you're you know an engineer or something like that that that is correct. I am the liberal arts. Major that works Rhode Way to represent professional stem So Yeah my job is I manage the corporate communications for Roshan Indianapolis and as part of that. I am really fortunate that I also get to do do all of our community relations and that includes our Roche gives back volunteerism program That involves all of our employees as well as any other Sponsorships ships or donations that we may given the community. So how many years has Roche been doing this particular program with with keeping up with beautiful. So I'm excited to I share that in two thousand twenty. It will be our tenure anniversary partnering with K. I. V. So we were already in the planning stages for that and we plan to do something a little bit more. I guess robust than what we've done in the past although what we've done in the past is fairly robust as well but I think we're looking to extend it for our tenure anniversary and maybe do something that's along the lines of a week long giving a program. Oh Neat do all four thousand employees participate. No typically said the four thousand employees about sixteen hundred of those are in the field a US So those are sales and also customer support functions About thirty three hundred or so actually work on the Indianapolis Campus and I would say that we typically have have Between two and three hundred people who come out to volunteer for the day of service It's one of those volunteer opportunities. Where the minute that it goes Out through our portal. We know within twenty four hours. We will list. Wow and we have Employees who year after year raised their hand to be team captains and we have A couple of executive administrators who year after year also offer to be kind of that hands on logistics expert for the volunteers on the site of Roche. So it's just one of those seamless events that K. I just makes so easy and enjoyable from start to finish that. It's just a shoe in in terms of wanting to do something that's both good for the community but also is a great way to engage employees. Sure so When you sit down and talk to Ashley or you're trying to put together sort of your custom day of service what are some of the goals like internally that you guys have I now I know we talk about employee engagement a lot but that can mean a lot of different things I right? We'll Roche is very committed to conserving and enhancing the neighborhoods woods where we live in Roche globally has been a leader on the Dow Sustainability Index for over a decade so environmental sustainability is a a core value. I guess you could say of Roche. And so when it comes to environmental sustainability. Were really looking at. What are ways that we can help improve proved the lives of people who live in the communities where we are and of course we also want the opportunity to be something that employees will enjoy And have an the opportunity to connect with one another and so For us because we're headquartered Just south of ninety sixth street in Marion County We looked typically weekly kind of around the surrounding neighborhoods so whether it's in Lawrence or whether it's on the Near East side those are areas that will typically look at first because we often often see need in those areas right and we wanna make sure that the communities around Roche are thriving That's very important to us to give back as locally as we can and then we also try to find places where we can have as many employees together. There are occasions with that number of employees where we have to split into different activities but we try and keep ourselves in at least one general location because it's really important for that sense of community. The employees really enjoy being able to see one another and to celebrate afterwards and really kind of reflect upon what we've accomplished and so for us us it's really about whereas the need. How does it align with kind of geographically where we like to focus and then what are those activities that we know will allow employees to really engage and work together So you're expanding to a week long for this tenth anniversary. Do you know what you're doing yet. We don't we've got some ideas okay. IBS put forth some different recommendations. So we've got to work with our leadership and and review those and kind of get their input input input and feedback but I think what it will involve is kind of a mix so we'll have kind of them were traditional outdoor day of service like we've done in the past past and maybe sprinkle in some things that would allow more of our campus for example some of our employees who work in manufacturing or the warehouse who cannot leave for for you know a whole day to go volunteer relooking at what are some opportunities we could actually bring to Roche. That may be only require an hour's time So somebody on a break bake or lunch break. Could maybe come over. So we're just trying to figure out. How do we engage as many employees as possible throughout the week? Yeah that's what I really liked about The the last volunteer opportunity we did as a company was that they thought outside of the box about how they could engage us in our specific talents. Rally rally. You know they're trying to do for you. Carol and Roche I'm sure that that's something that Ashley Your your team does all the time you get these phone calls and they WANNA customer service. I mean how do you make it a win win for everyone see no kind of Depends on what our relationship is with a company that we're working with kind of when they approach us an organization like Roche having such a long partnership we know what areas of the cities cities that they are really focusing because of the location To their campus so as we are identifying places where we're working in the city when we're doing are planning we already know we can have three hundred Roche. Volunteers that we know are going to be able to help accomplish these things in this part of the city. And it's become I'm just a really nice. I mean it's been almost like a ten year partnership of being able to identify places in practice to go and knowing that we really amazing volunteers and support to come and take care or that we do have Companies that will call us until like two months two months now we wanted to do a day of service and in those cases were. We're not able to do as much of the creative long-term planning and that's more of well. We already have this tree. Planting area identified as something that we you were going to be doing as part of this year's plan would you be interested in like your choice of these three places to plant trees Still do.

Roche. Roche Roche Roche Indianapolis Carol pull Ashley Hanes Vicki Wilson Ding Ding Kathy. potty Hayes Kathy B. Corp Certified Company Indiana Annapolis Cathy Vicky Ding US Sustainability Initiative Roshan Indianapolis Indianapolis Campus
"roche" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"roche" Discussed on KQED Radio

"O. U. C. H. for Roche and and a no in here take one word add two teams make up three definitions and no one alive Vermont public radio audience as you doesn't get any better than that will be played one of public radio's toughest and funniest game shows live right here in Vermont join us Friday July twenty sixth in the Burlington area or Saturday July twenty seventh in Woodstock tickets are so easy to get at says you briefly says you we'll be right back support for KQED comes.

burlington add