35 Burst results for "Robyn"

"robyn" Discussed on WHERE BRAINS MEET BEAUTY

WHERE BRAINS MEET BEAUTY

03:03 min | Last month

"robyn" Discussed on WHERE BRAINS MEET BEAUTY

"I think really <Speech_Female> leads are reflects. <Speech_Female> Which <Speech_Female> is why <Speech_Female> i think part <Speech_Female> of the magic that happens <Speech_Female> and my guess is it's probably <Speech_Female> pretty similar <Speech_Female> in your team because you're <Speech_Female> really feeling <SpeakerChange> that customer <Silence> experience. <Speech_Female> Yeah <Speech_Female> absolutely i mean <Speech_Female> we call it just <Silence> being intuitive <Speech_Female> with our <Speech_Female> clients and <Speech_Female> you know that's <Speech_Female> really saved <Speech_Female> a lot. That's <Speech_Female> really <Speech_Female> really <Speech_Female> helped us to not <Speech_Female> have really <Speech_Female> really hard discussions. <Speech_Female> You know. I <Speech_Female> could feel when <Speech_Female> the client <Speech_Female> is not in love with this <Speech_Female> formula or <Speech_Female> isn't like super <Speech_Female> happy with his direction. <Speech_Female> Or <Speech_Female> you know maybe <Speech_Female> wants to pit <Speech_Female> and i'll say <Speech_Female> it for them <Speech_Female> and you <Speech_Female> know and i think that <Speech_Female> just makes them feel so <Speech_Female> safe with us <Speech_Female> because we <Speech_Female> understand you <Speech_Female> know like <Speech_Female> it's. It's such an <Speech_Female> intuitive part of <Speech_Female> it too. That really <Speech_Female> plays into the work <Speech_Female> that we do <SpeakerChange> which has <Silence> helped us tremendously. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> So my last question <Speech_Female> for you is <Speech_Female> releasing something. I've been thinking <Speech_Female> about from my own <Speech_Female> family perspective. <Speech_Female> What your <Speech_Female> son's think <SpeakerChange> is cool about <Speech_Female> your job. Yeah <Speech_Music_Female> so <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> it's it's <Speech_Female> so wild <Speech_Female> to see them so <Speech_Female> excited about <Speech_Female> it. I mean my oldest. <Speech_Female> He's almost fourteen <Speech_Female> and he <Speech_Female> remembers back <Speech_Female> when i was pouring <Speech_Female> candles and <Speech_Female> no making <Speech_Female> home fragrance <Speech_Female> products and <Speech_Female> he's like a candle <Speech_Female> donkey and a sent <Speech_Female> junkie <Silence> My <Speech_Female> oldest <Speech_Female> really loves <Speech_Female> to snoop over my shoulder <Speech_Female> and see what i'm up <Speech_Female> to. And <Speech_Female> i think he's just <Speech_Female> really proud <Speech_Female> when he walks down <Speech_Female> those aisles with me <Speech_Female> and we and he's <Speech_Female> like didn't you <Speech_Female> work on this because <Speech_Female> have been <Speech_Female> you know in my <Speech_Female> in my closet <Speech_Female> and you know at <Speech_Female> the office with all the things <Speech_Female> were working on it. He's starting <Speech_Female> to become familiar <Speech_Female> with some of <Speech_Female> these brands. And i <Speech_Female> think that just is <Speech_Female> really cool for him <Speech_Female> for my youngest. <Speech_Female> He's five <Speech_Female> he loves <Speech_Female> to <Speech_Female> sorry. He <Speech_Female> loves to <SpeakerChange> test product. <Speech_Female> So <Speech_Female> you know. I'm constantly <Speech_Female> as you know. I <Speech_Female> do a lot of product <Speech_Female> development <SpeakerChange> for textured <Speech_Female> hair. <Speech_Female> And he's <Speech_Female> always like <Speech_Female> key. Waster is my <Speech_Female> hair. Do you have something <Speech_Female> to test. And so <Speech_Female> that's the fun part for him. <Speech_Female> And sometimes <Speech_Female> i'll give him formulas <Speech_Female> that have been <Speech_Female> rejected in. <Speech_Female> He'll add <Speech_Female> water to them and <Speech_Female> start with him up <Speech_Female> and he loves to <Speech_Female> do a little cosmetic chemistry <Speech_Female> in the bathroom. <Speech_Female> And that's <Speech_Female> the fun part <SpeakerChange> for him. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Robin that a <Speech_Female> so cool. I love <Speech_Female> that they gets to share <Speech_Female> in <Speech_Female> the final excitement <Speech_Female> of your <Speech_Female> of your business. I mean <Speech_Female> isn't that like <Speech_Female> that's as much a gift as <Speech_Female> like clients <SpeakerChange> paying <Speech_Female> bills. Yeah <Speech_Female> it is it really <Speech_Female> is and you never know <Speech_Female> i mean it. <Speech_Female> They might <Speech_Female> grow up when data. Wanna <Speech_Male> stay in the business. <Speech_Male> We'll see what happens <Speech_Female> it. It's gonna <Speech_Female> get interesting <SpeakerChange> future <Speech_Female> for for for men to <Speech_Female> move robyn. <Speech_Female> Thank you so much for sharing <Speech_Female> your wisdom with <Speech_Female> my fans. Today <Speech_Female> were so excited <Speech_Female> to be able to <Speech_Female> Shine a light <Speech_Female> on product development to <Speech_Female> thank you for having me <Speech_Female> and for <Speech_Female> listeners. I hope you enjoyed <Speech_Female> this interview with <Speech_Female> robin. Please subscribe <Speech_Female> through a series <Speech_Female> itunes and for updates <Speech_Female> about the show follows <Speech_Female> instagram. <Speech_Female> Where brings <SpeakerChange> me pd <Speech_Music_Female> podcasts. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Thanks <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> for listening to wear <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> brains. Meet beauty <Speech_Music_Female> with jodie cats <Speech_Music_Female> tune in again <Speech_Music_Female> for <SpeakerChange> more authentic <Speech_Music_Female> conversations <Speech_Music_Female> with beauty leaders.

robyn
"robyn" Discussed on WHERE BRAINS MEET BEAUTY

WHERE BRAINS MEET BEAUTY

05:12 min | Last month

"robyn" Discussed on WHERE BRAINS MEET BEAUTY

"Carry. I'm so excited to be here with you again me to. We have to introduce this episode with robyn watkins about this. You're not going to believe it. But guess where i met robin lengthen langton. So i have a question. I'm into the second phase of these relationships. So you mentioned on last week's episode with sarah fuller store that you also met her on lincoln while at about robin have you met her in person or was this interview the first time like speaking face to face. I connect with robin on linked in. Because that's just what i do right. This is where when people are so. I'm like very social linked in. And just you know. Wanna meet as many people as possible in our.

robyn watkins robin lengthen langton sarah fuller robin lincoln
"robyn" Discussed on Checking In with Michelle Williams

Checking In with Michelle Williams

03:17 min | Last month

"robyn" Discussed on Checking In with Michelle Williams

"The podcast is far. As do you talk about everything in the show or do you try to keep it separate listener and okay and i feel like it's great. That has never been able to to get to know us on such a better level but you know what i i don't know about robin. I like when you pose questions because we do like to have some viewer engagement right so we questions to upheaval out there. Like you know was the most embarrassed to it. Happened during sex like up and then his so-called Larry and i mean i lo- goes when we do that a levels episodes pros and cons of a podcast versus filming so prosecco I'll start with the cons. I feel like i one day might get tripped up talking about somebody or something close to me in. They're going to listen to the podcast and be mad at me because like i might tell a story about a close friend or something. Listen to it. Then they'd be like robin i know. Why are you talking about me like that. I'm afraid i'm going to like you know..

robin Larry
"robyn" Discussed on Checking In with Michelle Williams

Checking In with Michelle Williams

02:20 min | Last month

"robyn" Discussed on Checking In with Michelle Williams

"That's embarrassing and it's so crazy. Now because the show is airing and i'm getting so many people reach by the same especially women of color for us to be able to admit that i'm not necessarily okay. I'm i'm not feeling motivated. I don't have on my kate. My superwoman cape. Today right because that's how we were raised. That's not what we do. We're always the ones that everyone can rely on. We take now happening but the whole frigging neighborhood so it's definitely not in our makeup so for us to to be able to talk about. It is is great absolutely absolutely by the way. I have to throw this in there. My mother certain shows you not expecting mama to pick up y'all if we talk for thirty minutes twenty two minutes of it is about if an episode aired and it's y'all she's talking about like mama i do have to make sure she gets the app everything and so. Now i'm gonna be like you know. Just sell and robin pot callard philby. Hit me about the freaking podcast. So get ready to get real. Kevin hart host the new peacock original series heart to heart featuring authentic conversations with celebrity guests. Each week. kevin will sit down with a well known figure from entertainment to hold the deep personal conversation. You can expect the unexpected kevin. His guests will unpacked stories from their lives. Sharing moments of success failure and everything in between on heart-to-heart kevin will get to know the people behind. Today's big is personas. Celebrities arrived with little to no prep. They're not coming to promote a particular project there. Just two people. Having a real conversation and with kevin's friendly rapport. You'll feel like you're right there on the couch with them..

robin pot callard philby kevin Kevin hart
"robyn" Discussed on WIFA Waves

WIFA Waves

02:37 min | Last month

"robyn" Discussed on WIFA Waves

"It's such a great life hack you. It's so easy to it. High impact for low effort. And i love that. Yes thank you okay. We'll we will wrap that mark. What's ritual. I've oh yeah what's your morning ritual morgan. What do you do well. I have a form uncle son. So right now i snuggle with him every morning. I'm like i. I don't know who i am anymore but i do know that i get like an hour two hours of snuggle time in warning and right. Now that's giving me life so that's where i am. Joy it eventually. Yes that's meditation all in itself. Hey but he's happening. Take pictures of it. Then you can remember it so maybe don't even write anything down. Just take picture every day to video picture log will robin tell the with audience how they can get in touch with you. Stay in touch with you in. Maybe something that you'd like to share them enclosing short You know me personally It's a instagram is at the due to diaries dude. Da diaries For me personally lincoln you could. You know our obgyn do you Change stages change the stage dot com For more information there in there is a change underscores the underscore stage instagram as well But i would say. I'm most active on those two worms very cool when you said one thing anything you wanna share. You know if you want to share something that you're excited about this coming up or something that our audience can engage in with you know just sits just a we talk about values. I just not to be preachy. I just think it was like transformative and it was life changing to me to really understand like what i care about. You have what really matters to me. And then aligning everything i do. Not just you know working for a paycheck working for something a little bit bigger. And i just it changed my whole life so if the opportunity to take some space to really do that highly Magical will robyn thank you for your time today. Thank you knock me lovely chatting with y'all yes bye for now. Start at the beginning. Start with you. We need leadership through elevation awareness and discovery in a nutshell. It's thirteen weeks. Plus you a partner and a community.

morgan robin lincoln robyn
"robyn" Discussed on The Jump with Shirley Manson

The Jump with Shirley Manson

06:01 min | 2 months ago

"robyn" Discussed on The Jump with Shirley Manson

"Could imagine in surf. Less skillful tasteful hands. It could've turned into a real banner. I mean but instead it starts remains of mournful and tense. And you're sort of on the edge of your seat listening to it you know. It's not sort of just generic. I feel like in dance music. Things are definitely endanger much. Like in rock music of getting really generic and homogenize. Yes and this track is so different within its own genre but this track released struck me as being really like you're holding onto like running beasts know like holding them back those wonderful i think repetition is such an amazing thing to work with and i think the best club music drag was inspired by his kid. Was these songs where there are like court that can transit. they keep going you know they. They repeat themselves but they the more it's repeated the more it starts to vibrate and you know i think i think that's what great music does i think that's also why i ended the song in this repetition of this line these words because every time i repeated them i felt like they took on a new a new meaning like it left more space for me but also the listened to to have a connection with the song. Yeah tell me more about your relationship with production. Because i know that you have become more and more engaged in it. I've just started to come out as a producer but it took me a really long time and it. It does make a difference when i sat down with my own computer music program and started to like make sounds because then i had to be really specific about what it is that i was looking for and it also was really a crazy because things that i didn't think would come out came out. Gave me a more like realistic sense of who. I really am as a musician. And it's been a very interesting exploration for the last four years. You try things you try things forever and ever until something feels better than the other thing and that you might make a mistake and you hear something new the here before but then there are certain songs that just come out really quickly and with every heartbeat. What was actually one of those. It came like almost in one go but that isn't necessarily always a great thing like when people tell me. Oh i wrote this song and fifty minutes. I'm.

"robyn" Discussed on The Jump with Shirley Manson

The Jump with Shirley Manson

03:12 min | 2 months ago

"robyn" Discussed on The Jump with Shirley Manson

"Avant-garde. I think really unexpected and the of context of dance truck. We were talking a lot about that. Like how can we make a club record. That feels like it's six a little bit outside of what you would expect them. We were both listening to a lot of like modern like string music and our friend. Carl by the who is a. He's an arranger and composer. He his dad used to be in this amazing swedish jazz band in the sixties. And we were like he will get you know. Because we didn't want these slimy or like you know these she exactly so so we really went for it. And because also i think because it was. It wasn't for my album so there was like the space to kind of like also. I was writing about clearance relationships. It was really like a free space and it was the last song. Did you say on the record that you recorded. Yeah and so yeah you were maybe in a more experimental frame of mind. Yes and it was also. I think the first the first song that i recorded with a four to the floor bass drum or drum and it really shaped the way. I started to think about my next album. It was a really special song in that sense. Not only that. It was made from a very kind of free space. Where i wasn't signed. I just started my record label. I was really doing what i wanted. And then it it kind of gave me all this new freedom because it.

Carl
"robyn" Discussed on The Jump with Shirley Manson

The Jump with Shirley Manson

05:16 min | 2 months ago

"robyn" Discussed on The Jump with Shirley Manson

"Your men right will change but every song is like rammed with nukes and ramdas ideas and who greet beats and vocal hoops and so.

"robyn" Discussed on The Jump with Shirley Manson

The Jump with Shirley Manson

05:51 min | 2 months ago

"robyn" Discussed on The Jump with Shirley Manson

"So i'm really psyched her here and it's funny the reading up about your entire career. What struck me as really highly unusual. Is that you know you start to this. This young child star. And you know most people start their careers making sort of alternative weird or riskier records and then as their careers growth and they get more conservative. I think in the way that they approach music. You're the complete opposite. Yes i feel like you've started out one way. You know working with very disciplined. Max martin tight producers or literally max martin tennessee. And then we're here now in two thousand and twenty one and you're considered one of the most innovative influential musicians and your genre bats unusual. But it's true. I agree i have done that like reverse kind of Journey with my music. It's true it's given me a lot of freedom. Like i've always been protective of my freedom and i think how i started making music really forced me to do that because i was so miserable. And this place in the music industry. That i ended up which was like most commercial place in the music industry for a very very long time. I think pop music in the nineties was like a really kind of horrible place because it was still you know all of the old school really bad structures from like the old times in the music industry but then also with a lot of money and a lot of commercial interests and just popular culture becoming such a a big machine so it was a. It was a horrible horrible place to start out in. I can imagine and you have my absolute sympathies. It's been bad enough for me. And i've always been an alternative artist on dealings with that but i'm sure yeah. I came from this like you know kind of romantic childhood with my parents. Making experimental theater just doing things on their own terms and I thought when i was signed that you know i was gonna go to american release record and tour and kind of do what they did which was just like the absolute other thing. You could think of them. What what what i ended up in so i was very naive. Very naive. brought up was brought up in this totally different environment. And i had all these ideas about what i wanted to do. But it wasn't possible where i was it was it was You know it wasn't like i'm sure you know this like certain parts of the music industry i think especially around that time just wasn't really about music at all it. It was very very uncreative and the record industry was like built on something totally different. I think that the more commercial part of it. And then what i wanted to do But not interesting Observation about you know alternative culture does definitely have it sense of that. You belong to a certain tribe and it seems like so many pop are sort of out there hanging on their own you know must be very difficult to negotiate exact They ups and downs of our career by yourself. Yeah but also exactly because culture around culture is so important it really is important and it. It's not just music it's it's it can be. You know the way you dress as teen-aged way show who you are by by the music you listen to what you wear or the the ideas that come with music you know the it really is like the the transportation device of new new ideas you know. That's when those artists that you grew up listening to plant new new thoughts in your mind and the culture around that is i think Yeah really important for human beings but when you were young like i read that you were you. Vote your first song when you were thirteen. What did you write this song. I wrote my first song. When i was eleven and i wrote it about my parents divorce which was kind of dramatic story telling and i wrote it in my head. I was like a daydreamer. So i wrote the melody in my head. It wasn't until maybe two years later. That i actually was with someone that could help me make music to my song that i had had my head for a long time. And that's how i wrote in the beginning. I had songs in a library in my head for a long time. I mean you studied under a pulp master. Yes terms of max martin and his team total unto you. Think that you i mean. I'm assuming you learn so much from these people. I mean the way they approach making music like the old sixties version of you know these factories almost in some ways that they heated for sure. I did learn a.

max martin tennessee
Race Walking 101 With U.S. Olympic Trials 20K Race Walk Champion Robyn Stevens

Ali on the Run Show

02:24 min | 2 months ago

Race Walking 101 With U.S. Olympic Trials 20K Race Walk Champion Robyn Stevens

"I'd love to do a little race walking one. Oh one with you. Because i think there are a lot of Pretty widely misunderstood. I think a lot of people look at race walking. No it's just fast walking or it's slow running and it's neither of those You are doing you know. You mentioned coming in for the twenty k. Around one thirty five. That's a seven forty per mile pace. That is faster than i run. Most days it's faster than a lot of people run. it's also. There's a lot of technique required. It's not just walking faster So i would love if you could do some like race walking one. oh one what. Don't people understand about your sport. Well i definitely know the difference between running and walking. Because i was a runner and i was a dancer. So there's there's there's significant differences so it's definitely not a slow run for some training days my job my cool so my coach will call it the Whenever he puts down like to cater genitive regenerative means jog So that's the time that i get to break form jog. And sometimes my job is slower than my than my cooled. Race walk Which is pretty interesting to me. Amusing me just from given my background with my running and stuff but the biggest Perception is just I mean we do have a technique that we have to follow. There's two rules You have to land with the straight Knee and then that has to stay Straight until it passes underneath the hip and then you know always have to have one foot on the ground at all times by the judges. I and that's what a lot of people don't understand is they might see might slow down videos or they might see pictures where they see you like both feet to slightly off the ground especially in the fast races like if you watch melrose or if you watch us in like three k. Or or when we are going quite a bit faster during our twenty ks at you know going at six thirty. Six forty pays or Seven forty seven thirty pacer faster At its but the knicks. Actually better but this question. Because he'll he'll have like the exact point whatever it is but there's a certain amount that the i can't see and so that's why it's by the judges

Knicks
"robyn" Discussed on Goodbye to Alcohol

Goodbye to Alcohol

04:26 min | 3 months ago

"robyn" Discussed on Goodbye to Alcohol

"Names <hes> is that robin was drinking a bottle of wine in less than an hour. In fact she get a free evening she advised robinson. Try a trick that sheep. Don't to give up smoking. She said just make a lipstick. Mark every al coal free day an rope into just sat and it really helped these. Visual reminders are so powerful and we use annual truck his at tribe so if you'd like one of all annual trackers just email janet <hes> tribe suba and we'll send you one. The value of truckers is that you get dopamine hit every time you register an all coal free day and not dopamine gives you the encouragement carry on an more costa next day robin blossom at the age of thirty three when she helped to be carried off a plane at dubai airport. This was during one of those periods when she decided that yes she could moderate y- just one glass of champagne at led her to drink so much that she pulsed out on her return to south africa. She checked herself straight into rehab. Now believes that the well is divided into two types of people those who can drink a couple of glasses of wine to soften the edges on the rest of us. People like house who need to ditch. The dream can create a basket of tools other than alcohol to take the edge off when we ditch the drink. We have to replace it with something else. And that's why we need a personal boss could of tools roping kindly shed some of her tools with us when she got home. At six o'clock she would have a hot bath she would find. This calmed her nervous system and she wouldn't have to open the wine. She had a daily yoga and meditation practice. She loved walking in nature especially barefoot in the forest. She relies a lot on listening. Watch in reading. She says guess out of your own story by listening to someone else's story listen to podcasts. Read a book watch a movie and of course community reach out to a friend or even better reach out to try say about after fourteen years of sobriety. The last thing robin would reach four in a basket of tools would be a bottle of wine. We talked about the mommy to syndrome although robin whistle ready sober when she became a mom. She absolutely understands. Why many moms reach for the wine. At the end of the day we talked about how difficult socializing was in the early days. And how we need to take it. Gradually is robin. Said the last thing we should do is subject to all souls to a three hour politician. Early sobriety just. Don't go but you don't have to become reclusive because socializing will eventually becomes so much easier and being able to hold a non alcoholic. Drink definitely helps. Robin finds breathing exercises such an essential tool that. She took us through to her exercises. She also mentioned the sharla which is a wonderful yoga studio here in capetown tripe sober members can book discount it online. Yoga sessions with the charlotte. So yes another reason to go to tribe sober dot com and hit that. Join our try button to find out more about robin and check out. Some of her awesome paintings just her instagram page. Which is roping denny. Art and her website is also robyn denny. Art dot com. So that from me. Thanks so much for listening. Don't forget to subscribe in shed. The podcast see night's sweep ditching. The drink is like climbing a mountain. It's hard it takes courage and grit in an guide and that's where we come in here at tribes sober. We've climbed that mountain and we know the view from the top is amazing. Reviews are experienced to put together a unique membership program that will support you all the way. We've got challenges chat rooms sober buddies trackers and milestone awards. And that's just for starters so head on over tribe sober dot com and check out our membership program. It's essential resource for anyone looking to ditch the drink and change their life.

"robyn" Discussed on Goodbye to Alcohol

Goodbye to Alcohol

05:30 min | 3 months ago

"robyn" Discussed on Goodbye to Alcohol

"That's okay that home stasis may call it all different things you can be fancy at man you can call it buddha nature you can call it divine self. You can quote it home yesterday. Says it doesn't matter if you sacred or profane so to me. It's about increasing. The toolbox of what makes me feel k. And to bring some joy into my life because we drink to feel okay to soften the edge diminish thanks. -iety and bring a bit of euphoria and i i feel. The world is divided into two kinds of people people who can sip a glass half every night and softening of systems and those of us probably all your listeners. Actually feel the effect of what alcohol is which is a neuro toxin and they start to speak in ways that aunt themselves behave in ways. that aren't themselves increase. The depression increased anxiety. So if you met. I group where your glass and a half is just soft and you manage. It's wonderful but if you in this other group we have to find this huge basket and you start. small Will talk about a bit later. About what other the tools of gathered in thirty years. And you have to. I have replaced it with things that commie and make me feel okay and on a good day they give me some joy and on a on on one of my difficult days. They just call me. You know it's enough. It's enough just to you know just to feel not excruciating to feel okay. You're listening to a podcast from tribe sober. If you'd like to join our warm and welcoming community just head on over to tribe sober dot com and hit the membership tab that's www dot tribe sober dot com..

depression
"robyn" Discussed on Goodbye to Alcohol

Goodbye to Alcohol

01:37 min | 3 months ago

"robyn" Discussed on Goodbye to Alcohol

"Begun. All conversation by asking robbins introduce herself first of all. I'd like to sam. I'm really excited to be here. Janet because tribe. Soba is something i believe in with my whole being and i think it's extraordinary work that you're doing. I am an artist. A painter and a filmmaker I'm also a mother of two daughters. Who i'm nine and ten i'm a wife sista and most importantly i'm a person trying to come home to myself to come hooked part within me. That's in with all of us. That is actually okay. In some kind of homeo- stasis and then from that point to share whatever small bits of wisdom. I have with the rest of the world. That's it so beautiful. Introduction woman thanking. Let's let's delve into those drinking day following the gory details acid me federal. How old were you when you had. I drink flits go back. Well points knowing that i would speak to you today. I actually mapped out a time line because as you know some of it's quite blurry but i think i started drinking quite seriously In my final school from seventeen to twenty

donat india dubai
My Basket of Tools - With Robyn Denny

Goodbye to Alcohol

01:38 min | 3 months ago

My Basket of Tools - With Robyn Denny

"Begun. All conversation by asking robbins introduce herself first of all. I'd like to sam. I'm really excited to be here. Janet because tribe. Soba is something i believe in with my whole being and i think it's extraordinary work that you're doing. I am an artist. A painter and a filmmaker I'm also a mother of two daughters. Who i'm nine and ten i'm a wife sista and most importantly i'm a person trying to come home to myself to come hooked part within me. That's in with all of us. That is actually okay. In some kind of homeo- stasis and then from that point to share whatever small bits of wisdom. I have with the rest of the world. That's it so beautiful. Introduction woman thanking. Let's let's delve into those drinking day following the gory details acid me federal. How old were you when you had. I drink flits go back. Well points knowing that i would speak to you today. I actually mapped out a time line because as you know some of it's quite blurry but i think i started drinking quite seriously In my final school from seventeen to twenty

Robbins Janet SAM
Leon Bridges Is Reinvented on New "Gold-Diggers Sound" Album

All Songs Considered

01:25 min | 3 months ago

Leon Bridges Is Reinvented on New "Gold-Diggers Sound" Album

"Bridges. The album is called. gold digger. Sound the song we're hearing from. It is called motorbike and joining us to talk about this when his radio milwaukee's tariq moody hatred. Hey robyn how you doing all right. The bridges has had such a classic vintage sound over. the years. You know really comes from a different era and on this new album. It still has roots in the past but he kind of mixes it up a bit. Yeah it's a. It's a slight departure. Little more on the Kind of the modern rb sound instead of the traditional rb sound so he spent two years jam nap this place called gold diggers bar hotel and recording studio off the fame Santa monica boulevard in los angeles for less about two years and basically he created a whole new kind of modern. Sam i think that's because of its collaborations. Terrace martin who's best known jazz artis and composer producer. But he's best known for working for artists like kendrick lamar among others robert glass spor- so you hear their Their influences on the album. Yeah he has been on an incredible run of collaborations. Robert glassberg ten smart. You mentioned he's also worked with krung been casey. Musk graves. dip the avalanches. And i don't know maybe maybe it was inevitable that he would head more in this direction. It's not a huge departure. But he does slip into a more contemporary sound very comfortably managing to get like eight. Oh eight drum machines to sit next two horns and strings

Tariq Moody Gold Diggers Bar Hotel Terrace Martin Jazz Artis Robyn Milwaukee Robert Glass Robert Glassberg Kendrick Lamar Los Angeles SAM Casey
The Power of Giving Yourself Permission to Do What You Love

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

01:58 min | 3 months ago

The Power of Giving Yourself Permission to Do What You Love

"And robin. Welcome to the creative. Thanks for taking the time to join us. Absolutely so i found out about you guys and your company bright blue gorilla when you guys wrote in and when i saw what you did i thought. Wow this is weird and it's cool. Which meant a kind of a no brainer for me has having you as But before we get into your work. I wanted to ask you. What did your parents do for work. And how did that end up. Shaping influencing the choices that you both made threat your lives and careers Interesting question. my dad was a salesman and His grandfather who came over from europe in the twenty s. He started business in new york and it was like stainless steel giant. Kettles that you cook bagels in or certain kinds of metal that they used on ships so my dad came out to california with my mom in the fifties and it was it was great because they were the first of the family to travel and get out of new york and leave tradition so my dad and mom really had a a pioneer spirit upcoming to a new place and setting up their lives here in los angeles. And i think that really influenced me that it's okay to go to new places and reinvent yourself and plus my dad. Being a salesman was a real people person. He's always been really good with people very friendly. Not afraid to talk to someone who doesn't know and That came in handy when i started booking our concert and film tours because you have to talk to a lot of people and you have to be persistent because you get a lot of knows along the way so i think i picked that up from my dad and my mom Mostly a homemaker but she was also into market research for a little while and she actually pretty good painter. So i think that influenced me plus. She always liked to wear bright colors.

Robin New York Europe California Los Angeles
"robyn" Discussed on Meet the Thriller Author: Interviews with Writers of Mystery, Thriller, and Suspense Books

Meet the Thriller Author: Interviews with Writers of Mystery, Thriller, and Suspense Books

06:25 min | 4 months ago

"robyn" Discussed on Meet the Thriller Author: Interviews with Writers of Mystery, Thriller, and Suspense Books

"You are listening to meet the thriller author the podcast. Right interview writers of mysteries thrillers. Aunt suspense books. I'm host alan peterson. And this is episode number. One hundred and fifty four in this episode of the podcast will be meeting robin geigo. Who is an attorney and activist that tackles the complexities of gender race. Power and the perception in her debut novel. By way of sorrow it's a gripping legal thriller with the ripped from the headlines. Plot and unique protagonist who liked the author. Herself is transgender. Attorney had a great time with robin about her. Writing process Her career as an attorney and tackling complex of subjects like gender and race in her writing. so talking to her about that and a whole lot more substitute the interview coming up here in just a moment but first i want to let you know about a great tool for writers called pro writing eight. I bought a lifetime license a few years ago. And it's been a great asset that helps me end up with a much cleaner manuscript That i could Before providing aid and the or just using regular spellcheck or anything like that Parading aid is like having a personal writing coach and you can check it out at filling dot com for slash. Pwa and by using that link you'll receive a twenty percent discount on a yearly or lifetime subscription So join me over. A million authors editors copywriters students and professionals using writing to prove their writing. I can get those details again at three weeks. Dot com forced w. a. and you'll get that twenty percent discount automatically applied that will be automatically applied. If you click on that link and then you'll be supporting the podcast as well so i thank you for that. So that's three weeks dot com for slash p. w. a. All right here is my interview with robin geico. Hi everybody this is allen with. Meet the filler. Author and the podcast. Today i have attorney activists. Robin geigo who. I welcome to the podcast robin allen. Thank you so much great to be here. You know i should have asked beforehand that i your last name. Now and in fact you've got it absolutely perfectly correct so i figured you must have had help somewhere along the life. Oh good well. Sometimes i'm way off. And sometimes i'm on so i'm glad i was on there of so. Can you give a little bit about you about a year. An attorney enact this but could still still a little bit about your background before you started writing thrillers. sure. I have been practicing law for forty three years. I do primarily employment commercial litigation. I with a law firm called gluck wrap in freehold new jersey and i am a transgender woman. So that has informed both we'll practice and and and now in terms of my writing career by way of sorrow involves a transgender attorney so I have kind of you know taking what's something unique about my life in terms of being an attorney being out nope open as a transgender woman and turned it into something that i could write about this. 'cause they always say you need you. You're supposed to bright which you know about if people say well. I don't know about thrillers and killing and all that stuff well but you can still put your life in somehow right and what. I always tell people. Is that the main character in the book. Her name is erin. Mccabe and i always tell everybody. Aaron mccabe is not me. Aaron mccabe is thirty five years old. I'm not thirty five years old. Aaron mccabe is a very attractive. For instance woman up not but aaron is a transgender attorney who practices criminal defense law and for many years up until probably about six or seven years ago. I did a fair amount of criminal defense work and so when you said right what you know that is true. I i am an attorney. I am a transgender woman. And i've done a lot of criminal defense. So that was the perfect marriage of all three things to write a legal thriller. And what you a fan of the genre before you started writing. I've always enjoyed you know. Legal thrillers boat. You know and say. 'i'll i always enjoyed courtroom dramas. Be they legal thrillers or non fictional Books about you know the courtroom and trials and things like that so yes. that's something. I've always enjoyed think it's fascinating the to cry popular true crime junkie. So there you go because i mean you you see it in real life but they know you see it on television you read about it all the time and so. Yeah and it's something that we we all feel. We know something about just by osmosis we've acquired whether you law and order or whatever you know we all kind of had those experiences seen those experiences and then to read about true crime and what really happens it's it can be fascinating to some of the authors that you that infancy as a writer later on. I mean certainly. I would say scott to row. In terms of the basically will thriller. I when i read presumed innocent when it came out a probably thirty years ago. Now it's been out. I think in the eighties. That was the book that just grammy in terms. Of what a legal thriller could do more recently You know. I can't think of anybody off. Hand that has influenced me in terms of legal thrillers. Certainly there's a lot of people that i that i admire. Who you know right in the crime genre but not necessarily legal thrillers. Certainly walter mosely is somebody that i really respect Cheryl head who is another woman of color has a great series going so there's a lot of people that i really admire and enjoy their writing but they're not necessarily writing legal thrillers and so by way of sorrow that's debut novel.

Aaron mccabe alan peterson erin Cheryl Robin geigo thirty five years robin geigo robin geico forty three years twenty percent Mccabe thirty years ago aaron Today both robin allen thirty five years old robin eighties new jersey
Curevac’s Covid-19 Vaccine Disappoints in Clinical Trial

The Readout Loud

01:55 min | 4 months ago

Curevac’s Covid-19 Vaccine Disappoints in Clinical Trial

"All right. Let's kick off the podcast with a kind of a dish on the week's news and we should definitely start with cure vac Meg what happened to curevac co vaccine. Yes this was hugely surprising wednesday afternoon. The news came of the company's results from their late stage. Clinical trial of forty thousand participants of another rene vaccine and of course with the success of madeira advisor. The expectations were very high that the efficacy would be very strong and it was forty seven percent now. The company cited a large number of variants. That were in the trial though. Wasn't clear the exact impact of those various on the efficacy. And there's some speculation that it could be the differences in the vaccine from modernize and visor biotechs damian. You looked into this pretty deeply. Yes so not all. Mr nays are created. I shouldn't say equally the same so pfizer and medina both use an approach to work in a tiny modification that is meant to basically avoid the immune system from attacking the marnie strand that you insert curevac used an unmodified marnie for its vaccine and the company's reasoning was you know for an mri therapeutic. Yes sure you'd want to avoid an immune system reaction but for a vaccine an immune system reaction is kind of the name of the game and so that was kind of their thesis going into it but as a result of using the unmodified marnie. They used a smaller dose than pfizer. Madrid Which most likely was to avoid any kind of too much of an immune reaction and so a lot of people. Curevac didn't say this and they haven't provided really enough detail on the data in question for us to really dig in but there is a theory going around out there that enserch of this kind of goldilocks dose of this unmodified. Marta they might have had simply too weak of a vaccine to get the kind of efficacy numbers that we've seen from the pfizer vaccines.

Mr Nays Madeira Pfizer Damian Medina Madrid Marta
What Do Habits Have To Do With Dating?

Ask Women Podcast: What Women Want

01:56 min | 7 months ago

What Do Habits Have To Do With Dating?

"Robyn Conley Downs. My umbrella brand is real food whole life and then I have a book that feel good effect wage and a podcast the feel-good affect. My specialty is easy simple habits for health and happiness and that whole life piece that you mentioned. That's the connection so dead. We need habits in order to have a whole life and most of us go about habits the wrong way frankly and we overcomplicate things. We focus our attention on the things that do matter and then we end up in the same spot. We were under what's wrong and often we beat ourselves up for it and it's not really our fault. It's really the approach that's not working. So one of the parts of the feel-good pap roach in our method is something called the eighty-twenty rule and that's what you were mentioning so I can talk more about that but that's kind of the overview of like why habits and what does that have anything to do with dating and it's really like, okay. What are we doing in our daily life that is moving the needle toward the results that we're looking for, right? I love it. When were you talking to me about before we got on the something affect? Yeah, so creative principle and the eighty-twenty rule, right? Yeah. Yeah, so you may have heard of this before. O's principle. It's actually concept that is several like over a hundred years old it was dead. Bye and it's old Italian guy that he looked around and he thought okay. This is really interesting. It looks like 20% of the actions are actually yielding to eighty percent of the results wage. I mean this has been shown over and over in business and real estate in pretty much anything that you can measure what you think. Is that everything counts, but really it's a small percentage of our habits and actions that took out so that's always something I'm trying to help people learn is like, okay, it's it feels like overwhelming and that you have to learn everything under the sun and do a perfectly all the time but really almost always it's 20% of our actions that are using the results

Robyn Conley Downs
Ep. 386 Being the Best Version of Yourself - burst 2

Ask Women Podcast: What Women Want

05:33 min | 7 months ago

Ep. 386 Being the Best Version of Yourself - burst 2

"Teach him how to ban birth date for a lifetime or maybe not a lifetime cuz you'll find the one right away and then you'll stop dating, you know to be married, but you know what? I mean? I am Christian from Christian and chill, and I am the banter Queen. I teach guys how to charm more than just the socks off of women, and if you're struggling and conversation if you're getting ghosted if you're never hearing back if you're never ever getting the results that you deserve get me up at Crystal. And she'll want to know the hidden meaning behind what women say and do then check out the Chicktionary. It's the wing girl methods manual that gives you a full run-down of all the things women say they confuse men written in dictionary format go get a copy of the dictionary by going to wing girl method, That's fine. If you like what you're listening to and you want dating tips and strategies directly from me. Then you can get in touch with me by shooting me a text to the number 310-299-9139 clients of mine had personal access to me but now because so many guys ask my personal help regularly. I'm building a private bath texting Community where I answer your questions give you killer tips and just make your dating life smoother and easier than ever before even if you're not to stating and you're married I can help you with that too so long Shoot me a text at 310-299-9139. I really look forward to hearing from you. All right text you soon coming up on this week's episode of the ask women podcast. I'm not really even sure how to phrase this correctly. But what we're going to teach you this week is how to really hone in on the best parts of you so that you can show them properly to the women around you but more importantly they can help you become the best version of your life cuz he won't be clouded by all this other BS that's floating around you that you're think you're supposed to do. So we're going to teach you how to find that 20% that is going to make you a cake as man with women and with your cellphone. Keep listening. Hey guys, welcome to Pig. Ask women podcast today on our show. We have Robin downs from Real Food whole life, but we're not gonna be talking about food today with Thursday. We're going to be talking to her about really a whole dating life and how to have a whole dating life using only 20% of the things. You actually needed my saying that even correctly. I'm actually gonna have you explain it more correctly than me cuz this is your area of expertise. But like why don't you introduce yourself and tell people what we're going to be talking about today? Cuz I try to wrap my head around it. But yeah, but you know the expert in this area, so I want to hear how you describe it. Yeah. Well, I'm Robyn Conley Downs. My umbrella brand is real food whole life and then I have a book that feel good effect wage and a podcast the feel-good affect. My specialty is easy simple habits for health and happiness and that whole life piece that you mentioned. That's the connection so dead. We need habits in order to have a whole life and most of us go about habits the wrong way frankly and we overcomplicate things. We focus our attention on the things that do matter and then we end up in the same spot. We were under what's wrong and often we beat ourselves up for it and it's not really our fault. It's really the approach that's not working. So one of the parts of the feel-good pap roach in our method is something called the eighty-twenty rule and that's what you were mentioning so I can talk more about that but that's kind of the overview of like why habits and what does that have anything to do with dating and it's really like, okay. What are we doing in our daily life that is moving the needle toward the results that we're looking for, right? I love it. When were you talking to me about before we got on the something affect? Yeah, so creative principle and the eighty-twenty rule, right? Yeah. Yeah, so you may have heard of this before. O's principle. It's actually concept that is several like over a hundred years old it was dead. Bye and it's old Italian guy that he looked around and he thought okay. This is really interesting. It looks like 20% of the actions are actually yielding to eighty percent of the results wage. I mean this has been shown over and over in business and real estate in pretty much anything that you can measure what you think. Is that everything counts, but really it's a small percentage of our habits and actions that took out so that's always something I'm trying to help people learn is like, okay, it's it feels like overwhelming and that you have to learn everything under the sun and do a perfectly all the time but really almost always it's 20% of our actions that are using the results which helps us are having the biggest impact. Yes. Yeah. Okay. So let's do this towards our dating life because I know that what we talked about on the show. I mean, this is like our 370 episode, right? There's a lot of content and for some guys they're just like consuming consuming consuming making habit after habit after habit, but they may not really be focusing on one thing. The most impactful like our goal is to give them content that does have that kind of effect on their lives and dating life. But how do people

Thursday China 20% 310-299-9139 Eighty Percent 370 Episode 20 Today Hundred Percent This Week Eighty Ask Women ONE Robin Downs Robyn Conley Downs One Thing Eighty-Twenty Rule Over A Hundred Years Twenty Robin
Robyn Vinter, founder of The Overtake, on closing down the publication

Journalism.co.uk podcast

09:21 min | 9 months ago

Robyn Vinter, founder of The Overtake, on closing down the publication

"At your high. Roughly how many people did you really have signed up. I think we had more than one hundred. I'm not sure exactly how many Because has spread of a patriot in steady but the problem really was that revenue wise. We will always growing but would just never enough. You know we'd get maybe an extra support to a month. Which was absolutely brilliant. And i'm i'm so grateful for having this about his book. The kind of initial idea was to grow much more slowly than i am and not have not have staff and you know it got to the point where after a couple of years so many people come on board and there was so brilliant and they volunteered time. The i was trying to pay as many people as possible and And i was and i was doing that book. I realized eventually that they would never going to get a full-time job. Out out of this on fears and i was kind of like stringing them along a little bit with giving him. When are you saying that. In some ways he became oversaturated with writers. Then totally yeah. That's exactly what happened so the plan had always been you know when when we set up the plan the palm had always been on my plan initially had always been to have me and co-founder someone to run the business and meted do the editorial side. I felt quite confident building the traffic and actually i did that. Rarely really quite well and partly through knowing what would be well but partly through absolute coincidence We had one hundred thousand unique in the first month. Which is which is a law in an independent assessment am site. Yeah and that was being very lookie impove. That was by design. Obviously and so you. Yeah so the the idea had always been taps on the business side of it. I'd i'd gone on kind of entrepreneurship program saying they were very keen on Just launching a me. They'd always say general innings until you alone. And i was like i wet in ad. Retina startup befall. I worked in different companies. Am i knew hundred percent while i needed and it was someone to do. The business is so someone to do the revenue in the marketing side of things. And i would just focus on building the site in a building. The traffic i'm boats. I so that was kind of a big mistake. Rarely of mine was that. I just completely to that advice on board even against my better instincts. So i'd never intended to vernet completely alive and beveren said why not and then tonight i i guess i just thought oh well maybe the right. Maybe maybe once we get going you will always figure out exactly by knew it wouldn't and i don't know how allowed that auburn while the message that i was getting law of was You know what you need until you loan. That was the first one second. One was m u You all the best person to sell your business. I i also need. That wasn't tricks and sales before and i was terrible absolutely terrible like i can persuade people out people interested. I can persuade them out. So it feels like you're describing may actually exactly like i think that the skills ev sales in journalism monte overlap at all and they kind of almost the opposite in a lot of ways so yes i i i knew i would really struggle with that but again i thought maybe i've got this untapped potential. I never knew that had. Maybe maybe actually trying some iron thing. I i you know. I'll be good. But now i wasn't absolutely terrible am so yes i by the time. It kind of like registered that that those with the reasons why our revenue was going slightly. We were in quite difficult financial position. I already had paid rightism bald. And i did get to pay sales people though call by just couldn't give them in hours ready to make in sponsored content side of things. I'm sorry yeah i think. In hindsight i was very keen to kind of hang on to every brilliant writer. That came along diplomas debilitate said that they would have fulltime jobs eventually. Bachelor i think probably. I should've i should've stuck with just made a mean somebody else and you would have been the best way to. I think to be clear about this. Who were these other people that would come onto right for you. Say m initially. What how it started was i was kind of this one person band and somebody local uni hit emailed. Me and said can i conflict experience and i was like well. It's just me. So he can. But i i think i'd even gone back and gone. Actually no no. I'm just won't pass and so everything is at. I think is going to be like no now. I'm really keen. And i was like okay. Fine you can go. And i had some temporary office space. So in a shed off says she came she records painting. She was brilliant. And i was like. Oh this is actually be quite useful to have to have. Somebody is time consuming. Obviously to have work experience people badgley. She did some brilliant stuff. And i think challenge the week to two weeks. She's brilliant. So i was like okay. Fine i'll accept. Experience people amend wants the wet. Go out about that. I was getting a couple of emails a week if people saying. Can i come and direct experience so i started doing a one day a week internship which i thought was probably the best way of doing him So it it lasted like if you had two these up in fifteen days in total. I normal three weeks if you if you would take as a you know three weeks. Which is what the bbc does. All the bbc did. I don't know if they still do that. And i will take. Anyone is all out you know. I wouldn't especially the star. I wasn't kind of filtering through applications is just. They gone waiting less than make a come one day week. So many of them because leads. We've got i think. Three or four of the universe. He's got journalism at least three of the university's journalism goes as the only get work experiences. kohl's so i was just kind of inundated so i took as many as possible and some of them would just exceptional and graduated or whatever they were like. Oh you know had been one of the audience was like please can. I was like no. We've got rule. Like don't i don't want it to look like i'm expecting you know we've got the fifteen day role nuts set and he was like please like he. He'd worked in in a crappy job and he was like please. This is oil for to like all week. And i was like okay. I can say and really talking on your heartstrings. Then yeah exactly and and then that happened a few times and kind of people people stayed. And then i could kind of pay them a little bit of money. I would probably and bear in mind. I should say most of i wasn't paying myself a tall and actually allow the timer was paying reporters in my my team and i wasn't paying myself which i think was actually probably mistake is all because then i had to do a lot for you on swift kind of made me. I guess compensate. I mean you've gotta live yourself robin them. Yeah exactly. And i say when when you gonna plane and they say if in the event of an incident like you've put the the extreme skinny sell first before you before you put on a child and i think he's a bit like i think i was putting oxygen masks on my team and then i was in financial dire straits and i was already overloaded with with everything that that came with the. Take that really. I shouldn't have been doing freelance. Work to try and survive. I should have been pay myself first and then the team second to you wish you a oven. Oh one hundred percent. Yeah yeah i think. I don't know whether we'd still be here. I don't think it really changes that much economically. Some of the decisions i made were based on the i like these people and they deserve to be paid for the work day right. No i'm business. I'm running a business. And i have to think about myself in the business i and i i did it again. I definitely i definitely do that. this you'll freelance. Rate was fifty pound a feature correct. Yeah yes he was a flat rate. So it's fifty pounds name out. What was said. I can easy piece feature opinion. Although we didn't do a lot of body and especially numidian do love opinion. Because i am. I was just getting pitched signed much opinion. An alavi was quite. I guess uninformed unqualified opinion. Love was about politics and it just it wasn't it wasn't right for it so we kind of do not

Vernet Beveren Palm Auburn BBC Badgley Kohl Robin Alavi
Paint it out boxing and creativity with Robyn Spodek-Schindler

Creative Therapy Umbrella

03:47 min | 9 months ago

Paint it out boxing and creativity with Robyn Spodek-Schindler

"Okay ravin. Welcome to the podcast. Thank you. I'm so happy to be here so lovely to have you. Thank you again for coming on. And i'm really excited to dive into a lot of the topics we can cover today absolutely. I'm excited as well. I think this'll be great. Yes yes well. I wonder if you can tell us. A little bit about your. What kind of drew you to work with children. So that's a really great question. And i love when people ask me because it kind of leaves into how i found art therapy to I basically grew up working with kids. I was one of those people who was sitting a camp counselor. I'm the youngest in my family. So i never had little brothers or sisters to take care of but i just gravitated towards it and other areas of my life and when i was probably an elementary school. I made it very clear. I wanted to be a pediatrician. I wanted to be a doctor. Helps take care of the kid. And let's fast forward a little into college where i was speaking in organic chemistry. You get on that pre med track. I just could not it was. It was killing me in every sense of the word and i was crushed because it was like my dream so i had no idea. How am i going to work with. Kids didn't want to be a teacher. Like i knew. I had options. But i wasn't really sure and i always been in artistic percent and i've always loved doing art and my sister one of my sisters said to me. You know i heard about this. You know feel up and coming field. And i thought you should look into it and when i looked into art therapy and i realize that i still care for kids do it in. That's really amazing. Creative way i mean. My mind was blown. Because i combined everything that i loved here. I wanna help kids. I wanna help kids feel better. I love doing our. I love working with families. I love the interest of mental health. This just all really kind of came together in a wonderful way for me and it became my calling so i knew almost instantly. This is how. I'm going to help kit. This is how i'm going to do it. And i just followed through from there and it was pretty amazing yet. That is fantastic. And like what an you know to. It's so painful. Realize something like that when you have that dream and it's like wait a second. This isn't this doesn't feel right. Like i in organic chemistry or biology and then but then out of that you know coming to this like really beautiful thing where you can serve in the way that you've always felt like you wanted to write. It really makes you believe in everything happens for a reason. And that's a very big part of what i believe in and so at the moment yes. I was definitely crossed and confused. Because i knew i wanted to help kids and i knew i wanted to work with them. I didn't realize there were so many other capacty that and when this fell into my last so to speak it was it was just instantaneous. I was sold. I knew that this was what i wanted to do. And now even currently. I mean i love working with kids. And what their families and people always ask me. Do you ever see yourself working with adults. And it's not that. I like working with adults because i do. My main goal really is to help kids. That's just what i see for myself.

Ravin
Queen Latifah stars in the new “Equalizer” series as Robyn McCall

Radio From Hell

01:28 min | 9 months ago

Queen Latifah stars in the new “Equalizer” series as Robyn McCall

"The new Reimagining of the series. This one this time starting Queen Latifah. She is the equalizer. She's a wait a minute when former equalizer is a guy Edward Woodward? Yeah, from the eighties, I thought it was there. I thought it was Denzel Washington. Well, that was a few years ago in the movie. Yeah, I remember the eighties Syriza Edward Woodward and he was kind of an older British British guy, right? Yeah, but he was always a bad ass. And I remember one episode in particular were Adam and showed up as a villain that checks out I can follow. I need to find that now I need to go and watch that. Yeah, So here, Queen Latifah plays a woman with the CIA background to quit the CIA. Now she's helping out the downtrodden Azan, independent agent. And she's working with people in the cast is pretty solid here. Chris knows Lorraine Tu sunt. Uh, Adam Goldberg. Nice to see him Working and Liesel appear a You would know if you saw her. She's been in a lot of comedies that this is a war of the straight drama Rolling. It looks looks good, so far from what I've seen of it. Well, if if Queen Latifah is the equalizer Adam and had better watch out and a man could still show up is a villain. Yeah, I don't I'm not ruling it out.

Queen Latifah Edward Woodward Syriza Edward Woodward Denzel Washington CIA Lorraine Tu Liesel Adam Adam Goldberg Chris
"robyn" Discussed on Real Talk with Dana | Nutrition, Health

Real Talk with Dana | Nutrition, Health

04:04 min | 10 months ago

"robyn" Discussed on Real Talk with Dana | Nutrition, Health

"So remember if those things actually worked long term you wouldn't have to reset again year after year month after month to actually feel good so speaking of feeling good. I want to introduce today's guest. So it is robin conley down to his an entrepreneur and the author of the new book. The feel good effect. Reclaim your wellness by finding small shifts. That create big change. Robin has a masters in education with an emphasis in behavior change and four years of public policy and health change at the doctoral level so her work is tapping into edge. Science around psychology neuroscience. Mindfulness and habits. So what are we talking about on. Today's episode i. We're getting into the dark side of the wellness industry and how perfectionism all or nothing thinking and comparison get in the way of feeling good being happy and healthy and why all or nothing protocols in the pursuit of physical health can actually lead to burn out in a drastic decrease in your mental and emotional health. And don't actually help with your physical health. Long-term either we're also talking about what is chronic striving and why it is so damaging to our health and mindset and what we can do instead robyn thank you so.

robin conley Robin robyn
How to start new holiday traditions during an unprecedented year

Here & Now

03:35 min | 1 year ago

How to start new holiday traditions during an unprecedented year

"Thanksgiving. The huge surge in Cove in 19 cases means large gatherings are out. You may know everything about your family. Hence the word familiar. But if you haven't been quarantining with them for two weeks, you don't know the most important thing. Are they carrying the Corona virus? But resident chef Cat, Egan says you can still make a festive meal. And Kathy, you've been hearing about how people are going to share this meal, even if they're not together. What if people doing Hi, Robyn. All kinds of things. Some people I spoke to said Forget it. I'm canceling the holiday. I say no To that others tell me they're going to focus on a menu that has nothing to do with the traditional foods like turkey and stuffing one friends having lobster. Another one is making dumplings. I heard about another one is doing vegetable lasagna, and then they're these very creative ways to do it. Obviously, you can zoom with loved ones everyone at their own table in a different house. It's in a different city, and then some friends told me they have family That's nearby. But they don't feel safe having them over which is exactly the right thing to do. So they're each dropping off a dish. So I make the mashed potatoes. I dropped them at your house. You make the turkey you drop it at someone else's house. You sit down to eat separately on zoom, but you're all experiencing the same food. It's that is so good. It might work. It might have been because either side of the family recipes, but because people aren't doing these large gatherings, unless you know it's a home where everybody already list together. Apparently, a lot of big turkeys are sitting on the shelves. I hope they go to food pantries. You say? Get a smaller one or used turkey parts. How? How would that work? Exactly? So smaller birds apparently are in great demand right now, Sort of 12 to £15. But I talked to of fellow food writer. Excuse me. Name Cynthia. Grab art who has written a book just about The pandemic and the holiday and she offers a recipe for a skillet. TURKEY thigh in sage mushroom gravy, where you slow cook the turkey fight in a skillet one thighs huge that would conserve to people or you can have two for four people. And honestly, you shouldn't have much of a larger crowd than that. And sage is such a perfect fall. Herb Very simple, but really a delicious way to get a tender piece of turkey without dealing with the entire bird bond will have all the best pieces here now that order, But of course, if you're not doing the full bird, you know he can't cook stuffing in it, But you could still do stuffing anywhere Stovetop take, but you have a recipe for a bread pudding. It sounds incredible tells about it. Yes. So this is ultimate comfort food. This is sort of my version of How do you do with stuffing? If you're not making the whole bird this year, This is a kale, mushroom, caramelized onion and sharp cheddar cheese, Savory bread pudding. You use all kinds of leftover bread. You dry it out in the oven for a little bit. And then you saute your favorite mushrooms. You can use kale, Swiss chard. Um It lot of sharp cheddar cheese. This is so luscious, and I really think that the you have to focus on how do I make this holiday special? If I can't follow the traditions that I'm used to, and having one special dish that will you light a candle? You put out a good, beautiful plate. Maybe it's just you. Maybe it's you and one other person, but something that signals a new tradition starting

Egan Robyn Kathy Turkey Cynthia
How to start new holiday traditions during an unprecedented year

Here & Now

03:35 min | 1 year ago

How to start new holiday traditions during an unprecedented year

"Thanksgiving. The huge surge in Cove in 19 cases means large gatherings are out. You may know everything about your family. Hence the word familiar. But if you haven't been quarantining with them for two weeks, you don't know the most important thing. Are they carrying the Corona virus? But resident chef Cat, Egan says you can still make a festive meal. And Kathy, you've been hearing about how people are going to share this meal, even if they're not together. What if people doing Hi, Robyn. All kinds of things. Some people I spoke to said Forget it. I'm canceling the holiday. I say no To that others tell me they're going to focus on a menu that has nothing to do with the traditional foods like turkey and stuffing one friends having lobster. Another one is making dumplings. I heard about another one is doing vegetable lasagna, and then they're these very creative ways to do it. Obviously, you can zoom with loved ones everyone at their own table in a different house. It's in a different city, and then some friends told me they have family That's nearby. But they don't feel safe having them over which is exactly the right thing to do. So they're each dropping off a dish. So I make the mashed potatoes. I dropped them at your house. You make the turkey you drop it at someone else's house. You sit down to eat separately on zoom, but you're all experiencing the same food. It's that is so good. It might work. It might have been because either side of the family recipes, but because people aren't doing these large gatherings, unless you know it's a home where everybody already list together. Apparently, a lot of big turkeys are sitting on the shelves. I hope they go to food pantries. You say? Get a smaller one or used turkey parts. How? How would that work? Exactly? So smaller birds apparently are in great demand right now, Sort of 12 to £15. But I talked to of fellow food writer. Excuse me. Name Cynthia. Grab art who has written a book just about The pandemic and the holiday and she offers a recipe for a skillet. TURKEY thigh in sage mushroom gravy, where you slow cook the turkey fight in a skillet one thighs huge that would conserve to people or you can have two for four people. And honestly, you shouldn't have much of a larger crowd than that. And sage is such a perfect fall. Herb Very simple, but really a delicious way to get a tender piece of turkey without dealing with the entire bird bond will have all the best pieces here now that order, But of course, if you're not doing the full bird, you know he can't cook stuffing in it, But you could still do stuffing anywhere Stovetop take, but you have a recipe for a bread pudding. It sounds incredible tells about it. Yes. So this is ultimate comfort food. This is sort of my version of How do you do with stuffing? If you're not making the whole bird this year, This is a kale, mushroom, caramelized onion and sharp cheddar cheese, Savory bread pudding. You use all kinds of leftover bread. You dry it out in the oven for a little bit. And then you saute your favorite mushrooms. You can use kale, Swiss chard. Um It lot of sharp cheddar cheese. This is so luscious, and I really think that the you have to focus on how do I make this holiday special? If I can't follow the traditions that I'm used to, and having one special dish that will you light a candle? You put out a good, beautiful plate. Maybe it's just you. Maybe it's you and one other person, but something that signals a new tradition starting

Egan Robyn Kathy Turkey Cynthia
"robyn" Discussed on POSITIVELY JOY

POSITIVELY JOY

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"robyn" Discussed on POSITIVELY JOY

"And today we'll talk about how to incorporate our faith in values into our brand and our day to day work life. Robyn thank you welcome and thanks for being on the show that thank you for having me. I'm honored to be here. Your brand marketing strategist and i think to the average person wonder. What is that you tell us what that is well. I'd like to say you know. Everybody jumps into their business and they start marketing but the reality is we cannot successfully market. Something we don't have and we need a brand in order to market ourselves. Your brand is the story that you craft in create around your business and then marketing is communicating that story to attract clients. You know. I was just talking to my students today about. It's all comes down to the story. it's all about the story isn't it. It really is people people by personalities. They and we as humans. Especially i think in this digital world. We are hungry eager for human connection. And that's what branding is. It's really telling your story so that you can build an emotion emotional connection and genuine relationships with your ideal audience. In order to convert batman attract more clients. Can you tell us a little bit about yourself and your family and what you know. Who were your influences. What makes the robin graham of today. Oh gosh okay well. Let's start with my family. My immediate family. I have three children and almost twenty one year old almost nineteen year old a thirteen year old two boys and a girl and they really are my heart and my purpose for doing everything. i do. i am married to a really great supportive has been and we have a dog. We had one golden doodle who passed away in may and we had already ordered or purchased. Whatever you do with puppies a second golden doodle but then our became very ill and Passed away ten days before the puppy came. So we're down to one dog or back to one dog and she keeps me on my toes bit. we're big a big big dog family As far as you know influences in my life growing up. I grew up in a christian home. My mother was a teen. Mom and my father was six years older than her. So you know in today's standards that would have been a major ordeal. Maybe more except i don't know because it wasn't very accepted back then but Faith was always the center of our family. It was it was the core of everything we did my parents. I should say my parents friends were off families from the church. They knew my grandparents were also very faithful and it was just always. I guess at this at the core of who we were and that was a tremendous influence on me. I went through periods of time in my life. Where i had dow tour. I questioned things. As i met people in college you know might teens and early twenties but the that foundation. That was instilled in me. I think has kept me..

Robyn batman robin graham dow Faith
Atlanta - Trump supporters rally in Georgia as Biden visits

Dana Loesch

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Atlanta - Trump supporters rally in Georgia as Biden visits

"Voters went head to head when a group of Trump supporters showed up at a Joe Biden rally. We're going to have It's a parking lot divided by the political passion on display here outside FDR is Little White House spied in supporter Ow! Mika born here, and I just want to make a part of this history. Let's go, buddy, standing next to the biting folks, an equal number of Trump supporters like Tony from Columbus, carrying large signs and lots of American flags. I think Joe in the Democratic Party are going to head straight to socialism. Robyn

Joe Biden Donald Trump FDR Democratic Party Robyn Mika Columbus Tony
Interview With Robin McBride and Andra McBride John

How I Built This

05:32 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Robin McBride and Andra McBride John

"Okay so I warned you last time this story is epic right and I am assuming you're here because you've already heard part one of this two part story how two half sisters who didn't know the other existed until both were grown up went onto launch one of the biggest black owned wine companies in the world. But if you haven't heard part one, please stop listening right now and go back one episode and your podcast queue to hear it. As for the rest of you, you've now had a few days to dry your eyes and recover from the first half of the story. Which means we are at the business building part of what would eventually become the McBride Sisters Collection. Now, the thing about Andrea and Robin mcbryde is that despite both growing up in winemaking regions Robin in Monterey California, Andrea in new. Zealand neither sister had any real connection to the industry and neither had any real money to put towards a business. They were also young women of color trying to break into an industry that's often been dominated by older mainly white men. But now this matter they didn't care. They knew that they both shared a love of wine and that they both had a deep and powerful desire to work together. and. There was one other thing. They were motivated by mission they wanted to build a company that would make wine more accessible to disrupt and demystify the sometimes intimidating parts of wine culture. Grape varietals had a tasted regional nuances. Ratings even had a read labels. And when they I dreamed up the idea of starting wine company Robin, the older sister had been working at a corporate job and was married with three children and Andrea, was a college student at USC. I mean. Neither of you had a whole lot of start up cash if any did you Robyn did you I mean you had been working but you also family did you have any savings I mean not match you know it was kind of a nearly paycheck to paycheck. Already got married. We had recently purchased a home, but you know we have brand new twin babies and an older girl. So there wasn't a whole lot of cash available and under assuming given that you're on scholarship at USC in a college student, you probably were broke right I. Mean I got my scholarship checks in on. Where you could get a job and make money you know that was that was what I did. So the the the original idea was it sounds like what you guys settled on was let's just import wine and and Kinda put a label on it was that the initial idea. So we had this grand vision we felt like what was really critically important was that. Incredibly passionate about wine yes. Students of wine but we need to learn the business of wine and you know we could get this license in California, a federal import license that was like fifteen hundred dollars. It was like our total life savings and we could import other people's winds and we started by reaching out to two families in New Zealand, and then we could we could learn the business and we went to them and basically said, you know don't put all your eggs and basket. We think California could be a great market to grow your brands and your winds and we negotiated really long payment term so he could bring in the wine. Sell it. Click the cash, pay the light bill and then pay them back and then. As a part of the process was every harvest. We come back and you guys teach us how to make wine. And you Andrea ahead of some connections in new. Zealand 'cause you're from there and your family, your family farmers. Yeah. So when you first approach these wineries in New Zealand and they agreed to send you wine. How did that work like how many? How many bottles of wine did you initially by and then where did you go to sell them? So yeah so it was crazy. It was at the time at felt like it was an insanely huge amount of wine. In it was a palette which is. Fifty Four I. Like the the minimum of what you can put on a boat. But for us, that was just an insane an internet case of wine. There's twelve bottles. So right it just felt like a huge defeat to be able to get these licenses because you know the the sale of alcohol states is highly regulated. And it's very strict and so just the process of obtaining a license to import seemed and felt like such a huge rigorous process and then and then to convince people. You know to entrust in US and give US product and then to get on a boat and then and then bring it into the port of Long Beach at the time, and then put it into a federally bonded warehouse because you can't just like bring that to your house has to go into

New Zealand Andrea California USC United States Mcbride Sisters Collection Robin Mcbryde Robin Robyn Monterey California Long Beach
Things We Love About Fall

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

04:38 min | 1 year ago

Things We Love About Fall

"All right. We're taking a break from all this political talk. The debate is over we give ourselves a break. Okay. Sure. Sure I. Don't know what you're getting ready to say whatever you say. Almost. Say. So evening go ahead. All right. So here's the question. We're just talking about fall autumn the season and see we can start with you what what's your favorite part about it what do you like about it I don't wear draws in effect. Thank you Robyn? Thank you. All right. Come on junior which you got what do you love about the fall Thanksgiving coming That's what I'm. Doing Way Thanksgiv- venture favorite holidays Oh. Yeah, Oh yeah. By over Christmas. Oh Yeah. Because you know the family get together on Thanksgiving and it just be a bunch of characters coming in. Your family. Junior. Year we need seen who've been. Walking. But you say that everything's giving somebody. Super. Team. Family Junior. I love Ct.. Free Free. Man. Can you tell the story about when you took what you tell your grandmother about who you were going to vote for? Can you tell them? My Grandmother Out Messing with it I, call him she. Got To go vote and everything get selection. I. Remade I. Know You do I said. How kind of toll on she said what the? Walk your ass in here with a trump vote. He. Don't fuck. Actually. LITTLE MORE GRAPHIC THAN S. Right. So all right. Thank you. You can tell me what do you like best about fall outdoor six no mosquitoes and anything. It's time to do it. No mosquitoes, no bugs go you know what I mean? If you want to. Do it right. Fall is detached. That's the time to make it happen case we went from no underwear from your own. Okay. Well, two things I like about fall come on, we have time I like fall because I like watching a kids rake the leaves up. But don't have enough leaves. Off. That's always fun to watch. This boy and his that I'll look. Absent shop done that militants. Okay. Like a mattress, they don't just go down and bounce back up they did go down. Like a snowing jeweler or anything like that no. All right junior what else you got what do you? What are some of the best things you like about fall On man you know one thing about that. He Ain't here. Need them right. Okay. All right nephew, which you can. Think. About. Well. You know the best thing about this fall to be honest with the best

Robyn CT
'Wakanda Forever': Angela Bassett, Denzel Washington mourn loss of 'Black Panther' star Chadwick Boseman

World News Tonight with David Muir

02:58 min | 1 year ago

'Wakanda Forever': Angela Bassett, Denzel Washington mourn loss of 'Black Panther' star Chadwick Boseman

"Tonight the overwhelming outpouring of grief for Star Gone Too. Soon, he brought real heroes and revered legends to life on the big screen from Thurgood Marshall. Reggie Hudson's Marshall Mr Spells Attorney Thurgood Marshall to the Godfather of soul as James Brown and get on up. To baseball icon. Jackie. Robinson forty two Robyn curnow Chadwick bozeman commanded the screen. And he helped change the culture, his most famous role as black. Panther what happens now. What happens? To the rest of the wealth. Bozeman as king to Challah transformed. Hollywood. For many black Americans offering representation long overdue and unmatched sense of pride to be young gifted and black. We all know what it's like to be told that there is not a place for you to be featured we could create a world. That exemplify a world that we wanted to see accomplishing so much in just a few short years all while waging a personal and private battle statement on instagram revealing the star just forty three had undergone treatment for colon cancer two, thousand sixteen making movies during and between countless surgeries and chemotherapy news of bozeman untimely death stunning the World Denzel Washington who helped pay for both men to study acting at the British Academy of dramatic acting in Oxford saying he was a gentle soul and a brilliant artist. Angela Bassett who. Played Bozeman onscreen mother and panther writing. This young man said occasion was inspiring his smile contagious his talent unreal former president Barack Obama. Writing minutes work with kids to be young gifted and black to use that power to give them heroes to look up to to do it all while in pain. What of his years Saint Jude Children's hospital sharing pictures of Bozeman, visiting kids fighting cancer while quietly doing the same breaking down recalling two boys who wanted to live to see him bring Black Panther to life. There are two. Two little kids and and Taylor. Cool. recently passed. Away. From cancer in their parents said they just Detroit to hold on? To this movie come. In when I found out that they. Yeah. Is Is it means a lie? CABOT Bozeman meant so much to so many Americans particularly black Americans for those legends he brought to life and envisioning will conduct this loss at this moment in our country is impossible to overstate and Tom, he has already so deeply missed.

Robyn Curnow Chadwick Bozeman Bozeman Thurgood Marshall Colon Cancer Denzel Washington Reggie Hudson Angela Bassett Baseball Barack Obama James Brown Jackie Attorney Hollywood Robinson Saint Jude Children British Academy Of Dramatic Oxford Detroit President Trump TOM
How to Run a Business on Amazon.com - Tips and Tricks From the #1 Leader in Marketing Products, Robyn Johnson

Entrepreneur on FIRE

05:46 min | 1 year ago

How to Run a Business on Amazon.com - Tips and Tricks From the #1 Leader in Marketing Products, Robyn Johnson

"Just dive in Robin and start talking about seller central first off what is seller central for those people who aren't super familiar with Amazon. And why is it? The most common way to sell on Amazon on Amazon. Everything kind of looks like one big united platform but on the back end. It's actually split into several different places so like where you sell your journals is Katie p. That's a little different there seller central where you sell physical goods on Amazon. And then there's vendor central where you sell goods to Amazon and while vendor central has a lot of benefits can be really great especially. If you're a large brand you have to have an invite in. Amazon has not been inviting a lot of people so for the majority of people. If you're not already on vendor central seller central's going to be where you go anybody can sell on seller central and so it's it's the place where the majority of people who sell physical goods are going to sell their products so fire nation. I think there's a lot of things you need to realize recognize when it comes to Amazon. I mean it's a behemoth it is massive and there's a lot of people that have been doing seller central in different areas within that for so many years it is critical that you get content and you learn from the tips shadows and tactics from the best. And that's why I brought Robin on here today. So what Robin do people mostly get wrong when it comes to understanding Amazon's fees? I mean there's different size. Tears different category selections. I know personally from I and experience because I actually do seller central. I actually ship my journals to Amazon. They sit there at the Amazon warehouse and then they are purchasing distributed from there. So I've been having to deal with size tears. I've been having to deal with quote unquote expired inventory or long-term inventory and I think it's just a whole bundle of wax and a lot of people don't even know or understand before getting into Amazon and a lot of cases because they don't understand it. They do a lot of things wrong at the beginning. That really hurts them. Long term as far as keeping that net profit at a at a good solid play so break that down force so when it comes to Amazon. The Devil's in the details. Really so you really WanNa get into the fee breakdowns for your particular platforms. So whether that's Katie. P vendor central seller central on central fees are kind of broken down into a couple of different pieces. The first is going to be the referral fee. The referral is based on a percentage based on the category. And you're GONNA WANNA look at that category that you before you create that listing on Amazon. So if you put your category your product and category eight versus category be. It might be the difference between paying an eight percent. Were fee paying a fifteen or twenty percent refer so knowing that is really important. Different categories have different and specific price points. So there's like for example in the grocery category there. They run promotions occasionally. So if your product is at fourteen ninety nine you're charged eight percent and if your products charge fifteen dollars that might be charged. Fifteen percent and those those promotions will change over time but knowing that the referrals fees makes a big difference and then there's the FBI fees which is fees. The Amazon charges for you to send your item to Amazon Amazon. We'll take that item when it sells. We'll send it to the customer. The handle any customer service that covers shipping to the customer the pick and pack fee any customer service. And that's going to be based off of the size and weight so when you're having your products developed you really WanNa have those sized. Here's that are available on Amazon. Right there on your desk and you WanNa make sure you give yourself at least a quarter of inch maybe a half inch depending on how precise your factories are in the way that your packaged goods are so there could be a difference. Where if your product is just a little bit over that eight inch mark they your go from three to eight dollars something along those lines so you WanNa make sure that your products are not only. Take that into account when you're creating the products but you make sure that your products are measured correctly. You can if you're not measured correctly you can request was. Call the Cuba scan to get those chains and low credit. You back the difference in those fees if you can show that's the right size and then there's also storage so there's thirty day storage fees which are X. amount during q one two three and why amount during Q. Four so usually during Q. Four. It's going to be about five four to five times more than it is the rest of the year. And if you leave things in there a really long time then Amazon's GonNa charge you a lot of money because they don't Wanna be your storage unit. I mean that's a key thing I wanna really just hammer home for you. Fire nation that. I've had to learn the hard way. Unfortunately because you know I like oh I have these journals like you know. The best thing about books is that like they don't expire like they don't grow like they don't like mold like cheese like they're not gonNA actually go bad so to speak you know especially if they're store correctly which Amazon does do but then all of a sudden I was just like Oh if I send them like ten thousands and it takes me like five years to sell ten thousand than like years two three four and five like my long term storage fees. Keep going up and up so I actually use a separate warehouse to actually store the vast majority of my journals. It cost me four hundred and eighty dollars per month for like the sixteen Palettes of over thirty. Five thousand journals haven't stock four hundred eighty bucks a month at this warehouse because this is what they do and then when I need to. I'll send a thousand journals at a time to Amazon because I know that could sell those the four to six month timeframe to stay under that long-term store so you just have to know your numbers. You have to understand the referral fee. Like I love how you said that Robbins beginning that you could be paying potentially five to fifteen percent more than you have to be if you just didn't pay attention and shop around the different categories that your product qualifies for and that's so huge that so

Amazon Katie P Robin FBI Robbins Cuba
"robyn" Discussed on The Story Song Podcast

The Story Song Podcast

14:58 min | 1 year ago

"robyn" Discussed on The Story Song Podcast

"Call the Union in response to the NHL. Walkout was popular idiot and My Roof Emma stone covered the song using the cups Song Acapella version On the on the sixth episode of NBC's a variety. Show Maya and Marty. Have you seen that? The version is great awesome. It's really really good so good. It's so good and then it was recent and then it was recently covered in an episode of Riverdale so it's been covered a lot but I'm saying it's a great song I I do. I I only just recently learned then that Riverdale show is incredibly popular. Yes I had no idea it has a spin off that has leaked Josie and the pussycats in it. Yeah but it's it's weird basically Riverdale is like this generation's like Dawson's creek like people are nuts for it they love it must be the vampire slayer right okay but but when you know Duck Creek was on for us like anyone over the age of twenty five has never heard of it as what's going on but if you're under the thirty five you love it and it's all you talk about no. I've actually heard that it's so popular that they turned it into a comic book. Yeah send it back in time to the forties so weird. Are you creating weird. Yeah A couple of quick things about the other two writers songwriters Alex Alexander Crumlin was a Swedish producer producer and songwriter surprise surprise and he wrote songs for backstreet boys. And Cindy lauper Ariana Grande and Britney Spears including he co wrote if you seek amy end luck and then and then kloss Holland Who is also a singer? Songwriter and producer and guitarist. He's a founding member of Swedish rock band called Teddy Bears. They wear bare heads in their videos. And they're pretty fun. They have a video called a punk rocker with. Iggy pop is great. It's great they're really really from He has also written produced songs for a lot of popstars. Kesse Eagle Eye Cherry. Katy Perry Britney Spears Kylie Minogue Vanessa Hudgens and also Madonna songs some girls yes from the mbna Albert MD and album. Yes so two things. I just WANNA say that. We've we've really discussed the weird Pop Music Producers and writers that come out of Sweden that like do every song that you like Like super there's like four of them and they literally right in produce every song Which is Weird. The second thing is can on a completely unrelated tangent to anything just for rapidly. Just because I was thinking about this today because you said the name of his group is the Teddy bears which I love. Yeah I was thinking. Should we at this point in pop and rock music history? Should we be able to like retire? Band names what I mean by that is I feel like banning just keep getting in Wieder because they have to keep thinking of new things all the all. The good band names are taken. So can we say like? Oh Yeah you can you. Can you can be the Beatles again. It's okay. Well here's what I was thinking because like somebody who. I'm sure would love to be like zombies right as a great band name. But it's already taken or like the crickets or or any of these. Like I think a couple of them like we can weaken the film registry. Where like we made them into a vault. And we're like okay the Beatles you can have the rolling stones that's take like say but like yeah like we're going to start absolutely starship but we're going to retire like this. Ambi- of a new band comes along and they want to be the zombies. The zombies is now available right. You can become zombies because I'm sure a band would love to be the teddy bears but this guy already took it and they're like well. You can't be the teddy bears because somebody else is already the teddy bears so you've got something else. Actually funny that you say that because now there is a band called the teddy bears. Okay is it this band notice? Different benefits from okay. These are but this is different. This isn't the Teddy Bears. This is teddy bears and it's one word not to work very important so it's their Swedish so I don't think that matters and they wear bare heads so I think they own the the people who know him is to love him I don't believe were bare heads I mean not. They're not in their Their show business life but who knows what they did in their personal lives. What if seventy but again? What if somebody was like we want to be called the destroyers and they were already was a bank of the destroyers? I think you can. I think we can start retiring like go through the fifties and sixties and start. Retiring is on these band names and that other people pick them up. That's all I'm saying like I think it should be like you know like Like a lab the copyright will lapse and then in the public domain. I think some band names should go back into the public domain. That's all I'm saying. That's what I was thinking about this morning while I was getting ready to go to my job that I now sit at home and do anyway. We spoke about that new order. There was another band called venue water right so exactly you know you gotTa have the on. It drives the Ateneo or you know whatever you have to put like underscore exclamation point at the end. Just that differentiate. We've we've discussed this before. So yeah I mean. I'm waiting for them to retire. Elvis Presley and then I can just rebrand myself this right right. Yeah definitely Okay so robin originally spelled R. O. B. I N. She's a liar and she has two names dare she Robin Carlson She had interesting beginning life. She spent her first seven years touring with her parents. Experimental Theater Troupe. As we all do as we all of course she did. She said it was exciting. But it didn't help her socialize so she felt felt different. And you know. Maybe that's why she's got such a different sort of outlook on life. Who knows I mean? She also also slept in a tiny tiny chest in their wagon. So that was the other right. True also helped her. She's titrate. That's the joke. She's very tight. I'm pat the job so she wrote it for Song at the age of eleven and it was her first sad song and it was better parents. Recent divorced of course it was your girlfriend. No that'd be great. I'm imagining vary like slow black and white like Dour Swedish film. That's that's her parent's divorce as her right. She's standing on a rocky beach staring out at the ocean for like for like a really long time like the shock goes on for like thirty seconds. She started I guess her her career in one thousand eight nine which was voiced a character and a Swedish Norwegian film the journey of Melania which I had to look up. It's based on the tempest and it's super bizarre because it's Swedish nice our second Shakespeare reference of the of the pocket. No we'll make a TRIFECTA somewhere. So she was discovered in her middle school middle school at her middle school by a Swedish music. Star May and signed to richocheting records Sweden at the age of fourteen During the time she collaborated with Max Martin who we have discussed before. He's a big pop producer He's he's worked on a lot of stuff She released her first album. Robyn is here in Sweden in ninety five and then her big. Us break came in ninety. Seven and I found this out a week ago. Maybe she released this She had an international release of the album and had two singles that charted one called. Do you know what it takes and show me. When I found out that she sang. Show me love. I was blown away so I had no clue. Did you know I.

Teddy Bears producer Sweden Beatles Riverdale NBC Union NHL Josie Duck Creek middle school middle school Robin Carlson Maya Cindy lauper Robyn Elvis Presley Alex Alexander Crumlin
Voice Technology in Healthcare Book Launch

Voice First Health

10:24 min | 1 year ago

Voice Technology in Healthcare Book Launch

"The book first of all is divided into four main sections. I should also mention if you want to get access to the book or get more about it. You can always go to voice. I health dot com slash book. And there I've got lots of about it. That's also where you'll be able to access Links to order the book if you decide to do so and so on so again we have designed the book to really be made up of four main sections and in doing so we wanted to think about the different main areas that would make sense really to have this type of format and section one is made up of four different chapters It is an introduction to voice technology so these chapters really form the fundamental the basis for some underlying key concepts that really are relevant to the rest of the book and so yes these introduce some of the key concepts of voice technology in healthcare. Now if we dive into that section. I can tell you a little bit about the chapters and the people that are contributing in these chapters. The first chapter. I'm I'm very honored to say was written by myself. And it really looks at an overview of voice. Why is voice such an important Concept now when it comes to healthcare technology why I feel this is going to completely transform healthcare. Why believe that voice is actually the next operating system the video s and get into different types of communication and then I lay the groundwork for different use cases which of course are explored in more detail throughout the rest of the book the second chapter is by Atlanta ear. You may have heard her speak if you've gone to the voice of Healthcare Summit over the past couple of years. She was a keynote speaker there a few years ago and she is truly one of the World foremost experts on design voice. User interface design. And how it applies to healthcare and we put this early in the book because we really wanted to keep this in mind for all the readers when they are looking at some ideas and how best to design voice applications because the user interface design is so critical and so Atlanta's chapter is here at the The outside of the book as well the next chapter which we feel also is critical to designing good a voice experience. Healthcare is one by Audrey are beanie. She is the CEO and founder of audio brain and her chapter is entitled the Science Behind. Sonic branding how audio can create better patient caregiver and healthcare provider outcomes. And I'm really pleased to actually have a clip from you're you're just describing a little bit about her chapter so here is Audrey are beanie. Hi I'm Maury are beanie. I'm the founder. Ceo and executive producer of audio brain. And I'm honored to be a chapter contributed to voice technology and healthcare. This is an amazing book for anybody. Who's interested in health and wellness from every aspect? I specialize in sonic branding at my firm audio brain and one of our passions is and we advocate for the use of music and sound to promote health and wellbeing in this chapter. I discussed my twenty five years of experience in working in the healthcare industry. We talk about how the brain processes music and Sadam why. It's the perfect tool for communicating and helping to heal and promote wellness with new technologies emerging. Sound is even more important than it ever was and really has a strong influence on patient outcomes. I discussed some of the projects that we've worked on and the history of the industry and where it's headed in the future. I hope you enjoy the chapter and hope you enjoy all the other amazing authors that are in this book please go out and purchase voice technology in healthcare and you can find it at voice. I health dot com photos slash book. Thank you so much. We look forward to seeing you at hymns and the release of the book on March tenth. Thank you very much to audrey for those comments fantastic The next chapter is a really critical one as well that we thought fit really well at the outset of the book. And that of course is when we talk about voice. We also need to talk about privacy insecurity and so in this case we have nature lore From orbiter who wrote a chapter called secure voice in it is It's a great one It's all I can say. Really really critical information there. The second part of the book is another seven chapters and this is looking at voice technology and the patient experience and so here we have quite a few authors that have had experience with creating these voice applications and how seeing how it impacts patients some of these chapters include chapter five automated virtual caregiving using voice for services proactive personalized holistic. Twenty four seven and affordable. This is by Stuart Patterson from lifeblood then we have a really interesting chapter by Dave Kemp on voice and wearables and that and how that's going to affect the the Patient then we have another fascinating chapter by Rupa Patel. This is on synthetic voices for healthcare applications. Rupel is doing some amazing work looking at how you can create voices for for brands but also in the medical field. How can you create a voice for somebody that may be losing their voice? It's really really powerful. The next two chapters are edited versions of podcasts interviews. That took place here on this podcast voice I health we wanted to incorporate some of these interviews into the book as well touring to bring a real personal aspect to the To the narratives that you are reading and so as I said we have two chapters here coming up next Chapter Eight is voice. I health interview a diabetes. Care plans with an wiler. She actually won an award for her diabetes Alexa Skill and then chapter nine is entitled Voice I health interview Alexis skills for pediatrics. And we have Devon Nadar Speaking about some of her experiences with creating some skills specifically for pedes then we have a very interesting chapter by Robin Christoffersen. And it's called the rapid rise of voice technology and it's awesome power to empower. This is all about accessibility and Wonderful wonderful addition. And I do have a short clip here from Robin. Speaking about his chapter. So here is a Robin Christoffersen. My name is Robyn Christopherson. I'm head of digital inclusion at UK technology and disability charity ability net. I wrote chapter about how the Echo and voice first technologies more. Broadly represent a fantastic opportunity for people with disabilities. I've been lucky enough to be working in this area of technology and disability for the last twenty five years and health is incredibly important so read the chapter and learn about how voice first technologies are being used in so many different ways to help people live more productive healthier happier. Mo fulfilling lies. That's wonderful. And I love those comments from Robin so you can get a little taste of what that chapter is all about The next chapter is chapter eleven. And it's entitled an overview of Voice Technology and healthcare and is really by a team of authors from a Macadamia Technologies And they have been real leaders in the voice for space as well. So it's a it's wonderful to have them part of the book. The third section is next and this third section is called voice technology and the provider experience. Now go from you're describing. What the patient will experience were is experiencing with voice technology. And now we tackle what be provider is experience is experiencing and the first chapter is chapter twelve in this section and it's Mayo Clinic. Patient centered innovation driven. And this is written by a team at Mayo Clinic including a Doctor San Pruthi. Who's one of the cover authors of the book so Again a very very well written and excellent chapter chapter thirteen we get to another a voice L. Interview Voice Technology for behavioral changes. And in this chapter I speak with Dr Mattson Boesky. Who was on the PODCAST? Awhile back and he talks about his experiences about how we can use voice technology to really influence positive behavioral changes and hopefully this results in positive health outcomes. Now the next chapter chapter fourteen is called the laws of voice. This is critical to us in the healthcare. Space looking at implementing. Voice Technologies because. This is such an early early industry when it comes to voice technology healthcare that there are a lot of questions right now and we have to lawyers heather dealer and Bianca Phillips who we are very fortunate to have as a contributor to the book who outlined some of the questions. Some of the concerns in this regard and Bianca has Been Gracious enough to provide us with a clip for her as well alenquer chapter so here is Bianca Phillips Phillips I'm a lawyer with research expertise in medical law and digital helpful and they coordinate at Elektra of legal process methods and institutions in the. Jd Program will try blow school. I'm one of the contributing authors alongside co off a headache SLA. Us Attorney specializing in digital at life. And then what happens? The title of our chapter is the laws of voice as we enter this new frontier of waste best health lawyers and lawmakers will seek your expertise on the role of voice technologies in society in order to cheat. They understand the legal environment and the laws of voice. Now chapter rate is presented with nine hypothetical scenarios. We've uses a voice. Technologies in pre and post operative cat pediatrics genetic testing into health impediment health tracking. We then discuss some of the lake will considerations and legal contracts relevant to h scenario the chapter then tends to you by asking a range of questions and presenting. The guide called the eight pillows. We get you thinking about what below should be. And you'll role in shaping the future of law and society. So that's wonderful as you can as you heard. It's an extremely important chapter in this Early Industry when it comes to voice

Voice Technology Voice Technologies Robin Christoffersen Healthcare Summit Audrey Bianca Phillips Phillips Diabetes Atlanta UK Founder Sadam Maury Mayo Clinic Dave Kemp CEO Robyn Christopherson
"robyn" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"robyn" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Ready to unburden their souls. But Bradley, I you have to unburden yours. You are you a pimp? Hope I'm a pimp. Oh, yes. I have pimped out one particular log in somebody asked me four nine was like, I'm not gonna say, no. Yeah. That's just like the loving thing to do. Let's go to Robyn. Hello, robin. Are you a pimp a ho? Hi. I love. Oh. So what I mean? What are you? What what all are you leaving? Yeah. Well, y you know, I know people. I'm happy. Pretty much everything. Wow. Do you? Do you throw any like, do you reimburse anybody or do you just sort of happily? Enjoy the fruits of other people's labor. Well. Definitely the ladder. But they will not allow me to give them anything. So I just. Wow. Great. Thank you a lot. Wow. Robyn. Thank you for your call. I am. I am. I that is amazing. That's amazing. Me too. Let's go to Jamie, Jamie. Are you a pimp? I am a pin. But not a very good one because I'm not making any money off of. Okay. So that doesn't yeah. Which which password to which streaming service are you given out freely. Okay. See? So you. Talking like one person half a dozen. What's the deal here? I'm not even sure who all has..

Robyn Bradley Jamie