19 Episode results for "Robin Young"

Remembering Stonewall; Koreas Mark War's 70th Anniversary

Here & Now

41:33 min | 1 year ago

Remembering Stonewall; Koreas Mark War's 70th Anniversary

"From NPR and WBZ, Jeremy Hobson I'm Robin Young? It's here now on the steps of the Capitol today the chair. Of the Congressional Black Caucus, Karen. Bass, called it a Glorious Day because it's the day the House will pass the Georgia Floyd justice and Policing Act, which calls for a federal ban on police chokehold and makes it easier to sue and prosecute individual officers. Certainly people around the world are marching for. Human Rights in America. The United Nations is held discussions about human rights in America. We are supposed to be the beacon of hope for human rights in other countries and the justice, and policing, act is a bill for human rights in our country. But it is unclear what can get through congress at the Republican plan? In the Senate stalled yesterday NPR congressional correspondent cloudy. Gonzales has been watching all this unfold and Claudia start with places where Democrats and Republicans in both houses agree one of the things they agree on. They did overlap in several areas one of those. was looking at a federal database that would track police misconduct cases, and that would try in limit these concerns of police officers moving from one police department to another when they're having issues of misconduct in their background, and that was one area. It also made lynching a federal crime that is one issue that's been debated quite a bit in the house, but has not passed in the Senate and then overall. Both sides wanted to get to a situation where we didn't see cases of. Of chokehold and other dangerous restraint, but the Senate bill got to through training in a focus on de escalation tactics in the house bill had an outright ban at least when it came to federal police, and they also had a ban for No knock warrants in drug, related cases, and the Senate bill didn't quite go that far, and the Democrats didn't also had an additional provision which was to lower the legal standards to go after officers when it came to cases of misconduct. So Republicans didn't like the outright. Ban on Coles or no knock warrants as ending else in the house bill. that. Just a nonstarter. For Republicans Yes, they talked a lot about what is termed qualified immunity. This is a legal shield. Basically that is used to protect officers from certain repercussions, legal repercussions in cases of misconduct, and that was one area that most Republicans drew the line. They said they didn't WanNA. Go that far in terms reforming that but Democrats were ready to go there. Now so, what happens next? Is the Senate even going to take up a house plan? Right now it doesn't look good. This House bill does look poised for passage today in the House Chamber when it comes to the Senate. It looks like they don't have quite an appetite to take up this house bill. They were trying to push their own provisions. Democrats blocked them blocked that move and so it looks like for now. Things are going to be stalled when it comes to this issue. But you know there are two new tapes out of one young black men, in Colorado dying after a chokehold, another Latino man dying after officers put him on his stomach and chest in a prone position against That department's policy. As. He's tapes. Come out if there's a huge outcry from the public. Might there be a shift, and I guess the question. Is it possible that? Congress might do nothing. It is possible and we're talking about a divided congress. That is very possible. Unfortunately Democrats are betting that they're going to do well in the elections in November and they think they'll be able to move this legislation. There is a chance to respond to this huge outcry after the elections, but if we're in the same position as we are in now, which is divided Congress the odds. Just don't look great. Yeah well some Republicans are urging president trump to change strategy going forward. South Dakota. Senator John Thune says trump has a problem that's his. Those are his words winning over the middle of the electorate, including women independence in college educated voters. Republican those voters to keep the Senate, so, are you hearing these mutterings? I am. I am hearing some of that kind of view from Senate. Republicans, it's been a little surprising just seeing a little more daylight if you will between Senate, Republicans and the President and for example Thune when he mentioned this problem about winning over the middle of the electorate were hearing that theme a little bit in terms of other Senate, Republicans raising concerns about some of the comments that the president has said saying they don't agree with it that he went too far, and so that kind of goes to this point of the middle of the electorate and concerns that it could be hurting those voters. Have, a minute here. House Judiciary Committee Chair jerrold Nadler said yesterday. He may very well pursue impeachment of attorney. General William Bar. WHO's testifying next month before committee committees possible really. It looks like right now. That Barr could voluntarily come in to testify impeachment. The window is really tight right now, and it just seems like Democrats. Don't have a big appetite to take that on just before an election. Cloudy Goose Saleh's NPR congressional correspondent. Thanks as always thank you. Will there were just under thirty four thousand new corona virus cases reported yesterday in this country that beats the previous single day record set back in April, health experts say the hot spots can be traced to Memorial Day reopenings in many states, and there's a new question emerging corona virus tests does a positive result. Mean you're contagious? The answer according to the latest research is often no, and that can complicate life where people who appear to have recovered from the virus, but still test positive Martha Bebinger from member station W.. B. U. R. reports. In mid March cove nineteen knocked Amanda Joyce off. Her feet was like fever body aches, Salt Lake seven had just done. Wrestlemainia like I've just totally took me down by mid April Joyce was finally feeling better and figure the virus must be gone to return to work as a labor and delivery nurse Joyce would need to negative tests. She tried at least a dozen times over the next six weeks, but every other. Other test would come back positive, so Joyce, who is pregnant? Her husband and their young son stayed home I. Think like nine weeks I drove my husband to Lowe's and I just sat in the car, just because I needed to get out of the house, but otherwise the Joyce family remained in isolation, assuming she was still contagious, I was just cautious. Still getting those positive tests because no one could tell me. What it actually meant because research into how long someone with the coronavirus remains, contagious was emerging wild. Joyce was sick. The answer based on a small group of studies is five to eleven days after someone. Has that first headache fever runny nose or enjoys his case a cough? So. Why was a nasal swab? Still finding signs of the virus enjoys more than two months after she got sick. Here's Dr Erica, Shenoy, the associate chief of infection control at Massachusetts General Hospital. The test is looking for the genetic material the virus. It doesn't tell you if the virus is alive, it's capable of leading to infection another individual, and that's really important because that's determining. Determining how long we isolate individuals and may determine when they can return to work. The CDC says to negative tests or one way to determine when someone is no longer contagious, but the agency offers a second option. It's based on symptoms. A patient is cleared for work ten days after they get sick if they've had three days without a fever and their symptoms have improved. Shenoy says her hospital network is now telling staff not to return until they are symptom free. It has dropped the to negative test requirement just because you identify virus through this test does not mean that the person is infectious and capable of spreading disease to. There is concern about clearing someone to return to work or an assisted living facility or a homeless shelter if they might still test positive. Infectious Disease Specialist Josh Barocco was a strong proponent of testing to determine when a patient is no longer contagious. Until he looked at the latest research that supports isolation and checking symptoms, it is truly amazing how fast things change and while I think this is a reasonable approach right now if new data emerge next week or the week after then we are going to have to all of us retool our approach. This question of whether a positive test means someone is still spreading. The virus creates a dilemma for many hospitals. What precautions do they take with the ten percent of Covid, nineteen patients, who still tests positive thirty days or more after their first symptoms? Dr Richard Ellison an epidemiologist at umass memorial. Medical Center wants tests that show whether the virus is still active, but they aren't available yet right now. We're getting a black and white answer. The test is positive or negative. We're not getting variation of that. With these limitations ellison says, employers, schools, and summer camps should not rely on tests alone to decide who's contagious, and who is not some kids might spend the entire summer getting tested before they be able to be approved for going to camp. A diagnostic test can help find someone who. Who has the corona virus and does not have any symptoms, but again it does not mean that person can infect others. When they finally gave me that second or that go ahead to be cleared I was like this is the first time I haven't felt like a a lab experiment. Amanda Joyce is thrilled to be out from under the COVID nineteen microscope, visiting with friends and family from a safe distance after a two and a half months of nothing, but virtual contact has kind of a nice feeling. Do let back into human society. So how let out of the cage? Is Back at work now, but won't be on the job for long. She's due to deliver her baby in early August for here, and now I'm Martha Bebinger. Covid nineteen has forced many celebrations to go virtual among them is pride month, which is normally marked in June with parades around the country pride month celebrates the Movement for lgbtq rights which began in June sixty nine when a police raid on the stonewall in a gay club in new. York led to a riot Paul Glass and his husband. Charles Evans have foul. Massachusetts were there last year to commemorate the Fiftieth Anniversary of Stonewall I spoke with them. First of all you were both at stonewall separately, but didn't even know that you were both there until recently explain that. Well? I was living in Boston at the time, still living at home, teenager and I was exploring in New York for the weekend. What I mean by exploring. Is that there I want to see more of what the gay life had to offer in Greenwich Village. And Charleston I had met the year prior. We dated a little bit long distance, but then it wasn't really going to work out so I kind of sneaked in town without telling him. And I was on the opposite end of Christopher Street down near the piers and was working my way back up towards Sheridan Square, when folks were kind of running down the street and sending out word almost like the town crier that there was commotion going on up at Sheridan Square so. Everybody kind of ran in that direction Charles was coming from a club on the opposite end of Christopher Street. So, we never really saw one another. And why why did you not discussed before recently that you were both there at Stonewall at the same time? Now. No, it just didn't. It never really came up. It wasn't something dad. I didn't think really to share it everywhere. I didn't realize. You know although I knew about What's stonewalled? Comments sparked. A bit of a revolution, but it really wasn't didn't take. Hold of wasn't as publicized until now. Charles t tell us a little bit about how you ended up there at stonewall. On that day you were raised in north. Carolina but you were living in New York at the time. Correct I was raised down southbound. My aunt so I was up visiting my parents for the summer and as usual you just hang out and it was. One of those days I wanted to go out and I ended up going to village, and there was. This club called a Bonsoir that always free. And then it just happened to be that Friday at the leaving the club. I, King, down West Fourth Street and as I approach. West, Fourth Street, as saw a crawl now going back with a little bit. Athar Relieved Club. We always go to Sheridan Square just hang out just because young kids I was like I said I would are between summary was between my freshman and Sophomore Year in college, so we just wanted to hang out and as close to shirts square. We saw this crowd annexing. Renew we. Joining into the Crou- now as to others, it was kind of interesting because. In a riot mode because before we had a big riot at masks, my college. and. I guess so by getting into this crowded. Just made the draining even higher. And next thing a no is that the is lady here we are. and. Were you worried for Your Safety Charles that evening? Not Written Not Adia think about that. Because when by the time you got the I guess all the screaming in Holland in. We kinda found out what was going on, so we kind of joined in, and it got to be two point, too. If you lived in New York during that time of going to clubs, you would be in a club. And then all to music was stopped. UNPLUG the jukebox in so common will walk around. So got be a point you at todd of being tie it so when we found that exact what was going on? We feel good, so there is no danger. I felt no danger at all. What about you Paul? Did you feel like you were in danger at all during stonewall? I didn't feel as much so much endangered because I felt we had numbers, and it wasn't the kind of commotion. If you will from the police, they were being resistant or pushing back, but they really weren't being violent as I have seen them in other situations, they I think they were more afraid of the crowd. The crowd was afraid of them, and they really were at moving. In reverse when they were being prompted with. You know things that were being thrown at them, so I felt There was some safety from that perspective. Paul did it feel monumental or historic at the time. It felt monumental, but I didn't feel that the historic pot until later. What about you Charles did? Did it feel monumental to you? yes, into assault in so many different ways and IBM black and blind in itself This was just another time of fighting resistance. So it was just. On uprising that I felt that was. Part of my nature to fight for my rights, so as talking about mom monumental is just another step forward for my bryce and his time, not being as my Ratio Rights. WHO's my equality? Rise is being gay person. What impact do you think stonewall had on gay rights in this country I'll start with you Charles. It a lot of is. We just wasn't a group of people that were out in drags of being out girl, and all the other stuff we humans also, and we had our rights. There were so many drag Queens. That were there that you know. They will walk down the streets years later weeks later. Should I say and proud to say here? I am accept me for who I am. And I didn't think I still don't think the anyone has the right to tell us how. We should have love life, and how we should go out and enjoy ourselves. And what about you Paul? For me, it felt empowering I think it empowered all gays in general it. It was one of the first times if the gates had fought back for and fought for their rights, felt Lizzo, they were no longer sub-human. You know. They felt that they should be respected. And they had rights for a long time, certainly from from my perspective, in being the time that I had been out in gay life. The, attitude was pretty much. You didn't have any rights, so you just had to go along and and comply with whatever was the order of the day and folks began to feel as though when they come to come together, they had power, and that power was evident at all. Your, both gay and both African American as you look at all the progress that has been made for both of those groups over the decades. which do you feel at? This point is the one that has more to be done that there's more progress that needs to be made. Abbas say both. So what I? Think this ad, this ground to be covered on both ends on both fronts, both racially as well as for. Q. rights as well. Do you think that that a younger generation of lgbtq people in this country understands what happened at stonewall and how that led to where we are today. No and I look back when they were interviewing a young lady on at the Boston Pride, and they asked her what was stolen while all about, and she had slightest idea. She even turn to a forensic. Could you help me out? So we are talking fifty years later, and it seemed like it was Outta. Sight Outta mind to a lot of the young kids, and that's why I think so important for us. Older lgbtq to communicate to these kids and understand the importance of because. Sometime I think they'd just live for today. That there's a generation that has lost some the rich history of about stonewall and a lot of the activism that happened Post Stonewall as well. There's a whole generation is just wasn't born around that time to and that they're not in tune to all the of the rights that they have they enjoy now that they that living on the backs of of those who were part of that initial uprising and dose who have carried the manor since then. So, as we approach the fiftieth anniversary of Stonewall, we should tell our listeners that, even though you were on and off together over the years. You're now married right? Yeah, how did you finally decide to Get together for good while he. Now that's a rich rich story in and I'll try to give the short version. We we. I was living in New York. After nine eleven I left New York after thirty years in Mo- moved back to Massachusetts to much I had purchased a home and it was. Not long after it was a friend of. A friend of mine who passed away and a mutual friend came to the funeral. We were very close time, but he was still living in new. York He. We exchanged, and we hadn't been in communication. He exchanged information. The next week and he runs into Charleston. Charleston I had that point had a twelve year absence and we hadn't been in communication hadn't seen spoken to one another. He gave Charles. My number eight gave me chills number I called him, and it looked like we we still. There was a little bit of a spark I invited him to come to the Cape He came and it was on since then and. Two years later, we got married. And that was seven years ago seven years ago. Well congratulations to both of you. Thank you, thank you. We spoke with Paul Glass and Charles Evans last June for the fiftieth anniversary of stonewall. You can see photos of them at here now dot org, and by the way they continue to protest. Both of them took part in several black lives matter demonstrations over the last several weeks near their home. And if you're wondering about this music, according to the Stonewall Veterans Association, this song was one of the most popular in the stonewall jukebox. Good Lovin ain't easy to come by by Marvin. Gaye and to. She was once undocumented. Now she writes about the undocumented immigrants. We often ignore day-laborers, housekeepers, deliveryman people who don't inspire hashtags or t shirts. That's coming up on code switch. The European Union is working on a plan to reopen its borders for the summer tourist season, but maybe not to Americans joining us now from Paris is NPR's eleanor. Beardsley high honor Hi Jeremy. So they're trying to come up with a list of countries, from which people will be allowed in what is the criteria for making that list well, they were still determining the criteria this week. They're going to be meeting tomorrow. All twenty seven heads of the EU really going to hash this out together what they're looking for our countries with sort of similar infection rates as the e, U and in the EU right now, sixteen out of one hundred thousand people are being infected by the coronavirus in in the. The US it's one hundred seven people out of one hundred thousand, so basically seven times as many and as we know. Jeremy the US. Has You know more than two million cases of the highest in the world right now, you know Europe. The EU is actually the world's biggest tourist destination. Two million Americans come every month in in the summer, and so they would like to have them, and the E U is trying to salvage a bit of a summer season, but it doesn't look good right now. Wolf and the US and Brazil then based on that criteria would not make that list, but Americans would not be allowed in this summer to the EU. That's right. That's exactly what would happen now. They're going to a French official. WHO's deeply involved in these negotiations spoke yesterday, and he said every two weeks they would reassess the list. You know they're going to be looking at the overall. Overall trend of cases, but also countries response you know how they're meeting it through testing surveillance tracing containment, and you know because these countries in the EU really shutdown France was really completely closed for two straight months, and it's really been sort of. It's not been uniform in the US. Many states didn't close others did is completely all over the place, so there's not like a a uniform. Response to it. There's been talk of sort of a bubble of Western Pacific. Bubble of Australia New Zealand people with similar infection rates, being able to come in. But we don't know yet. Who's going to be on that that list of who can come in and who can't. When it comes to Covid Nineteen in Europe at this point. I noticed Italy. Which of course was one of the hardest hit countries early on only reported about two hundred cases yesterday new cases while the US reported nearly forty thousand. Does it feel in Europe where you are like it's close to over. You know it really does I mean I. Actually have to remind myself. Sometimes, that were still in this threat. We still and there ads on the radio public service announcement saying the virus is. Is still out there, but Jeremy. All the cafes and restaurants have opened parks have opened I mean aside from the fact that everyone's wearing masks in public transport in all stores and a lot of people in the street. Everything feels kinda normal right now, but there is talk about a second wave, and so that's why the e U wants to be very careful about just opening its borders and letting in people who could could spread the virus, but because they do not want to have to shut down again and go through what they went through all the deaths I mean it was just horrible. The Eiffel Tower actually opened. For the first time in more than one hundred days this week it did that was its longest closure since World War. Two it reopened, but you will have to walk up. If you WANNA, go, and the top is now. Yeah, a lot of are taking it as a challenge actually and you know they're not allowing you know. They're allowing four thousand visitors a day, instead of twenty thousand, and you have to walk up everyone going up the east pillar, and down the West Pillar, and you have to wear a mask so things that life has changed but it. You know it's very hot warm here summer. People are out to of feels normal, but it's not quite normal. As NPR's Eleanor Beardsley in Paris. Eleanor, thank you thank you, Jeremy. As the country grapples with systemic racism, end of pandemic, the president has been combining both doubling down on his of racial slur to describe the coronavirus here. He is at the rally in Arizona with young voters egging him on Tuesday night. Was Catching on. Corona virus right. kung-fu! Defenders like press. Secretary Kaley mcenaney say he simply associating the pandemic with its place of origin as the media has of course, the media does not use the term Kong flu, and she says it's harmless, but the organization stop a API hate which tracks self reporting anti-asian incidents says since March it's received more than twenty one hundred of them. We WanNa talk about the impact of a slur, but also get the latest on where we are. Are With covid nineteen and our next guest can do both Dr Lena Win is an emergency physician and public health professor at George. Washington University. She previously served as Baltimore's Health Commissioner. You may have seen her on CNN and she I wants us to make clear as uncomfortable as this is for her. She doesn't want to conflate or confuse her story. Without of people in the black lives matter movement Dr Wen. Why don't you start there? Robyn, thank you so much for bring up this topic in this way. I think it is important for us to talk about racism xenophobia and the attacks directed at Asian Americans, but in no way do I. Want to take away from the urgency and the moment for black lives matter we are Asian American. Join in and support blackledge movements to talk about dismantling systemic racism and the legacy of anti blackness in. In this country, so this is on a conversation about comparing injustices, but I hope we all see it as reckoning for what happens in this country that we all have to be part of the solution to stop off forms of racism, xenophobia and hate when it comes to this racial slur that the president uses Kung flu, and the crowd applauding while the your thoughts when you hear that, well, it brings. Brings me back to what my colleagues who are Asian Americans and I'm go through. I'll tell you what I've experienced every time I, read an article, every time I appear on air to give the message about how to reduce your risk for getting krona virus I will get messages calling me a bad eater saying that I have no right to talk about this topic because it's quote, my people who brought it. It to the country. Even people writing to be saying that you're the reason why people are dying. You should go back to your country and take the virus with you. My colleagues for doctors and nurses on the front lines have told me stories about how patients have refused to see them others yelling at them on the street after coming back from work where they are risking their lives to save others. We've internalized this and I think a lot of my colleagues feel like we should not be complaining, but I also think we need to talk about it because it doesn't have to be this way. I mean our president and other public officials need to be leading the way. To talk about the racism and injustice in our country, but also to correct the record, and unfortunately it seems like our president is going in exactly the opposite direction well, it has a a terrible impact. Any form of racism had did I hear you correctly once say that patients in hospitals are spitting at eight doctors and nurses I have heard from one of my colleagues about this occurring, and yes, it is about the individual incidents, but I also worry about what this means for other patients hair, if there are patients who are somehow not trusting the advice that they receiving from their doctor because. Because, their doctor looks asian-american American. That's a big problem for that person's health care and more broadly. This is part of this politicization of public health that are also really worry about. There's a reason actually why the World Health Organization has an entire committee that's dedicated to naming new diseases because they know that when a disease is named after a type of people, a country or region than create stigma on that provokes potential racist incidents and attacks that's happened for others before, and we're seeing this happening now in the US and around the world, and we understand that this false thinking that the Chinese. Created this in a lab that has been debunked over and over sent it here is almost an attack that's also perpetuated by staffers and hospitals. And that another result, which it's painful, but it also has terrible health implications is that there are Asian Americans, who feel they can't go in to get care. Because of the way they might be treated right I would say to that. It is impacting the way that we as a country have dealt with covid nineteen, because the initial focus on travel bans from China. That, all of this was somehow due to Chinese. People also missed the number of travelers coming in from Europe who actually were carrying the virus, and in fact them understood that in the New York region, the initial spikes are not because of travelers from China from Europe. To win. Thank you so much for sharing some of these things because we know as you said you will, you will be targeted again, so we appreciate you pointing that out, but you also are the go-to person so couple of questions here we are hearing about of course the spikes in several states the highest rate of cases. Across the country and some of the spikes were hearing about Texas Florida. Those places where young people in particular we're going to pool parties. We're going to bars several weeks ago and now it. Many more young people in those states are testing positive or coming down with covid nineteen. Why do you think we're not seeing more spikes from places that were hotspots for protests with people know thousands of people marching. It's a great question and. Would just I say that you're right about the trends occurring across the country that they are deeply concerning we have states with a record, high and hospitalizations, not just the number of infections, but we're now seeing the lifetime, and we're seeing that in places like Arizona that I see us are already getting crowded that that state has reached eighty eight percent capacity when it comes to its issues, and in fact, these are the same trends that we saw in the New York area back in March, and so we are coming to a very dangerous place. I would say. In multiple places across the country, but as The trends that we're seeing for young people versus the protesters. I mean I. Think a lot of this has to do with being outdoors in the protest and also protesters taking many precautions including wearing masks. It is possible that we will see spikes as a result of the protests, because there is a lack time, the incubation period the period between exposure, and when you start, developing symptoms could be up to fourteen days, and for others may still take more time for that person to become severely ill to seek treatment, so there is a lag time, but so far we're seeing from the initial results of testing of those who attended protests is. A. Relatively small percentage are testing positive. We know that being outdoors versus indoors substantially reduces of transmission by as much as eighteen to nineteen times as opposed to in parts of the country that reopened and you saw on the numbers of young people going into bars and restaurants that were crowded in indoors with her speaking and singing without masks why there was so much spread to there and I think the lesson for all of us now is. This is a very contagious. Contagious disease it is spreading rapidly across the country. There are particular hot spots that have the potential of becoming new epicenters for the outbreak, and it's not too late to turn this around. We all have to do our part and so governments to do their part and policymakers really need to ramp up testing tracy isolation. They should consider hitting pause on reopening and requiring masks, and for all of us recognize that just because we can do. Something doesn't mean that we should. He was going to ask you. What can this be done? And you say it can be done if there's asking if there's social distancing opening, slow down, and yet we saw palm. Beach County in Florida. Commissioners vote to require masks, and you had people lunging at the commissioners, screaming and yelling about how that was unconstitutional, but Dr Win I just want to hear you say that again. You think this can be reversed absolutely, and it's not just for those areas around the country that are seeing the surges even if we're living in parts. Parts of the country that don't seem to be seeing spikes right now. There is almost certain to be community transmission. That's happening now. We're just not picking up on that level of exponential spread yet, and so we really all have to do our part to not take this lightly and know that each of our individual actions can affect the collective result for everyone else around us. Definitely no one emergency physician public health professor at George Washington University previously. Baltimore's Health Commissioner Dr Wen. Thank you so much for speaking with us. Thank Robin. Today is the seventieth anniversary of the start of the Korean War. The US fought alongside the south in a conflict triggered by a surprise invasion by North Korea that were ended in a stalemate in nineteen, fifty, three, joining us now is Samuel. Wells Cold War fellow at the Wilson Center an author of fearing the worst how Korea transformed the Cold War Samuel Welcome, and how would you characterize the relationship between these two countries today because there are still tensions well? Well, it's up and down, but it's a function largely of what North Koreans are trying to accomplish their basically the initiators of most of tension, and then they periodically choose to relieve it in order to try and gain some concessions from acting nice for a time. This is a continuation of struggle between governments in the north and the south, each of which would like to rule over the whole peninsula. And how did the US become such a key player? Well. It wasn't by plan on this day seventy years ago when the word came in that. The North Koreans had invaded. The US was taken by surprise. We knew that there had been a build up of forces, but as it happened many times this time, it wasn't all front major invasion. The Truman Administration this this was a a weekend, and the president was back in independence. Missouri taking it easy. He got some back to Washington. Then when you got back, he was confronted with a group of A. Able and experienced advisers who said we view this as a Soviet probe of both our will to protect a friendly nation and a challenge to the United Nations and Truman said. We need to help our friends and he ordered. American aircraft to go in and try and bomb and stop and American warships to go in provide, they will fire support, and he hoped that would be the end of it, but it wasn't because there's North Koreans kept coming, and we had to send in ground forces and there we were Truman never wanted to acknowledge. That was a war reporter suggested that well. Maybe you should call it a police action so he. He referred to it frequently as A. Police action. but for the troops who were there? It was a war and a serious. And you say that it transformed the Cold War between the US and the Soviet. Union, how did it do that? The reason the war precipitated at this time Kim. Il Song had wanted to invade the south for a long time and he couldn't do it. Without huge supplies. Equipment from the Russians and Stalin wouldn't approve in January nineteen fifty. Stalin reversed his policy and civil cables of to Kim. Saying we can now talk about the opportunity that you wish to take advantage of now. The reason he did this is because. because. He had made a deal with mouse at home that he would support the invasion. This would expand Communism Asia, but that Kim needed to have mouse support if the North Koreans got into trouble so when we had a successful invasion at Inchon famous I, Must Arthur amphibious landing the Chinese intervened massively at this point Washington had to do a major strategic review, and in this review they decided that the Chinese and the Russians were willing to accept a lot more risks than we had ever anticipated and we needed to. Initiate a full military expansion. That's how the the Cold War which had been essentially. Political became a nuclear arms race between the superpowers in its most. Dominant characteristics. So. Why didn't the tensions subside between the north and the south, and between the north, and the United States when the Cold War came to an end and the Berlin. Wall came down. because. It became clear that the North Koreans who had wanted nuclear power and had been helped by. The Soviet. Union to establish nuclear power were engaged in a covert nuclear weapons program, and were making fairly significant advances and. We have never got an agreement with the North Koreans that laws fully honored and lasted. Although people keep trying some more naively than others. So I have to say that. As a child of the eighties in the United States I learned a lot more about the Vietnam. War World War One, and world. War Two than about the Korean War If, there was one thing that Americans should know about this war which started seventy years ago today. What is it? What is the legacy? What last out of it is? A huge contrast between the two Koreas. The North is impoverished and a third generation dictatorship. The South is a vibrant democracy. With an economy that ranks twelfth in the world. And as huge exports, and as we well know in the United States. Electronics automobiles and such, so the legacy is quite substantial, and the Koreans and the south are very well aware of it. At a Samuel Wells, who is a Cold War fellow at the Wilson Center he's the author of fearing the worst. How Korea transformed the Cold War. Thank you for speaking with us. Thank you very much pleasure. And here now is production of NPR WB. You are in association with the BBC World Service I'm Jeremy Hobson and Robin Young. This is here now.

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Black Birder On Central Park Video; Administrators Rethink Police In Schools

Here & Now

41:49 min | 1 year ago

Black Birder On Central Park Video; Administrators Rethink Police In Schools

"From NPR and WBZ, you are I'm Robin Young. I'm Tanya Moseley. It's here now when he was a teenager. George Floyd told his classmate. He wanted to change the world and today. His brutal death has done that Loyd is being laid to rest this afternoon in his hometown of Houston Texas. Thousands of mourners have lined the streets of that city. Of A long farewell for Floyd, whose death has ignited global protests against police, brutality and racism Houston public media's Kyra, Buckley is at the funeral, and she joins us on the phone and Kyra describe for us what you're seeing. Folks have been arriving all morning. this is a private funerals for friends and family of George Floyd There's a lot of media here. This event obviously is very important to folks, not just sharing Houston, but all over the country so what we're seeing right now it is you know people dressed in suits ready to walk by a pile of flowers that's been left as a fun of the church also there are some folks from activist groups like MOMS Demand Action also people outside the church, wearing shirts that say I can't breathe, but those famous last words George Floyd and the mood here in somewhat somber, it's a different tone than what we've seen of some of the gatherings over the last week or so people here are really S-, according to one another through their grief. WHO's expected to speak at today's funeral or expected to hear from Reverend? Al Sharpton He's going again today eulogy. also we've heard that Reverend Lawson will be here now. He's the pastor emeritus. Of Mueller, Baptist Church, that's in the Third World here in Houston where George Floyd spent uh, much of his childhood, he also spoke at a rally on Tuesday I'm and then also vice president Joe Biden was in Houston to meet with family yesterday and he left a video address for today service. What have you learned about George Floyd's life there in Houston where he was born and raised that that illuminates this moment. Floyd grew up and the third ward and he he grew up to be a very tall person. He was known as big floyd He played tight end four the Jackie Lyons his high school and they wanNA state title actually while he was there but one of the things that we've learned is that he opened up a a mystery opportunities back in the third ward in the housing projects near where he grew up and. You know she really. He is somebody that led a spiritual and religious life and spend some time That, other people have that opportunity in the area where he grew up. George Floyd will be buried next to his mother He called out his mother in those last moments of his life We're also hearing that a horse drawn carriage will carry him to the last mile. To his grave. How his his death impacted Houston. Well as we've seen across the country and also here in Huston. People are upset. They're saying that this is just another example of how systemic racism is hurting our country and it's deadly for communities of color. here in Houston we've seen a lot of gatherings, big and small and just celebrating George's life, but also we've seen people pushing for change Harris County. Commissioners will look at. Proposals to help form the police department here. People say they want more accountability now. Houston police have been involved in a fatal shooting. They believe a handful over the last six months and people want answers they want. The body. Cams could be released from that so one of the proposals is to have an independent review board with subpoena power, and that's going to be debated later today. now, of course there have been activists here in the community that have been working on police reform for a long time but it would be hard not to say that this is probably push them to take a look a little bit sooner. That's Cairo Buckley. She's with Houston Public Media and she is reporting from George Floyd's funeral today. Kyra thank you so much. Thank you. Well as George Floyd is buried, protests continue an echo another time. Here's a young John Lewis now. A US congressman on March seventh, nineteen, sixty five about to lead the march from Selma to Montgomery Alabama. Today to dramatize to the nation dramatize to the world. Hundreds and thousands of Negro citizens of Alabama, but particularly here in the Blair, the my right to go. They were met with horrific police violence a day. That became known as bloody Sunday Princeton historian. Julian Zeller is here to look at today's news through the prism of history, as he always does for us and Julian. We know you've been thinking of the sixties. Civil rights protests watching today's protests. So how would you characterize the impact? The protests then? While they had an immense impact, the protests were able to gradually change public opinion and build more support, especially in the North for civil rights legislation, the movement created a new generation of activists like John Lewis, who had spent not just the sixties, but the rest of their life fighting for racial equality and most important, it led to legislation without the civil rights movement, the Civil Rights Act of nineteen, sixty, four, which ended segregation in public accommodations and the voting rights act of nineteen sixty five. Would have come to be so it's an example of why grassroots movements actually matter right when you think of that. The Voting Rights Act just came in one, thousand, nine hundred, and these. Were you know the grandparents? A lot of of a lot of the protesters were seeing today and back then these were not just peaceful protests, but blacks in their Sunday best dresses, white shirts and slacks. Couldn't afford to make a bad impression as a little girl. I remember you know the black and white news footage. But how DID ADULT AMERICANS REACT? Then you know there is widespread public support now. For this protest movement, you say it grew then talk about that. Grew, but it took a long time so gradually you see in different northern states. In the country, more and more support for legislation, but that's between the late nineteen fifties, and the early nineteen sixties in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, three. There's a Gallup poll. Still shows seventy eight percent of white people would leave their neighborhood if an African American family moved in and much of the country, still saw the civil rights movement and leaders such as Martin Luther King as radicals. So it has a big effect, but but it isn't as if it happens overnight, and that's why the movement was so conscious to try to be very careful in terms of how it presented itself, not simply in terms of of how they dress during protests, but during the Selma marches for example, marchers were told explicitly. Don't respond to white racists. Yelling things that you don't engage the police march silently. What else are you thinking? I WanNa ask you about something else that. We've been watching in the past couple of weeks. But what else are you thinking as you watched today's protesters? And thinking of of how they're changing political opinion, not just public opinion. I think one of the stories I've talked about a lot is how the movement helped the change how Lyndon Johnson? who was president fought about the imperative of civil rights, voting rights bill and I think in the last few days. It's been stunning to watch both house. Democrats take up this issue, but equally important cities and states across the country seem to be responding finally to the need for police reform I. Don't know if it will continue I. Don't know how long it will last, but that's an important story. I'm following. But while we have you on the other hand, president trump encourage states to deploy the National Guard to quote dominate protesters crackdown on looters now for some of us. This was a piercing reminder of Kent State in Nineteen, seventy president. Nixon, calling out the guard on students protesting the Vietnam, war for students were shot and killed one my childhood friend Jeffrey Miller so. You know painfully conscious of that, but do you find yourself wondering Julian? Why would any president risk that you know calling in young people with guns? Many later said they were scared to death members of the guard. To face off against other young people, you know Americans facing each other. What was the political impact on Nixon? Well before that happened, Nixon had campaigned on law and order in nineteen, sixty eight, and he made the protest movements foil and promised the rest of America quote unquote that he would reimpose a sense of control, and that's how you know can state played out in his mind. As much of a political imperative. For everyone who supported that kind of action as as anything else, but it was horrendous it. It led to death, reignited the Anti War movement that made it even larger, and it made the press pay attention again to all the people who are fighting against Vietnam, but it's a mistake that could easily be remade and Ken State. It was just a few national guards. Men who led to the death and led to the tragedy. And, then just in the few seconds that we have I mean we've been seeing a move to militarize I would assume. You'd. You'd say that would be politically risky. Politically risky and risky to the people on the ground. I think what we've seen in the last few weeks is often. The violence isn't the examples of looting that we saw early on, but it's in police taking provocative action rather than taking action that will create com allow peaceful protests that continue Princeton's Julian Zelter a helping us with history as always Julian. Thank you. Thanks for having me. Activists in Nashville like so many parts of the country are calling for the city to its police department and the police union like many other unions in the US is pushing back for more we have Sergeant James, smallwood a Metro Nashville police, officer and president of the fraternal order of police in the city and Sergeant Welcome, what's been your response to calls to defend police and redirect that funding into social services like the city of Minneapolis has pledged to do. Well, you know I think calls to defend. The police are not based in. I think. A lot of folks out there who think that that's GonNa be the solution to all of society's problems and quite frankly law enforcement is not the crux of all the socio economic problems that exist in our country while community programs are good things for our community, and they should be well funded. Taking money from the Police Department to fund them is kind of like robbing Peter to pay Paul and we're not. Not doing ourselves any justice by doing that, I think we need to find real solutions to the real problems rather than trying to find band AIDS that are actually GonNa make the problem worse I want to ask you more about that, so you were appointed back in January to a commission to study things like the challenges to law enforcement, with mental illness calls homelessness, substance, abuse and other social factors. Wouldn't it benefit police if they didn't have to respond to calls for example to help someone with dementia whose wandered away? Could you actually imagine a world where you would have fewer officers, but then also fewer responsibilities because the social workers would be there to handle most of those types of calls. In a perfect world I that would be great, but I don't think that we exist in a perfect world, I think we're in an environment where people believe there folks out there who are willing to do things like that who actually are not in there are real dangers that present themselves when you have things like folks who are suffering from dementia or other mental disabilities that officers have to intervene in on day in and day out basis, and you know rather than defunding the police and and taking money away from them. Maybe we should consider funding them further and making sure they have. Have more adequate training to deal with those situations. What do you think the answer is? When you see the video of George Floyd and the officer in Minnesota, and you see other calls to action based on other other police. Brutality acts throughout the nation. What do you see as a solution will I can't speak for the other instances. You're speaking of The the George Floyd incident is a horrific video. You will not find a single police officer in this nation. Who looks at that and says that was the right thing to do. It simply was not that was a bad actor. Actor he in the folks that were there have been charged with a crime, and they will face and have to be held accountable for what they did that day. One bad actor however should not tarnish the entire profession of law enforcement. We are a population of people from communities who want to serve and make the world a better place to say that one session view. Does it concern you that it's not just one person that we've can look at data over time to see a problem that exists within many police agencies with the direct action against black and Brown people, and perhaps even. Even cases of police brutality you. It's not just one person who's involved in these incidents, but these incidents are all very different from each other and to say that they're all police. Brutality is misleading. I can tell you that dangerous still exist in our society, and they're still criminals out there in our society, and as long as people are still out there willing to victimize communities, law enforcement must exist. Bring those criminals to justice. Nashville released an updated police body CAM rollout plan yesterday more than one hundred body and car. Cameras are going out starting next month. Do you support this reform? Absolutely since the inception of the idea we've said. We support body cameras. Is GonNa show our police officer a very professional job on a daily basis, and hopefully it will show people that you know law enforcement isn't necessity even still in today's society to say that it's not just doesn't stand to reason what other changes to policing in Nashville support. You know I think it's important for us to do a better job at sitting down at the table with folks and sharing reasonable perspectives. In until we can get past the barrier of folks who don't want to speak with fact and reason, and they just WanNa base everything in emotion in rhetoric. We're going to struggle so I I would support any kind of conversation within the community bridging that gap between law enforcement, and the people that they serve to show perspectives from both sides so that we can both understand the difficulties that each of us are facing. Can I ask you another question though sergeant isn't part of that sitting down at the table and having a real conversation about acknowledging the issues that are problematic within police agencies and police departments I just mentioned to you. Of course George, Floyd, but there are other cases that have been proven to be substantial involving police action against community members. That's problematic. So you know like, I said conversations based in reason absolutely I think we need to share perspectives from both sides, and to say that law enforcement as a whole is a problem, and when when ninety nine point nine percent of arc encounters or positive and productive is kind of like throwing the baby out with the bathwater that's James Smallwood, police officer and president of the fraternal order of police, in Nash Bill, Sergeant Thank you so much, thank you. Well let's hear more about police and their relationship with the community. Members of the Denver Board of Education are debating a resolution that would the role of police officers in Denver Schools schools, in Minneapolis in Portland Oregon have already gone a step further voting to end or limit the use of police on campus here's Ginny Arnesen? Vice Chair of the Minneapolis School Board? We're being called upon to be clear that we cannot have contracts with organizations that allow culture that does not value the human life of its lack citizens. Let's bring in Jonathan Step. He's national director of the Alliance for Educational Justice a group advocating for police, free schools and Jonathan. What would it look like an? Would you like to see all of these officers gone from schools, or do you think there should be some schools that actually have officers? Oh, that's a. that's always a great question. safety is not. Brought by police, particularly for a black and Brown students, who, as of twenty fourteen now make up the majority of Public School Students so when you ask the question under our vision, absolutely like we believe in a young people who have been organizing I'm believed that there's a way that we can bring and half safety in school. That doesn't involve police. Violence doesn't involve massive. Criminalization doesn't involve racist discipline. Can you go further there? Because what I'm hearing you say is that having a police officer in a school doesn't make it safer, and in fact, it may be adds to this idea of saying kids as criminals. Is that what you're saying? Can you give me an example of that? Absolutely? Since two thousand fifteen, the the alliance kind of got into involved in. In, this work around advocating for fee schools with the assault at Spring Valley, which was the recorded brutality of a black student, Black Girl Kara by officer, feels at the time who strangled her, and in body, slammed her and then when Nyah Kenny a high school student at the time I, tried to interject and stop the brutality. She was arrested. For many of us that raise the issue around policing and how it's used, we're seeing young people, particularly black and Latino Youth, being brutalized by school police, and being arrested for what is normal, adolescent behavior stuff to ship a handle by a counselor stuff that should be handled by a family and for many young folk in our alliance. It's really like these opportunities for restorative justice it even with what we've seen with. The root of school shootings, right? We've seen just as many school. Shootings be diffused by a counselor or caring adult, as we have seen by supposedly police officers, and most of the time like we saw with Park land was a complete failure around police officers to actually keep young people safe, and that wasn't the only one case that happened around that time and so I think there's a real question, a real reckoning around what are police doing in our schools? What are? Are they really doing who they really there for and I think part of our challenge to to schools in is. How do we offer a different lesson around what is possible for creating safety again doesn't come with a cost of the criminalization and brutality that gets visited upon black and Brown. Yeah, talk, a little bit about your alternative vision for how to make sure students and faculty are safe at school. Does it involve any kind of curious personnel at all? I think what we will point to the work of the black organizing project out in Oakland they have offered us what they call the People's plan that calls for the replacement of security as well as. Police officers with community peace builders are movement particularly in education. Justice Movement has a long legacy of groups who've been doing community pills building leading restorative justice programs in schools again. That was something that was stripped away post. Parkland by the Devos. Administration is kind of blame. Sort of justice school shootings, but mostly we're guided by. There's a saying that we say that comes to us from a young person that we lost named George Carter the third. A He always imagined schools that had mood detectors instead of metal detectors, and is that kind of orientation that kind of transformative vision of what safety can look like in our schools for black and Brown youth, for really all young people is what we're really striving to generate, and a lot of it is still to be organized for realized and built. Let's Jonathan Step. He is national director of the Alliance for Educational. Justice. Jonathan thank. You so much, thank you. The. Corona virus has had a devastating impact on economies throughout the world and many governments have jumped in to help, but not Russia. The Kremlin has taken a more modest approach Charles. Maine's explains from Moscow Boris t two is used to giving straight talk about the state of Russia's economy. We had quite a little crisis. The Kremlin's longtime point man for entrepreneurial rights. TITA is delivered annual reports to President, Vladimir Putin on the state of Russian business through good times and bad only this year. Tita says the outlook is so grim. His team picked new color for the cover of his report something to match the mood of the moment. It's led this time because of course the general situation. Two thirds of all businesses teat of surveyed say it's a coin. Toss whether they'll survive. Next year half called the economic situation catastrophe or crisis, and adding to uncertainty President Vladimir Putin by anthem all. Solution you GIO in a bid to stem the outbreak. Putin repeatedly ordered Russians to stay home and take paid vacation the problem the Russian leader offered businesses little. If any financial support to pay salaries, stop soon. Shin. Each year, an associate, a tool of a is among Russian entrepreneurs who calls the plant absurd. She's CO owner of under Sun, a chain of kid friendly restaurants that had two thousand employees before the outbreak. She's been forced to lay off of her staff despite the government directive. Business. It. Jacob Jake any bulletin that businesses could keep all these employees pay them shows no sense of how business works says to tool of a we need to survive the hire people again. Russia's small to mid size business sector more than a fifth of the economy has largely been left to fend for itself amid the pandemic. Some firms paid partial salaries. Others sent employees on unpaid leave. Amid the government's forced economic shutdown last April hundreds gathered in the city of London Kafka's in southern. Russia, demanding the resignation of local authorities and the right to return to work, people would not come out and mass if they had money talk so gay Gudiev is a leading Russian economist now based in Paris, but he grew up in vladikafkas. Says Public anger is a direct result of the stingy bailout by a president out of touch with the needs of the People Mr Putin is not a president of small entrepreneurs, the president of big corporations. He's a present upstate corporations. anti-government demonstrations have been limited so far. State pressure may also play a role organizers behind the VLADIKAVKHAZ rally currently face criminal charges in Moscow police have forbidden. Forbidden demonstrations outright in the interest of public safety, but polls show rising dissatisfaction with Putin across the board, and at a perilous time, the Russian leader plans to hold a constitutional referendum July first that could keep him in power until well into the next decade, and there are signs that front political calendar is finally forcing the government to open the economy and state coffers Ozlem. Nazi planner. It's economic you within the last week. Putin's Prime Minister Mikhail Schuster on a new seventy three billion dollar recovery plan to offset damage from the pandemic. The Kremlin says it will go beyond what the government has provided so far tax deferrals and limited loans for a small percentage of private firms with a new stimulus will be enough to make up for a bailout. That wasn't largely depends on whether. Russia keep a virus that is from spiraling out of control for NPR news I'm Charles means in Moscow. As. George Floyd is buried today. We're reminded of another event. That happened the same day. He was killed on memorial. Day another black man named Christian Cooper asked. A white woman named Amy Cooper, no relation to leash her dog as required in New York. Central Park as you recorded on his cell. She said this. Lose. Please call the cops. Please call the Guam's. Governor African American. Men threatening my life. Please tell them whatever you like. Amy Cooper was around the vilified for threatening to use Chris. Cooper's race against him then that moment was overtaken by a new video of George, Floyd, but Jason. Ward hasn't forgotten Chris. Cooper like him. Jason is a black burder host of the show. Birds of North America. When I was fourteen I spotted a peregrine Falcon eating a pigeon on my window sill in the Bronx. I never looked back. I'm Jason Ward. This is birds of North America Jason grew up in New York's South Bronx actually lived in a homeless shelter with his family for awhile. He's in Atlanta now Jason Are you there? Im Am thanks for having me. We're GonNa talk birds, but you're thoughts when you saw that tape as we all did of Christian Cooper. WHO's a very prominent black burder in New York and that interaction that he had with amy. Cooper, yeah, I mean. It was a scary video to watch you know knowing Christian personally I know how strong and confident of a person he is so simply hearing, the trembling in his voice shed a lot of on how potentially dangerous that situation could have been in? He was obviously aware of that. Upon watching it, there's a lot of anxiety being built up having some somewhat of a similar kind of experience, being black, being in nature, it was just it was kind of scary. Talk more about that. You kind of a rare sighting. BLACKBIRD IRS are somewhat rare I'm sure there is there is some fear or tension about about what about what a black man walking around staring things might be accused of. You know what yes, yes, in A. Yes, it's very simple. It's always been a precarious situation to be black in America period now if you take that premise, and you add on top of that wandering around maybe a suburban neighborhoods or being alone in the wilderness that danger factor goes up. You know I remember doing a point counts for for banding birds and this mission. Mission required need to walk around neighborhoods looking for birds at a previously banded on maybe power lines or on someone's roof. You know so these birds that had been previously abandoned in backyards, and now we're seeing how far they have strayed from their territory so unfortunately something that we love to do something that we're so passionate. About is also something that is inherently dangerous for us. And I'm wondering if there's even more of a sense of that in central park, there's this terrible legacy of false accusations of black men in central park. The Central Park five falsely accused of attacking a jogger president. Trump perpetrated that terrible lie. They were all acquitted. A black man in a Bush, waiting for just the right moment to to spot that spotted whatever it could be fraught. There's no doubt about it and we're aware of that, you know. I think that there's never a point in which we are unaware of our body language because we have to be, it's about survival, something as simple as me greetings my backpack, and pulling out my binoculars I'm very conscious of how obvious I make that. Or simply walking around with a pair of binoculars. Are they obvious are? They held away from my body? These are tied these kinds of things that I pay attention to in these are kinds of things that the vast majority of burghers it never crosses their mind I live in Atlanta, so it's his southeast, but you know it gets cold enough to the point where I would like to cover my face while I'm burning, but have to be conscious of that once again. These are things that I should not have to do, but here in America, sometimes it is the difference between life or death. We'll talk about how you came to this. Despite that obstacle of perception you grew up in. Rough part of the South Bronx. You were in love with animals. And how did it get to birds? You know what it kind of came to birds. Really naturally. My First Love was dinosaurs that was about sixty five million years, too late couldn't really go outside and study them or so I thought. That love initially for dinosaurs grew to anything else. That cross flew swam. It didn't really matter I loved it birds. Cool animals that fly around and flight. That's something that's freeing not really restricted by any bounds. These are animals that can say you know what this is not really the best kind of situation from an environmental perspective. Let me fly leave and find some greener pastures. The that ability was something that I wanted to be able to do as a kid growing up so often I couldn't do that so I live vicariously through them that image of a little kid in the South Bronx looking up, and wishing that he could fly way or getaway like the birds. It's really compelling, yeah! There's there's moments. Where you know, we're always looking for the next bird, but in actuality we should also be appreciating the wins that we do see that bird may have come here in an arrived in your backyard and flown here from South America. Verge of seen so much in their short life spans. There was that desire to do exactly the same thing for sure, and later on in life I find out. I wasn't sixty five million years too late. Birds have been around for. For about one hundred million years, birds are dinosaurs. They are the only living dinosaurs to this day, and by that time I was hooked I was like okay. These are my guys, so then you. You become this burder. You have a mentor. J Drew Lanham another bird of colour. You start this show or going to have episodes at here now dot org, but let's just listen to one. Because what's so clear in what we love is how much you love birds. Winter rolls around and I see just hordes of yellow warblers I think that I'm going to get tired of p skies, and when spring rolls around, and then summer arose around in their long gone I'm thinking to myself haven when we're those yellow rump coming back again you start missing them. Jason Tell us what are you looking at me? So now it's the beginning of June and spring migration has subsided, and we are currently in baby birds season so for the next four weeks, or so no matter where you live in the country. You're going to start to see a lot of baby. Birds Birds are nesting, and the chicks are ready to fledge, so they're hopping around on the ground is a very scary and unsure time, so a lot of the breeding species, cardinals Robbins, birds of prey hawks owls the next generation. If you will, birds are growing up right before us. And what are some? It was some of your most magnificent sightings the thing with. Your heart stops. You know it never gets old and I talked a little bit of an eclipse earlier about those warblers, each and every single year seeing those neo tropical migrants, those birds that travel thousands of miles at nighttime, our all sleeping and lined up in our neighborhoods for about six hours before continuing their journey, there's always that energy and excitement, and also some level of respect that they're allowing you know to to watch them for a couple of seconds it never gets old seeing a warbler whether it's a black, throated, green or a Seru. Leeann warbler doesn't matter each and every year. It's just a treat to watch them spend a little bit of time during their journey with you. In this moment that we are in time, tell a young black man or woman given what they might have seen with Christian Cooper. Why would a young black person take burning because we need you to the future of conservation, the future of birding the future of how well this planet is doing with climate change, the future will be at. It's best if we have voices coming from a lot of different backgrounds, those young black bird is out there. There are people who are desperate who are just waiting to connect with you and help. Figure out your pathway in what you love most as you become, you know birds yourself, or maybe it's a reptile lager, or maybe love insects, or maybe just love hiking. There are networks of people out there who are waiting to connect with you and help you out with that journey. Just ward host of birds of North America. He also works with Atlanta Autobahn Society Jason thanks so much. For having me, I appreciate it. Like the US people are also protesting in Mexico calling for an into police brutality. The demonstrations are in response to the death of a man who died in custody with Mexican police last month, three police officers have been arrested in an effort to quell violent protests in Mexico City and Guadalajara and one police officer was set on fire for more. Let's bring in NPR's Carrie Kahn who is in Mexico, city and carry. What more do we know about this case? Yeah. It's a very disturbing. Yeah. It's a very disturbing case. Giovanni locus was a thirty year old construction worker who lived in town south of. And this is all according to local reporting He was with his family in that town when police allegedly singled him out for not wearing a mask, and that's something that is required in the state where he lives He was detained by police and. Bystanders started taking video right when he was detained in a lot of it was captured by his relatives who were there on the scene, and you could see him trying to squirm free from the police, and what's really chilling as you hear his brother repeatedly saying to the officers if you kill him, we know who you are. That's very chilling and then He was taken along with a neighbor to the police station and three hours later he was dead, and an autopsy was performed at the time, and it showed that he had died from sustained beating and wounds from meetings, and this took place on May fourth, and it did not come to light until just recently. What is it about this particular case that sparked this movement you mentioned there's video which sounds very familiar with what has happened here in the states. Yeah, definitely and I do believe that it's the protests in the US that really emboldened. Demonstrators Bolton the family to really hit the streets and demand justice for Giovanni. And you hear a lot of them in the protests that were last week. Talk about this case and the police abuse of authority and Power. We've heard stories about police bribing in uncertain Mexican cities. But how prevalent is police brutality in Mexico? It is quite prevalent and it's very well documented. We see a lot more incidents of police abuse here because of the the rise of social media and videotaping and the government at salve interestingly has studied this very widely There was a study conducted a couple years ago by then. The National Statistics Office this is a government agency, and they found that sixty four percent of people that were arrested between two thousand, Ten and two thousand sixteen had suffered some type of aggression from police. Fifty nine percent said that they had. been hit and punched thirty seven percent said that they had wounds from the that aggression, nineteen, almost twenty percent of the people said that they had had electric goal shock treatment. Just horrific signs of of abuse six and a half percent said that they had been burned while in custody. There's torture is well well documented by people that arrested in Mexico. It sounds like these are deep systemic issues. Is there any oversight or even a call for oversight of police on on a national level? Oh clearly they're. They're always, but the cries. Are you know a few protesters here? Few protesters here? This has been sustained protests over the last four days. It's unclear, though if what we'll see, we'll come out of it if they can keep up the momentum, but norm here in Mexico is that there's an outcry about a certain case or an incident, and they'll be arrests, and like you said at the outset, there were three arrests in the case of Giovanni. Lopez Most of the time their arrests are low level officials with interesting. The rest in lease go is that one was actually a supervisor, so that's a little bit encouraging, but again the norm is that the prosecution cases are poorly put together and more times than not they fall apart once they go to trial. We'll have to see here. In Mexico City, there was a case a young girl. She was sixteen years old who was protesting on Friday, and there's video again of her being subdued by officers, and then kicked in the head. She's in a hospital right now and the mayor of Mexico City arrested those two police officers. That's that's unusual for something to happen so quickly. Do, you know the latest on the police officer that was set on fire again. There's a video of that, too. That's a very disturbing case. You see the police officer getting the protesters, and then as he walks away, somebody throws an accelerated on him, and then lights, a match and lights lighter, and he was lit on fire, and and he is in stable condition and the governor of the state of police. Go has vowed to find that person who at the police on fire. I want to ask you, have you? About the corona virus, so Mexico has opened more parts of the economy lifting restrictions on construction and the last time we talked we were talking about manufacturing and the mining industry are the number of confirmed cases and deaths, declining and our people, wearing masks and social distancing. Still the number of cases are not declining We have a just registered. And twenty thousand cases more than fourteen thousand theft, so no the cases are not declining. The lifting of restrictions in those industries is going on, but clearly in large parts of the country, and especially here in the capital and the surrounding metropolitan area where the outbreak is the greatest. The numbers here are not declining. That's NPR's Carrie Kahn in Mexico City as always. Thank you so much, Carrie. You're welcome. And here now is a production of NPR and WBZ you are in association with the BBC World Service I'm Tanya Moose Lake I'm Robin Young. This is here now.

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Iceland's Melting Glaciers; A Historical Look At Impeachment

Here & Now

44:00 min | 1 year ago

Iceland's Melting Glaciers; A Historical Look At Impeachment

"Is Robin Young thanking you for listening to the here and now podcast and inviting you to contribute to supported the F. at donate pot. NPR DOT org slash. Now for all the reasons that you listen here now helps you make sense of the world and when you donate to your. NPR Station nations your supporting the journalism that brings context and perspective to the news and conversations with people making a difference in the arts music and Culture so oh please make a donation to your NPR station today and that investment will come right back to your ears just go to donate that NPR dot org slash now while we're building NPR and its member stations. Thanks to you now. Let's go back to the news from NPR IN WB you are. I'm Tanya Moseley. I'm Robin Young. It's here and now and today. Democrats unveiled articles of impeachment against the president of the United States. Here's House Judiciary Chair Jerry. Nadler today in service to our duty to the constitution and to our country the House Committee on the judiciary is introducing two articles of impeachment charging charging the president of the United States Donald J trump with committing high crimes and misdemeanors. The two articles are abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. Let's bring an NPR senior political editor correspondent Dominica Montenero and Domenico. There's been such a divide. There's been such a toxic atmosphere for so long. You know it. It just may feel like of a day like any other day but it's really not. Can you briefly breakdown further. What's in these articles? Yeah I mean the two major pieces to this says you noted are abuse of power and obstruction of Congress notably left out was any mention of quid pro quo or the word bribery. which we've been litigating gating for about a month now But it does note that trump conditioned White House a White House meeting and military aid quote for corrupt purposes. Mrs In pursuit of personal political benefit also left out of here was there was no obstruction of justice charge. which had just come up in the House Judiciary Committee meeting? So that's what's in pretty much and what is left so obstruction of Congress but no obstruction of justice. Justice and there was a question whether this will come from the Russia. Investigation Muller saying he couldn't clear the president of -struction in that investigation couldn't clear him but implied applied. It was Congress's job to either to impeach or charge. Now was that purely for political reasons. The Russia report was critical of Donald Trump but he was so diminished by his attorney general bar and by his allies on Fox News. That it's been made kind of a caricature. Well I think there's been so much time between When Muller Investigation report came out that you know Democrats didn't act then they want to keep? This narrowly focused on Ukraine. This is after all all what one over moderates to be able to Support impeaching and removing the president. So I think you really have the moderates who are who are pushing things here rather than the progressives who've been kinda pushing for impeachment and it's been seeing a lot of progressives disappointed that they didn't include more things didn't go further. There was one illusion by my reading of this on page seven of the articles to the Muller reports sort of an abstract reference and said that these actions were quote consistent with President Trump's previous efforts to undermine the United States government investigations into foreign interference in United States elections. And that's IT and can't well Republicans and even some supporters of Democrats have said. They should wait for the two thousand twenty election. Let voters decide Here's the the intelligence committee chair. Adam Schiff today Ben Franklin said we have a republic if we can keep it the president and his men say you can't keep it and Americans should just get over it. Americans don't get the side American elections anymore not by themselves not without foreign help. An Echo there of Mick Mulvaney White House Chief of staff words when he said Yeah there was a quid pro quo. Just get over it. But but but again what did they say about. Not Waiting and going to court over these subpoenas that the president is refusing to let witnesses mulvaney respond to yeah. There's been a lot out of criticism in reaction from conservatives toward a House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry. Nadler for intimating that they can't wait until the twenty twenty election because because the president is a threat to the security of the twenty twenty election. They sort of were saying. Oh that's hogwash. Well I would just point to an interview that we did. NPR Rachel Martin on morning edition with Neil Cox. y'All the attorney who's representative of a democratic causes before the Supreme Court where he said quote quote. The allegations here involve cheating in next year's election. So it's a little weird to say let's have the election and then let that decide. He then said that was kind of of like being accused of cheating and monopoly and your solution is. Let's just play a game of monopoly and see who wins to decide who's right. That can't possibly be the rule. Just I WANNA take a second to listen to the president's alley. The House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy today criticizing the Democrats. No it is not difficult to defend this president because as president did nothing. That's impeachable. It's hard to defend Democrats on how they're running this house and what they're doing inside their majority. That's the difficulty that I have. We're going to hear that back and forth fourth. I'm imagining for the foreseeable foreseeable future. So I'm sure we'll have you back to Mexico questionably Republicans rallying around the president. NPR senior political additon correspondent. DOMENICA Montenero. Thank you you're welcome. We'll joining us now for more reaction to today's top story is representative Ben Cline Republican of Virginia Jinya. He's a member of the house. Judiciary Committee Congressman. Klein you've called the impeachment inquiry a farce and tragedy your reaction to the specific charges made eight in these articles of impeachment unveiled today. Well it is clear that the Democrats are bound and determined to impeach president. Remove him from office as they have been set on that course ever since he was elected Three years ago I would argue that. They have set the bar so low for impeachment. That just about any presidential activity is going to be falling under this category that they've set and called abuse of power well. Well let's talk a little bit about that. Let's take each article intern. I Democrats argue. The president abuse the power of his office by withholding military aid to pressure the president of Ukraine and to investigating investigating the Biden's as well as unfounded theories about Ukrainian interference and the two thousand sixteen election as we know. What exactly do you dispute about these? The specific events well therefore facts. That haven't changed since the beginning of all this and won't change Both president trump and president dolinsky say there was no pressure. The call transcript shows no conditionality between aid and an investigative Santon argument. That is actually at the heart of all all of this whether or not it actually shows that I mean Democrats say this A definite violation of the constitution to pressure Ukraine to help in the twenty twenty twenty election in fact to the contrary the Constitution gives the president the right to set foreign policy. That very power is what gives gives him the right to pursue corruption in Ukraine and he can't exempt a potential political rival or his son or anybody from that investigation but the argument is that the investigation was looking into a political rival for personal gain if we were to try and say go pursue corruption in Ukraine and go trying and investigate corruption in Ukraine but exempt a political supporter. That would be obviously wrong so exempting a political opponent would also be wrong exempting. His son would also be wrong so when you go and investigate corruption in Ukraine. You can't say except for these people okay. If that if that's the argument agreement let's talk about the second article of impeachment which deals with the obstruction of Congress. Democrats say the White House has urged witnesses not to cooperate with the inquiry and divide subpoenas and fact. The White House blocked witnesses from testifying the intelligence committee his document. Twelve current and former officials with direct knowledge of the events ten have been subpoenaed and have been blocked from testifying not a single document. The committee has requested has been given. Let's talk a little bit about What what exactly do you dispute here? What we can talk about the right of the president to exercise executive privilege? His claim claim to executive privilege. If some have contended that it is too broad they can go to court they have the courts have come back and the president has used used the courts just like any other American under the fourteenth amendment. You have a right to due process. So the president's pursuing using that right and arguably sadly the Democrats are the ones using their power by saying. We're not gonNA wait for the courts we're going to charge you with obstruction. In the meantime that is an abuse of power our intelligence committee chair Adam Schiff today address the argument that Democrats should just wait for the election next year. which has also been a big argument instead of impeaching president trump? Let's listen the argument. Why don't you just wait amounts to this? Why don't you just let him cheat in and one more election? Why not let him cheat just one more time? Why not let him have Ford Health? Just just one more time. That is what that argument amounts to congressman. What's your reaction to that? Do you think there's any risk to the integrity of the next next election if the president faces consequences here while I'm pleased. The chairmanship appeared from his bunker today. Because I sat through ten hours of testimony yesterday in the Judiciary Committee about his report and for him to be the leader of this Impeachment process just puts a fine point on the fact that is a fraud and his not in any way. A legitimate impeachment inquiry Congressman Klein. I'm thinking about The public at large. They're listening to us. They're looking at all of these hearings. They're trying to make sense of everything. Do you feel it is your constitutional duty to serve as a check on the executive branch partisan politics aside. Do you worry that. Not Holding President trump accountable. You're eroding the power of Congress absolutely not we have a responsibility to the constitution and the rule of law. You do have an abuse of power. It's in Congress. It's with this majority. Jordy who will not abide by the voters decision back in twenty sixteen and have been on a course to remove him ever since it's disgraceful l.. Deplorable and I think that Nancy Pelosi needs to respect the will of the voters and withdraw impeachment process representative tentative. Been Klein Republican of Virginia Congressman. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you for having me. What were the best album songs in memorable moments elements from twenty nine thousand nine hundred? I'm Robyn Hilton Join. NPR music all this month as we look back at the past year from Lil non sex billy to Liz. Oh and Leonard Cohen. Listen on all songs considered from NPR with new episodes each week. It's here now so every place. It is a huge amount of moving highs with all going forward into the violate that was Linda. Our guide on a track trek of the Solheim of Yoko glacier in Iceland we driven miles through land rim by snow covered mountains and field strewn with volcanic rock steam. Here here and there rising from Iceland's. Do Thermal Underbelly to report on the climate crisis because Iceland is on the front lines in the Atlantic the UK on one side Ride Greenland on the other. The North Pole above a popular stopover for tourists many of whom come to see the glaciers an irony because all three hundred of them are melting. Eighteen won the Hawk actually disappeared and with our travel emissions. Were adding to the problem. We stand by Grey Lake a black beach of broken. Volcanic rock in freezing pelting sleet in the distance the only color the glimmering green white ice of the glacier. Linda explains is it used to reach where we stood. How much has it receded logged? saw in the last fifty. He has retained more than seventeen eight hundred red meat. Yeah that's about eight football fields. We've got crampons. Ice Picks harnesses as we hike over over to that up. The ice would seem like a good idea is now terrifying. I sweat from pelting sleep. What could go wrong crevasses and the most important thing about this is that they can form in a few hours trying not to fall in we are up and humbled as they say when an ice piece breaks off? You're breathing the same air. The Vikings did and like Iceland. Glaciers are other worldly no wonder tolkien based his middle earth. Lord Lord of the Rings on this land but they are also fragile when we leave. Linda tells us to look back my advice to take picture of Sola Maiocco because maybe next time if you will evacuate will be he's appeared are completely different from now so what she and keep in mind how it is now else because everything changed everyday. Our glaciers are melting away. The most of them are retreating. That's one of Iceland's progressive. New Young leaders in his modern government office in the capital Reykjavik. All this week we're going to look at the impact of climate change on Iceland's natural Be sources a harbor closed because of rising land others impacted by rising seas. Let's start there. My name is Goodman Inky Good Branson and I'm the minister for the environment and natural resources in Iceland. Just call me momentum minister that sounds really good. That's what I'll do a receding or melting glacier at sea rise but what does it do for the country when you don't have the glaciers. They're one of several issues use One is the chains in the runoff from glaciers. Some of the glacial rivers that we have we use us a means of producing L. atrocity or most of them they the flow freely to the ocean and the impact on ecosystems off. The oceans are not known known enough. What is in those glaciers? That's going in the ocean. And how will that impact your oceans. Do I understand as well that can one town. It's twisting the the water pipes or the infrastructure underneath town the land is rising because Glaciers are melting. Because then you have less maas on the land so it simply eh lifts up so the land is rising where the glaciers are melting. Glaciers are so profoundly heavy they were holding the land down in within in some of the glaciers there are all kinds and as the weight of the ice becomes less the probability of an eruption increases. This it sounds like a lie. You know it's like work you know personally. Some people are simply next to glacier a glacier that they have have in there perhaps fifty to sixty years lifespan seen retreating. I was raised up on a farm where my grandma taught me the names of the Montaigne and foreclosures issues that we we saw on the horizon and one of them was now we see three glaciers and probably if things continue a second the one we'll have disappeared so it's also very iconic and symbolic for many icelanders. The way they mentally affect us and I'm not sure if we we fully understand those social and emotional changes related to that. What else do you do? As the Minister of the environment to offset set climate change. We have already been quite successful when it comes to heating almost one hundred percent of of heating in Iceland is from renewable resources to your thermal and petrol then we also need to look at fisheries and agriculture and tourism in two thousand and we had about three hundred thousand people visiting us a similar number two the number of the whole population in Iceland in two thousand ten half a million. And now it's about two million people coming here. So we haven't perhaps perhaps been able to fully manage tourism in Iceland but they're trying. This is the magnificent stoker geyser. It's packed with tourists. Sent here by online travel sites. Iceland's officials are trying to spread the tourism around. Still we find travelers like Wendy. Tim Rochester Minnesota. Who Want to help with tough situation but I think tourism can help away? Somebody suggested that every tourist should pay for tree. It'd be planted. Yes exactly do that. Oh Yeah for sure. Yeah Yeah have a carbon tax on your flight. Fine no problem yeah. Yeah at the Sleek Week visitors center we meet the Robinson family from Plano Texas traveling with their adult Sung. That's why we're here. We wanted to see the glaciers and we wanted to see the iceberg iceberg. And the guys. Because who knows if his kids will be. That's Kinda sad as I wander over to son do you think about that. Especially within within my generation Being greened in less than air carbon footprints very big thing does. I mean. It'd be beautiful for us to be able to maintain it For the generations beyond me. We are in the early stages of having tourism as a major industry meets carpet in Steiner Syn director general of the Iceland Tourist Board. He tells us there are many reasons for Iceland's popularity. Iceland air has long promoted promoted the country as a stopover but for a while recently would even assign you an employee as a weekend guide competing with wow airlines which expanded to fast and went under and when a spectacular volcano blue in two thousand ten the world attention was on Iceland and people liked what they saw but also after the bank collapsed in two thousand eight Iceland. This land was cheap not anymore by the way well now. Icelanders are trying to manage the crowd signs everywhere as tourists to be safe. Don't climb fences to take self. These people have died. I'd don't step on hot springs nearest hospitals and our away. Also many of these sites are sensitive and are not prepared to get All the this this spring also we need to find out how to handle visitors from countries that we not been having previously sleep. Asians also North America. Do you mean not prepared clothing wise for going out to glacier or standing out in frigid weather to see the the northern urban lights. Yes the router. People that haven't experienced darkness driving conditions. Snow Rain Win. Jiving out of town northeast just stunning being no shoulders. Nowhere to go. There's no triple A.. If your car gets in trouble there may be nobody as far as the I can see for miles all around you. You're yeah even. There are visitors here that never experienced being totally alone also were you know. Nature's very sensitive in springtime. It becomes muddy eighty and it is damaged. We have unspoilt nature here. which is what our visitors want to experience but we have to make sure that it's not damaged you also conscious of trying to protect the visitors to some of these sites are other worldly? But they're dangerous they are. And it's really heartbreaking heartbreaking not only heights but when people are walking on beaches and they don't understand how dangerous the ocean can be when the waves come and just take people away. Yep this is also part of the appeal of Iceland. It hasn't been tamed. What impact is climate change had on tourism? This is probably the biggest challenge for tourism. We are an island. People come here with airplanes. What we need is is to find out some way that we can handle this because travelling and visiting other people and and enjoy to meet other the people's and get to know other cultures and other countries is the best way to keep peaceful world? Would you ever put a limit on how many years can come. This is one of the questions that we need to be answered one day. Hopefully not. We've met people who have come to Iceland specifically because they fear some of the awesome nature is disappearing. That's very sad at this and we have to turn around. It's strange to be a destination where people come to experience experience this experience before you're gone yes which brings us back to Iceland's melting? Glaciers the most famous Lullaby in Iceland is demean designated that's cultural icon. Andreas Magnusson. You'll hear from him again. But today his thoughts on that Lullaby it's very gloomy and it has places it's so slipped. My little of the rain is trying outside and in the glaciers the death deep services are holding suddenly something so I that have looking at it in awe as A godly dangerous being into being something. That is dying. Dying Glacier is rather sad sight. It's like a stranded way and it's almost schlick telling you something something with this week. We're covering the climate crisis in Iceland for incredible pictures. Go to here now. Dot Org i Robin Young thanking you for listening to the here and now podcast and inviting you to contribute to support it at donate dot. NPR OUR DOT ORG slash now we're building NPR and its member stations. Thanks to you now. Let's get back to the news. The CEO of the popular luggage brand away stepping down after an investigation from the website. Recite the verge detailed toxic work culture inside the company Zoe Schiffer is the reporter who broke that story and she joins us now. Hi Zoe Hi so if you travel you've likely seen folks willing around bees carry on suitcases. I actually have one but for those who are not familiar. Tell us what away does and how they got so popular. Yeah it's a good question because what they do is sell luggage but if you look at the mission statement and the website they really position themselves. That's a travel and lifestyle brand. You're kind of buying into this idea of what your life could be like. They're in the war. Be Parker brand of companies. He's that sell directly to consumers import a lot of money into facebook advertising yet and Worby Parker being the eyewear company that you're talking about So so you spoke to current and former employees at away who described this toxic work culture at the company. They complained about working long hours with no overtime being asked to cancel their vacations Some even reported being chewed out by the CEO on public slack channel. What else did they tell you? Yeah so in retail tale. It's typical to work really really long hours. And that was part of it. People really felt like they were being pushed to the breaking point. They were working fifteen and sixteen hour days without a break they they would kind of work towards their one day off in months and then suddenly at the last minute be told. Oh wait you can't have that day off. You have to keep working but the really different thing about away. It was all taking place on these public slack. Channels employees aren't really allowed to email each other directly so they use this offered. Wait so you're saying that. Every form of communication education had to be on a public channel where everyone could see including the CEO. Ya exactly and they're really prided themselves on giving really harsh feedback. They would say you know. Don't go easy on the people who work under you. People have to be able to learn. Everything is a learning opportunity so while they would talk. This talk of you are allowed to make mistakes. It's okay to slip up now and then when it happened in reality it would kind of turn feedback into a spectator sport. There was one line in the article where they said you would here the CEO Typing and you knew something bad was going to happen. People would hear that sound of her fingers on the keyboard and the whole office would tons up just waiting to see who was gonna get this rated because it wasn't just one message message after message after message of one person just getting totally chewed out so the departing. CEO Steph Corey apologized for her behavior after after your story came out and she also asked employees not to share like or favorite the investigation even on their personal social media accounts as we mentioned. She's stepping down as CEO but she will continue as executive chairman. So I'm just wondering. How significant is this? Move really and do you expect expected to change the toxic work culture there. It's an open question for sure. I mean her apology was one thing and I think that it was commendable. Not everyone apologizes is was even after a big investigation like this. Of course her stepping down is a massive Move Forward for the company it symbolically very important. That people are saying you. You know this type of behavior is not tolerable but I think employees are saying they are hesitant to celebrate quite yet. They're waiting to see what actually changes on on the inside you know they're bringing in this new. CEO who previously was the CEO of Lululemon and that place had its own toxic work culture issues. And so I think that the the company has a long way to go to prove to employees. They're actually going to treat them with respect. That's always schiffer writer for the verge. Zoe thank you so much. Thank you house. Democrats today. Unveiling two articles of impeachment against President Trump charging the president with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress saying president trump pressured the president of Ukraine to investigate former vice president Joe Biden a political rival in the twenty twenty election and then Keeping Ping lawmakers from speaking to key members of administration despite subpoenas. Here's the Democrat. Adam Schiff Chair of the House Intelligence Committee. The President's oath of office appears to mean very little to him but the articles put forward today. We'll give us a chance to show that we will defend the constitution and that our oath. It means something to us well. The White House released a statement calling this a pathetic attempt to overthrow the trump administration and said the president trump expects six to be fully exonerated in the Senate because the statement says he did nothing wrong Jewish zealots. Her is professor of History Public Affairs at Princeton University and we often come onto him moments like this so Julian start with. What kind of moment is this? Everything has seemed so partisan and so toxic There's a generation that might remember over the last impeachment vote in trial that was for bill. Clinton may be thinking will. This is modern politics politics politics. How would you describe this moment? Well Look we've had a lot of moments elements of toxicity since two thousand seventeen and a lot of things that the president has done. That were on precedent but impeachment has only happened opened a few times and and this is the fourth case that we can talk about with the president and that gives it historic. Wait in a way that some of the other events don't and it looks like the House will probably pass articles of impeachment and that's a permanent mark for this presidency when you say fourth time we have Johnson who was impeached Nixon. Who Left Office when a group of senators as you pointed out? Walked across the you know to his Oval Office and said you have to get out. You're going to get impeached. Meaning we're going to vote for Impeachment articles you're going to be charged before it goes to the Senate for trial so he left before that could happen. And then of course you have Bill Clinton and now Donald Trump so. I mean how is this resonating with you. Well It it is kind of watching the sorts of events I write about in the past passed. And and so when you when you see it happen It it has a different flavor than when you read about it in the archives or you observe it as a historian and and also it is in many ways a combination of these tensions that have been brewing between the parties and then the tensions that have been mounting over for this particular president and the way he uses presidential power. And this is the first time really gonNA have other than the two thousand eighteen midterm election. Some informal response to what he has done. Yeah but what do you think of. What the Republicans are saying which is yes? This is a culmination. This is Democrats. Just not not liking this president not liking the fact that he won trying everything in their power to to undermine his presidency including the Russian investigation they will put that in there and the president said that he feels the Senate will Clear him is he right in a way because yes the house is likely to charge him. Impeach him it goes to the Senate which Republican led they will probably not find him guilty probably not remove him from office. Is the president then right in saying that he's GonNa get exonerated. Well in the first part I don't think he was right in that what drove this was simply hatred for the president. I think the leadership of the House really really didn't want to do this speaker. Pelosi is someone who really was impacted by the nineteen nineties in the Clinton impeachment and was very fearful of going this route so I I don't think in the end that's why they went through with this part of the process and and the Senate probably will not Remove him But what will happen is the house will now have formally Given its verdict on what the president did which matters it matters in the history books and equally Republicans will be on record in the Senate and in the House as saying this is okay and that's something that will come back in future elections and in the history books take take us back. Eighteen sixty eight prentice president Andrew Johnson impeached. He'd succeeded president. Lincoln after Lincoln was assassinated and the house impeach Johnson because because he was fighting reconstruction in the south after the civil war. So just briefly more about that. That's exactly right. He had immense tensions with Republicans in Congress who are trying to pursue pursue a bold program of social justice after the end of the civil war and they were really frustrated and angry with the way Johnson was rolling back these efforts alternately though they impeached him on a very technical violation of a of a new law that prevented presidents from removing certain officials. who had had been appointed by previous presidents without Senate approval In the end he survived. this is exactly but is notably we talk about the impeachment when we talk about Johnson and we talk about the different problems emerged with his presidency And so that was our first case. Well Oh he stayed in office and did so just quickly did. Did that have an effect on the balance of power going forward. It did from the history that we have he really was much more more restrained After that happened and wasn't able to exert presidential power with the same kind of forces before so we go to nine hundred seventy four and as we said the house. Judiciary Committee approved three articles of impeachment against President. Richard Nixon Republicans March up. And say. You gotta get out. But this was in connection with the nineteen seventy-two break in at the Democratic acquatic headquarters at the Watergate building comedy. It would be funny if not so sad but then there was a cover up. That's where we get the line that we tell our children it's the cover we're up not the crime there was lying about it. charges similar Obstruction of justice abuse of power Contempt of Congress but in that case in the case of Richard Nixon. There are a lot of people supporting Nixon until there was a moment when tapes came out and it. It's interesting because we we have a president now. Who says the kinds of things that people say on tapes that are secret he says it right out loud you know uses foul language has said you know I want? The president. President of Ukraine yelled at reporters at by the helicopter. I want the President Ukraine to investigate this. The you know it's almost like what could we. What could people? I will be shocked by to shock them into changing their stance on a president trump. It's hard to know. And that's a fundamental difference with the Watergate process in. They were various moments like the revelation of a smoking gun tape or even before that the transcripts of tapes where the present cursed a lot. That was actually something that it caused outrage. In the country we are far beyond and that sense of outrage is no longer there and I think it undercuts efforts To have these impeachments actually actually happened and the president does a lot of his dirtiest business right in the open and in some ways there might be strategy. There that undercuts efforts to shock shock the public into responding to what what he is doing. Interestingly with Nixon the obstruction of congress was a much bigger issue In the end this really moved a a lot of Republicans to say. This is wrong that he has to follow through with the process whereas today you know. Republicans basically have said it's okay for him to obstruct everything well and okay for a lot of things. We're remembering with Bill Clinton. It started as an investigation by Ken Starr into the suicide. Vince foster there were conspiracy theories. He's launched by the Wall Street Journal and others of opinion pages and others that the Clintons had something to do with their friends. Suicide moved into an investigation of Clinton finances and didn't find anything there and ended up with a blue dress and a you know. An abuse of power In the Oval Office relations between Bill Clinton and Monica Lewinsky. Okay it's amazing the terms that took it's kind of unbelievable The substance was much less serious in terms of the ultimate action. Compared to what we're talking about today vis-a-vis how you use presidential power a but you look at the quotes from Republicans at the time especially on the importance of truth and the importance of law and order. And that's not what the Republican Party is about right now and you can see pretty profound change in the GOP. Well you know because we know that the president paid through his lawyer. Michael Cohen paid off women that he had relations with claimed on tape. You the things that he did with women. The notion that if he were to have some relations in the Oval Office one doesn't see that even coming close to an impeachable offense in this climate. Not at all I mean that's kind of the least of the things that probably the president could do at this point and get away with it. President trump has gone much bolder He's just been very open and obstructing and even in what he did with Ukraine although sometimes there's denial is often admission and the statement. Let's do more of it or it's totally fine And so I think the standards are changing. That's part of the story of this impeachment. In terms of what a president can do Angelina reminding us President Clinton was also acquitted in the Senate. No American President has ever been removed used by impeachment Julie's professor of history and public affairs at Princeton. Thank you so much thanks for having me we shift our attention to Madrid where a cop twenty five the UN climate change conference is in. Its second week. Activists have taken to the streets. They're frustrated by what many say is a lack of urgency to stop the rising sea levels and greenhouse emissions climate activist service Greta Tune Berg joined thousands of protesters many of them young people and from indigenous communities joining me now from Madrid is Lyndal Rowlands and adviser to the UN and author of a recent report on climate change for the international non-profit group. Civic Lindell welcome thank you so much so you're in Madrid. What are you seeing? And what's the energy around. The conference activists have complained that it seems like Moore's happening on the street and in press conferences than perhaps behind closed doors. Yeah absolutely this is really very much what we're seeing here in Madrid this year. We've seen so much energy on the streets these here. We've I've seen millions of young people marching in every single country around the world in Madrid. Last Friday we saw half a million young people matching but there are just really remains. This big gap between what young people are asking for on the streets in what is on the table in the negotiations here at the UN cop. I WanNa talk a little bit about your report which was published this past November and it focuses on the current challenges. The people who speak out for climate justice face. Your report is found that environmental activism awesome is one of the most deadly and dangerous forms of activism globally Why is this the case? Well unfortunately what we see is very much the people who are protecting ow ow collective rights to fresh drinking water to clean air to breathe that often really on the front lines and they they are And often these are indigenous people for example Protecting the Amazon rainforest and these people unfortunately are often being arrested. They're being subject objected to campaigns and also unfortunately in some cases there was subjected to violence including death. Even just last week we saw that to indigenous people people Involved in environmental activism were killed in Brazil. Yes you've mentioned the Global South and Brazil and we're seeing that environmental defenders vendors as you mentioned are discredited and harmed. What are some of the other ways that you're seeing that happen? It's also happening in places like the United States and Australia absolutely so I'm from Australia and I was so sad to wake up this morning to see that you know. Sydney is completely covered in In smoke from bushfires bushfires. It's so sad to see that you know school children. That were being told a COUPLA months ago by the prime minister that they shouldn't be participating in climate strikes because they should be in school today they can actually go to school because the smoke is so dangerous that they have to stay inside the people who is supposed to be leaders. How Prime Ministers and presidents? They're they're really trying to shift the blame. I think that in Brazil as I've mentioned a couple of times we've seen For example that these information campaigns We've seen both in both scenarios. The you know accusing volunteer Fifi firefighters of deliberately. Starting fires to to get attention at the same time even in Australia. We saw the top political aide making these same Accusations with absolutely no evidence so I really think that as the kids are saying in the streets it's time to really invite these activists into the room and to create a much more justin ambitious environment for it for negotiations at the UN. As well Lindell. I'm thinking though too that the power dynamic here though is so stark. You're talking about indigenous folks. You're talking about young people and end if they are being in many ways discredited or their lives are in danger. How do you even begin? I'm to take on this issue and build momentum for real change your absolutely. That's a very good question. I think that really we are seeing. You know young people people who are being asked to take on this responsibility and I personally find them so so inspiring and and so courageous for example. Such as you know there's They're a young people here for example who've been striking in Russia where When they were these massive climate strikes back in September all around the world they also they wanted to have a a group strike but they were denied a permit so they went out and they held the strike one person at a time because they were only allowed to strike one impersonated time without having a permit so they are so courageous they are risking being arrested But they shouldn't have to be because really You know we should be the adults in the room and we need to be taking on the responsibility on young people shouldn't have to be fighting for their future and definitely shouldn't be facing The risks of being arrested tested for exercising their rights to freedom of Peaceful Assembly and Association. What do you see as the next steps after this conference in this conversation around? Climate change especially when it comes to These activists some of the youth activists are exploring options. Such as as I'm I'm court cases and more I guess shifting the conversation more towards accountabilities the needs to be a lot of progress made in that people the need to inform themselves about what's happening in that. When you do inform yourself you do realize that this really is the issue that is to affect us all Lindahl rollins and adviser deserve to the UN and Co author of the latest civics report? We will not be silenced. Climate activists from the frontlines the UN. Linda thank you so much for taking the time thank you so much here now is production. NPR and WBZ in association with the BBC World Service. I'm Tanya Moseley. I'm Robin Young. This is here now

president President Congress Democrats President Trump NPR Iceland Ukraine Robin Young NPR Judiciary Committee Linda White House United States Adam Schiff UN Senate
Younger Voters Energized In Iowa; Nigerian Travel Ban Expansion

Here & Now

42:32 min | 1 year ago

Younger Voters Energized In Iowa; Nigerian Travel Ban Expansion

"From NPR and WBZ. I'm Robin Young. I'm Tanya Moseley. It's here now. Today's senators are hearing closing arguments. For and against the removal of president trump for abusive power and obstruction of Congress vote to acquit. The president is expected on Wednesday last night in a Fox News interview before the Super Bowl. The president was asked I if he delayed tomorrow night's State of the Union address. No I'm going to have it It's going to be done. We're going to talk about the fence that we've made nobody's made achievements like we've made so many different things joining us now with the latest. Is Tim Mack. Who covers politics and national security for NPR and him on Friday? It wasn't immediately really clear what was next for this trial. How do you expect it to go today? Well we're expecting to hear closing arguments for both the president's defense team and the house impeachment managers and they're going to probably laid out over the course of the afternoon And then senators will have have a chance. They haven't had over the course of the trial. They'll have the chance to speak over the next couple of days Senators have been forced to sit in their seats and be silent over the course of much of the trial and now they'll have some time until Wednesday at four PM when we expect a final vote on acquittal They'll have some time with the next couple of days to explain. Explain their positions on witnesses and on the impeachment trial more generally. We've been able to hear some of them today. Here's house impeachment manager Jason Crowe an opening arguments for removing trump from office. I submit to you on behalf of the House of Representatives that your duty demands that you convict president trump. What are you hearing about Former national security adviser John Bolton Who of course claims to have first hand information? That president trump held up Ukraine's military aid an exchange for an investigation of Joe Biden. Is that debate over from hearing about fear hearing from him right. Of course the Senate declined to hear from John. Bolton had voted against witnesses on Friday and Congressman Adam Schiff. WHO's the chair of the House Intelligence Committee? He's also the lead manager in the With for the impeachment articles he declined to say whether or not his committee might take an active role and subpoenaing John Bolton going forward he I was on CBS's face the nation over the weekend and he said he did not want to comment but he said that the truth would come out right then. John Bolton has a book that's expected to be published in March it's now going through a declassification or a classification national security review. And it's possible that the house could go ahead and Subpoena John Bolton if decided to take that step. Yeah I want to ask you about something else More Republicans are now saying that even though they are set to to acquit president trump. They are acknowledging his actions were wrong or inappropriate. Here's Iowa Senator Joni Ernst on CNN with Jake Tapper yesterday. Probably not something thing that I would have done He's done it now The president has a lot to to to do what he wants to do. We also heard from Senator Lamar Alexander of Tennessee. Who said something similar and he believes that the American people are the best to make the final decision? On trump's fate is this the consensus among Republicans. This argument there's a big variety of reactions and defenses for the president among Republican senators. Some will say as Senator Lamar Alexander has said that. There's misconduct here but it doesn't rise to the level of An impeachable offense Some we'll say as Senator Ernst said in that clip that you played Oh I wouldn't do it that way but I'm not quite ready to say he can. He committed misconduct and still others will say in the Senate that the president did nothing wrong and everything was perfect and find with boat is July twenty eighty fifth call in all the elements surrounding the impeachment articles. Yeah yeah as I said at the top that the president will hold his State of the Union address. What do we expect to hear from him? Well it will be a very obviously political speech that he's running for reelection and he's the first president to give give a state of the Union address while running for reelection and under an inactive impeachment trial So you can expect him talk about what he believes to be his accomplishments and I suspect he'll probably take a little time to mention that trial which from all From from all appearances he's expected to be acquitted on Later this week. That's Tim. McKee covers politics national security for NPR. Thank you so much. The Hugh Hole there are now eleven cases of the new corona virus in the US but more than seventeen thousand two hundred confirmed cases in China and at least three hundred sixty one deaths their entire provinces closed off. Let's get the view from American Nick. Kauffman of fullbright student in China since August studying economic namath development in rural province which borders who bay province where the outbreak began in the city of Wuhan. The Fulbright program has sent students email all saying they've temporarily suspended the program in China and they should leave the country and nick. You say as you move around say university campuses there. Are People doing medical checks taking your temperature. Yeah I think that that's something not only at the universities but going to a museum or which have actually recently been shutdowns downs. You can't do that anymore. But going on a subway or going to the train station or every now and then in transit there will be sporadic. Stop just to make sure you're not Brian Fever so pretty much everywhere you go. They will check your temperature if you're going into a place that's frequented by other people and then at restaurants for example I I think I must be a city order because most if not all are not open to customers to come sit down and they let you order there and a lot of them will have you wait outside side and then a woman or a man in a mask will come out and hand you your food. It's actually been a bit of a boom for the local deliveryman. You've seen dumb kind of congregating out front of various restaurants picking up orders for Chinese citizens that just don't really WanNa go outside or interact with other folks so it's been a booming in a business for them but I don't think you know to joyful for the reasons behind it. When did you first hear about this virus? And how always how is that. Knowledge changed in the last few weeks. The virus a in mainland China kept a pretty low profile at say through most of the month of December number and early January. The first time I found out about it I was actually travelling to Hong Kong on research. I took a train from Guangzhou down to Hong Kong and there was just a wall of what I presume must have been Hong Kong doctors or medical professionals Scanning everybody with body temperature checks and asking about our our travel history and I remember kind of looking around and thinking like what's going on here and then of course over the next couple of weeks. It's certainly escalated on the mainland and people became more aware of it. I am frightened. Yeah I mean I am aware that the severity rate for people my age. I'm twenty three years old isn't as high of a risk and when I talk with a lot of the students who are Chinese. I think the real kind of fear that you get is these students are very nervous about their grandparents or older members of their family in China Such a culture of respect for grandparents and filial piety already and then in on way since it's a pretty rural province a lot of these students his parents went to the cities to work as migrant workers so these students were being raised by their grandparents and are very very close relationships with them so there are very worried about if their grandparents get sick and they're already in a a region without the best medical facilities compared to Shanghai Beijing. I think that's where the real fear is manifesting itself among students in my in my province albums while fear is one thing but panic would be another now. We know the Lunar New Year holiday was extended to keep people away from work and businesses longer. You don't keep them home longer in your area. Are you seeing people who lived there wanting to leave. Are you seeing people looking for face masks asks. Are you getting a sense. That people are moving from that concern area to something else I would would hesitate to call it panic. I think there is a high level of concern and a little bit of fear. I think the A concern with WHO is. They did close off a lot of public transportation. He should in subway. I think it's important to remember that. A lot of young Chinese don't drive and a lot of them are very reliant on public transportation to get to where they need go so people do certainly a big concern in their hometowns of if they get caught up in these these lockdowns I did take a train before for the severity of the of the virus. Really kind of came out and even at that point I was the only person on my train and this is again. This is over the Lunar New Year. which is the the highest travel season in China? It's hundreds and millions of people young men and women that sell snacks and drinks off the trolleys up and down the train. AL's I've never seen move that fast. Because they weren't selling anything and one of the men just chatting with me and he was saying that he's Kinda relieved. The translates to empty because it means that he's communicating with people and not at risk of catching the virus. Well and Nick Kaufman. You're heading out of anway province where you are in China. You're heading to Taiwan. What kind of protections are you gonNa take when you travel so I'm going to be going through all kinds of medical screenings checks consistent? Temperature checks when issues issues like this to spring up in China frequently though put up large red banners three slogans. I've seen in particular. The first is a buscher yet. Way which says do not eat wild animals and the second and third is funk fung do a ball who jarrin which would translate to combat or prevent the virus. Protect yourself family. And so there's all kinds of precautions being taken so on a personal level. I'm fortunate to be going through lots of medical tax ax and making sure that I'm safe. And then on a more macro scale they've been very clear in their advice of what they want to do and what they want them to avoid. That's Nicole Kidman. Fullbright student researcher in on Wade province China. The Fulbright program has been temporarily suspended. He's going to be leaving that area but nick thanks for your observations and stay safe. Thank you Robin. NPR's code switch is a podcast about race in America. That's about all of us are histories. However represented wanted the ways we've worked together and worked against each other? You'll learn. You might get mad. You'll definitely laugh but don't take my word for it just listen to NPR's switch. The Iowa caucuses are tonight in recent polls predict turn out by young voters could swing the outcome back in two thousand sixteen young voters propelled Bernie Sanders to a virtual tie with Hillary Clinton in Iowa this year sanders is competing with a number of candidates for that demographic and canals Chris Bentley reports their vote could prove decisive four hundred voter registration leading. Yeah Yeah we glasses haven't yet begun at Iowa. City High School and eight members of the caucus club are planning their final final. Push to get out the vote. Anyone eligible to vote in November can caucus tonight even if they haven't turned eighteen yet and the caucus club hopes all of them will. It's time for class. But a few students stick around tonight will be their first time. caucusing and senior Daphne. New P- says she's nervous. I'm intimidated 'cause I'm afraid of crowd house and don't do a lot of political speaking and I'm like Oh my gosh. I'm really scared but you know it'll happen. Nuke says she'll face. Those fears to support Pete Heat. Buddha judge the youngest candidate in the race. Maria Berry is still deciding between Buddha. Judge Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren. But she will definitely caucus and she thinks many of her classmates to at city high of fell that. There's a pretty big shift in the amount of people who are just talking about political issues that perfect day today. I mean with gun violence. School shootings climate change. I just think there's always something just really affects them and they really do care about the Google form they can just put your question. Those issues are also motivating young voters a few miles away at the University of Iowa which which counts more than thirty three thousand students. Okay super hyped up US longer Jocelyn rough is trying to get some of her our fellow. Hawkeye's psyched up about caucusing. She's executive director of Hawk. The vote a nonpartisan student group. Trying to boost turnout among young people. They're they're answering questions over social media and in person sessions and holding a mock caucus on campus to get first time voters comfortable with what can be a confusing process. That's important because young people typically vote at lower rates than older generations but the twenty eight midterm elections saw an increase in youth. Turn out in Iowa. According to state election data and rough predicts another uptick this year. The sense I'm getting is that there's really a culture shift and young people and they're excited about voting. It's not only irresponsibility in your civic duty. which sounds kind of scary and alienating? But it's also the best way that you can make an impact on the things that you care about an intangible way young people can definitely Swing this selection Courtney Julich is a PhD candidate at the University of Iowa studying young voters if they turn out at eighteen percent which is not far off from what older people turn out which is usually like in the low twenties. They can definitely swing the election. And we've seen that happen with Obama surprising win out in two thousand eight in the Caucasus. Here in Iowa Woah and then again with Bernie Sanders almost virtually tying Clinton which was also very unexpected and those were motivated by the youth turning out in voting for these specific candidates as the sun goes down over a snow-covered campus volunteers for the Bernie Sanders campaign. Dial away in a phone banking session at the University of Iowa Student Union. They're trying to expand sanders voter base by mobilizing people who may have expressed support for him on social media or to a campaign campaign volunteer but hasn't yet committed to caucus tonight thought the volunteers emphasized sanders proposal to cancel all student debt as well as his plans for healthcare in the environment. Three issues that polls show young voters ranked highly zoe. SWINTON is president of the student. Group Hawks for Bernie Young voters feel a lot of pressure. Because this feels like our last chance I mean we're burning it as our last chance right like I think he's GonNa run again but this is something that we need. We need it right now. And we can't have another four years with no change in twenty sixteen sanders one more than eighty percent of Iowa the caucus goers between the ages of eighteen and twenty nine. But this time sanders has more competition at a town hall event for Joe Biden at the university the city of Iowa last week twenty year old Madison Burke said she's leaning towards caucusing for the former vice president for me. Personally I think that experience an office is huge and so I think that finding a great candidate because it has an experience and that makes me feel safe. But Burke says she's also considering Elizabeth Warren and Andrew Gang a few seats down at the same Biden event twenty-seven-year-old van gators candidate of choice is clear from his hat reading math to his Yang. Twenty Twenty sweatpants. He came from Florida to volunteer for Yang and says he's been canvassing voters around Johnson County. We told them the other is the caucus coming out. There's a guy who wants to give you a thousand dollars. There is like light up and they're like Oh yeah I'll do that. And then hopefully we can shocks and people here in Iowa. Yang got more votes than any other Democratic Democratic candidate in this year's Iowa Straw poll a statewide survey of more than twenty seven thousand young voters released last week. But the big question for any campaign relying on young voters is whether they'll actually show up tonight to caucus a circle Tisch college and Suffolk University poll released last month found thirty five percent of Iowa I will voters ages. Eighteen to twenty nine. Say They are extremely likely to caucus if that holds true. It would be a historic year for youth turnout in Iowa and one where young young voters could make or break a Democratic candidates campaign in what polls show is still very tight race for here now. I'm Chris Bentley. President Trump's new new expansion of immigration restrictions on six countries could have devastating impacts on Africa's largest economic center Nigeria. Nigerians make up the largest population relation of Africans living in the United States and historically the US has been trading partner and ally to Nigeria under this new policy. Nigerians will no longer be able to apply for visas to emigrate to the US permanently for more. We're joined by Jimmy. Koei Joe President of the Nigerian American Multicultural Council. She's based in Houston and joining us from Lagos Nigeria. Welcome to hear now. Hello Tanya I'm glad to be here you mean. What's been the reaction to this ban from Nigerian Jerry in communities both here in the US and their Nigeria well it Of course came as a surprise for us and also we were a little bit it Consent disappointed that Nitra being created the ban family means a lot to Ross. I'm playing Joe happened. Family family members around us so the First reaction is the separation this will cause to family members and they had shipped. That will follow. Because this ban prohibits bringing family to the states. Yes it does. Since it's it's it doesn't prohibit visitors short-term Visits but the longer term wants which is usually family children fighting in for the appearance to come join them or spouses fighting for each other siblings. That's what we see this band affecting and this is where we kind of grappling with them. What are these implications especially for the next generation Shen patrons? Nigeria is also the most populous country on the continent of Africa. And that's also a very important konami globally. Nearly eight thousand as an immigrant visas were issued to Nigerians in two thousand eighteen to the US. Russia and China are investing and pardoning heavily Nigeria. You are a longtime Exxon Mobil double executive. It's what brought you to Houston. How significant from your view is this band to Nigeria's economy and really losses for the US? Well part of what I see here is that It certainly will make business more difficult and especially chilly again. Part of the loss I see to the. US is the loss in tonneins. You know this bands will reduce the kind of talent our show up in the in the US. Because once since I get into difficult. I'm you would look for other places if you want to go somewhere else. The the ban Dan give an impression of being not as inclusive as we all see the US as so maybe you know people will look for the options unveil the options on over the world so it will be the loss of the US invariably the Department of Homeland Security says Nigeria failed to meet minimum security requirements The President of Nigeria says. The government will be working to fix those security lapses. But do you think your current President Biharis policies fees are responsible for lowering Nigeria's standards around the world we did we did read that. There is a tax setup to look into these cups and see how quickly to fix them. So we're hoping in the near future. Sure these gaps will be fixed and that then the ban will be revoked just like the Homeland Security. I believe chart was one of the countries which they have revoked the ban so we do hope that whatever measures required from the Nigerian student government's side of the equation will be resolved. You're in Nigeria. Right now visiting family and work duties duties How are your friends and family there processing the news? You know when things has such that you probably can't do much about not You have to start thinking of although tentatives so it's like well maybe the. US is not the place to go. And it's many people are disappointed and And and it's still a bit fresh. I must say So Oh you want to all the other. Alternatives are still not quite clear in in people's mind on what next to do. We're just hoping that that is going to be temporary and that will be able to go back to business as usual another leader. That's Mako as Yoshi. Is President of the Nigerian American Multicultural Council and she joins us from Lagos Nigeria. Thank you so much for taking time. Thank you for having me Sick it and six Williams Mexico Jill in the final touchdown of last night's gripping Super Bowl battle between the San Francisco Forty niners and the Kansas City chiefs. That's how it sounded in Miami. Here's how it sounded in the Kansas City. Power and light district where thousands of fans watching on the big screen led by quarterback Patrick Mahomes. Kansas City surged back from a ten point deficit to win their first Super Bowl and fifty years coach. Andy Reed's first Super Bowl. Victory Ever Final Score thirty one twenty Carl Palmer of Casey. You are still up a explain what this means means for for Missouri and Kansas City. Haven't gone to bed. We'll say it's a huge wins. The first time in fifty years that the chiefs have won a super bowl really as one fan. Put It last night. A cornerstone of the city this franchise team which has been here since the early nineteen sixties and really really a powerhouse team in the early days of the NFL but have gone through some struggles in more recent decades and had really heartbreaking playoff losses and disappointments women's over the years. I should know I'm a lifelong chief's fan grew up here But yeah last night I think for a lot of fans was the culmination of rebuilding project with Andy. Reid is Koshin. Patrick Mahomes as quarterback in really it felt right in the way that it happened with the comeback in the fourth quarter. Well we want to talk about Some of those elements but first. Let's get this out of the way. President Trump tweeted after the victory congratulating the chiefs for representing the Great State of Kansas. So very well. Kansas City this team both live in the great great state of Missouri. How people taking that interest that? Just nothing burger. Oh well I I will say. Kansas City are used to national figures. Mixing up exactly where the city is So it is a bipartisan problem. If you WANNA put it that way And I think most reasonable minded metro residents residents Probably took it with a grain of salt To to be fair there is a Kansas City Kansas just across the river but the Kansas City That you think of and and the chiefs as in jazz and barbecue that is a Kansas City Missouri. That's right and but you can take a sharpie and just kind of circle the state anyway. Look Patrick Mahomes. The quarterback only third African American quarterback to win a super bowl in the history of the game so young in his twenties so new to the team. I mean people might not realize he was the chiefs first round draft pick in twenty seventeen. Just talk a little bit about how the city's embracing him. He's quickly become probably outside of the likes of George bread and Len Dawson. Maybe already at twenty four the most beloved figure in Kansas City sports history. I'm certainly last night's win the fact that he was. MVP and helped lead their comeback in the fourth quarter assignments that even more Just a couple of things to note about how a door he is special cereal being sold in a local grocery store around here recalled. mahomes magic crunch a frosted flakes type cereal and the local grocery store chain high visas. They're expecting to sell three hundred thousand boxes of that. This season another thing that story that was posted to twitter. Don't know if it's true or not. I haven't verified but it kind of speaks to the love that Kansas City has for this young man said that he him and his girlfriend went out to the eat at a local restaurant that they weren't bothered than when he left. He announced to the the room. You'll thank you so much for letting US enjoy our dinner and peace and walked out and then the restaurant told everyone that they had paid for. Everyone's wants meal. Oh Man I want to move to Kansas City by the way sorry forty niners fans maybe next year. But that's cow Palmer of Casey. You are there in Kansas City Missouri. Observe Kyle thank you today. We launch series on what some are calling the silencing of science under the trump administration listen a national parks scientists receiving a cease and desist letter after testifying to Congress about Climate Change Sharpie Gate when President trump falsely claimed that Alabama was in the path of Hurricane Dorian emails just obtained by Buzzfeed. Show that at that time officials at the National Weather Service and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Were writing each other saying things like help an Yup crazy the Sabin Center for Climate Change Law at Columbia University's as law school has been tracking this erosion of science of truth with a special tracker called the Silencing Science Tracker Michael Gerard Director of the Saban Center joins US welcome. Thank you Robin. And you actually have to trackers. They're one focuses just on climate change deregulation rolling back of a lot automation but the other one this silencing science tracker what prompted that we saw that as soon as trump was inaugurated he started talking even more loudly about disregarding science. We saw that percolate throughout the federal government. We decided to keep track of it so that they would be held accountable. People would know what they're doing and and we will hook people up. You can go right now to hear now dot Org and just scanning through I mean. Here's a recent entry on the tracker for December Twenty Fourth Online pollution tracking database. Ace removed. Just tell US Moorland on that one. So the National Library of medicine which is part of the National Institute of Medicine for a long time head. A website called talks map where you could look at any particular location in the country and safe there any superfund sites or polluting factories. These are other sources of pollution. That were there So that if you were thinking about moving to a particular place for example you could see what's around They have taken that down. They've eliminated dated the site The data are still available in obscure places such half-ton four but the general public no longer has easy access to this information about these sources of pollution in the communities where they live or might WanNa move just picking out a few more The trump administration access federal advisory committee focused on invasive species. ABC's White House strikes climate change language from vehicle emissions proposal. When you see it all together like this in the tracker it's it's pretty overwhelming? Say No longer are interested in expertise or at least the kind of expertise that might lead to conclusions that they dislike as you said they've been eliminating a lot of the scientific advisory committees and those that have survived. They've kicked off many of the academic scientists and put in-place industry representatives. What are you hearing from people? In the government agencies there is an enormous amount of distress by the career staff. You have a lot of dedicated very sophisticated. Scientists and other professionals who've been devoting their careers to keeping a safe from pollution and unsafe products products and so forth and they're being squelched Some of them are leaving If they have other opportunities and I'm also seeing my own university see that many young scientists are deciding. They don't want to go to work for the federal government. That's not a congenial place to actually carry out good science anymore. Well here's another item from June twenty four. Th of last year studies showing damages from climate change buried by the USDA scientists at the USDA claim that the agency has deliberately failed to publicize research publications that address the impact of climate change. So again people with an in agencies are reporting this but we mentioned in the introduction that won National Park scientists got a cease and desist letter. Is the government allowed to do that. Tell people they can't speak about this well. They can tell their employees that they shouldn't appear at certain events or write certain kinds of articles. And that's been happening increasingly and so scientists who were for the government are told not to appear at professional conferences references. They can still reply to subpoenas but in general the gag orders of for federal employees tend to be effective one. One of the items people will remember. It reads on three separate occasions in September president. Trump's stated that Alabama was under threat from Hurricane Dorian even no no no government. Weather forecast predicted any impact will be felt in the state. And we remember the Sharpie that drew on Whiteboard map including Roping Alabama Into a forecast when it didn't belong there. Why do you think this is not making a bigger impact because there's so much else happening out there? There's there's so much noise out there in the world. But in this particular instance the emergency responders in Alabama who listened to this unnecessarily took precautions and scrambled and so forth whereas the places where the hurricane was actually going may have relaxed their diligence of. It's also very dispiriting to the professionals in the weather bureau which has traditionally been a completely non political agency but here people are trying to mess with the results. Well as you know the president trump has always said that government regulations have stifled business. And that's his you know he's in the business of business and jobs in the economy and that the government is bloated and many his base believed that could this just be trimming regulatory fat but of course that is true for the coal industry. For example there are lots of other businesses that are badly hurt by climate. Change if your business is flooded or the transportation is disrupted because of extreme weather events or the other kinds of things that are happening increasingly as a result of climate change the wildfires and the hurricanes and the extreme rains and so forth. Those businesses are really really hurt so it's only a very small slice of the economy that has helped by this regulation much. Larger portions of it are hurt. Well and I was talking about the cost of of the agencies that are controlling a lot of these issues and a lot of president trump supporters. Feel that that work should be outsource that it should be in the private sector sector not paid for by tax payer dollars you say what. Well if it is paid for by industry dollars by the industries that don't want the the negative impacts to be revealed. Then you know you get what you pay for. And it's much more economical to society to have independent objective objective science. What has jumped out at you? I mentioned the Alabama. You know sharpy squiggle but what are some that have jumped out at you. As you've tracked them how pervasive it is how every time that a climate scientists wants to raise his or her head above the foxhole. They're intimidated or were there Shot down by one particularly egregious example. Is that a lot of the standards for certain kinds of air. Pollution are based on long standing etymological studies and they show that certain kinds of pollution are very bad for health. There is a new proposal that would block the use of those kinds of studies because they call it transparency but what they really want is the medical records of the individuals who were studied in the epidemiological the logical studies that of course violates patient confidentiality. It's just an elaborate ruse to avoid using these very important and well accepted peer reviewed studies. We should say that. In some parts of the government. Science is flourishing. NASA is one example that's always given the National Institutes Institutes of Health has had increases. Does this seem to be largely about the science around climate world the science around climate and also environmental protection in general. It's the science that could have the effect of costing more money or reducing the prophets of certain sectors of the economy NASA science doesn't do that and so- NASA science isn't endangered but parts of the National Institutes of health. Do that like the taks map site that they took down and so those are vulnerable. Well what do you think the I just I. I'm asking you a question. I know the answer sir. I mean what's the effect of this at a time when we're supposed to be ramping up. Our knowledge of the impact of climate and the environment. One of the things that has made America great is the brilliance of our science All of this is really putting America behind There are other countries that don't have this new disregard for science it is disabling. US from advancing technologically and much of that technological advancement as a basis for a lot of our economic prosperity. It's also inhibiting our ability to anticipate and prepare for the negative impacts of climate change. Is that we know are coming. But what what happens in a country where people are told not to believe empirical science I have this is beyond or will people had no conception that there would be such disregard of Truth and facts and knowledge and information and expertise. They're all being thrown under the bus and the country will be much poorer for art. Michael Gerard Director of the Center for Climate Change Law at Columbia University. The we've been talking about the silencing science tracker they've developed we'll hook you up here now dot Org Michael Thank you so much and also this week we'll take a closer look at the EPA the Department of Agriculture Silencing signings hearings this year census numbers are being watched closely here in California. That's because the state may lose. Its first congressional seat in history. Thanks to a decline line. In population. Many people are leaving California for less expensive states to the north and southeast like Idaho Texas and those places are now grappling with the influx fluxa population. Derek Thompson is senior editor at the Atlantic and he joins us from Washington as he does each Monday and Eric. I want to start with some of the reaction from the places. Californians are moving to and Tober Wayne Ritchie. A candidate for mayor in Boise joked about building a wall around the state to stop Californians from coming in he. He didn't winning of course but he brings up a sentiment that others might be feeling right. Yes it's a popular sentiment out west. Then it's not just boise. There was a viral Wall Street Street Journal article about another small Idaho town that felt like it was buckling under the stress of thousands of inbound Californians in Texas. It's largely the same thing saying there are all these stories bemoaning. The arrival of Californians is practically become a cliche and in fact the governor of Texas recently issued a warning on twitter where he essentially said when when you come here from southern California leave your high tax habits and liberal ways in California so what you see across the West I think is this sense that they're being overrun by a California diaspora and yet you argue that this idea that there's a mass exodus from California may be overblown. What do the numbers tell us? Yes I do think it's overblown There is so much talk in the media about a California exodus today that surely something is changing and it is in two thousand twelve California grew. Oh by about a hundred and ten thousand movers. That's both American. Movers and immigrants last year California lost forty thousand people on Migration. So if you look at those two data points you're like oh well it's an exodus but when you talk this date demographers as I did with those. Say It's unfair to compare twenty twenty two twenty twelve twelve which is really a high water mark for California adding people if you pull back the lens further if you look at say the last forty years of people moving in and out of California. Yeah what's happening now. Just isn't that dramatic when it comes to migration the number of outbound Californians for example in two thousand eighteen was really no higher than it was in the mid to thousands really pressure lower than it was in the Mid Nineteen Ninety S. So if this is an exodus than California's in kind of a semi permanent state of Biblical accidents and we shouldn't be freaking out about it today. Yeah you know. I lived in Seattle for ten years. In the whole time I was there I kept hearing about Californians coming in and unchanging Cal Seattle in Washington state. So why do you think there is a backlash particularly now. I think for two reasons the first has to do with politics. Texas for example is on the cusp. I think from flipping from a deep Ruby Red Conservative states to a more mixed purple Apple State with Blue Democratic Metros and read rural areas and in that context the next family from California that moves to like Plano. Texas isn't just some new family that slightly different tastes barbecue that you can learn to get along with their potentially the demographic Straw that could rig the GOP's appease back in Texas so people are afraid of that political swap number. Two I think is that Californians really are moving to some different places for example. Idaho really wasn't on the top of the list for a lot of outbound Californians but now it is the number of people moving from California to Idaho doubled in the last six years. Even though overall overall migration had a California didn't change that much so it's a bit of politics and be a bit of I would say distribution California from places. Yeah Idaho uh-huh in particular is really interesting because it's not nearly as populous as a place like Texas. How is this big shift? Changing a place like Idaho. Well we have to use the big H word housing. I think a lot of the moves both into Californian out of California are about employment and housing and right now with employment unemployment unemployment relatively low. A lot of families are making the decision where to live based on housing prices and housing prices have just gone nuts in California recently the average which home value in Los Angeles San Diego San Francisco has increased respectively by seventy percent eighty percent and one hundred and twenty percents in the under the great recession. Just absolutely sword and as a result a lot of families that may have gotten to start maybe even immigrant families that gotta start in those coastal Metros now that they wanna lay down on routes and start a family that that that builds in the US. They're thinking we can't do that in Los Angeles or San Diego. We have to leave. So where do they see as a place with jobs with with land with cheaper housing. Well Idaho's right there. And where does that leave California ultimately. I think the fear for California shouldn't necessarily be exodus. Exodus it should be genesis that is it's about not just the people who are leaving but the children who aren't arriving we see in California. Is that middle. Class Families Families Relieving. They're having their first or second kid. Somewhere else births are falling. Fertility is declining across the country including the Tino who make up about a third of that state's population relation and as a result. is I write in the piece. The Golden State is becoming richer more exclusive a slightly more opulent shade of Grey Array as its meeting. Age grows up. Golden State is turning platinum. And that is something that demographers are absolutely worried about. Derek Thompson is senior editor at the Atlantic. Dick as always thank you so much for joining US thank you here in house production of NPR WR association creation with the B._B._C.. World Service and Johnny Moseley. I'm Robin Young. This is here now.

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People Of Praise, Explained; BLM Co-founder Patrisse Cullors' YA Book

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42:47 min | 8 months ago

People Of Praise, Explained; BLM Co-founder Patrisse Cullors' YA Book

"Support for here and now and the following message come from MIT's system design and management offering on campus hybrid and Distance Education for over twenty years earn a master's degree in engineering and management. Join a virtual Info session on Wednesday October twenty first from seven to eight PM. D. DOT MIT dot edu from NPR WB. You are I'm Tanya Moseley. I'm Robin Young here, and now, and we're getting reaction today to a declaration denounced by scientist but embraced by the trump administration according to reports. It's a petition with many private signers claiming that reopening countries and letting the young and healthy get the virus while keeping the vulnerable away is the best way to create herd immunity against scientists have discredited. This theory of former Harvard Dr compared it to mass murder on CNN today because of the number of people that would die this week. The World Health Organization's chief Teijiro Scabby Asus called the approach immoral. Allowing a dangerous virus that we don't fully understand to run free is simply an etiquette. It's not an option. Dr. Michael Oester is director of the Center for Infectious Disease. Research, and policy at the University of Minnesota Dr Michael petitioned the Great Barrington. Declaration comes from a libertarian. think-tank again, arguing getting the virus brings immunity. Why are people in medicine in an uproar? The only way we can really state the conclusion about what this will mean is it's just plain dangerous. We could expect to see three to four times the number of deaths that we've already had in this country that would play out in addition it is not based on any good science suggesting that somehow you can bubble the wealthy people who. Will in fact, not have serious illness and those who have underlying risk factors that would have serious illness. It's just it's Pixie dust thinking. Because first of all, you don't know someone who might think they're healthy may not know they have a condition. We've heard stories of people who are tremendously healthy doctors are puzzled have no idea why those people? Couldn't breathe on ventilators and died but talk about how viruses work because Arthur. Some illnesses that maybe do not recur and perhaps herd immunity might be a solution but others like you know corner viruses, colds are krona viruses. We know they come back every year. So the immunity doesn't last isn't that one of the problems with this virus we don't know if immunity lasts. Well, we will. achieve in a sense herd immunity. That's not an issue. It's like gravity it's going to occur. The question is, how does it occur? Is it through natural disease or then we count on the immunity coming from actually having the infection or will it occurs vaccination and regardless of whether or not is from natural disease or vaccination we are going to have to deal with this issue durable. Immunity, how long did it last remember we don't have durable with influenza and yet we get back into every year and we prevent many many thousands of lives from dying because of influenza so that that's the real message we're getting across here. Is it? No one is suggesting that we aren't going to have to deal with those virus in a way that on a population basis. Most of us will be immune. Someday the question is how we get there. So you can get vaccinated and get immunity or as you're saying, you can still get sick and it's kind of like a roll of the dice you might die but other people might stay alive and we can get immunity that way in the long run we don't know how long that will last but. Of those two ways to get immunity it sounds like using the vaccine and having fewer people die seems like the better ideas what he think i. hear you saying, right. The really important message here is that if you get infected with this virus, you may not die, but you may very well developed another condition called long haulers, which is a chronic condition, which now seen anywhere from twenty to thirty percent of people who had mild illness at the beginning of the course. But by week five or six post illness, they actually now are experiencing severe chronic fatigue syndrome like pictures. If you look at their chest, xrays, they have damage to their heart and their lungs, and so we really haven't fully understood yet. Exactly all of the negative impacts of being infected I would much rather achieve my immunity even a short lived through a vaccine with the idea that then I would get booster doses over time going at this by just facing the infection as the answer is just not based on any credible science. The Michael we have to ask you quickly the website of this declaration calling for her immunity claims to have nine thousand sixers as we said, most private but some public biophysicist and Nobel laureate Michael. Levitt from Stanford Dr Cody Meisner professor of Pediatrics. An expert on vaccine development at Tufts those are big schools and big names. Some cases would you say to people who say see they believe in this? I think the first thing to look at us who signed that no one with credibility in the area of Cova to research and development anyone who is coming from the public health world that has had to deal with Colbert on the front lines are signing that. we've seen people who are well outside of their area of expertise will sign on as a social. event. So to me I, think the World Health Organization, the NIH, the city see thousands of people who are truly of public health experts on Texas diseases not only have not signed it but absolutely oppose it as dangerous. Dr Michael. Oester home director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and policy at the University of Minnesota. Thanks as always. Thank you the Supreme Court's ruling that allows the trump administration to stop the twenty twenty cents as early is raising fears at the count won't be accurate and that non whites in particular will be undercounted. The sense was extended because of the coronavirus pandemic joining us now is Kristin Clark who's the president and Executive Director of the Lawyers Committee, for civil, rights under law which represents some of the parties in this case. Welcome. Thank you so much for having me Kristen. The battle has has focused on whether the Commerce Department which oversees the Census Bureau had followed federal law. When it set September thirtieth deadline, the justices however have given no reason for their decision. What's your reaction to this ruling? The disappointing ruling at the same time, there is a silver lining. This administration sought to short circuit. The twenty twenty cents is by a terminating the count back in September. They then set a new date at some point in our litigation of October fifth, and at the end of the day, we managed to secure additional weeks that allowed millions of Americans across our country to be counted. So while we are frustrated and disappointed by the Supreme Court's or yesterday which offered no detail or justification for a blocking, the ongoing twenty, twenty cents is count we are taking stock of the fact that but for this litigation and but for efforts to push back against the trump administration's eleventh hour effort to. Short Circuit the census that there many hard to count communities that likely would have been left out. Okay a silver lining somewhat. But who does this ultimately hurt most? What are the wider ramifications of this ruling a we know that historically harder to count communities include black people, Latinos and other communities of Color People experiencing homelessness and low income families are often the ones who tend to be undercounted. So those are the communities that stand to be shortchanged by what's happened here. This decision could also set the stage for a bitter fight over the use of census numbers for the appointment of the next congress. Can you explain how? Census data is used to allocate seats in Congress. By state, it's used to distribute trillions of dollars in federal funding. It's used to determine the structure of the Electoral College. So we need accurate census data to fulfill these important objectives. What happens next is at some point, the bureau will turn over data to the president whoever that may be and the president will in turn turn that data over to Congress. There is the possibility that Congress in the house in particular may reject that data if they find it flawed inaccurate or unreliable, we'll have to see what plays out in the weeks ahead for right now, we're making our strongest push for people who have not yet participated to to get counted before the bureau officially shuts the process down on October fifteenth, and then we'll do what we can to make sure that posts count work which includes analyzing the data. Assess the quality of the data actually takes place. You know this census has been complicated from the START I by the trump administration wanting to add a question about citizenship that many experts said would discourage immigrants both legal and undocumented from responding the Supreme Court rejected adding citizenship question. But do you think that issue of whether or not? The census could ask about citizenship harmed the census even if it wasn't ultimately included. It's been a rollercoaster ride with this administration and every turn we've seen in the trump administration really politicize the. And weaponized the census to achieve certain political goals and we know that the end goal is to have a set of data that excludes and omits people of Color to the highest degree possible and in particular, this administration is bent on excluding undocumented people from the next round of redistricting that takes place in our country. So I anticipate that legal battles will ensue in the road ahead and that civil rights organizations will fight to the nail to make sure that we have affair redistricting process in our country that aligns in the way in which the constitution calls for. Kristen is the president and Executive Director of the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law Kristen. Thank you. Thank you so much for having me. Bit. Tonight President trump campaigns in Iowa state he easily won for years ago Joe Biden holds a virtual fundraising event. It is just twenty days until election day. So let's get to it with our political strategists. This Jamal Simmons the Democrat High Jamal. I, Robin. And Matt. MAKOVIAC the Republican. Heidi you. Matt. either. And I think we all can agree that it's very likely that judge amy conybeare will be confirmed to the Supreme Court before Election Day. So this entire week of hearings maybe about just firing up the base Democrats making it about the court overturning obamacare and voting rights and Republicans, making it about defense of faith and her being a suburban mom, and I should have maybe in the case of the chair Lindsey Graham speaking to voters in his tough. Bid But Matt Start with you briefly do you think it's having an impact on voters? Well, it is in the sense that it's reminding voters of the importance of the Supreme Court and of President Trump's record in this area where obviously there are partisan differences but I think broadly speaking the country Is, generally, supportive of the judges put on the bench. I think obviously this, this is a winning issue for trump to helpful issue. It unifies the Republican Party entirely and it pushes other things you know off the front page and off of our you know, Cable News. Channels. So I think it's helpful. I think that the president putting forward a qualified nominee who's so easy to to connect with an so engaging and an impressive is very positive and that's why I think at this point the Democrats don't even really seem to be putting up much of a fight. Well Jamal do you think presidents have acknowledged or or getting that? This is just going to be the way it is. I think Democrats are fighting on terrain for the voters. They think are actually sway -able here the reality is two Republican senators have already said both of them women have already said they wouldn't support them and fight in the midst before the presidential election occurs if one or two more Republicans were to be swayed in that way, then they can stop the nomination from being confirmed before Election Day. That's A. Those are long odds, but Democrats, are making the cases that had that big impact on the election but it will have a big impact on the future of Roe versus Wade whether or not that maze legal and whether or not. We still have pre existing conditions covered by healthcare plans. So that's the ground that Democrats are going after particularly targeting suburban women who are concerned about those issues. Well, it's also perhaps about. This election yesterday Democrat. Chris coons asked Conybeare it about President Trump's sowing confusion about the election, and you know maybe rushing her confirmation. So she could vote in his favor if there's a disputed election comes before the court and she would not commit to recusing herself. Let's listen I certainly hope that all members of the committee have more confidence in my integrity than to think I would allow myself to be used as upon pawn to decide this election for the American people. Matt. This is a president who has been on steroids has been railing about. Investigations by his attorney general that didn't go the way you wanted Lashing out. As a strategist. What are you hearing far Republicans worried about what president trump might do if he doesn't win. Are you concerned. No I'm not concerned I. Mean I think I think both sides have signalled that they are going to pursue legal challenges if they lose and that's perfectly appropriate you saw the Gore campaign do that in two thousand and ultimately was decided the Supreme Court if either side were to you know somehow go beyond legal remedies I think the vast majority of the country would rise up against that and that's if it was the president. Of Four Vice President Biden. So No, I don't have any concerns about a peaceful transfer of power president trump refusing to leave office. This will ultimately get settled. either through the courts or through an election and a process where it's clear who who won the election I don't think it's going to be clear on election night. I think it's going to take some time and intact maybe. So close that a couple of states decided in the mailbox come in seven to ten days later could actually flip a couple of states and perhaps even change you win. So I, think we're GONNA be in for a hall and it's going to be pretty divisive but I don't have a lot of concern about it I think the courts. clear this up and and rule on the merits. Listening to you. I'm listening to I mean matching up guess he's not concerned by listening to even the language. He uses which mail in ballots me flip a couple of states that implies that there will be a result that is flippable right? The reality is we won't know the results until those male imbalance come. So there's not a state that is the can be turned. The question is, what is the accurate count? So the concern that I think a lot of people have not just Democrats is that the president himself the vice president, himself would not commit to a peaceful transfer of power that is just an amazing. Outcome or amazing point in the middle of a democratic process has been going on since George Washington and refused to be named king. So we've got to make sure that the President Donald Trump is held to the standard. Every other president was held to before him. Including I worked for Al Gore and Al Gore lost at Surpreme Court case he could have kept fighting on other grounds, but the vice president decided you know what? For the sake of the country and the democracy? I. Will Stand Down with my forces in the peaceful transfer of power. Meanwhile. One of the things that you're binds being asked you know trump is being asked to accept the the vote by being asked what about payback and if he wins if the Democrats win, the Senate, will they go for court packing expanding the Supreme Court? And he gave his first substantial answer to that question. Would he side with progressives in his party pushing for this expansion to protect abortion rights gay marriage the affordable care act he spoke with WBRC in Cincinnati I'm not a fan of court back but I'm not I don't want to get off on that whole issue I want to keep focused not the president would love nothing better than to fight about whether or not I would, in fact, pack the quarter not pack the court et Cetera the focus is why is he doing what he's doing now? Demolished, succeeding on deflecting this. Yes. I think that Joe Biden's position is that we're a long way between here and him being able to make decisions about those including whether or not. There's a Republican Senate Republican Senate in many ways. The question is even mood I however of the case that if the Republicans go along and define the very scanner that they put in place for Barack. Obama, that all rules are off the table Democrats should be looking at whether or not be more justices on the Supreme Court eliminating. The Electoral College by the not, we should change redistricting laws around the country because they keep fouling with the census. Everything is now on the table and Democrat pushes as hard as possible and make the Republicans play defense. Now, let me night in Pennsylvania President trump held his second mostly mask Lewis not socially distanced rally in two days, and he said this after boasting about blocking low income housing in the suburbs. So can I ask you to do me a favor suburban women? Would you please likely? I saved. Condemn neighborhood okay. Ooh, Matt then is not a dog whistle. That is a trumpet I saved your neighborhood from what you know in in blocking low income housing. As strategist is that the way to to get suburban women over to your side polling shows that they support, for instance, the black lives matter movement. Well I. Think he's probably in talking more about law and order you re instilling. Our cities but he does obviously believe that that that action related to Hud you know would have would have been something that would have changed the kind of the fabric of of suburbs in ways that people who live there may not have wanted But Yeah, look to me I think it's it's that you know healthcare education and those kind of issues. Affecting for suburban women and there's no doubt in twenty eighteen Democrats made gains with suburban women and that's they flip the house and won forty one seats. Republicans. have to find a way to win the back and I think more that we talk about the economy. The Supreme Court you know law and order in and make sure neighborhoods in cities and suburbs are safe and then goes they're all winning issues for the president he needs to stay on that message for the next. Twenty days. For instance, we have Joe Biden and we're not going to hear it now but you know talking to Florida seniors yesterday saying Hey Republicans are hugging each other. When was the last time? You could hug your Grandchild Matt. Some pundits are starting to use the word landslide in reference to a Biden win. Yeah I think that's unlikely. I don't buy the national poll showing twelve or fourteen point lead. I mean I do think that Biden has gained gained over that ten day period from the first debate through the president getting Cogan how the White House handle is I think things are starting to come back now and look these states are closed. It's GonNa. Depend a lot on the ground game. Out Data operations, how official you're spending your money what your closing messages, all those things are going to make a difference. I think right now you'd rather be Biden's than trump but I think trump's team does have enthusiasm advantage and that could make a difference again I I believe this can be very very, very close election. Dumol, are you rolling up? Okay Yeah? My worried. I'm worried about is the Democrats get a little bit complacent and the question you were going to ask but you know there's one there's one suburban wife and mom who should be concerned about violence and she and who is concerned about violence, and that's the governor of Michigan who was targeted by extremist terrorist gangs to warn the kidnapper. I think if we're GONNA have a conversation about people being safe in the election. The question is are the trump forces whether the proud boys, the blue boys or whatever group it is they WANNA call themselves. Who WanNa go into election election sinners and target voters on their way into ballots. Are we concerned that there's a there's a right wing extremist faction in the country that will not abide by the laws of the country and the president seems to be enabling those people and not down. It's quite something Matt. I'm going to give you just a less quick quick answer. Are you assures you were the last time? We spoke that Senator Lindsey Graham was going to win reelection in South Carolina. We've never we've never seen anyone raise fifty, seven, million dollars in one quarter as team here on the democratic side I still think trump's margin in south carolina that's really hard for to overcome, but it's going to be very, very close election. EAC Republican Jamal Simmons the Democrat thank you both. Support for here, and now in the following message come from MIT's system design and management jointly offered by MIT's School of Engineering, and the MIT's Sloan School of management earn a Master's in engineering and management STM EDUCATES MID career professionals to solve complex challenges at the intersection of business and technology with over twenty years of on-campus Hybrid and distance education experience. Join a virtual Info session on Wednesday October twenty first from seven to eight PM SDSM DOT MIT DOT Edu. Are you planning to fly over the holiday season well, according to a recent survey conducted by travel booking site hopper fifty, five percent of respondents said, the holidays will be the first time they've traveled since the start of the pandemic but will holiday travel be like this year we'll airports be packed. WILL AIRFARES BE HIGH? Let's bring in here and now's transportation analysts Seth Kaplan Hey seth. So some states have have lifted restrictions for people to travel but in terms of bookings for the holiday season is the demand actually there can we expect to see crowds terminals for Thanksgiving and Christmas? Depends what you compare it to look there'll be more people traveling on Thanksgiving and Christmas than there are let's say today if you went out to the airport. But look. There aren't very many people out there today and there haven't been very many people out there for a number of months now so. I took a look at airline schedules, which is basically the best proxy. You can. You don't really know how many people are traveling until you look back on it later but for perspective yeah. Airlines are scheduling more seats the Wednesday right before Thanksgiving than they are today but they are scheduling far fewer seats that day then they were scheduling on a Wednesday in October. The middle of October last year two, thousand, nineteen, according cerium scheduled Ada. Well. We're having this conversation now in mid October because this is the time when prices start to go up for travel during the holidays. Is there a time during this window that travelers should actually be booking their holiday flights this year? This would often be it. Generally, between about a month or two months before you travel is when you get the best deals and yes, that's typically true. Even for holidays people kind of get nervous they think well holidays. I'd better book way out but Consumer Psychology Airlines know people think that. Sometimes. They play the game and so this would be it. Now look this year obviously things are very different I could tell you that people have been saying they're surprised that fares are lower and in the end that's really supply and demand economics. As you mentioned more, people are planning to take their first trips then than are doing so now and airlines have reduced seats enough that they think they can get fair something like what they used to get in the old days even though airports will be nowhere nearly as crowded as normal would. Right. I mean airlines almost never lower prices closer to flight date anyone who flies knows that but we also know some airlines are leaving many seats between passengers empty for social distancing with a little time have with you remind us which airlines are enforcing social distancing. Right so among the major airlines will say, the four biggest airlines, Delta has committed to keep the middle seat empty generally speaking unless you have a family of three traveling together until after the new, year southwest has made that commitment for now until after Thanksgiving united in American not doing that all of the let people change their flights for free in some cases if you're on a packed flight by the way Airbus, just yesterday claimed that social discount plane occurs at one foot instead of six feet because the air flows down rather than across the room. You know. Obviously. It's GonNa, take a lot more convincing than that to get people back into the air in the same kinds of numbers as before. But a lot of the time comes down to not just what happens on the airplane but the destination, the quarantine as you mentioned, cycling several states still requiring visitors to quarantine for two weeks if they've traveled from areas with high levels of Corona virus thank you so much, Seth. That's here. Now's transportation analysts Seth Kaplan. Back in June support for black lives matter was at an all time high and people around the world were speaking out against bigotry and racism. But in the months, since America's racial reckoning support has declined a recent Pew Research Center study found that fifty five percent of adult support the movement down from sixty seven percent during the demonstrations. In June, this is nothing new for B. L., co-founder, Patrisse cullors she's written a. Book about the country's relationship with Blm called when they call you a terrorist, a story of black lives and the power to change the world here she is reading an expert. If ever someone calls my child terrorist if they call any of the children in my life terrorists, I will hold my child any child close to me and I will explain that terrorism is being stalked and surveilled simply because you are alive. I will tell them what freedom looks like. What democracy looks like. It's the push four and realization of justice, dignity and peace. Now Patrisse cullors has come out with a young readers version of the text for what she says is a new generation of burgeoning activists. Patrice welcome back to here and now thank you so much for having me back. It's an honor. Yes. So it's been two years since the original book was published. Why was it important for you in this moment to adapt it for young adult readers? We always had a plan to adapt it for young adult readers once I wrote the book and twenty eighteen alongside Ben Deli. We felt like it was important to speak to young millennials and JEN's ears I did not realize that we would be speaking to them during an uprising during one of the most important moments in our country's history, which is this national election. There's always been a partisan divide and support for the black lives matter movement, but they're actually seemed to be turning of the tide at least over the summer. But that changed after confrontations between protesters and police and president trump stepped up his criticism of the movement what has been the impact of this backlash to your efforts and really the movement at large. There's a couple things that I think are really important for people to understand, which is when black people call for being free when we call for. An opportunity to. be able to thrive. Instead of just survive we are often met with. Being, demonized, where often met with being undermined, and so our movement is no different than the civil rights movement. It's no different than the movement to end the Black Code. It's no different than the movement to end the abolition of slavery. In this country, we are part of a long legacy of black freedom fighters who have challenged America to really stand up to its constitution to challenge America to really. Look. Black people in the eyeballs look us and our souls and say that we matter that we matter to this country that we've always matter to this country and I think it's unfortunate. That the right and Donald Trump specifically has used our movement as a pond to try to win this election The people are to say who they want US president and we don't need to demonize an undermine a movement that is really not just four black people but for all of us, well, this movement has has prompted young people to mobilize in ways that we've not seen in recent history. So we actually thought, it would be nice to have a young reader, my thirteen year old daughter. Audrey. to read your book and ask you questions and here's her first one. As a younger teen and I'm sure for younger teens out there who I've read the book. What are some things that I can do to help you know with the new election coming up because I'm thirteen cannot vote what are some things that would be helpful so that we can progress going forward. Best question ever. You know I think number one, young people can remind. Each other why it's so important to vote. They can learn about the voting rights act can learn about voter suppression and oppression right now and gear themselves up to be a part of a larger movement to push for healing and transformation in this country I think young people can. Teach each other and remind each other on lookout for misinformation and disinformation. Don't let the Internet explain what's happening do your own research and remind each other that I know. So many young people are you age. And a bit older and younger were out in the streets It is a constitutional right to protest do not let people tell you otherwise and protest is at the very fabric of this country's existence. You write extensively in the book about the increase in suicide rates especially among young people of Color. Here's another question from Audrey on this topic. One, talking about the rates of attempted suicides. You were talking about rescue plans and I wanted to know what that meant and go more in depth about that. Well. So many communities at the margins poor communities black poor communities cannot rely on the government. We're seeing that right now and the middle of a global pandemic. Have only received one, twelve, hundred dollar check. To try to feed their children to try to pay their rent the government unfortunately is not trying to save us and so there has been so many powerful ways that I've seen the community band together and show up for each other mutual aid programs that we've only dreamt about were created in this moment in this pandemic. People checking on their neighbors bringing them food. An organization that I work with trump heels did by cove event providing free Cova testing and Compton and We are really seeing the power of humanity right now even under such a gross neglect. Because of the National Government You know in your book you write in great detail about the exhaustion of activism work both physically and mentally what what keeps you going and what would you say to young activists who feel exhausted right now rest. There is a long fight ahead of us do not overburden in your body you don't have to. If, you feel like you are doing too much if you feel like your body is doing too much. Check in with your team and the community around you be held accountable to your health and your wellbeing. Sometimes, there is moments where you have to stretch stretch stretch and where your body is sort of like Addison Brink. But we shouldn't stay there for long we shouldn't have to So do the work now but also part of the work is rest. You know the momentum of the black lives matter movement. This year really took off across the globe. We saw major protest movements in places like the UK and Kenya and South Africa, where people are not only demonstrating solidarity with the US but also holding a mirror up to their own racial history and police saying, how does it feel to see this movement? You've created impact so many people. Oh, well I feel really grateful for the opportunity to be a part of. A powerful team of people who created this movement and to see. How? Much it's impacted not just this country but the entire world was just on a call with black lives matter members in the United Kingdom talking about how they build it infrastructure for for black folks who are fighting for our freedom. We gotta get on a call with black people in Brazil and talk about how we work together. We have such opportunity. We've always had such opportunity as black people to get us to the places that we deserve and I think we do it best when we do it together. Patrisse cullors is one of the CO founders of black lives matter and has recently adapted her book when they call you a terrorist for young adult readers Patrice. Thank you so much for this conversation. Thank you for having me. This is beyond Sweden. Thank your daughter for me to. And if you'd like to read a passage of Patrice his book, We have an expert at here now dot Org. Who are the people of Praise Judge Amy Barrett is Catholic and has also said to be a member of this group of Charismatic Christians she served on the board of several of their schools and once lived in the home of one of the founders that we know members of people have praised engage in physical forms of worship including speaking in tongues, faith healing. But what else some former members say women are treated as subservient to men. Francis Rocco is Vatican correspondent for the wall. Street Journal Frank Start with a basic definition. What does people praise? The group is a so-called Covenant Community within the Catholic Charismatic Movement, which started in the late sixties, early seventies and is now. Especially, in Latin, America and Africa starting the United States but these covenant communities in the early years. were. These very tightly knit groups. Like the people of praise which is about seventeen hundred, adult seventeen, fifty adults in many cases over the years they've. Times lived together shared roof single people would live with families and so forth and they meet at least once a week they contribute and five percent of their income usually to the group, and so it's a very, it's a very intense form of charismatic Catholicism. Well, there's the Catholic charismatic renewal that's a movement that embraces some of the principles of Pentecostals as you right, and that began in the late nineteen sixties. The Catholic charismatic renewal people have praised was born from that in nineteen seventy, one in south bend. Indiana where the University of Notre Dame is located. Then you write also about as you said, this a pledge to a covenant and here's where some former members of come forth and found difficulty in this they say husbands and people have praised are considered the heads of the household there called the heads. Then you write for a while with female leaders assigned to look after women were until a few years ago called handmaid's after the Bible's description of the Virgin Mary but changed that because, of course, the dystopia in. A book, the handmaid's tale. What were the criticisms of what they say is this part of people of praise. Well, some of the former members, one early member in particular that even wrote a book criticizing and saying that women were secondary demand they had to defer demand. If you talk to the members now they will say that that's not true. They will say that it is true that they believe in the biblical idea that the husband is the head of the household but without means in practice is that final decisions the family will do fall to him, but it almost always these things are worked out in dialogue but. That in practice is not a dominating thing, but that's separate from the handmade thing that was now call women leaders. Those are advisers to other women fell a women and then the the head ship. This idea everybody has ahead husbands are the heads of their wives but husband himself has had who will be another member and this is forum mentorship they this isn't somebody who tells you what to do, but he gives you advice or she gives you advice in the case of of an unmarried woman, their mentors or coaches maybe. Well, Democrats did question Amy Coney Barrett about her Catholic faith in two thousand seventeen in another hearing Dianne Feinstein said that she felt that her faith was dogma in her and there was a lot of push back on Democrats after that they've said that. This time around there. Maybe going to go a little easier on her because most people feel that faith is a personal thing. But then you know the caveat to that is except when it may be enacted some sort of policy or in making law or making decisions for other people, which is what the supreme? Court does make these decisions. Yes. She might be asked about things that are part of her Catholic faith. Her views on abortion but is there anything peculiar to people of praise that might lead to a question about her abilities? Right well, all right based on my conversations with them. If she were asked, you know, would your husband tells you how to rule on on a case? That's the looming question because he's your head I think the answer that she would give me some other conversations is that's not the kind of. Advice ahead gifts in other words you're headwind down engineer, how to do his job or her job, right or a schoolteacher anybody else these are people with whom you talk about life decisions and they tried to help you to discern with the with God wants for you. It wouldn't be the kind of person who would be telling the person here she is advising how to do her job. Frank Rocco Vatican correspondent for the wall. Street Journal willing to his reporting it here now, Dot Org. Francis Frank. Thanks so much. Thank you. We wanted to note a giants passing, Jake? Kennedy. WHO WITH HIS WIFE sparky founded one of the biggest volunteer event in the world for homeless kids Boston's Christmas in the city has died from the AL S. took his dad and one brother and threatens another. We spoke with Jake sparky and their sons Zach a researcher furiously looking for a cure for this insidious disease. Jacob this view? I consider. Total blessing. because. I just have to interrupt and say that sparky just looked at DAK ended A. Circle around her ear with her finger, the the universal signal of crazy man. I am sixty five. So. The life I lived a total lesson. That's so jake. Later will post our stories and how you can support his legacy Christmas in the city and the fight against Hale S at here now dot Org I'm Robin Young I'm Tanya Asli is here now.

president President Trump Supreme Court Joe Biden Robin Young Matt America World Health Organization Dr Michael University of Minnesota Dr. Michael Oester MIT Senator Lindsey Graham Jamal Simmons Congress colds influenza
El Salvador Makes Bitcoin Legal Tender - Bad News For Wednesday, June 9th

The Bad Crypto Podcast

49:49 min | 6 d ago

El Salvador Makes Bitcoin Legal Tender - Bad News For Wednesday, June 9th

"Exactly where is the bottom for the bitcoin price. How low can it go. Anonymous is targeting. Elon musk after. His alleged manipulation of bitcoin inventory is surprised at how long theory of two point knows taking. We are as well. The l. fell during presidents has submitted a bill to recognize. Bitcoin is legal tender. And guess what it passed the. Us department of justice has retrieved over two point. one million bitcoin paid as ransom by colonial pipeline and president trump is pissed a lot of people off by saying bitcoin. Seems like a scam asked for us. Well it's always sunny. In the repulsive bad crypto tovia grip goes up gripped. Goes down but crypto is here to stay kind of like us in fact were never going away. We'll podcast from the great beyond if needed and we will haunt you forever after up a less. That is you. Leave us a five star review after this bad news episode number. Five hundred. Twenty two of the banker plant And welcome to the bed grip podcasts. The show for the group book curious crypto series and the show most likely to have a fart joke in it which i think is something in of itself we got that one right out of the way so luckily this episode will have no corn references as all. Because we're not that corny anymore. Did this is our weekly news show. That's travis right on jolt com. Thanks for listening and thanks for making us a one hundred business odd gas because we all about that business. Y'all the business. Decrypt does as we mentioned in a previous episode. We are well on our way to over one hundred million downloads. We are nearing it. It's really far away but we are on our way towards it. We're getting closer. And i'll tell you after last week's episode with dr our from injia. We have more fans in india than ever before so we would much to say. Welcome to new friends in. Yeah we are so glad. You're listening to the shogunate. Thank you so much we appreciate it very much and we are glad you have to to the not so bad podcast. We are not as bad as we used to be. We are getting better because we are growing our audience in india. We've been needing in waiting on you for the bad quipped podcasts. To get even better we just sell that more. But i'll tell you what's not at. Is these guys just came out with another press. Release announcement today actually. Don't have the info on that right front of me. But they're partnering or developing another multiplayer game. It's like every week it's something and they are released nizing. The gaming industry f. one delta time twin samba's create defense heroes others in the works out. Animal brands dot com and sunday. Which is our next episode number. Five twenty three. We had lizards interviewing robin young. The ceo of animal. And we've got some great content coming from him so amazing vision from animal. And we've also got an interview with a man who became a multimillionaire by investing in animals during their very lean period. So he's it's going to really enjoy the show sunday. You might not enjoy today's but you definitely get enjoy sunday's yes oh yeah i don't know if you can tell people that you got to reserve judgment until you do your own listening in then let us now if you enjoyed it because you can subscribe and leave a review and they're not gonna know if they enjoyed it less. They listened so we have news. And this is where we're gonna drop the music that takes us to the news. Drop it producer erin. Time stamping sewed for the ninth of june and the year of two zero to two the one in his water four pm. Edt and the cripple mark caps are looking green today as we are back to one point six seven five trillion dollars overall market bitcoin up thirteen percent in the last twenty four hours. Thirty six thousand six hundred twenty four dollars a theory twenty six seventeen tether a dollar one finance hundred seventy bucks. Donald dollar sixty three doj coin. Thirty five cents extra p. ninety cents the us coin a dollar one also the dollar. The stable are actually worth more than the real dollar right now. Polka-dot twenty two dollars eighty two cents coming in at number ten. This week is the unicef walk. Twenty four dollars in eighty eight sess zone. Things are looking for. I i when i opened up. The green gecko to look at travis. I figured bitcoin with somewhere around thirty one or so. Because that's what. It was last night when i looked so it's up this is the the craziness of the crypto markets. Yeah i mean it is it. I was expecting. I was expecting around thirty three. That's what i checked. It was earlier this morning. But think about this. The global crypto market cap is. What one point six five trillion right now. One point six seven trillion. It's about twelve percent over the last twenty four hours which you know if the stock market increased that much in one day people would be flipping their shit. But that's what happens in the crypto market. Right when you see this all the time. Bitcoin going up fourteen percent in one day. That's like nothing it's basically it's it's gone up over the course of the last week point one percent. Which makes you think about it. Like oh my god cryptos going down going up going down is what it is and if we look over the course of the last seven days who are the big winners overall fate of fuel t fuel up sixty one percent of the guys. Got yourself some fuel. When fuel was super cheap data and fuelled combined there i guess fuels gas amp the amp token up forty eight percent so lada lot of people love solana got a lot of soul up thirty eight percent this past week to forty almost forty three dollars soma which i'm a big fan of cosima as well. Kscm that's up. Twenty seven percent date is up twenty five percent The curve token is up twenty two percent. Are we've up al garon. Bitcoin gold file coin are the pirate. Chain may ten percent so not a horrible week overall. Some of them took a big doubt. But here we are back again and Back above where. We're last week. I remember looking at the last week. It was like remember seeing it. Like one point five maybe one point four trillion or so and pop. Back up so yeah. There's definitely some losers for the last seven days but nothing more than down twenty percent which again in the criminal world is is not much to To write home about so the price. According to this article coin telegraph yesterday was nearing thirty thousand dollars. And there's some people at whale map. I guess that's an analyst firm that says bitcoin could go below twenty thousand dollars that they see nineteen thousand as the support floor that that would be the absolute bottom. Which makes a lotta sense. I personally don't think we're gonna see that and i personally. Don't think this bull run. I'm sticking with been saying ever since we came off at high of about sixty five thousand that it just seems too soon. This feels like a major shakeout. I don't think the whales are moving their crypto. All that much. I think there was the one that guy's name the sold a bunch and jimmy. Jimmy jimmy did it damage jimmy. Yep moved the price too much. But i just. I can't see us if we did go down. I do tend to agree. That nine nine thousand would have to be the bottom. I mean how. How do you mind it point and for it to be cost effective. What that would do is that we get regular people spitting up their computers again because a lot of the big miners would shot back on the amount that they're doing as it's not profitable that vote. Well it's one of those things. It's not profitable in that moment. I as right now but you can still go on mind bitcoin. And it's it's an investment. Why why why not why would you have. You have a bunch of mining rigs wide. Shut him down. Keep it rolling. Keep getting that bitcoin. Why that happened legitimately. They don't normally hoddle their bitcoin. They might normally just peel it off. Buy more mining remember. Last time we saw the bear market we cover multiple stories about buying the mining ribs You know they're turning them off their sullivan. Some were closing down. There was a a huge lip. But this time right now it says here in this article is that a lot of the bulls are are lining up in protecting that. Thirty thousand pricing system data from coin. Telegraph market pro and trading view. That is showing there that there are a lot of people who are putting up. Big walls at At those prices and so thirty two thousand thirty thousand Yeah we don't want see we don't want to see that that dip continue to go down and luckily right. Now we're at thirty six thousand six hundred up fourteen percent right now. It's still going up so let's keep that trend moving in the right place. I have a feeling this is based on zero data other than my feels. I think i think we're gonna pass. Forty thousand here's tunica. Keep popping back up. I think now we've done the little dribble in the testing. I think we're cruising backup. I think we're doing it right now. But that is not dr travel advice. So there's an article from about a week ago bloomberg. The reason it's important is because last time crypto. Bitcoin took the dump was because elon. Musk tweeted something about a broken heart. Quinn was concerned and people are ridiculous like they respond so emotionally with their money to a tweet from a guy who's really pretty much irrelevant in the big picture. I think elon. Musk is brilliant. And people are hating on him for these tweets. I think history is going to be very kind to him for his innovations. I think that people laughed at edison and other inventors time and they were probably eccentric. You know people as well musk's eccentric and is the crypt specialists. No but is he doing some amazing things and and a progressive thinker as far as technology goes and the new horizons for mankind. Yeah he is so you know. Max tries getting up on stage. Bitcoin twenty twenty one really. That's almost that's almost as cringe-worthy as a b. connec was a moment almost not. We're not going to talk about that. I just included an article about that. And i think also what they're calling the high priest of bitcoin max kaiser it did an interview on stage with micro strategies michael sailor. And they're like we're not selling we're not selling f e lan. That's and they went off on ilan. Also i think he did something where he ambushed. Jack dorsey about something as well. So max kaiser putting himself out there in at the miami event. Bitcoin twenty twenty those of you who went to the event We didn't see you there. We're looking all over for away. We weren't there. We were somewhere else and but you know what looked like. It was a great event. I mean i've looked at some highlights and some of the different. Some of the things that went on second fun of a lot of people were there. I i real big event since said the covets along these articles that we see in the crypto world over the course of the week our bitcoin could go to this number down. Bitcoin could go to this number in there. So many articles like that during the week and they're all pretty much a waste of time. That's why we we'll usually cover like one just to kind of say. Hey this were some strategists. Think it's going. But i'm bored by them because half of them are wrong automatically just by default. If you're calling it down and it goes up. Guess what you're wrong you call up and it goes down. Guess what you're wrong. I think the only thing that matters that might manner to traders but for those that are investing in crypto because of the function that it has in the freedom that it can bring to mankind this new form of currency. I don't think they're looking at the little downs. And maybe that's why sailor. It'll kaiser burnout selling guys. Sal you want. You don't sell you don't if you're trader you're playing the ups and downs of make money. Good remember that a taxable event. Every time you you play that up or that down that's a real pin nuts. And i would say this if you really want to figure it out is. Don't rely on experts to tell you what to think. Become an expert yourself dive in and learn the charts. Figure out what it means when you see this particular pattern. What does that mean you see this. What does that mean. There are a lot of really great. Know charters out there on youtube that teach you how to build your own charts on trading view. And that's what you should be doing. Should be trusting your own instincts and and you should be going into you know some of these telegram groups just as entertainment in. What are they saying about. Okay great take it for a grain of salt because there's so many chills out there trying to show you their shit coins that the old school snake oil salesman people they this salesman's almost i think it is. It is snake oil. That's what when we have projects on the show. We attempt our best of right. But you don't always know the intentions of somebody's. Aren't we like to work with projects that have docks themselves and we are always transparent with you. That were being compensated if we're being compensated and we always tell you dope by because they're on the show go do your own research you have nobody to blame but yourself making bad investment decisions so by the same token just because somebody's typing something up at a telegram and they say it's good a moon soon. That's that is your indicator right there that it's probably not if you've got a bunch of you're developing a token has developed an army of people to go out to other telegrams. Say what do you this coin. It's gonna moon soon. Guess what it's orchestrated and they're just trying to take your money. So i am not a financial adviser but i do have a head square shoulders and i can see a scam. You know i could smell it. Smells like after. Travis gets of the bathroom. It's not good while speaking of scams moved article around here speaking of scams The former president of the united states donald trump says he does not like bitcoin s because it is a currency that competes with the dollar and he wants the dollar to be the currency of the world. He called it. A scam wants crypto to be heavily regulated. He wants heavy regulation while he was in office. Four years yet every chance to do that and actually he had some people around him who were pretty crypto savvy. So i'm surprised at this point that he would think that bitcoin is a scam when the paper dollar is the biggest scam. Maybe we've ever seen because you know. They just print as many as they want. They're not audited. There's no limit to how many they can print. The value of them keeps declining over time. Where folks we're about at the end of the dollar's dominance. It's the days of the dollar almost done because they're so freaking. Many been circulation in the us can print a hundred dollar bill for six cents per one hundred dollar bills for six cents all day. Long joe calm and law and then somehow or twenty three trillion dollars in debt. What's the him tell me about. The scam is again trump. Yeah it's a scam. It's a sham. Big flimflam I and many others are not happy with former president for saying i haven't been this. Piston him since he let them get away with stealing that election. I was more piston. But i'm over. I'm good let let this Fake regime work. Its way out yes. We're leaving that show is. That's what happens. You just offended me. Joel ray your your conspiracy theories. So i'm gonna take this. You don't want me to take off this hat and can beat your ass. I know where you live. I will up your place by you. Call me young lady. Be young lady you man but i tell you a little bit. Don't assume my gender so let's go back to on for a moment. Because video came out from anonymous this week you know the the anonymous organization the dudes wearing the guy fawkes mask in the voices change and basically maybe producer. Eric may be. You cannot change my voice your because this is what the video said people were nothing more who is just for so you know. I don't what we are legion. Something else something they. What are they gonna do. What does that even mean like. We're in iraq. Your we're going to hack your pipeline. I just i don't understand what. What is the threat here. I don't get. I remember anonymous threatening stuff during you know. The elections never saw anything happen based on in the hour. I watch those anonymous videos. And i just think it's some sort of like you know it's like i if somebody's creighton is video. There's no way with all the technology out there. The real people is not going to get tracked. And i just don't i just don't mean it doesn't seem to me that there's any elite anonymous organization things like i am anonymous. My parents basement. I don't have a job rich. I think i do our maybe. Our next show could be totally anonymous. People have no idea that it's us. We'll use voice whole. It's like i'm box and i'm mister robot. Defy regulation is coming. The world economic forum has released a policy tool kit to for defy organizations to promote fair efficient enforceable regulations for the emerging digital asset marketplace. So great you know more more powerful people telling us how to how to live our lives so we need more regulation. We need more people telling us what to do and treating us like children because let's face it. Nobody can get through this life without being told what to do that is true. There's there's another arm here. I got an aside here. Sometimes you like to pop it in the side. I have a couple of sides. Based on that aside i i'm gonna i'm gonna pop a couple of them in here for you one elon. Musk as agreeing with italic buren on a dose coin ethereal collaboration so there might be a collaboration in the future of does and ethereal working together. Also what would they call that. A no ch does theory. Probably does theory him. Yeah that works okay. Probably what they would do a also another aside. We were talking about trump and crypto while the current white house tech advisor. Tim wu he likes to keep at least a million dollars in bitcoin so he has at least a million dollars in his own personal stash that he did doing a financial disclosure. I think that's good. And also we talked about solana earth's recently in the middle during the We were doing the chart stuff. So salona is Is aiming to raise four hundred fifty million dollars because they wanna battle eat theorems. Supremacy salon has a really interesting ecosystem folks. We've been talking about solon if you listen to that each week. If you listened to the news show you here. Whoa salon over the top week. Oh it's grown. It's grown it's grown. It was up to sixty bucks now. It's at forty two bucks and so that is interesting and then also polkadot and kusamao stuff together with their chains. So big news some big projects that i think are doing some who are in over the next year who are the dominant sort of crypto projects. That we're gonna see the infrastructure. The highways of the internet. The ecosystem more stuff's going to be built on. I think we're gonna be talking a lot about salona more about polkadot kasama. A lot of those projects right. There are going to keep moving forward because they got great leaders and great technicians behind their coat. So i'll keep an eye on those. Do some research on this stuff. See what you think. What about hats. Or we're gonna be talking about hats you know we should probably have hex on just to you. Know to to heck him off. Y'all off you know. Here's what i find interesting is that no exchanges are will listed i. That's what i don't get like. I thought whatever you think of it. There's tons of schick coins that are listed right. So why would you exclude This one in particular from exchanges when there's so many others out there that could be so much worse. I think you know you can get an unicef swap And i think there's some hearings on it. Btc and maybe a couple others in. Maybe there's more. I don't know i could be wrong but it's funny. Somebody posted a photo of richard heart in this group. I'm in in. He's it's r- a cool picture right. It's got this chart behind him of heck's going up in he's dressed like a king. It's like okay eagle much. Yeah no kidding now. Also so some of the additional articles. That i was talking about in the show notes. I have put them in shown out the normally we have him in nice sort of outline form in. So what i've done. Is i put them in the outline form but i actually will get them a little bit so you can see that. Those were a little tangents that we went on. So little tangents tiny tangents from the different pieces salon abuse news. The other piece news at the other piece of news are in there with the news. All of those are in the show notes. You can shortcut your way there to it on the website. Go to bad code. I n ford slash five to two because this is five twenty. Two back in may colonial pipeline suffered a ransomware attack from criminal hacking group known as ducks thereby crippling the company's operations they halted for almost a week causing general panic in shortages a gas stations than they paid a ransom of seventy five bitcoin which was worth about four point. Four million at the time the fbi gone guess. What the department of justice made an announcement on monday that they've retrieved sixty three point seven bitcoin worth about two point one million under taken by the ransomware and digital extortion task force so the acronym for that would be are created by the justice department in april combat. Were attacks so gay governments. Can i call bullshit on this one jerk call at twelve so i was thinking about this and i was like so. How'd they get this. How did they get the sixty three point seven bitcoins. They don't have the private keys. You you don't have somebody you can't just go and confiscate cryptanalysts or did they. How did they do it. Did they say it was on a coin. Base account was on an exchange because it was on an exchange that maybe they would work. But if somebody just stole seventy five. A bitcoin from colonial pipeline. I it says they did then. They didn't leave it on an exchange. Will it says it was likely had it on a on a on a private wallet. How did they get it. And i'll tell you how because this was most likely an inside job. this is most likely bullshit. Because we've seen there's so many things is put my but my rant hat on. Its right here. You have to read it. It's right it's actually right here or is that the f. b. was able to trace the transfer of about sixty three point seven bitcoin to a particular wall address with the law enforcement agent having the private key for the address. What how would the agent have private key right address. Because it's an incident. That's the private key for that. There's not there's not the type of decoding of encryption to be able to have the bullshit this is. This is what i think. So member during the election i biden. And they were going to say it's going to be a dark winter. Well what happened well. It texas had power outages right. The worst huge storm happened. Power outages and then the pipelines coming through. Oh gases being out. Nobody has any gas. Now is a cyber attack on the food industries. Now there's going to become shortages and food. This to me does not seem like a coincidence. This seems to me to be a coordinated attack on the american people. Somehow some way there's some bullshit going on and there's no way that this fbi agent had this private key for this address for sixty three point seven. Bitcoin and less they were in on the hacking. In some ways. This is complete bullshit to me. I gotta call red flag on this. Because i do not believe one fucking word of this. Isn't it a yellow flirt red flag perp flag green flag. I don't care i am. It does not matter what color you mean. It's it's it's it's pride month you throw a rainbow flag. You can do all the flags but this is bullshit to me. This is bullshit to me. Folks offends you in any way. Think about it. How the hell did they do it. They're they're scared us. Trying to scare other shutdown electric. They're gonna shut down on oil and shutting down food. Things are going to get a little bit crazy for folks if they don't start preparing in some way i would recommend trying to find ways to get some solar power if you don't have it getting a generator somehow if you don't have it getting one of those freezers that you could put some food in the in store it. Because the price of meat right now skyrocketing right. So i don't know if you can go somewhere local and get by a cow and get that cut up cut up butchered putting a free. Freezer probably not a bad idea. There's some crazy some shenanigans going on. It seems to me that if you connect the dots like you could do on the wall like a conspiracy theorists that. I am but unfortunately i have just the amount of series that i've been correct on since the year two thousand. It's too damn high. Because i research and i connect the dots and you got to you. Got to connect the dots these days. There's there's some going on. They're not telling us in boisterous. How oh the fucking agent had the keys. Bullshit and on that note travis is gonna take your drink of water and his. That world's travis did not kill himself. No did not. We are not suicidal. If i disappear. Whoops what happened more shenanigans neither the jeffrey epstein and neither do the president of el salvador his name as naib will kelly and his goal is to make his country the first to raise bitcoin as legal tender. And guess what the bill pass today right before we were getting ready to record the show. We've found the news that it is officially a supermajority past if this morning. Apparently there was a big conversation in twitter spaces as it was happening. It goes into effect immediately that the government would allow ninety days for an infrastructure to be put in place. Joe this is. They have to in el salvador. You have to assume that you have to take. Bitcoin is legal tender. Yeah well listen to this. I mean so. This was a big thing in miami. The president of el salvador naib lukhele announced. He was by the way if you look at his twitter he's got laser is a very nice. That's cool well. So jack maller. She's the founder of strike. That's a digital wall built on the lightning network. He lived in el salvador for three months and he had like seventy percent of the people that don't have a bank account and twenty percent of the whole country's gdp. The amount of money that comes in comes from remittances that are sent by migrants back to family members twenty percents of their gdp and so by by setting this framework for bitcoin to become a functional currency legally within the country that is going to open up a whole lot of doors. That's can eliminate a lot of those remittance fees. Because i think that a lot of the folks that are in different countries that have left. El salvador are going to then get bitcoin. Let's figure out how bitcoin works. Start sending money to their family back with big point. If they've not already been doing it. And i think that this right here. They're saying this they're calling this. The shot heard round the world for bitcoin and tim. Draper called it a brilliant government move and said entrepreneurs and investors will be on the next lights to el salvador. Yup i don't disagree. And there's people that are laughing and mocking of because el salvador has really critical issues right now because there are a lot of people trying to get out across the borders and go somewhere work there can be more prosperity but maybe this will help to reignite their Their economy this builds out in it becomes a crypto centric country where it sounds like it will i bet in the next few years. They'll be way better off than they are now because people will have a little bit of bitcoin. Bitcoin cruise up in value. And i would. I would if i was a betting man. Sometimes i am on the come there on the they're going to be rising and i think this is huge and i think this is partly due. This is partly part of the reason that bitcoin is cruising up right now as thirty six thirty seven thousand dollars because how a country is now accepting this as its official currency wo. Somebody had to be first in says. You're in this tweet that the government is gonna create a bitcoin wallet for merchants. They can use any wall they want. But if they need help and this is a mandate by law you have to accept bitcoin. This is what legal tender means now. I'm not a big fan of this whole laser is thing you know. It's like this this movement. These people posting laser is pictures on their profiles. I've never been a bandwagon china. I thought for a moment about doing now. I don't do that if i was gonna post anything. It would be a picture of me with big googly eyes or something in just to say. I don't go along with everybody else. Scheduled doing your laser is. It's not nothing. Yes so speaking of el salvador. And they're doing stuff and take him crypto in racing. It the new. Cftc boss has he says after googling it the new cfcc commissioner. Dan berkovitz has called for a crackdown on unregulated defied derivatives platforms. This just came out fourteen hours. A day says defy is a bad idea and probably legal. Not only do i think that unwise defy markets for rid of investments are a bad idea. But i also do not see how they are legal under the sea e any and the a is some acronym that i don't know what it is. So say douchebag angles. I don't know what it is. But i just googled. It looks bad okay. Are we moving on. Its move is as crazy to me. Okay it is crazy. A bitcoin nest dot com. Has this article that we find interesting. A new australian report shows that fraudsters take bank transfer over crypto currency. Not crypto crypto exists. Just so people can do scams and stuff. It's bad because bad people use it but of course the truth is that bank. Transfers of course are more. Use this out of australia. Ninety seven million australian dollars stolen through such tranferred transfers with a forty percent increase over the previous year. Bitcoin was the second highest payment method about twenty six and a half million in losses according to the c c c c c. I could foresee that. And i know that that banks are being really really cautious on these transfers. Now because so to buy a place in puerto rico. I actually had to go back to my bank and get cashier's checks to kind of help do all the deal and the owners of the basically how it works is is the they have a loan on it. Then you gotta right one cashier's check to the originating bank. Pay off whatever they owed on it. Then you gotta write a check to the new owners for there's any profits difference of what they bought versus what they sold it for. Then you gotta pay the attorney assert fee got pay the deed geyser fee and so there's a total seven checks right to get this think and they wouldn't wire the total amount of money and they were freaking out about cashier's checks. It was like folks. This is my money. I what i need to do with my money. And i need to have access to it because i'm only here in america for a couple more days i gotta handle this shit now and i gotta go back there at handle this and so that. That was the biggest challenge. I think of buying a home in puerto. Rico's getting all that all the ducks in rhode. You ain't seen nothing yet junior way to you. Get here and you try to get your driver's license on. Oh that's going to be great fighting. You gotta have a medical report. You gotta get your driver's record from the state that you're in you have to have your real social security card your passport. You'd have to have an fbi check. Which means you gotta go get fingerprinted. This get a driver's license. You have to have a permanent address here so you've already overcome. That is your house. But that's just the beginning of answer or droughts. Yeah all. I meant to find my original Console security card. Yup if you can't get one by the way i found that you can go to the social security administration. They will replace it for you. Sweet they will they will send you another one. Okay ever had to use your social security card anywhere ever since ever since the first driver's license i guess i guess it makes sense saying you gotta get your driver's need social security for praise massport. How about that. Not enough enough. Not enough you gotta have your so another quick story from around the world you could read more about in the show notes. Denmark's tax minister wants to change the country's existing tax code to respond to challenges posed by bitcoin other cryptocurrencies. I'm sure he's not alone all over the world. They're trying to figure out how to update their tax codes to deal with cryptocurrency. And it's gonna take them a long time right there. Just barely figuring out a bitcoin in theory with all of these all coins. All of this defiant. Nafta all these other inertia coins up there. I don't know how all of these dexia's and these wallets. How in the world. It's it's difficult enough for those of us who are in to try to keep track of everything house. The irs or other government agencies gonna figure this stuff out. You can take time going to take time you know what else has taken time forgetting. Ethereal two point. Oh is taking a ridiculous amount of time so much time that. Even the talich buren the crown. Prince of crypto is surprised at how long this is taking and I guess there's a lot of problems with the is talking about this and hong kong and he was. It was interesting because he's not the one building. There's a bunch of team members are out there building because it's a decentralized thing any thought that it should happen should have happened a while ago but now it's take three months is turned into eighteen months. And it's gonna take even longer. They're thinking that might take one year to do proof of going to actually take six years to do and so it is pretty complex. I bet he's looking back going. Damn why did i not bill prove stake in the first place and according to the roadmap mate that it's probably not even going to be done before late. Twenty twenty two might not be until early. Two thousand twenty three now until proof of stake happens so we will see a speaking of steak. I would like mine medium rare but yeah but seriously though the proof of stake network they said when it's all done is going to use around ninety nine point nine five percent less energy. That is huge. That's why it needs to be done then. Nfc's might work a little better. And i would say probably the miners. It theory is not going to like that because the gas fees will be negligent at that point. I wonder what it does. The prices are going to be wild to see what happens when you go from proof to prove stake should be while. I am a little disappointed that it's taking this long but not surprising. You know retallack says it's mostly people problems apparently also around the world solar travis's. There is a hard drive shortage. In southeast asia in demand for hdd's in sd's to farm proof of space crypto has spread to europe in now chia farmers are snapping up hard drives in your she. That's the proof of space Crypto that's that's spreading and people are people are getting really excited about chia and i believe it's cheating network. I think is the website i don't remember. I don't not seeing it as usual. People don't actually link to the actual pro side. They just. oh oh. Here's another link to another article. V wrote about chia but she is what is causing those drives to to explode and So there's a lot of people in europe that are now buying some. I've bought a nice couple of ten terabyte drives. I think she could be huge because what you do. Is you create this huge plot of this free space on an external hard drive. And then you're gonna be able to begin to mind chia through that additional space and they're gonna use that space for whatever they're gonna use it for but it allows you to earn crypto from that and it has not launched yet but they think that this the hard drive boom is gonna just keep going and when she had finally launches they are. It's gonna it's gonna pop up this nice video here on this. It says what is chia. What is the chia network. And they're saying it's a new crypto. The claims to be more environmentally friendly than bit point or bitcoin uses the proof of consensus which requires minors to run powerful computers to solve mathematical problems. Chia uses the new proof of space time system that relies on unused storage space so staking out a hundred gigabyte plots on your hard drive five hundred gigabyte plots terabyte plots that is Which will be filled with hashes. When a new block has added a blockchain. it's ashes compared with the hassle of the farmers drives and blah blah blah. and i. it's it's an interesting mechanism so so check it out Chia s x is at the token that is correct. Also giving you dollars right now. Environmentally friendly stuff solar power would be a great way to mine. Bitcoin guess what it's coming to the us. With an investment of five million dollars from jack dorsey square block stream is providing the infrastructure for this. They've teamed up to create an open source solar powered mining facility at one bloodstreams mining sites in the us. The knowledge gained from building a bitcoin mind powered by renewable energy. That's what they're all about here. They raise awareness in show how bitcoin mining in conjunction with renewable energy can help drive the clean energy transition. Hey who turned out the sun right. That doesn't happen is sun doesn't go up solar solar power there so why not arnesen it well. There are people who wanted to bill. This sort of cloud thing around earth to protect us from the sun rays and in stop global warming. Yeah we want. We don't want global kolding okay. We don't we don't want ice age. That's what happens whenever like a big asteroid meteorite hits earth or a big like volcano or super bowl. Like what could happen. Yellowstone happens all that debris goes up into the sky if lies around in the atmosphere and the jet stream and no sunlight gets through an ice age happens and crazy shit. People die dinosaurs. Die all that stuff so yeah we don't want it. We we want to keep. The sunlight keeps us out. Until there's no more scientist has been blocked out by a super bowl. Now babu there. We got but why not harness our of solar energy until that and frankly. I like the sun. I'm getting a savage tan. Here reporter rico over hand twos crazy my feet ahead. Those flip-flop tan. You know my commute. Here's the d. goldman sachs is betting on defy infrastructure firm blocked damon and. I don't know what they have. Against matt damon. But they're trying to block him now now. Block damon d. e. m. o. n. And you know goldman sachs is continue to invest in crypto companies. and how. 'bout we got because what happens. A lot of times in the government is a so incestuous with some of these top companies. And you'll see ceos of this company moving into regulation positions and over here in the government blah blah blah. How we get somebody from goldman sachs that likes to go be are cftc director. Not this douchebag doesn't like crypto. What doing those non crypto deuce bags of will that is almost get a. Wrap up the news for this week's earlier travis. Right there's an article hero. Publish x dot com. We one point out that you could find the show notes about electronic being everywhere. Lecturer neom is a partner a friend of the show and we are operating as advisors for them any task dot com in. This article talks about how they are shaping the future of online marketplaces through blockchain in crypto. They're doing a lot of really interesting things and Etf continues to get adoption. So we recommend that you do check that out. if you've been following the markets recently you probably heard all about game stop all the crazy shady things hedge funds are doing to stop retail investors from winning while what if there was a platform that late you take control of all kinds of investment opportunities. Not just talking about criminal trading also tell you about commodities stocks even foreign currencies prime xp pt can be your one stop shop for all your trading needs check them out a bad co dot in forward slash. Prime xp t. And get this fifty percent bonus on your first deposit. All you gotta do is use the promo code. Bad crypto podcast. Easy to spell. I shouldn't have to spell for you. Bad crypto podcast. It's all one word bad code dot. In ford slash prime x. b. t. in sirloin travis. We have some interesting reviews that have come in via listener feedback. Five star from maximus from the black hole. Wrote these guys are not gals. That is all five starters. He's he's assuming general identify and maybe have changed. Another one from spent youth said so bad. It's good joel common travis. Right the bert kreischer in thomas. Agoura of crypto podcasts. So i am. I just totally out of touch. We're not no even bring compliment so if you have hot Saw the The comedy routine of bert kreischer and his russian machine. How many bit. That's probably one of the best stories. I ever seen him telling the story about how he goes to. Russia doesn't know any. Russia spoke for years russian in college. Learned nothing and then all he knows how to say that he's the machine gets caught up in these russian mafia guys and madness ensues. It's really great. What's really great is apparently us to star review by toseh- mart. Too much non crypto. Talk too much political opinion. Not enough crypto analysis. I like the news aspect of the show but the social and political commentary makes it unbearable. Listen to that's too many words. Just call it. Unlistenable ryan not unbearable. Listen to your wasting words. You're sucking up. Needless oxygen just makes. Is jason vigil virchow. Vigil virgin crypto high but with the unnecessary political commentary for some crypto tidbits. But then you quickly learn there. Just hyping crypto with the vast majority of other crypto podcast with the added occasional political commentary recent episode mentioned conspiracy q. Thought that the had a hand on releasing cova from a wuhan lab one of the guys mission that he wasn't afraid of cove because it's strong immune system and because the virus would eventually go away. These guys should stick to crypto except or hyping crypto. Apparently so we should stick to nothing. Jason buddy what do you do stick to that instead of writing. Ravines listen to podcasts at are going to educate you listening to us or open your mind that perhaps your point of view need it back to your filter bubble yes. So here's the answer to those requests for us to change how we approach is show no hard pass working at its. It's what's going on there. I hear snow jason. It's me your filter bubble bad. You're like minded friends. Want to talk to you about things. You already agree with country singer. Jason stay where you are. Be a lemming or go. Listen to tom mcdonnell. Right that guy will bust open any any filter bubble that you have. You will off the crap on that thing. Thanks why you also snow. If you guys don't know by now that this is who we are and this is what we do. Then you're never going to figure it out. We are for the discriminating. Podcasts in crypto listener with a sense of humor we don't claim to be financial advisers. We are not experts. Were just going down the rabbit hole burdening our conversations that we would have everyday regardless of whether or not rosa show to you in. You're invited to come. Listen and guess what. Sometimes that means you're going to hear some other thoughts that we have. That might not be crypto centric. That's who we are in. Anybody who raiders to what the crowd says to to frame their content in a way to placate others is not being authentic in general. It real these reviews. We've got to to star reviews which was nice. They weren't just a one-star they were kind of. But i've changed my ways now. Never going to have political thoughts on my own ever again and soon as podcast is over. I'm going to get four vaccine shots because well in if you do that. Your assured stay mediocre turkey. But that's all we wanted to do. Cook the bad crypto. Podcast is a production of bad crypto. Llc the content of the show the videos and the website is provided for educational informational and entertainment purposes. Only it's not intended be does not constitute financial investment or trading advice of any kind. You shouldn't make any decisions as to finances. Investing trading or anything else based on this information without undertaking independent due diligence in consultation with professional financial advisor. Please understand that. The trading of bitcoins and alternative crypto currencies have potential risks. Involved anyone wishing to invest in any of the currencies tokens mentioned on this podcast. Should i seek their own independent professional financial advisor. We are waiting novels do again. I do declare us. I'd click you wait. It's a rousing time. Maybe our here waiting for joe news articles once again. Let's just remind everyone how long it takes to digest on digest tomorrow and now back to the news.

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Tipping In The U.S. Is Broken; Remembering Rep. John Conyers Jr.

Here & Now

43:21 min | 1 year ago

Tipping In The U.S. Is Broken; Remembering Rep. John Conyers Jr.

"Zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started at indeed dot com slash. NPR podcast this message comes from here and now's sponsor indeed if you're hiring with indeed you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions then this kincaid fire has been spreading fast and furious how much of it is contained so at this point only five percent of the fires contain. That's actually firefighters in Los Angeles have ordered evacuations after a fire ignited near the Getty Center Museum and in the northern part of the state in the span of twenty four hours kincaid fire in Sonoma's county has doubled in size the fire has now been burning for five days thousands of people there have been evacuated and more than nine hundred forty thousand customers have had their power shut off an attempt to prevent more fires from the Central Valley all the way to one of the northernmost cities Eureka and touch the region they're asking people to leave and in part it's because this fire as we know can spread very quickly in a very short period of time but the we out to the Pacific coast this fire is also threatening the city of Santa Rosa and many of the same areas that we know were impacted by a deadly wildfire also thinking about resources as this fire continues to spread do you know anything about the amount of firefighters who's coming from where and they're also all these other fires are happening throughout the state right so luckily you know cal fire has a pretty robust partner program they work with a lot of different firefighter agencies a two years ago I can only imagine how traumatic this must be to live through this all over again what are people telling you yeah so I think that I'm all over the region coming to help out and There are thousands of firefighters on the ground working to contain the kincaid fire there also all of these evacuations how are the shut offs from Pgn e the state's largest utility company impacting these evacuations. So we think about the so I saw firefighters coming from all over the state from other states firefighters from Nevada are here from as far south as San Diego as just for wind event that's been happening here we've had gusts of seventy eighty ninety miles an hour up where the fire is that has just exacerbated things astronomically entity lowering of of how much has been contained so I think the reason the containment has lowered is because the fire has expanded pretty extremely overnight because of the are also taking into account how difficult it might be to contact people because of the power shut offs so that's part of the decision making why we see mandatory evacuation orders going all the on down over the last couple of days and it's burned sixty six thousand more than sixty six thousand acres wow and what's the reason for the process we're joined now by K. Q. E. D. reporter Michelle Wiley she's been on the ground throughout the weekend welcome Michelle thanks for having me thanks for being here all weekend we've been hearing the experiencing this evacuation and the possible loss all over again so that's definitely playing in people's minds but the other aspect of it is because the two thousand seventeen fire happened creations the PG and he shut off really play into the thinking of the folks who are making those decisions a lot of the evacuations have been preemptive so that's before the fire has even local officials have learned from that and I think that's why we see a lot of these preemptive evacuations why we see a pretty smooth evacuations overall folks knew this was the you try traumatic as the right word to put into play here so a lot of the people there maybe they their house burned down during the two thousand seventeen fire they just rebuilt another posssibility they got prepared for it a lot of people were ready to go when they're cities were ordered to evacuate and so for the most part while there is that trauma playing it then there has been for the most part very smooth evacuation I can only imagine though that it's chaotic wondering where these people are going shelters in place but also these major centers where they can find hotels and family members very chaotic thank you so much for this update that's Michelle Wiley from NATO Supreme Allied Commander with responsibility over Afghanistan he's now at the Carlisle group Admiral Stavridis we don't celebrate death that's what Isis does but eighty news thank you so much Michelle thank you what president trump says he's considering releasing portions of the video from this past weekend's nightime US military rate in northern Syria in which Boubacar Baghdadi the leader of Isis killed himself as US troop dog chased him. Admiral James to Rita's is former certainly does not as surely as winter is coming the Islamic state will come back the Islamic state is much more than any single transit Leeann temporal leader Baghdadi it's an ideology it's profoundly believed ideology by many of its adherents and the last of this lethal venal organization and any semblance of celebration is certainly premature well what do you make then the highly highly insulting he was chased to death by the US dogs when he set off his suicide vest he also killed his own three children but to it is also a network robin it is disaggregated it's global it's deeply embedded on the Internet and in the world of cyber we have not heard of president trump's language yesterday he called Baghdadi who calls himself a Muslim many Muslims would say that he's hijacked their faith but I'm he called him a dogwood trump's language is that militarily something that is a good thing that may be followers of Baghdadi need to hear that kind of language or I know that you join other analysts saying it is a better thing for the world that Baghdadi is gone but you believe as others do that this doesn't mean the end of Isis I wish it did but it's the military is that the kind of thing that's going to rile up members of the Islamic State even more I think there's little doubt that the Islamic state they will use the president's comments in highly inflammatory and I would argue very effective proselytizing and recruiting efforts so those are both troublesome aspects of the aftermath of the killing a Baghdadi I do wanNA pause for at least one second Robin and simply say we also ought to point out robin that we were able to recover a great deal of an Solari material computer files that will help us the quality of our intelligence organizations particularly our CIA operatives who go into the field with our military and lastly we ought to celebrate the fact that the line of tough calls it something we expect from the occupant of the Oval Office I think president trump clearly made a correct decision here and by the way president trump credit for okaying the rate I do it's a it's always a difficult decision I watched both President Bush and President Obama make those Kurds who must be feeling bruised and weakened by the US withdrawal supported us and provided some of the key intelligence here you also it's I think it's also the level of operational detail that the president provided I thought was beyond anything I've seen another president do there is something to celebrate here and that's the professionalism of the armed forces of the United States both are special operations our conventional forces that back them up for instance that president trump is considering releasing the video footage of that military raid on the Isis leader we know President Obama at one point release can you to face the Islamic state do you know any more though about how the raid was impacted by the fact that president trump did announce a sudden pull-out of US troops from Syria the Kurds who as you just said and everyone has said gave intelligence that helped this raid they have felt abandoned by the US our closest and most reliable allies in northern Syria and it cedes the battlespace if you will to Vladimir Putin the series take this message comes from NPR sponsor mind body find book and pay all in one place owners can join the network at mind body online dot COM SLASH NPR mind body it rings true to me and I think that it's a further indication of the policy failure in simply stepping back from the Kurds and we're reading in The New York Times that this raid was well planned before the president made that pullout announcement and that the Pentagon had a scramble to carry out the raid Kurds and with the Turks that's going to be challenging and then secondly interagency cooperation making sure the CIA the NSA the Department of the video but I'm hearing a reaction from you you thought never good All it does is provide a study guide to our potential the body connects millions to the widest variety of local fitness classes and the offer the same experience when it comes to massage and acupuncture spas and salons going with the Islamic state going forward that's Admiral James Stavridis former NATO supreme allied commander with responsibility over Afghanistan and author of the book sailing I we have to continue to keep the pressure on the Islamic state the best way to do that is through international coalitions we need to convince Iraq to special temperature controlled freezer in the African American bio bank in the clinic's Lerner Institute to be used for Future Research Studies clinical trials are important for doctors who are trying to find and test new treatments for diseases but researchers often struggle to get people of color to Partic- in your access to the largest consumer wellness network and marketplace that the raid was accelerated but the reporting based on my own a decade of experience as a three and four star officer planning and conducting rates like this debate in clinical studies black Americans in particular have distrust that's rooted in past abuses like the Tuskegee experiment a forty year government study that'd be continue to use a rocky facilities so we can base operations out of there we're going to have to I think come to a better accommodation with both the opponents going forward in my view no upside to doing that I I think the the salient question here Robyn and you ask a moment ago is what next house of the pull out I think there there is extreme logic to that line of thought I do not have firsthand knowledge that in Charlotte Saad were criminal and dictator and it also gives a much wider playing field to Iran well what happens now because we're hearing his blood specimens forever because of his relationship with urologist Dr Charles Modlin Dr Modeling came up with the idea to develop the African American let's continue the high level of cooperation we'd seen and third and finally we need to address the challenge that Isis presents in the cyber thank you beautifully but his specimen won't go to a typical medical lab for analysis instead it will be frozen and placed in US Asian you'll understand all chairman says he's aware of some of the frightening stories of past research abuses like the Tuskegee syphilis experience Chew North Ten admirals on his way to character most every is thank you all the best bye bye Oh bank a few years after he started a minority men's health fair the event provides free clinical services once a year it attracts hundreds of African American men ethical to use the white man as the gold standard that white male body was treated almost like the prototypical human and whatever information which is derived from studies nations after he built trust with participants who came back year after year he started asking some to agree to be part of the bio bank he believes this is the only old in the Internet they are going to continue to use that tool very effectively I think that that is an area that needs more emphasis that would be my prescription for again in the nineteen thirties in which hundreds of black men with syphilis were told they were receiving free healthcare but in fact we're never treated with Penicillin Merlene Harris Taylor practices locally and on the national level she says the lack of diversity in participants is a big problem for many years scientists felt it was safer and more I from stroke he says several Cleveland Clinic researchers have used the bio banks specimens including one study that's trying to discover the gene associated with heart disease studied the progress of untreated syphilis or we know for good that easy you know it probably won't ever go away Cameron says he's okay with the clinic keeping now I'm Arlene Harris Taylor in Cleveland Ohio and now to some news out of Detroit the longest serving African American lawmaker in congressional history has died Persson ethicists have been emphasizing that inclusion of all populations is important Rivera says researchers need to do more to attract diverse participants such as during his office visit the nurseries can sit for him to Camden about how his specimen will be used you'll understand there's no benefit to you there's no confidence only by a bank in the US dedicated to specifically obtaining African American samples we WANNA make those samples available to any investigator essentially worldwide reports on a Cleveland physician who was breaking down barriers between one black community and researchers Cleveland resident. Tom Kaman is getting his blood drawn at Cleveland Clinic wants to dedicate a portion of the research to eliminating healthcare disparities to investigating the pathogenesis of lobbies diseases that we see that are more he's in heart attacks in African American men Case Western Reserve University professor of bioethics Suzanne Rivera is very involved in overseeing research meant the Centers for Disease Control calls it an unethical forty year study were some black men were lied to and never given penicillin so researchers former representative John Conyers junior passed away on Sunday at the age of ninety to talk more about his life and legacy we're joined by Todd Spangler Washington correspondent for the of the way congressman conyers unfortunately left office in two thousand seventeen under the cloud of sexual harassment allegations. Yeah let's talk a little bit more about that Detroit free press taught thanks for joining us thanks for having me so you're in Washington right now what's been the reaction to conyers passing well it hasn't been anything on especially afflicting African American males for example African American men have a sixty percent greater incidence of developing prostate cancer and are twice as likely to die having flexible hours so people can plan around the workday and having more meetings off-campus in places like churches Dr Madeleine's patient Tom Cannon the parks worked in his office at one time he's responsible for what we now know is MLK junior day but as you said he was later in life dogged by these sexual miscount based on that population were assumed to be broadly applicable to everyone more recently the national institutes our health and H and university researcher leaving their blood for use in research studies because of the history he says he didn't want to be seen as one of the researchers who only reaches out to the black community when they want something on yours was known as a trailblazer on Capitol Hill he co founded the Congressional Black Caucus he was a driving force pushing for reparations for descendants of slaves Rosen merge floating around with congressman conyers about whether or not he was involved with were not but ultimately this came down very quickly at the end right at the height of like the reaction was for Congressman Cummings who died last week hasn't been anywhere near that sort of level outpouring of emotion largely because members of the Michigan delegation you're not seeing the same level of response from Speaker Pelosi and some other folks that you you might otherwise expect and I think that's because and holds onto that district for forever he was a Labor lawyer before that his dad also John Conyers was pretty well known labor lawyer in Detroit and seen or had been sexually harassed by the congressman over certain years now he denied that he throughout said that did not happen office before Congressman Conyers became a congressman had worked for John Dingle who was the longest serving member in a matter of a month and it was stunning and in fact he actually said that he was retiring and not resigning even though there were calls for him to resign at the time of the metoo actions having across the country and it came out that he had made a secret settlement with somebody who had as a champion of their rights and I think to a certain degree some people will feel like he got railroaded out of office I mean Black Detroit is really coming into its own he's the first congressman from that area that sort of represents that and congress at age thirty five yeah right worked in his office who had left the office and who had apparently she said had a relationship with him and then some other people came forward and said that they had says he lived in the neighborhood around Cleveland Clinic for sixty six years but was never asked to participate in a research study not until he attended the minute Oh Congressman Cummings was in office at the time that he died and even though there has been a lot of outpouring of grief from people who knew conyers well he got a top the House Judiciary Committee the first black congressman to have that role and suddenly sort of his career just crashed I mean it ended really office and deserved some sort of money for leaving the office nets what he claimed it was so there was this cloud all of a sudden and he went from being the is something that just since chills down your back I mean he was he was absolutely bold very strong congressman for the place at the time standing on top of a car in nineteen sixty seven trying to calm the crowds down with bullhorn in the middle of the Detroit riots in addition to his role in Washington he really played the significant role in shaping Detroit tell us a little bit more about his life before entering public on it fair to people of Color and always be remembered for that despite the way that he went out I think that for people in Washington who went through it's really difficult to say I mean I I think that for people in Detroit for black detroiters particularly he'll always be remembered from NPR and WBZ. I'm Robin Young I'm Tanya Moseley it's here and now and California is in a state of emergency with fires raging throughout the state wanted him out I think in Detroit he'll always be remembered as somebody who first and foremost thought about civil rights who just believed that America was it is complex but given his expansive career in this later sexual misconduct controversy how do you think his legacy will be remembered boy it's there were people at the time in Detroit who felt like he was not getting the treatment that somebody else might have gotten the way people turned on him pretty quickly decided doc allegations tell us a little bit more about that well and the dog this is the way it happened was very sort of sudden there'd always been sort of room congress in its history and conyers worked as a legislative assistant to Mr Dingle before a new district was created this is at the time when when thirty mins health fair is just now being you know that we feel comfortable about coming here and we know we can get here and get in and get the same treatment for it's never anything like that in terms of the money that he paid to this this one staffer he said that was sort of severance he said that she had done a lot of great work it has that's what sort of the world he grew up in came through and he was alleged politically and socially the pictures of of young John Conyers I am an individual's have developed a presence in the community and that's been intentional and so we spend a lot of time in churches and other organisms and what's to have high blood pressure not that I know that's why I'm here to get checked out and says he was reluctant at first to approach them in about by his wife two sons and brother in a statement conyers family says quote Congressman Conyers was a devoted father and husband and his world revolves around securing just through that period it'll be more of a mixed bag because of the way he laughed but it is district he'll always be conyers is survived the other two smaller parties the Liberal Democrats and the Scottish National Party have proposed having an election on December the ninth instead of the twelve so they may London what does it feel like now it feels like a country that is in limbo right now not that much if you look at it has for free when you sign up at indeed dot com slash NPR podcast terms conditions and quality standards apply and this is another big Newsweek including a number of major developments today on Brexit the European Union is giving the saying we wouldn't do very well so they have actually today instructed their members the Labor leaders Jeremy Corbyn has instructed members to abstain from the vote when it comes to hiring you don't have time to waste you need help getting to your shortlist a qualified candidates fast with indeed post a job in minutes set up screener questions then zero in unqualified candidates and when you need to hire fast accelerate your results with sponsored jobs new users can try changed since we were here last year except that there is a lot more frustration with the government frustration that there are no easy answers to this no matter what today Boris Johnson would need two thirds of the parliament to say yes to an election December twelfth so he is likely to lose this vote today but the for Northern Ireland because of some kind of trigger that can't happen right that looks like that is off the table at this point even though you'll remember that Prime Minister Boris Johnson had said that he'd rather be you can another three months extension beyond Thursday's deadline to come up with a way to leave the EU meanwhile the British parliament is voting today on whether to say yes to Prime Minister exit through Parliament fast enough they granted that extension today or the Robin they're calling it a flex tension because they say if Britain can get parliament to agree on an efficient put that on the table this week and the reason they want to do it on the ninth by the way is because students would still be in school on the ninth as opposed to the twelve and they think that will clean withdraw bill sooner than the end of January then the extension could be cut short well meanwhile you mentioned parliament they're voting today on whether to hold and team he'll be hosting this show from the BBC. Later this week Jeremy well-positioned high well you know Robin whether it is Brexit or Downton Abbey you can always count on the Brits for some good drama in a ditch then extended the deadline beyond this Thursday now he was required by law to ask the European Union four extension when he couldn't get his deal for a cleaner action in December how how does that fit into all of this right so basically Boris Johnson is the leader of the ruling Conservative Party now he could wait to hold an election but they're looking at the polls and they're saying well if we held one now we do very well the Conservatives would do very well the Labor Party meanwhile is looking at the polls happens robin half the country is GonNa feel that it's unfair to them now sky news here in the UK one of the news channels has had a that's true so start with the extension to be clear this this thing there's no chance of Britain crashing out of the EU this week with say no solution to problems like a border on the campaign trail there's been lots of talk about ways to help the thirty nine million Americans living in poverty Democratic candidates Cory Booker and Bernie Sanders have both recently rolled out poverty policy plans specifically ways to help the children of those families most impacted not moral channel that shows everything other than Brexit so if you just have had enough of hearing about Brexit you can watch this other channel but we are going to have a lot of really interesting countdown clock everyday on their screen showed how much time was left until brexit they took it off today but they also just to give you a sense of the frustration have an entire the economy is not working for average Americans Cory Booker speaking there and before Him Bernie Sanders we wanted to take a closer look at what Child Poverty Boris Johnson's proposal of general election on December twelfth so let's bring in our brexit correspondent in London charing me off season is there with a here now hi Nisha thank you Tonya thanks for having me so when you were with the US partnership on mobility from poverty you and your team took on this really big question what would stories This Week Robin people young and old left and right we've got Peter o'dowd of here and now he's going to be reporting Berlin to give us a sense of how people in mainland Europe example born in the Mississippi Delta into poverty versus a child as you mentioned born in Silicon Valley right in the San Jose area and so even in places attributed in those communities yes so it's really not surprising that you also found that gender race and immigration status also matters in what ways you take dramatically increase mobility from poverty and so you guys went to thirty communities places like New York City the Mississippi Delta Silicon Valley Detroit impact on future outcomes for children who were born into poverty so the bottom twenty percent of income based on where they were born but when they got to be almost as much as well as the bottom ninety percent I live in a low income black and brown community I see every single day I'm fifty cents an hour or less and what we found I when we looked at gender was that when we look at white men only about twenty percents and you found that where a child grows up really impacts mobility tell us more sure yeah absolutely I think one of our US partnership members put it back issues so what if we crossed you know gender with Ray so I just mentioned white men so we have far more for example don't white men are working in low wage jobs and that number is much greater for women and then we said well what if we then you know it's important to look at the intersection there's not acceptable and it is not sustainable that top one tenth of one percent now owns adults what were their chances of moving out and up to the top and if you can imagine a map of the United States you see vast differences for a child looks like in America right now and why there hasn't been much change and the number of kids living below the poverty line since nineteen sixty-nine according to Pew Research Nisha we looked very specifically and you could look at it in a number of ways we look specifically at wages and sometimes there are these you know inaccurate notions that if people are living in poverty it's because I when he said today when it comes to poverty the United States zip code matters more than genetic code so where we are born and where we grow up can have a AH AH this message comes from NPR's sponsor indeed where you see significant job growth that doesn't necessarily automatically mean that they are great opportunities for everyone or that a opportunity is equally in Stopped US and she said in Spanish what does this word you keep using what is Silicon Valley Oh wow and they would get more votes if they did that with all of this what does it feel like. They're you reported before a primarily on Brexit from the largest tech companies on the planet yet never the Twain shall meet there's this new report that discovered many families lose their Medicaid all black women so why twenty percent of white men are working in low wage jobs double that number forty percent of black women are working low wage jobs and then forty six today and so we were having conversation breaking bread having lunch with some parents primarily women in the Mayfair eight men were there any surprises when you went into those communities maybe things you didn't expect to learn yeah it was one of the most powerful things that we did and we're having this conversation in simultaneous Spanish English interpretation so that everyone could participate in their language and their own voice and one of the women tell is managing director of narrative change in national initiatives for Robin Hood a New York City based nonprofit focused on fighting poverty and she joins us now from New York for feeling about all this and of course I will be speaking with my ninety three year old grandmother year how Jerry Hobson at the BBC in London thank you look forward to open I felt so strongly about it because I you know I've had the good fortune to sit in a lot of Privileged positions in government in philanthropy and one of the things I have realized and antic woman who women who are non-citizens on that includes women who were legal permanent resident sixty percent are working in low wage jobs right so that's triple the percentage of what percent of Latino or Hispanic women and then we said okay it's really important to look at immigration status as well more than sixty percent of Hispan- in East San Jose this is the neighborhood where Dolores Huerta says Hershovitz began there organizing we kept talking about over lunch this idea of being in being in Silicon Valley Ride really spent my career trying to combat is this idea that you know people who are closest to the challenge people living in poverty themselves are rarely at those tables when decisions are made Russian President Lyndon B Johnson famously declared war on poverty back in the sixties and during that time that declaration really unleashed this maybe just even with the best data and research don't come through so for example you mentioned we went to Silicon Valley and we went there because it is one of the communities historically for how sort of illustrative that is of both the cultural and economic divide that exists right these are families living within thirty minutes of the off care because of these confusing rules and procedures that they have to go through to see care I know that you all focused very much looking at the since time one of the reasons we need government intervention is when there are market failures right and so when we have people working very hard and not making the kind of even honestly those are all basic needs I don't think any of them can give I'm just thinking about how systemic this is how over time we've seen this generation

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Tom Steyer Talks South Carolina; COVID-19 Traps Chinese Comedy Star In U.S.

Here & Now

42:12 min | 1 year ago

Tom Steyer Talks South Carolina; COVID-19 Traps Chinese Comedy Star In U.S.

"From NPR and WBZ. I'm Robin Young Tanya. Moseley it's here now. President trump has said that a widespread outbreak of covert nineteen is not inevitable. Even as his top health officials have warned. Us businesses schools. Really all of us to prepare for more infections. All of this comes as the total infection count worldwide tops eighty two thousand with more than twenty eight hundred deaths globally and in northern California. A person who had not traveled to China or come in contact with the known case has fallen ill. It's the first time. Health officials have not immediately been able to explain the source of the infection. Joining us for more on all of this is NPR science correspondent Richard Harris. Hey Richard Hard. So yesterday the CDC told people pointblank to start preparing for the virus to spread than President. Trump started talking essentially walked back. Those statements and said the risk to Americans from the virus is very low. What's the government's message? Well I would put shortly as saying that you know hope for the best and be prepared for the worse and I think the public health people are saying we need to be prepared. Because it's quite likely that we will see more spreading of this disease in the United States. better to expect that in prepare for it and have it not happen than than not to be ready if and when it does show up. I think the president obviously Wants to downplay. The you know the the trauma this going on the markets are jittery and and he's trying to basically Calms come some pure so so both messages have their purposes. And I and but and there's some more at cross purposes and perhaps they are yeah yeah And whether they're adding clarity to the American public is the big question and President. Trump also announced that he's putting. Vice President Mike Pence in charge of the White House to respond to the virus That's in place of appointing Corona virus. Czar what's the reaction been to? That decision hasn't been a lot that I've heard around Washington today thus far I think. The main concern is if If Vice President Pence takes over will that politicize the response I think it's very important to recognize that public. Health officials have credible messages. Because they're based on science and I think if the public starts hearing that these messages are based on politics rather than science. They won't believe the advice. So that's You know that would be. That would be a disaster. Really if if in fact people stop believing the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or whatever I will say that the vice president did appoint a well regarded scientists named Debbie Blix to be his essentially point person on this. So that's an encouraging. Sign that that science is still a high up in the mix here so you know we will always watch this real carefully. Yeah and the president has also said he expects to allocate two point five billion dollars to fight the virus. But I WANNA ask you at the time we have about the new case in California that the CDC is investigating they say this could be the first community spread of the new corona virus. What does that mean? And what do we know about this patient? Well community spread is is not a good thing because it means that they don't know exactly it came from this person did not traveled to China. They don't know if this person came in contact with somebody who had recently traveled from China. So if they don't know what's going on it's the question is has been circulating quietly in the community and we don't know they're investigating this very carefully to make sure that they can get to the bottom it if they possibly can. This is a around in Solano County California which is Around the environment of Travis Air Force Base where a fair number of evacuees had been brought. So I'm sure one of the questions are going to be asking is is in any way related to the quarantine center they had set up at Travis. Air Force Base. Yeah yeah you know this diagnosis seems to have come later than it could have Because of a delay in testing and the CDC says it's resolved it. But what can you tell us what's happening there with the time we have right when this person showed up at UC Davis Hospital in Sacramento the doctors that I said to the CDC. We're worried about this person having covered nineteen could we test them and they said No. It doesn't the testing criteria and they had to ask again and finally the CDC said yes and And that's when they were diagnosed that's because the tests have been short supply the CDC has had fairly high barrier for who they will allow to test that apparently has been resolved at least on a technical standpoint so we should expect to see a lot more testing starting up In the coming weeks that's NPR. Science correspondent Richard Harris. Thank you thank you well. It stay with Cova nineteen and turned to Steven Morrison Director of the Global Health Policy Center at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington who co authored a report in November before this outbreak. That said the American people are far from safe from a health crisis and the US is woefully. Ill prepared to respond to global health. Security threats. Steve What did you see then and still now that needs to happen while the basic proposition is that in our preparedness against these types of outbreaks. We're stuck in a cycle of complacency followed by neglect. And that's true. For the investments that are made here domestically as well as the investments made overseas and key partner countries that are mostly acutely vulnerable African countries and others that where you have a high propensity for dangerous outbreaks. And because we're in that cycle we tend not to invest in a sustained basis at an adequate level and we see that today in terms of the proposed budgets to cut. Cdc BY SIXTEEN PERCENT HHS by ten percent So it becomes this race. It becomes the scramble versus a more premeditated and sustained effort over the years. And if we have sustained human to human outbreaks in the United States and I believe we will see that We're not going to have immediately available vaccines or antivirals or a cure for some time into the future. What we're going to need to have is basic items like protective gear good infection controls in hospitals and clinics. But most importantly we're going to need to be communicating to the public. What form of social distancing is going to be essential in this period in order to minimize transmission and that means suspending congregational kinds of activities. People are going to be staying home from work. They're going to be staying home from school. They're going to be staying home from sporting events they're going to be electing not to take that trip. Perhaps by air by air that they had planned as a as a family vacation or a business trip And they're going to need to do some very simple things like hand washing and and the changing the way that we greet and meet one another and so you're saying they need to plan for those what you seem to agree isn't inevitability and just one last question. What do you say to people who say? Oh we've been here before and SARS was kept out Ebola horrible impact in Africa but minimized here sky's falling. I think what we need to say to. People is be very honest on what we know what we don't know what we know is that this is a dangerous new virus that we have not seen before. It is highly transmissible. It is highly contagious. The data that we've seen so far in the major study released by the Chinese on the first forty five thousand cases shows that for eighty percent of the people infected. There was either no illness or very mild illness. But for twenty percent you had extreme illness that put people into the ICU. And you had two point. Three percent death within that population so for one in five people that we know of today this virus burrows it's way deep into the respiratory system deep into the lungs and it induces fairly rapidly induces a very dangerous form of viral pneumonia That puts people into extreme circumstances that require very high levels of sophisticated care in order to survive very expensive and demanding care and then two point three percent. Don't make it and pass away. And if we imagine that this is spreading very rapidly through populations our testing capacities have been very limited in knowing the actual true presence of the virus in populations. Our general understanding is that this way out in front of us. We do not see it and even if it turns out that as we discover more about this illness if it turns out that the the case fatality rate is one percent versus two point three percent. That's good but it's still a very dramatic. A threat seasonal flu in the United States kills thirty five thousand people year. And it's point one percent fatality rate and it infects only about nineteen or twenty million people if we get a spread that touches forty percent of the population fifty percent of the population with a one percent fatality rate in a twenty percent extreme illness or even ten percent extreme illness that will create havoc and overwhelm our health system. And so we need to be very attuned to all of this and be preparing for that possibility and hope that we're wrong. Hope that in fact. It is far milder and less dangerous than than it may seem today but by all indicators. We need to be taking this very very seriously. And that's the argument. That's being made by our leading epidemiologists and I take quite seriously stephen. Morrison Director of the Global Health Policy Center at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Steve Thank you. Thank you so much. Well that may have made you sit up straight. I remember we are taking your questions about cove. Nineteen at here now. Dot or just a little place to click on there at the top of the site and we will try to answer them all on. Monday and there are plenty out there here now. Donald each of us is the star in the movie of our life. But how much of a role do we play in other people's movies and it was a really sort of palpable fear that they were going to reject me or worse? The unseen pressures placed on other people this week on hidden brain from NPR. This week I sat down with Congressman. Jim Clyburn he's regarded as the most powerful Democrat in South Carolina. He's currently serving his fourteenth term and serves as House majority whip during our conversation. Clyburn told me. He does not take sharing his endorsement lightly. He knows his power here and that many voters in South Carolina look to him when choosing a candidate. He explained why he feels vice. President Joe Biden. Is the best candidate to win the presidency. I think there are a lot of good smart people who are good politicians but temperamentally the ought not be president and with comes to temperament. Biden has with a text. Let me ask you something. So you know Iowa took us all by surprise what happened there right now. Biden is not really doing that. Well I mean he's come in second in Nevada. We're headed into South Carolina. It's almost like he said prior that it feels like coming home when he comes to South Carolina and he's really depending on South Carolina's to to help him stay in this race. Are you concerned at all that the rest of America might not be feeling how you feel? Sure I'm concerned about that Remind the rest of America that when Bill Clinton got to South Carolina run for the presidency back in Nineteen ninety-two he at loss. Eight or nine ten contests before so. I'm not discouraged by that. I would hope that Joe Biden was a better debater Joe Biden headed turbo stammering problem. When he was a child star. Yeah and I said too much. I think your other come clean with the American people that people know. Then you're looking in the camera. You're looking for thoughts you looking for the best way to express the thought but your come clean. He didn't. The second thing is that he was held bit on not attacking. Democrats and people want to see him fight. He's well I'll fight trump and that there was a problem for him. But when I look at what we're going to be up against in November. I just believe that Joe Biden's the best. Well as I said as I mentioned he calls this coming home and is really depending on South Carolina to pull him through. But I was reading about a group of women the reckoning crew here and South Carolina through voice crew. The cleaned it up a little bit. Well what's interesting is that they would go knocking door to door several months ago. Asking folks at first they were behind Kamala Harris and asking folks who will be voting for and everyone was saying Biden and now that Cameras Out Cory Booker's longer running. They've been knocking on some of those same doors and now folks are saying. I'm not so sure. What are you saying to South Carolina's who really this state feels consequential. Because of what happened in the other states in the caucuses will I can understand that I went to a funeral. Friday moment in my accountant passed away and four or five people in that church before the got started. When it's no for me. What are you GONNA do? Who are you going to support? We need to hear from you. That's when I made my decision to public one thing I want to ask you about is Bernie Sanders He. He's leading but you have concerns about a democratic socialist Why well it's not just a democratic socialist. I like birthday but I know South Carolina and I think I know this country Peter will I also fake history or to be instructive? Explain what you mean. Well housing around in nineteen seventy to nineteen seventy two. That was the year South Dakota. Us Senator George McGovern through grassroots campaign won the presidential nomination but Kleiber notes that McGovern only won one st losing out to Richard Nixon. And that's what I see happening here today history or the be instructive and may be wrong about this. But if he were to get the nomination Senator Sanders yes. I hope I'm wrong. I just don't think I am. I want to ask you a little bit about some of the other candidates You have explicitly ruled out people to judge WHO's campaign. Your grandson is working for as a possible candidate. You could endorser stand behind. I I just want to know more about why because I know the state and I know what I think is best for this country. I guess yeah if I guess to rent represented clyburn it but I want to ask you a little bit more about this. Do you think there's a generational divide here There's always a generous in Nevada. That's true there is a big thing about this those generational divide between me and my dad but when it comes to this moment where we're trying to decide as Americans who were going to put forth As a nominee in ultimately president of the United Is that generational. Divide enough to divide the democratic alignment there. Do you know what I'm saying without me. Nineteen seventy two. It was there that I'm always afraid of that shoe that was sitting in. My Dad did not agree with everything that we were doing. There was something wrong with your son going to jail. My mother was fine. Burma not my data so there are exceptions to every rule representative Clyburn. Thank you so much for taking time with us. Here in Columbia. We wanted to take a closer look at that younger generation of the Democratic Party. That Congressman Clyburn. And I were talking about one of those voices. It's crystal Spain. She's Cory Booker's former state campaign director and the current campaign coordinator for the South Carolina Democratic Party. We met at the Tiller Center in Colombia. It's a place where residents can go for help with water and heating bills about fifteen percent of people here live below the poverty line. There are lots of everyday issues that People are dealing with here. That are really a matter of life and death. Most Times they get overshadowed by these big picture policy ideas crystal Spain and I began our conversation talking about the growing role. Black women are playing in this presidential campaign at one time at least five served as state directors for Democratic presidential candidates. You know black women you know. We're we're always there. Were always working. We remain on the political front lines period. And were there because we need to. We have to protect our community. And we're we're we're now refusing to cede for people who are not going to stand up for us and it just means that we're now not only running campaigns but we're also running for office Here in South Carolina last year we elected to new black women. Mayors you've got Ladonna Hall and Sally South Carolina and you've got Tracy Clemens over in Norway in these are women elected in small towns in very rural communities and also last cycle. We flipped a house. The State House seat that was A Republican white man that went to a black woman. So you know. The political landscape is changing and Black. Women are definitely a part of deciding factor in that change. So it's exciting to see you travel pretty far and wide for the booker campaign knocking on doors. Talking with voters. What were the issues? They talked about that. That really stood out to you. The main issue here in South Carolina voters I believe was healthcare. State that has not expanded Medicaid. There's still hundreds of thousand people who are not covered you know. They don't have access to affordable healthcare treatment Can go on and on. I mean they're still like they're fourteen counties here in South Carolina that don't have obgyn's and so that means that mothers have to travel outside of the county sometimes driving forty five minutes for prenatal care appointment so they just many things Within healthcare system you know that hurts South Carolinians. You're so steeped in politics. It's your passion. What our conversations. You're not hearing that. You wish you were hearing about this presidential election. People aren't excited and then I use the word excited because we've seen excitement. You know in two thousand seven with Barack Obama And we saw kind of a a non excitement in twenty sixteen So it makes me nervous when people don't get excited in especially if the Democratic primary for the Democratic Party our base really has to be inspired and excited to really go out in droves to get the right people elected. So that's the one thing that I'm I'm not seeing a lot of excitement about the election. Does that translate into hope? Do you feel that people are feeling hopeful? I think the presidential was kind of overwhelming for folks after that word a lot I was just walking through I will sit here and focus and by the debate. They steal don't know who because it's just overwhelming because going on for so long I won't say the people aren't hopefully they're just ready to get a nominee so much of the conversations we've been having are about the Horse Race but you mentioned the center that we're in right. Outside of these doors are hundreds of people who are trying to get help for their electric and water bills Do you think that we don't take that into consideration when we're talking about the issues in the concerns of everyday people you know? I don't want to say that we don't. I think that it gets overshadowed a lot. And that's when people really disengage and become a little apathetic about the process. Because you gotta you gotTa have access to the Internet here in South Carolina. A third of the state doesn't have broadband connectivity. Kids compete with the rest of the country when you can't even with the rest of the world when we can't even connect to the rest of the world so there are lots of everyday issues that People are dealing with here. That are really a matter of life and death most times crystal Spain current campaign coordinator for the South Carolina Democratic Party Crystal. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you so much for having me. I really appreciate it as cove in nineteen continues to spread around. The world is of course raise concerns about the global economy. Something we've discussed as a potential impact. But when we're beginning to see so to get a sense of the scale we wanNA BRING LLC MSNBC Anchor and economics correspondent correspondent. Hi Allie so we've been watching the markets dropped for days around the world and in the US where a near what ten percent loss for me is. Now that's just a tiny tick from you know with a long arc going up but it's a tick the go straight down. So how much of this is investor? Fear you know investors sending a message. We'RE NOT GONNA WE'RE GONNA withhold our money to make you see this. How much is real evidence of economic loss caused by the coronavirus companies shutting down? I don't I don't know how to describe a percentage to it. But it's it's you're right in identifying that it's two different things right. There are some companies that can provide evidence of earnings that will be lost because the airlines aren't flying to China or casinos. Things like that. There's a whole lot of other companies that have no direct exposure at the moment but investors are saying. I don't know where this is going to go. I don't know what how long it's going to take. So I'M GONNA take my money out and putting the bond market that tends to be very sophisticated investors and then there's a third category of companies where once we hear about community transmission. There's one case in California. That might be the first case where they can't figure out where got it. Once you get into that then people start getting scared about going. To malls I just mentioned casinos casinos doctor. Taking a hit Ballparks public transit things like that so this is all built around uncertainty but right now most of the loss in the stock market is not actually about prophets. That company will lose. Its GOT MORE TO DO WITH FEAR. Well and there's two pronged things here. Thousand workers have been told to stay home in London because of one infected co worker. So they don't Wanna get their workers infected but on the other hand. Lufthansa is sending people home without pay to buffer against future losses. You know we were also reading about a company here. In New England just moved their production to China last fall and between the trade war and now the virus which shuttered some factories. They're they're wondering if they should have so. Give us more tangible examples of how this hits business well. A lot of companies are now thinking about business continuity right. So there's there's an issue about whether your customers will come. There's an issue about whether you fly people to China or you don't if you've got factories in China or supply chain but there's a whole completely different issue for places like yours and mine where we work. Where if this thing breaks out companies want to do the least The most to try and prevent outbreaks in the workplace right. Most of us are in the workplace every day so there are all sorts of business continuity plans in place for things like terrorist attacks. And things that'll take you out of business for a few days but this one gets really complicated so people are starting to figure out is they're going to be more teleconferencing more working from home. What are the places that get? Hit the ride sharing industry. The shared economy might start to get hit whereas things that you do from home like zoom and meetings like that start to benefit so everybody I think every CEO and every manager in the country sitting around thinking. Who Can. I have stay home. How can I avoid the spread of this thing? And how do I mitigate against workers getting sick and consumers not considering my product real quick jet blue is now the first airline to lift changing cancellation fees because of the virus. Who Pays for this? You know when companies start to do things like that is their insurance so generally speaking. There's not insurance. For pandemics epidemics there is business continuity insurance from the business side. But I think lots and lots of everybody's going to allow people to cancel Take the loss moment. They'll she. Msnbc angry an economics correspondent. Thank you thank you over. What is this past weekend? A couple hundred people mostly Chinese students and professors gathered in an auditorium at northeastern university in Boston for a fundraiser. For Wuhan China Ground Zero for the cove in one thousand nine outbreak. The event was organized by we star. A nonprofit just formed by Chinese in the area who've been sending tons of medical supplies to this city under quarantine when they began playing videos from China's internet showing families separated streets emptied. Several people began quietly weeping in their seats including this professor skis. Mclintock's desk you. These films are incredibly powerful. I feel the same way. It touched my heart a thirty five years ago. I came to the United States from China but still it must be so hard. Yes but I'm used fired. By lots of people for wrestle risking their lives to help others a few rows back student. Monica Shaw. This must be hard to see. It is you're saying like I'm already like you know I've been crying. Was Wuhan in your home province or no choice. Not by Chinese hunt is part of China so we were like all Chinese people just looked up and there was a health worker with a mask on and he just took his glasses off and started weeping. Yeah because they cannot go back home because they're like potential virus carrier so they can just talk to their families over the phones and then after that just wiping their eyes. Then Jesse Appel a young white Jewish man. From Newton Massachusetts took the stage seven years ago he went to China on a fulbright. Scholarship studied Chinese and standup comedy and became a Chinese comment. Why excellent nobody believes your shoes? It's the best part about what I do. I get to make people half. That's like the greatest job ever and now with the epidemic people are Homesick Some of them haven't seen their families on a long time. They hope their families are healthy. They they're also maybe worried. Even if my family member got sick maybe they wouldn't WanNa make me worry. And they wouldn't even tell me how many here know Jesse's work. He appears on popular TV shows. In China. Shanghai Jiao Bushehr his videos. This is low way style of takeoff on Gangnam style have gone viral Dot Kushner Lau West Jesse performed in China with his teacher. Ding Dong Chen. Here he played an American proud of his Beijing opera skills. That's Beijing opera. Richie also brought to the steelers tonight. There's a joke in there. It's complicated but the point is part of Jesse show is a tutorial on Chinese cross. Talk comedy which includes singing telling them about their own culture. Crosstalk what is that? Yes the Chinese word Shung. It's kind of like Abbott and Costello or Laurel and hardy two men two person shows. There's a joker the straight man to go back and forth back and forth. It's all taught master student so I- apprenticed with a Chinese master teacher for six years in China disciple. Yeah I mean to be able to study so closer with somebody heated comedy for fifty years. He passed away in two thousand eighteen but really his entire life. He was doing comedy and for people you know in the Cultural Revolution. He was sent to Do Comedy for coal miners out in rural Shaanxi Province for ten years and he just had to make it work. It's it's on a whole `nother level of making people laugh than anything I'll ever have to do in my life and have somebody who went through all that experience and is now teaching me how to do comedy like that was that was really an incredible experience. Now you're doing stand up comedy in China. Do you ever worry. We use as some people in the audience. Kind of look you know at each other like should we laugh? My goal is to bring people together. I don't like that I sometimes have to think twice about what I say on stage but I can't. I don't have the luxury of not doing that. I want to go on stage. These people laugh. What is it about China? When I first went there it was that the language and the culture was fascinating and as an American doing comedy there. I have opportunities that are available because the comedy is growing so quickly when I got there in twenty twelve. There were twenty people in the whole country. Do Stand up and now there are hundreds of millions of people that love this thing. I get to be a part of that. Even though the road is definitely not straight Jesse had come home to visit but now he can't go back to China because of the virus and he's been following the millions of people confined to their homes. Their people just in home healthy thing hold because they go outside might mean somebody me somebody here. And that's how the virus spreads so a big round off all of these people for Hon. It was very important in doing these. These shows for American audience that I that I explained that will hunt for me is not a place of an epidemic. Wuhan is a place right performed. Ride friends where there's subway construction and they eat crawfish and doing a show about the pandemic which is not a funny topic was a challenge for me as a comedian and honestly I didn't even know until the first time I did those jokes. Whether the whole thing would blow up it was as you said a fine line that you have to figure out how to walk but I think if you do manage to walk it I think it meant more obviously means a lot especially the videos. Jesse showed of people under quarantine coping by training air quotes for the Olympics. Oppose the videos at here now dot org. They are hilarious. A young man plays Ping Pong by himself both sides of the table. A woman plays pool on her kitchen floor with eggs. Kind of there was a bit of a laughing through tears. In Curl with a teapot she was what curling teapot on. The ground My Internet over the last three weeks in on the Chinese side of the Internet has really just been a deluge of virus. News News Virus Virus News and it fluctuates wildly. Between Oh everything is horrible. And we don't know when this is going and also here's a funny video of of a guy who created like a swim room and living room. Because he was so. She's on the table in his living room. And they've got books up in front of his head which is sticking out over the table and they put a pan of water underneath head and he's got a swim cap on and everything he's not getting very far but he's definitely try. Although there's something about that you brought more humanity to this tonight. Then I've seen in weeks of coverage sure we don't usually see portrayals as China is very funny but the people there are very funny when I thought of the idea of making the main thrust of the corona virus routine about all these funny videos I saw online. I figured people will see. They're making funny videos at home. We make funny videos at home. Regular people are just making funny videos at home except they're doing it in a very different and challenging situation. This is your home out. Sounds like China's your home now and yet you're stranded here worried about them back. I'm an inverse refugee. I'm worried about my friends back in China. Not only because of the illness but psychologically. I'm worried that people are going to be scared to go outside and meet friends and who knows how many months it will be before people are really just comfortable being in a busy room together and not touching like you know people right now. Are you saw the thing? We have people touching elevator buttons with condoms on their finger. 'cause terrified to touch anything. I'm worried that life is going to take a long time to go back to the way it was Where people just go out and they meet their friends for dinner or will anyone come to a comedy club? Yeah but I made a video blog about the charity. Show that we did last week. I put that up. It got five million hits overnight and I have people who are sending me private messages once every ten minutes saying we're taking sears shows. I think we'll have this new demand for comedy with people wanting to get out and see stuff and in the meantime I can make videos on the Internet and coming back to tonight. How did it feel at the end of this evening again? I saw people weeping and just the joy at the end. I must've felt good. It feels really good refinish with this video the Olympics and all these people training at home and you know weight lifting with boxes of beer and like you know curling with pots on the floor and I was I felt like I was being a little help. That Chandler stays strong lawn. We spoke with American Chinese comic. Jesse Appel a fundraiser. Four Wuhan the city in quarantine in China his videos hilarious and ways to help our at here now dot org and broadcasting today from South Carolina in Columbia. A city where you can hardly drive through without seeing Tom. Steiner FOR PRESIDENT BILLBOARD SIGN. His campaign office is also right in the heart of downtown. Columbia. A sign of the billionaires huge investment in the State. He spent twenty million dollars so far on television and radio ads and it seems to be paying off today. A poll shows that here in South Carolina are still ranks third trailing only behind sanders and Biden nationally. However it's a different story several polls show. He's only gained about two percentage points. Tom Steiner joins us now on the road in a car between campaign events ahead of Saturday's primary and Super Tuesday. Welcome to hear now. Tanya thank you so much for having me so you jumped into this race for president last July and your strategy among other things has been to zero in on South Carolina. Tell US why South Carolina is a state Which reflects the diversity of the Democratic Party? It has a heavy proportion of African American voters. It's got a lot of Latino voters. The Democratic Party is a big tent with a lot of racial and ethnic diversity and South Carolina's a state that reflects that and I think South Carolina gets to make a statement about what the big tent that is the Democratic Party and the very wonderfully diverse. American people get to say so. I've always wanted to make sure that I came here and spoke to you. Know every part of the Democrat coalition. I understand that but I want to ask you a little bit more about that strategy. Your strong presence here could really be seen as too late. You're pulling at two percent nationwide even though you're doing much better here. In South Carolina. A critics are concerned. The support won't play out elsewhere. What's your response to that? Well I think that what I'm trying do is to show that I can pull together. The coalition that is the Democratic Party. Did in fact. We don't have to go with one of the extremes. We don't have to go with the democratic socialist who wants to take over big parts of the economy. We don't have to go with the former Republican mayor of New York City that we can go with a progressive Democrat who speaks to the issues that count with Democratic voters. And so I'm trying to show in South Carolina that I am that person. It also seems like you're trying to position yourself kind of as a middle of the ground choice between the moderate candidates and Bernie Sanders. You've also been big on addressing climate. Change Racial Justice as you mentioned. Do you think that message is coming across to voters? But let me say this. I don't think of myself as a middle of the road person. I'm a straight up progressive. I really am. I think if you look at climate I have the most the most aggressive programming climate. I declare a state of emergency on day. One known also saying that I'm in terms of race. I'm the person who talks explicitly about race. Who is for reparations for slavery? Who believes that unless you deal with the subtext of race in virtually every policy area in the United States? Then you're not really dealing with that policy area honestly. I I think the reason that people think that I fall in the middle is I have a business background. I started a business of my own. I built it up and I walked away from it and people think that as a result of that. And they're right. I understand how the economy works. I understand that job creation and prosperity. They're absolutely right. But in terms of environmental justice economic justice or or racial justice. I'm a straight up progressive. We know that you have a long history with going your own way. You spent millions of dollars pushing for president trump to be impeached. Despite at the Time House Speaker Nancy Pelosi objecting to that. But many Democrats are looking ahead to the general election and they're eager for underperforming candidates like yourself to move out of the way and possibly unite behind some of the top contenders. Is this something that you're willing to do. While they're couple things I'd say first of all. I'm trying to show that I am a top contender. Tanya I'm trying to show that in fact I can pull together this coalition in a way that other people can't that's what I'm doing here in South Carolina talking to people directly. This is a turn out election. You don't have to worry about whether the Republicans will turn out because they always turn out. The question is will Democrats turn out and I believe impeachment and our grassroots effort is a big reason the Democratic turnout between two thousand fourteen in two thousand eighteen minutes from thirty five billion to fifty nine million. That's why we the house. How would you define a successful campaign beyond winning the nomination? I know that is the number one goal but also in thinking about all of the issues and the topics that you talked about around racial justice around climate change what is successful campaign for you. Talk to be fair. I am trying to win this campaign. I am trying to be the nominee but I'm fighting specifically on issues that I've worked on for decades. I'm running for president because I deeply care about economic justice. Americans have been absolutely taken advantage of by corporations government racial justice. I've been absolutely care. That's something my family's cared about for generations and climate justice. You know. We don't have a choice. I was worried that the kind of things I CARE. The most about wouldn't be addressed and out here pushing to address deep injustice in our country. And make sure that we're safe. That's presidential candidate. Tom Steyer in car headed to a campaign event in South Carolina ahead of Saturday's primary election. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you very much for. Have Great Pleasure here. Now is a production of NPR and WBZ our association with the BBC World Service. I'm Tanya Moseley Broadcasting from South Carolina public radio. I'm Robin Young. This is here now. I'm Tanya Moseley in South Carolina where unlike in years past voters we talked to are less sure about the candidate. They're standing behind this primary. I still think after his name wrong and he just being one because like Obama. But I I don't know I'm this. I'm still undecided next time on here now.

South Carolina China United States President Democratic Party Cory Booker Joe Biden Centers for Disease Control an NPR California Wuhan Congressman Clyburn Washington Robin Young Tanya Tanya Moseley CDC Senator Sanders Barack Obama NPR Msnbc
Sept. 30, 2019: Ibtihaj Muhammad's Children's Book; How America Lost Religion

Here & Now

43:06 min | 1 year ago

Sept. 30, 2019: Ibtihaj Muhammad's Children's Book; How America Lost Religion

"From NPR and WBZ. I'm Tanya Moseley. I'm Robin Young. It's here now and they're on recess but some house. Democrats aren't taking a break they scheduled closed-door depositions with several several key figures in their impeachment inquiry into what they say is president trump's abuse of power in that July phone call with Ukrainian president on twitter over the weekend president then trump demanded to meet the whistle blower who flagged that phone call and promoted warnings about civil war if he's impeached and this morning and an interview with Fox and friends host Ainsley Earhardt Eric Trump was asked how his father's doing father's doing great he understands the deep sea for what they are my father's been fighting the deep state for the last three years in Washington in DC he. He understands it worth it. Does he ever want to say this. It's not worth it. I'm giving up you know he's the greatest fighter in the world and he will fight these people till the bitter end and again. It's it's GonNa Backfire but I want you. TAMRA KEITH IS NPR White House correspondent. She joins US and Tam so you have Eric Trump on fox talking about the deep state a White House policy adviser. Stephen Miller used the same conspiracy theory language on Fox News and he met pushback from Anchor Chris Wallace who pointed out the inspector general found on the allegations from the whistleblower to be credible so how critical a weakest this this is a week of what will be many weeks of this this process but it's beginning and that's that's really what's happening is. You've said that they're going to be these depositions. There's a deadline for secretary of State Mike Pompeo to turn over documents payments related to the Ukraine call and also related to the president's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani freelancing in Ukraine trying to get investigations nations that he thought would benefit president trump so it is a very big week but it is it. It is not the end. This is the beginning well you mentioned the freelancing singer. Rudy Giuliani yesterday former trump homeland security advisor Tom bossert when on ABC this week he was asked why president trump both before during and after the phone call with the Ukrainian President keeps bringing up the debunked conspiracy theory that Ukraine was behind the hacking of the two thousand sixteen election not Russia and when bossard focused his criticism Giuliani I am deeply frustrated with what he in the legal team is doing and repeating that debunked theory to the president it sticks in his mind when he hears it over and over again and for clarity here George let me just again repeat that it has no validity at Tam we know President President Trump is furious at the conclusion of US intelligence that Russia was behind the hacking of the election wanted him to win but why else else are Hyun. Giuliani focused on Ukraine in some ways. I think they see Ukraine as an out like somehow if they can prove that Ukraine gene was responsible that that forces in Ukraine were meddling in the two thousand sixteen election that those forces were helping Hillary Clinton that you you know remember Paul Manafort who was fired from the trump campaign or forced to resign because of a so called dark ledger showing he had done work in Ukraine and had been paid long story but President Trump still is talking about that there's just this mix where there's a lot going on with conspiracy theories about Ukraine that president trump wants once revealed that he thinks will will somehow set him free and then also there's just the matter matter of Vice President Joe Biden and his son and even though there has been no evidence of wrongdoing there the president and his allies keep trying to bring focus back to that you know in part because Biden is seen as a top political rival the president trump a top potential opponent for forum in two thousand twenty. Even though it's a that is a debunked theory Biden was actually pushing for investigations into corruption in Ukraine not trying to stop stop them but just want to ask you about something we're hearing today. Republicans including President trump attacking the whistle blower and the laws the whistleblower complaint says he heard about trump's phone call through concern. White House officials trump and others are saying today that the whistle blower laws were recently changed to allow for hearsay information that is is not true not true okay we could just leave that move on Illinois Republican push back on the president's re tweet of supporters warning morning and this was a warning about a civil war happening. If impeachment took place in cans and garage veteran wrote I visited countries ravaged by civil war. I've never imagined such a quote to be repeated by President. This is beyond repugnant kind of insinuating what will happen if he's impeached but most. Republicans are still a very strongly defending the president correct that's right and they're and they're sticking to talking points that the White House distributed last week it turns out they also distributed them. Democrats accidentally but the talking points go after the whistle blower and and and certainly that is where the the public messaging is right now. It's worth pointing out that although the whistleblower did not here most of this stuff firsthand it was second hand information formation that the whistleblower combined compiled dust far the whistle blowers complaint is checking out it checks out against the transcript checks out against other are things that we know have happened so thus far going after the whistleblower is is not exactly working because the facts the fact both president trump and Rudy Giuliani have said what they said. Were the president said in that phone call real quick Wednesday. We'll see the former. US Ambassador Marie Ivanovich who the White House fired back in May Thursday the formulas on void crane crew Kirk Volcker who resigned last week. These are closed door hearings this week yep that's right the this is now being led by the House Intelligence Committee and that committee does a lot of things behind closed doors and much which of this investigation in these early stages will be happening in that way. They're also working on securing the testimony of the whistle blower him or herself. Temeke White House correspondent funding for NPR Tampa thank you you're welcome. There's now call for more so-called red flag laws following a series of massacres across the country entry red flag laws allow police or family members to request that a person's guns be confiscated if they believe that person poses a threat to themselves or others California California Governor Gavin newsom is expected to sign a bill soon that would expand the state's current law known as the gun violence restraining order as Katie or from member station station K. Q. E. D. Explains Right now. The current law is being underused on June nineteenth rookie Sacramento Police officer Tara O'Sullivan Eleven was responding to a domestic disturbance call. She and her colleagues were helping. A woman removes some belongings from home. When all of a sudden the shooting began again as heard on this police body camera video officer O'sullivan just twenty six was shot and died several hours later the man accused of her murder. Adele Ramos had had run INS with the legal system before four most recently in the fall of twenty eighteen when he was charged with misdemeanor battery against a minor but skipped a related court hearing and was subject to arrest when he shot and killed Sullivan Veronica pair is a research data analyst at the Violence Prevention Research Program at UC Davis in a recent recent study she and several colleagues found red flag laws like California's can play a role in preventing mass shootings she says Rama's would have been a good candidate for a gun violence restraining order or GV are Oh we have reason to believe he would batter his intimate partner again and we know that he's out on bail and access to firearms that sort of a perfect spot for GPS to come into play as sort of a stop gap between the arrest in the trial but the public records inquiry reveals no order was ever requested either by the Sacramento Police Department or Rama says immediate family and pair says so far that's the norm in California in the first three years twenty sixteen seventeen and eighteen we found that there were total of just over four hundred individual respondents. GV Arrows and comparison some other states like Florida and Maryland have had that many in the first first few months of implementation and expansion of California's law would allow educators employers and Co workers to request a GV Ro as well as police police which could lead to more being issued San Francisco Assemblyman Phil Ting authored the expansion bill and said it makes sense with school and workplace replace shootings on the rise. This is a tool for ordinary people to protect themselves so that they can send their children to school and feel safe. They can go to work in feel safe that they can live their lives out if you'll save but ting says this is not a panacea that's because there's a lack of education around the estates. Red Flag Law many in the law enforcement arenas simply don't know how to use it San Diego City attorney. Mara Elliott recalls the first time her office requested requested a gun violence restraining order the first time we ever filed when we actually had to send one of our attorneys down to the business office at the courthouse to help the business staff process our request for a gun violence restraining order. That's how new it was. Elliott has since made a concerted effort to use California's red flag law more in San Diego. The city accounts for a large portion of the orders issued in the state and in the last year Elliott has launched a training effort for law enforcement agencies agencies that started in San Diego and is now expanding to other parts of California. She's seen as a champion of the law. Elliott says well there are other measures that law enforcement can use to confiscate guns gun violence restraining orders offer something unique it is a tool we can use before something thing horrible happens and with the others we have to wait for some triggering incident and supporters say the more law enforcement knows about the law of the better since most request are currently made through police for here now. I'm Katie you're in Sacramento this message comes from NPR sponsor. Mind Body Mind Mind Body connects millions to the widest variety of local fitness classes and the offer the same experience when it comes to massage and acupuncture spas and salons find book and pay all in one place owners can join the network at mind body online dot com slash NPR mind body your access to the largest consumer wellness network and marketplace professor McConnell. Are you ready for me another challenge. I'll read I'll read everyone. It's fear is Berg in this episode. We talk with actor. Matthew mcconaughey listen to. NPR's asked me another the answer to life's Funnier your questions the new children's book the proudest blue looks at a universal childhood experience the first day of school but for Sisters Faiza and Assia the first day is even more special because older sister. Assia will be wearing his job to school for the first time the head covering which for for many Muslim women is a way to honor Islam but as the to navigate the day the two encounter questions as well as teasing. It's an experience that co author to Haj Hajj. Mohammad knows all too well. She made headlines in two thousand sixteen when she became the first Muslim American woman to represent the United States in the Olympics wearing a job. Bob And the first two medal winning bronze in the women's team sabre event again. The book is the proudest blew a story of job and family and Empty Hodge. You are the epitome of confidence for so many women. What was it like for you as a child to where he job to school so hey jab at at least to my family and my experience my sister's experience with it was that it was very normal and commonplace and so for US growing up as Muslims in the states I grew up about thirty minutes outside of New York City in Maplewood Township. That didn't have very many Muslim families when I was really a young we were the only Muslim family so to be a lot of children's first interaction with Muslims and to have to explain what hit hit job is while you're wearing it. I think it can be a quite a heavy load to carry. You know if you're four fifth grader at that age you want if it is yeah. There's a story that you have in the book about a boy calling it a table cloth and that is something that you actually experienced Yup. I remember his name to the stay and this is why I wanted to author. You know this children's book. I know what bullying feels like. I know that those words have piercing newer and how hurtful they were but also I think it was a great opportunity to use this moment in my life and hopefully help not just any any you know I had job as experienced said wearing pajamas school for the first time but also to teach children how to celebrate one another despite our differences one thing that really struck me about the book is the very gentle way that you bring through that through line of bullying. It's almost observational and it's also so very innocent. It's from child is is that's experiencing this for the first time there's this fine line between making children aware and also scaring them and I'm assuming that was intentional I mean it was intentional for the bully not to really have a face right. You don't see his image. He kind of looks like this dark shadowy figure but at the same time it's so I think meaningful her response to that situation and her friends you know to rally around turn to ignore his comment. I'm into not you know lash out in that moment and I think it when you look at the younger sister phases perspective for her or to see that it didn't change how taller proud her sister was that moment how she stood and she continued to play with her friends and not allow how it to a factor change how she felt about herself. I think it's a a meaningful moment for children out there who ever had that universal experience of bully. There's a passage that really speaks to that that I love for you to read. Osceola job is to laugh. Osceola jobs like the ocean waving to the sky. It's always is there strong and friendly. Some people won't understand your job. Mama had said but if you understand who you are one day they will due to it's beautiful the illustrations to are so colorful they really do bring to life not only the job but the environment that these two young sisters are in. I think that Hatem Ali. He's a Canadian illustrator he did. It's such a remarkable job with this body of work. I think that he brought the words to life these comparisons of the Hijab to the sky into the Ocean Ocean just the beautiful blues that he's able to capture the words. I think he's very talented and I'm so happy to partner with him on this project. The two main characters actors in the book are ASEAN Faiza and in the back of the book. We learn that your sisters are also by the same name as buys a what did they think about the characters in the book well. I wish that you could meet them. I think. Sag is responses so indicative of who she is. She's a woman very few words and she's like Oh. That's cool but that said a phase. Ah and I have been together for years and years and years so for her sure. I think it was awesome. Experience as well to be a part of the book and I think the most interesting thing that my family saw is that the character Faiza the images images that had him illustrated look a lot like my four year old niece down to like the little fluffy pigtails that she has speaking speaking of fencing and your illustrious career you've said in interviews that it was your mother who steered you to fencing because it was a sport that would allow you you to dress modestly in the Islamic tradition but competing in a job opens you up to a lot of questions and criticism as well. I think that people have a hard our time seeing things that haven't been done yet and within my sport historically white sport to have you know an African the American woman climb up the ranks who also wears his job for whatever reason was just never received well and my personality I would say is to challenge this idea of no you know why is it that people are intimidated by my job or intimidated by hi my ethnicity and why can't we exist in have the same opportunity so it was never a question of you know. Why am I here for myself anyway. I knew that I had a job to do and that was to make space more inclusive not for me but for anyone coming after me I wanted to get through the door and hold it open for hopefully more young girls young boys to be in this space where traditionally we haven't been welcome yeah and when we're talking about this space. We're not only talking about just the bigger space but we're talking about your interactions with your teammates. Some did not even want to see you on the team. Yeah I mean that's true but one of the cool things about being a US athlete is that it's point based so in the end and it didn't really matter what people thought you know if I allowed the mistreatment that I received by not just teams but coaches as well. If I allowed that got to affect me mentally we wouldn't be sitting here today. You know I wouldn't have been able to be successful so a lot of it is being very myopic and your focus in your goals roles and once you're able to climb to the top then you're able to like us the opportunity to unpack those moments. What does it feel like to have young young. Women Young Muslim women come to you and say you are my role model. I'm definitely pinch me moment. It was a dream you know uh-huh and even when it happened for me it was like just very surreal so I feel very blessed and thankful for for the opportunity but I always say I wish it had happened prior so it would have been far easier for me to see myself in the space but I have always known that my journey has been bigger than fencing. It's about having equal opportunity equal access. You know a lot of the reason why the sport of fencing is not as diverse as other sports is because there's very very limited access for underserved communities and underrepresented communities and I would love to see our kids try out different things and not that right believe everybody needs or should be Olympian or have that goal but just to get out there and be active year now writing stories for young women who are growing up and in looking to role models that perhaps you did not have I hope so and I hope that they see themselves in this work. I truly believe believe that anything is possible with hard work and you have to see it for yourself before others even willing to do that for you. You have to really want it for yourself. If ty- Haj Mohammad is the author along with S. K. Ali of the proudest blew a story of he job and family. Thank you so much for joining joining US thank you there's another important tradition for millions of Muslims the Hajj the Pilgrimage to Mecca Journey Muslims are required to do once in their lifetime time. One of those pilgrims was the actor and comedian. Ahmed Ahmed Google my name and it matches the name of a guy in the Middle East. He was a terrorist terrorists. I think he's in the Middle East Google Megan this guy in the medical. His journey came just as he was getting the attention from Hollywood eight one eight for so long the day before I was leaving for Hud's. I got a bunch of calls for auditions and I called my mom and I was like Oh. I can't leave Hollywood's knocking on my door and she said did you know while you're going to hug and I said Yeah you invited me. He's like no God invited you you. You can only come by invitation from God and the true the significance of the moment only became apparent to him once he was in Mecca and there's millions of pilgrims some coming in on first class flights others or walking their cameras through the desert hazard cracked bloody feet and everyone's dressed in white and I remember looking over at my mother and she was on her knees crying and so of course you know that made me cry so buckle. Nice started crying and it was just this magnificent feeling and force of something so much bigger than you epic out of a movie movie. You were supposed to go to hodge when you have send all that you're supposed to send I one at a time when I was twenty. Seven years old on forty two now also I gotTa go back a med amidst pilgrimage on the hodges part of the Emmy nominated series the secret life of Muslims created by filmmaker Joshua Sal you can watch a video of Meta Med and find out more about the project at here now dot. Org this message comes from NPR's sponsor answer indeed when it comes to hiring you don't have time to waste you need help getting to your shortlist of qualified candidates fast with indeed posted job in in minutes set up screener questions then zero in on qualified candidates and when you need to hire fast accelerate your results with sponsor jobs new users users can try for free when you sign up at indeed dot com slash. NPR podcast terms conditions and quality standards apply and you you may know that undocumented immigrants who've been victims of crimes in the US can apply for special protection called the UV. Lets them stay in the country and grants them a path half to citizenship but as president trump continues to crack down on immigration advocates worry that more people who could qualify for the U Visa are being detained and deported W. A. M. U. L. U. Reports nineteen year old. Erich is at home in northern Virginia with his older brother. Fernando who's twenty one. We're not using their last name because concerns about their legal status as I walk into their living room a small scruffy dawn's past Eric's legs but their mom Kenya is at home in May immigration officials came to their house and arrested her she had been in the US for fifteen years. Kenya left El Salvador in two thousand four because of gang violence she was detained at the border but released in the US and told a comeback for hearing. She says she didn't get a date or time so when she didn't show up she was issued. A deportation order that same year Fernando was devastated when his mom was arrested nope and Sal Solo. I didn't think anything I only wanted to see her hurt to think about moment while detained. Kenya applied for a visa her ex boyfriend here in the US abused her. I should call the police and got an emergency protective order. Eileen Blessing Kenya's immigration attorney Paperwork says it says victim stated that her boyfriend assaulted the her and broke her cell phone the officer observed fresh markings and cuts to the victim's face with our visa application pending Kenya. Ask the deportation be put on hold hold. US Immigration and Customs Enforcement denied the request saying they found no compelling reason for Kenya to stay in the country in late August. She was deported to all Salvador where I called her but you can't believe it. I'm here in my country in a place where I have to go out with people who will protect me because I can't go out alone. Kenya says she still afraid of gang violence. Which is why she left the country in the first place her attorney blessing says she's had several clients aliens including some with criminal records who've been granted stays while waiting on a U. Visa? She suspects Kenya's deportation is the result of a change on how ice handles these applications Sion's. This is a huge change. We're talking about non-criminal. WHO's been here for fifteen years. I thought it was a guarantee that they would grant the stay removal in the past when I got request to put a deportation on hold for someone with a pending you visa and had to check with another agency last month. I dropped that requirement and now ice officials can choose to deport cord on their own. The agency says the old process was quote burdensome due to a large number of visa applications in emailed statement and ICE spokesperson said that the recent policy see change had no bearing on Kenya's deportation and the agency arrested her because of her deportation order from two thousand four but advocates are still concerned. The change limit limit stoop process for crime victims. Cecilia Friedman Levin is with the cease to a group that works with attorneys for immigrant domestic violence victims. It's shutting the door on all fronts no and I think that creates chilling affect for survivors coming forward you know who could potentially be eligible for this type of protection meanwhile Kenya's Kenya's back in El Salvador waiting recalling lip and so. I'm hoping something can happen but I don't WanNa. Be here no salvador. I can't sleep deep. I feel anguish. I'm desperate Kenya's. You visa application is still pending but there's a huge backlog and the government only approves ten thousand a year hear. Her lawyer says it could take six years or more for a decision for here and now I'm Elliot even though much of our attention is on Capitol Hill and the controversy he's surrounding president trump in Ukraine. There is a Democratic presidential primary race underway and we've been talking with the twenty twenty candidates ahead of the primaries and the General Election Shen today we have Democrat Joe Sestak a former congressman from Pennsylvania. Welcome well. Thanks for the aboard. It's really great opportunity. What Mr Assists you've been called. Probably the most interesting Democrat you forgot was running. Let's talk a little bit about why. Some people believe you're interesting. I you were the highest highest ranking military officer ever elected to Congress back in two thousand six. You served in the navy for three decades. You're the director of defense policy under President Clinton but you were also late to this race. You're coming in somewhere between zero and one percent in the polls. You haven't participated in the last debates. You haven't qualified for the next WCHS debate but despite all of this you hate the word Longshot what keeps you can let it to this campaign well. I I was late because my daughter's brain cancer answer which initially drove me into politics back in two thousand and five when I was in the Navy I got out to take care of her rent for healthcare for everyone that saved her life so so he came back last year and so I wasn't thinking of getting in but as I sat with her particularly when she went through poteen beam radiation burning radiation for her brain that that saved her again. I decided I needed to get back in and so I- some may say it's late. I think my ideas timely what I also learned in. The Military Terry was amateurs. Do Tactics experts do logistics what we wanted to do because we worked in other people's mind late we secured the beachhead in Iowa because you have to identify eighteen hundred people for the caucuses one in each of the precincts. We went everywhere seventeen thousand miles. We traveled old two hundred thirty five events to do that. Let's talk about Iowa for a moment you have really taken on an unorthodox guerrilla-style strategy there in Iowa more more than any other candidate to date. Why did you decide to take on this approach. It's always about people going to them and so that's why we went everywhere. Particularly the rural counties Janis. We're so few do and by and large that's sometimes where they feel forgotten by my party. That's why I took that approach. Let's talk a little bit about the issues you mentioned healthcare with your daughter and I'm glad that she's on the road to recovery but you've been inspired by your status as a veteran and your interest in in creating a national health system and Indus you talk about employing physicians modeling sort of like the Veterans Health Administration and talk about what it would look like yes it's because I have seen the rural county school hospitals in the world counties closing over one hundred already this year so the va it has been when shown by the New England Journal of Medicine to be number one in terms of being tied or better than any private or public healthcare providers so I want a public option that proves itself that that is one way to go for the rural counties because no for profit hospitals are going to go back there but also have a public option that would prove itself. Alf As we head towards Medicare for all for the rest of the nation but my thing is I want to make sure that when two hundred and fifty five million Americans or in some form of private healthcare we just don't mandate it by the next two or four years we give it a transition of choice that proves itself to get us there. Let's talk about some of the the other issues. another signature issue includes combating climate change. It's on many of our minds right now. In your first one hundred days in office president what would be your the top priorities in combating the climate crisis after hold a town hall in the middle of America and I will do those every two weeks I will fly to Paris to convene the hundred ninety four hundred ninety six nations that are not meeting their national commitment to the Paris climate accord including us because because we know that here in America even if we do get to zero in greenhouse emissions it won't matter unless the rest of the world does it because eighty I five percent of the emissions that have to go to zero come from abroad yes here at home. We have to have a carbon fee dividend. Yes we have to stop. Fossil fuels opted. He's moving to Green Energy and yes we must stop offshore drilling in the Arctic on native American lands but we also have to convene the world because it is is one world and that catastrophic threat if it isn't stopped everywhere will explode on us one last thing. I do need to bring up. We need a new plan can call training for a lifetime because when the coal miners kicked out of his job who is there to give him a training. Nobody we spend less on the artisans artisans the labor force those use their hands in their minds and many of them may be affected by the change the climate change efforts so we have to make sure that we spend money and I've set aside two billion so they're trained to go into green manufacturing jobs. We spend less as I mentioned than any developed country on the sixty five percent who don't have a college education but they really run our economy. Two hundred billion is a lot of money where would that money come from absolutely I have laid out where where we can get over one trillion dollars and that's only part of it so take carried interest those are those equity gentlemen and Gentle Lady's up in Wall Street that even though they don't invest their own money they actually can get it taxed as though they are investing throw money which is much less than you can have a soldier in Afghanistan who has to pay at the regular income tax rate. It's called carried interest so that is a is a significant part of it. Also we have to bring back at least half of that corporations tax cut that this administration gave why they were supposed to bring that money back from overseas and the reduction in their corporation tax amount was supposed to be invested into jobs into helping people a Grogan incapital with new jobs didn't happen. I'm wondering how though you'd get Republicans in Congress on board with this plan with all of it. Thank thank you for that question. Because that is the major reason I would be running to unite this country. What this nation most wants. Most yearns for most needs is someone with people know all Americans though that he when they disagree with him he will always be comp to them above one's party above above self in any special interest that is what we need more than anything else will end up much as you're pointing out with another president that will only be able to executive orders and the next one rips it out. America can't go sideways anymore. Speaking of our current President more Democrats are now calling to impeach the president after this this whistle blower complaints surfaced shed house. Democrats pursue impeachment. I think when the commander in chief who occupies the presidency reaches out to a foreign leader and invites him to actually vilely the most sacred sanctity of commerical fear free elections there is an obligation upon the Congress to follow its constitutional duty investigate it and if it bears ears out that the evidence is pretty compelling and conclusive that he did that then they must proceed with impeachment a few more questions for are you if you were to become president. What are the first three issues that you take on that are important to you when you start that first day because unity of America if we're ever meet our defining challenges of the time is the absolute prerequisite after beating Mr Trump I would hold that town hall and do it every a two weeks. So all Americans know on. They're listening to you but letting you know where I stand. Then I'd fight a Paris climate change stopover at NATO to let our allies is no this past administration kicked you and told you it was a rap as far as our great leadership of rules based world order but we're back and then I come home and announced his training for lifetime as I came home and then I'd walk into a mosque to let everyone know that you know we're all equal and I love you all aw and then I'd walk to a gun show perhaps invite all he north to go with me who I knew who ran my backside back in the seventies when I thought it was GonNa Marine Corps. We may disagree okay but I'm going to go there to say I am for the flow of weapons man but I love that you do the hunt. What would an assault weapons ban looked like for you. And how would you make that happen and that would look like just like we had in the nineteen nineties with these semi automatic weapons. Were banned and you know the deaths. Police officers plummeted to near zero grow because of that but I want to go to that gun show to say no the Heller decision was good in that. It said there's no slippery slope here. They said in that decision that that doesn't mean all weapons should be out there on the streets of America. We must end semi automatic weapons from being that a useful war. We don't want those on the streets of American. That's why I've got to go to the people on this not just the elected representatives in Senate just like I did in my district Democratic Twenty when he twenty presidential candidate Joe Sestak. Thank you for joining us. Thank you for more and we want to take a look now at a recent Wall Street Journal. NBC News survey that found around younger Americans don't value patriotism or having children as much as young people did two decades ago and they don't value organized religion in the same way way these are the so-called nuns religious affiliation known and since the early nineteen nineties the number of them has tripled Derek Thompson senior editor at the Atlantic joins us from Washington as he does every Monday to talk about why this has happened. Derrick welcome back. It's great to be here. Thank you and you write that more than nine out of ten. Americans belong to an organized nice religion throughout the sixties seventies eighties but then came the nineteen nineties. Now you spoke to a sociology and religion professor at Notre Dame with the too good to be true name Christian and Smith but what did he tell you about what happened in the Nineteen Ninety S. This is a really interesting inflection point like you said the rise of the religiously nine affiliated otherwise called the nuns isn't incredibly modern phenomenon in the US. It's this hockey stick moment that takes off in the early nineteen nineties so I asked him the what happened in the early nineteen nineties he said historically speaking. They're sort of three events that we have to key in on the first is the association between the Republican Party and the Christian right that did not necessarily exist the nineteen sixties. It was instead a reaction to a series of things that happened in the late sixties early seventies the sexual revolution the Roe versus Wade decision the nationalization of no fault divorce laws and the Bob Jones University case where it lost its tax exempt status over its bannon interest ah interracial dating because of all those things the Christian right sort of jumped into politics and merged with the Republican Party in a way that I think offended a lot of moderates and liberals who began to detach from both organized religion and Republicans together that's number one moving briefly through two and three to is the end of the Cold War for the previous forty years. There'd been an association association between Godless Evil Empire wants to Cold War was over godless wasn't necessarily as evil and number three I think after nine eleven during the Bush years there it became this sort of new association not between Godless NECE and the evil empire but rather a between religion and zealotry at at the national level in the US or the international level with Al Qaeda and that too has fed into this sort of rise of religious affiliation. This is so fascinating I mean take the the end of the Cold War. Reasoning you know people you remind us could suddenly say well. I don't I don't belong to a church and not be thought to be communists. which previously they might have been and then as you say after the Al.. Qaeda attacks there was a a wanting to distance from organized religion and there was also the scandal in the Catholic Church yeah but but so who who is doing this non affiliation is it one specific demographic. Yes the the group that is most pulling away. Okay from organized religion over the last twenty to thirty years. Our young white liberals young white liberals are the ones that are leading the rise is in the nuns. You don't see as a similar as as dramatic increase among blacks and Hispanics it is being led by young white liberals and you you see this in fact that you know as the Republican Party has become more and more entrenched with the Evangelical Movement that in a way saying you know I'm I'm not a Republican that by proxy by rejecting the Republican Party a lot of young whites. I feel like they have to reject organized religion as well and so this is what's ironic to me is is that there was this thesis from the late nineteenth century that said that religion was. GonNa lose its halo effect because of science science was going to drive God from the Public Square but in fact in the last thirty years there's been no grande scientific revolution and make people lose their faith in God science hasn't driven. God from the Public Square politics has ask particularly driven religion from the Public Square for young white millennial. We should say first of all. There are many young white millennials who are very active in churches temples mosques. We know that but also use. There's another factor which is that when young people nowadays are nowadays listen to me are delaying having their families and having their you their own individual lives for longer by the time they settle down they may not have time for activities on Sunday morning or Saturday morning because they have gyms to to go to and they've got this other kind of schedule. That's interesting but then you also write about what may be one of the I mean obviously very religious. People might worry about about this from a different perspective but you note it becomes harder to have a social life without a a an institution to attend yeah. I think it's a good point I should I should say Chris. Smith listed a lot of non-political reasons. Why religious affiliation might be growing including as you mentioned. Maybe rising divorce divorce delayed adulthood. you know it seems to me that religion you know isn't just a theism. It's not just a belief in God. It's it's a bundle. It's it's it's a community. It's a theory of how the world works. It's a way of finding individual piece and I find that a lot of people who have rejected the organized religion bundle seek to shop for individual pieces of that bundle card so you know maybe their work is a religion and politics is a religion and spin class. This is a church and not looking at your phone for a few hours is akin to a digital sabbath so it's interesting to me that as so many millions of Americans have abandoned organized denies religion they have only sought to recreate it everywhere. They look so they've given up. God to a certain extent only to seek him out everywhere else. We'll are her will lead to your writing at here now dot Org Derek Thompson senior editor at the Atlantic thank you thank you and here now is production of NPR and WB you are I'm Robin Young at our base in Boston Tanya settling at your homeless coast sweet home California at Npr West and Culver City Tonya Mosley. It's here and now

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Calif. Blackouts Impact People With Disabilities; Twyla Tharp's New Book

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Calif. Blackouts Impact People With Disabilities; Twyla Tharp's New Book

"This message comes from here and now's sponsor indeed if you're hiring with indeed you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions then zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started at indeed dot com slash. NPR podcast being this train but at the same time sort of claims not to understand the policy that he's driving so a little bit I guess difficult to believe money bought him the Ambassadorship can you remind us of what son Linh said in his testimony he essentially testifies a a little bit to the his blue military uniform and medals to testify as part of the impeachment inquiry into president trump he's a Ukraine expert on the National Security Council and date a US citizen he said the push to investigate Biden would undermine US national security Greg Jaffe is national security reporter for the Washington Post and joins is now Gregg welcome thanks much so Alexander van men who we should say wants to make clear he is not the whistle blower said in his statement that he reported his concern liar here who we should also say is trump donor yeah really big trump donor gave I think a million dollars trump's inaugural fund and essentially earns to the legal counsel of the National Security Council can you explain more about what his concerns were sure he comes out of a meeting in July with check that he didn't realize or even understand the notion that trump was withholding this meeting in exchange for political investigation into Biden he says he didn't exchange for a an Oval Office meeting with President Trump and that meetings really important to the Ukrainians how does this with what we've been hearing from other witnesses asking for an investigation into former vice president Biden Sunlen says he doesn't understand that and he sort of muddies the waters to whether there was a clear quid pro quo Gordon Sunland told so they really have a lot of credibility because they all seem to be on the same page where he seems to be kind of a little bit off in left field so sunland is the this inquiry so this really corroborates bolsters what we've heard from previous witnesses both feel on a hill who is the director for Russia in Europe on the national security yeah and he's the only outliers you said yeah he's his story seems significantly different from everyone else he's really with the other interesting thing about someone is he's talks about growing up in Brooklyn I think in Brighton Beach and Being pressured by his father his mother dies in the Soviet Union to really assimilate into American culture the small listening group in on the President's July twenty fifth phone call with Ukrainian President Wlodzimierz Alinsky then men is the first official on that call to test I'm a master Bolton feeling a hill who's boss and a two senior Ukrainian officials in ambassador Gordon Sunland who's a big trump donor and the ambassador to the Vigne also said in his statement that he never had direct contact or communication with the president and he's also not partisan tell us a little bit more about his a you and he comes out of that meeting very concerned that essentially sunland is putting pressure on the Ukrainians to open an investigation into Joe Biden in the lead on this with Kurt Volker who's the special envoy to Ukraine and Rick Perry the energy secretary the three of them called the three Amigos and Sunlen really seems to be fi and a draft of his opening statement released this morning Veneman said quote I was concerned by the call I did not think it was proper to demand that a foreign government investing ground so he's got a fascinating background he comes from the former Soviet Union when he's three years old he speaks Ukrainian and Russian sure he and his brother who's a a twin both joined the army they both work together the Ns see his brother is a lawyer on the NFC and Council essentially vindicates boss and ambassador Bill Taylor who is the US Ambassador to Ukraine essentially all three of them telling the same story and a slightly different story I think the one thing that comes through from his statement is this is a guy who really buys into an US army officers loyalty is to the constant antsy Pelosi said that she will hold a vote to affirm the impeachment inquiry this Thursday what does this mean for the inquiry and what's next I think what it is understand that Paris which is natural gas company on which Hunter Biden Joe Biden son serves that essentially asking for an investigation into Brisa was Russian into the country not to a political party and not to any single individual he also has a purple heart after being wounded in an attack will serving in Iraq directions his opinions on Ukraine and and Bolton Really supply that to US Greg Jaffe is national security reporter for the Washington Post Colorado the decision is controversial and depending on who you talk to it will either make the BLM more efficient or give preferential treatment to the fossil fuels and How things will proceed going forward will this also push for I know we've been talking about John Bolton and him testifying as well we'll that this is an effort to sort of take away that talking point I think I I don't think it changes anything in the near term but it will set a clear schedule in terms of when things will become public designed to do is to sort of take away a Republican talking point that this inquiries being conducted in secret that the president is not getting due process or his rights yes he is really pushed that he is patriotic and that is a big part of what he wanted the public to know about him Vince testimony comes a day after House speaker. Newt Greg thanks so much for joining US sure happy to do it well. The federal government's Bureau of Land Management has announced that it's moving headquarters from Washington DC to push the direction towards getting folks who have either been silent or had refused to testify to testify. I don't know that that's still remains to be seen industry Noah Glick of member station K. U. N. R. Reports Grand Junction Colorado is where the bill is setting up its new base the mid sized town about sixty three thousand people is named for the meeting spot of the mighty Colorado and Gunnison rivers a city tourism video puts it like this transaction Grand Junction Mayor Rick Taggart says the shakeup will give his city a stronger political voice as a smaller city in Western call we're not as well known I think Bolton's testimony you're right to hone in on that one that one's really critical because the one thing we don't have a so far is a person in the room with President trump describing trump's decision but overall he says there's no doubt the move will make it easier for industry interest to access bill and bureaucrats and harder for national environmental groups for really as for Chevron Laremy energy oil and gas producer and a Colorado state oil and Gas Association Office in a statement ABM spokesperson said any suggestion that the location was chosen to give select interest groups special access is quote flagrant and Ironic Gilman says it's hard to know the intentions behind the he's the ranking Republican on the House Natural Resources Committee he says moving the out West we'll put agents closer to the lands they manage and the interests of those lands look reported that since mid July eleven am employees have already quit with more resignations expected to come that has some Democrats and environmental groups worried seven beal and staffers are scheduled to move from the nation's capital to this idyllic town halfway between Denver and Salt Lake City and hundreds more will be scattered across the West Gelman and assistant professor of political science at the University of Nevada Reno where he studies congressional partisanship and agenda-setting so in the case of BLM mining interests access to be a lab when regulations are being written and some of those folks will be close very close the Grand Junction headquarters will be in the same building as a corporate office this message comes from NPR having people on the ground who have the ability of making the final decision not just having a job there in locally but also having the ability of making those decisions that's GonNa be it's not everything but it does tilt the playing field a little bit too who can talk to those bureaucrat who get that face to face time that's a selling point for Utah Congressman Rob Bishop stuff you're going to expect all the big players to show up but for the smaller day to day stuff who you're hearing from what's important what's not important that sort of access does matter procedures and I think that's part of the intention to allow a state that is off for extraction and nothing else to have the freedom to do that without any oversight by the forward there is no merit to that the rationale for it is hard to figure out in fact I don't think there is one that's House Natural Resources Committee Chairman Raul Grijalva a Democrat refused to provide funding for the move in the latest budget but a department of Interior spokesperson says the relocation is moving forward using funding previously approved by Congress or sponsor mind body mind body connects millions to the widest variety of local fitness classes and they offer the same experience when it comes to massage and a plus that's GonNa benefit people not everyone agrees many beal employees have expressed frustration over the move and the investigative nonprofit pro it will affect more than half a million customers and many of them are already in the dark the intention of course is to save lives but for medically vulnerable people hugh puncture spas and salons find book and take all in one place owners can join the networks at mind body online dot com slash or the rocky mountains give way to the natural beauty of the South West and the differences are dramatic there's nowhere else like it just look around and you can the end of next year twenty the industry is taking care of above anything else Ryava says his committee has not been given enough information on the types of jobs moving west and he's concerned about decision and because of that sometimes we don't have the voice even our state government that we'd like to have industry also stands to benefit according to the losing season staffers could further strengthened the influence of the oil and gas industry but Bishop doesn't buy that why could simply the gas and oil industry have more influence. NPR mind body your access to the largest consumer wellness network and marketplace more blackouts are expected today across northern California as wildfires continued to rage in many parts of the State California's largest utility company Pacific Gas and electric says elitist outages given the track record of this administration particularly the Department of Interior that seemed to be whole bet on making sure the gas and oil are taken care of and the fossil fuels welcome to here now thank you so you've been trying to raise awareness about the impact blackouts have on people with disabilities what do you want people to know. Boy I mean there's just so much for people to know we have rolling blackouts as you've just mentioned my power is still on but fielding request from individuals and families who need everything from hotel vouchers to backup power or even just to go into their homes and not relying on local government or even PG and E. to help us we're raising funds and developing mutual she works in the healthcare industry is an advocate for the disabled yummy also has bone brittle disease and uses an electric wheelchair to get around yummy seal up windows and doors because although we are quite a ways from the fire with the wins the smoke has traveled to the Greater Bay area so it just a mile or so away I have friends who have been without power for a couple of days the the community of people with disabilities in our allies were just like those who rely on breathing machines and other equipment time without power can be life threatening joining us now to talk more about this is your me wrong of Oakland. Eating companies farmers ranchers their locus of power there sort of epicenter of where most their people are is out West and Republicans want those folks easy making positions being so far away from Congress the last thing you want is little fiefdoms in each state making their own decisions and doing there the bill could be in its new home by the end of next year for here and now I'm noah glick and Noah story comes to us from the Mountain West News Bureau folks with respiratory issues or relief feeling those effects as well and when it comes to the power outages you said the twenty four hour warning nobody with access and functional needs I have a job I have a car I've a dual income family and I still can't afford the level is not enough that's what pge gives and that it's very ablest people on fixed incomes can't afford things like generators can you talk a little bit about how you've been impacted by these planned power outages I know you mentioned you still have power right now but it could be imminent you know when when you have your five days it assumes that people who are able bodied or well resourced would be able to quickly either get back up power have a older wheelchair in my shed I have kept that one charged just in case it's just really difficult to find the resources early warning systems and amenities like a toll free emergency hotline and even charging stations I was just floored when I read this because twenty years later all of solar generator that I would need to be able to keep my life going at home so what I've done I have a power wheelchair that I use primarily what we need are more resources specifically from PG knee because they can certainly afford it yummy this feels like deja Vu back in two thousand one sensation environmental group that's out there or cattle ranger that's out there I mean I'm sorry that's an argument that you come up with to try and find some reason to stop a logical move from going Yummy what can non disabled people do to support their disabled friends and neighbors during these events I would say be allies find out what the community federal government through the law and in two other requirements greenhow says he's prepared to issue subpoenas if the committee doesn't get the information it's looking for the House and Senate have both aide networks so that people who need support can get it there's there are about twenty volunteers kind of centered around East Oakland that her aga had these rolling blackouts to cut the use of electricity during the state's energy crisis back then and back then several disability agencies were pushing for statewide local governments with resources to be able to reach residents we need very hyper local neighborhood by neighborhood based resources means we need for everybody join with us so that nobody is left behind in these kinds of scenarios yummy wrong is an advocate for the disability what the market was doing demanding more renewables for instance on partial yes the price of natural gas is barely above two dollars at the moment basically asking for the same things what is your message to pg any and really the state how do you want them to support you you know PG needs to be providing we're independent living thinners will be able to provide hotel vouchers some backup power support but they can't help everybody filed lawsuits against a federal rule meant to prevent black lung in minors stepped down as the company's CEO it turns out that despite president trump's claim company just became the eighth in the country to file for bankruptcy in the past year and Robert Murray a cold booster who held a big fundraiser for president trump last summer and with Wood Mackenzie Greg tells more what's going on well Murray Energy the vast majority of his minds are profitable and producing cash flow it's the massive ex aims that he will bring back coal clean coal energy the market had other ideas turning to renewables and Natural Gas Gregory Marmon is principal analyst mm unity and California she lives in Oakland Yummy thank you so much thank you staying with Energy Murray Energy the country's largest private coal that you need there are independent living centers across the state that PGA is just now getting around to kind of standing up grant programs or go to hotels or traveled to places outside of the planned Shut off zones and that just is not the reality for in doesn't include workers I mean how do bankruptcies impact workers we remember profiling co workers who were protesting they were literally striking and then definitely a significant amount of renewable energy development and the price of developing new projects of renewable energy has come down significantly most of the debt that he yet they finally just a few days ago got those payouts but workers are often the most hurt in these bankruptcies and remind us what happened utility like pg telling people well in the next twenty four hours from forty eight hours we're going to cut off your power for maybe one two three we'll go off line by twenty twenty-five coal stockpiles at power plants are already at the lowest level in a decade is there any way this might be information administration is forecasting a ten percent drop in American Coal Production Twenty nine thousand nine Wyoming we were always surprised when reminded that Wyoming is the country's it seems pretty bad it's very bad in the industry at the moment low cost renewable energy and even lower cost natural gas is definitely Manson he undertook in the last few years where expanded into northern Appalachian underground mines expanded into his purchase of foresight energy he took on a lot of debt and then they started bouncing checks a few weeks before and very rarely in the coal industry do you see minds that are still producing positive cash flow this shutdown but that happened I'm sitting on a train track protesting that when their company black jewel when out you know the workers they didn't keep their salary obligations to workers they had to pay off other debt from NPR and WBZ. I'm Robin Young I'm Tanya Moseley it's here and now army Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Vin arrived on Capitol Hill this morning decked out in majority of US minds but that's still only about ten percent of the US Co market is produces metallurgical quality call and remind us that's metallurgical coal as opposed to thermal coal that is a very low price environment at the moment is causing a lot of problems is this just an industry or industry leaders willfully blind to of and that is the the biggest percentage of coal use and that is way down we're also reading this a shipping problem here Western states including Washington state aren't allowing I mean it's extremely unlikely at the moment you we might see it stabilize for a few years but in terms of reversals it does appear to be very unlikely reminded the difference metallurgical coal is used to produce coke which is used in the steel making process is used reduction of raw iron ore into finished steal while thermal coal you only use that power plants who are industrial processes to produce mostly electricity but there's some industrial heat and that's the kind that we tend to think walk through the day declared bankruptcy yeah the EIA the Energy Information Administration is also projecting out another seventeen gigawatts of coal production host a lot of heartaches in the industry increase in rates of mine closures as natural gas production continues to rise and renewable energy production conducive increase largest gold producer accounting for more than forty percent of coal output coal production there in the first half of this year is down thirty percent actual black tools are very southern New Jersey to the company and to the community around it presented a very positive viewpoint and all of a sudden cash flow the market and if they do so that played a part in their bankruptcy remind us what happens when there's a bankruptcy companies have to pay off their debtors I in that in cold through their ports they're citing environmental concerns how big an impact is that very very at least partially pay the partial problem for gone was probably a few years ago where that there were different expectations of of the market at that time it looks pretty bad I mean we're reading that the US energy in this is this also The difference between different kinds of ways that coal can be used metallurgical coal is still very profitable at the moment or the cloud peak which declared bankruptcy a couple months ago what happened there was there they with the fall in demand for coal they tried to expand to the Internet leave our projections and the and the protection from a in terms of natural gas production in price levels and then the projections of the development of new renewable energy. It does suggested that there's going to be any real reversal in the coal industry what we see it's stabilize at its current level so they'll be a few more mine closures across the mostly I'm Robin Young this is here now -secutive what would you tell coal workers are projections going out in the next twenty years we do see the steadily decreasing level of corporate oxygen and on the alphabet and Google side you know Amazon's not yet in wearables and so this is an opportunity to sort of push ahead fitbit scores that's gone by the wayside things to to apple and what apple has been able to do with its watch and sort of make it the must have item fitbit when it came out back in two thousand seven it was really one of the only devices in the world known as wearable tech but how water market for wearable technology paresh Dave broke the news he's technology correspondent for Reuters and Paresh we still don't know whether this deal will happen or what Google Dr podcast terms conditions and quality standards apply Google's parent company alphabet reportedly wants to buy fitbit if the which were tons of domestic cowpokes and we do see it fallen pretty low in the next five years just read the projections this message comes from NPR sponsor indeed WanNa comes to hiring you don't have time to waste and when you need to hire fast accelerate your results with sponsor jobs new users can try for free when you sign up at indeed dot com slash NPR after this news yesterday Google's went up by two percent why do investors like this idea for Fitbit the issue is that the companies big is this market for wearable tech and how much of it dis- fitbit actually claim right now yeah one of the questions is whether the novelty of the reportedly offered fitbit but really the big question is why would a company like Google want to buy fit bit Goule has really been investing this is worn off and you know whether it was sort of a fad you know when I see a smart watch it's a it's usually an Apple Watch I know my fitbit is you need help getting to your shortlist of qualified candidates fast with indeed post a job in minutes set up screener questions then zero in on qualified candidates are you at a time when you might not have a phone right next to you when you're working out for instance right right Fitbit stock price surged twenty seven percent sorta been struggling the last few years few years ago the stock was at around almost fifty dollars now it's barely pushing five dollars you know a few years ago in developing its own hardware the last few years and that's because it seeing companies like Amazon Microsoft facebook all of its big rivals also invest in collecting dust in in one of the drawers. It's not something that I've really been seeing lately either and surprising because a lot of the the early reviews aware and these smart watches these fitness trackers wearables whatever you wanNA call what fit that makes their another opportunity to put a computer with goes ahead it would make Google a major player in the market for fitness trackers it could also open the door for Google to compete with Apple smartwatch and make a splash in the Bra we'll watch earlier this year Google bought some smartwatch. Ip from the fossil group for about forty million dollars do we know what Google plans to do with that a bit was the thing that that people wanted and they had this whole game fixation element you know where you'll be competing against your friends and everyone would be talking Gregory Marvin principal coal analysts with Wood Mackenzie Gregory thank you L. Thank you all demand just as power plant close in the renewable energy developments continue to increase so in right now in twenty nineteen we have a little bit over seven hundred million he said that you know it has the best software around but you know at this point you know they're under ten percent market share and there's a lot of questions about hat are they getting into the smartwatch market the plans for that or sort of unclear at this point by you know we know that Google a few years ago was working on watch they did look at the idea and there's been a lot of questions over the last couple of years when is Google Pixel smartwatch GonNa come out and Pixel is what they call their how much bigger the the SMARTWATCH market gets so I think that's the the opportunity Google sees to to put sort of new life into this brand he mentioned their smartphone and other devices so there's been a lot of speculation about that and certainly user interest in such device we will definitely be watching this potential acquisition from Google fitbit thank you so much that's Paresh Dave he's technology correspondent for Reuters thank you own company as well as the New York City Ballet Paris Opera ballet the Danish ballet and Baryshnikov here's part of the score for push comes to show for the billy Joel musical moving out picked up two emmys a MacArthur fellowship and been inducted into the American Academy of Arts and letters so she will no doubt find and it's exhausting just ticking off Twyla tharp achievements at seventy eight she's created more than one hundred and fifty dances for her I'm comfortable laurels on which to rest right Oh wrong wrong wrong when Twyla tharp is waiting for something like a subway she'll go over dance routines with subtle movements answers call it marking she says we mere mortals can take the stairs jump rope the most efficient way back from injury take up space dancers call it a platoon stride into a meeting and push against things meaning isometrics put also push back against the notion that getting older obligates you to receive is as you indicated a measure of the simple fact that you will find obstacles no matter what age you are but that the eight Twyla tharp new book is keep it moving and she's at NPR's near studios welcome thank you can we start with an isometric put our proms Dan for as long as you possibly can resistance exercise it's the basis upon which all calisthenics operates and it amy pulling my stomach muscles to excellent very good see their these little moves count of course they do that little most become big moves and big moves body if it's tended is going to do better with those obstacles than if you just let it go its own way and hang out in a corner somewhere and business of entertainment and that for the most part their public will rather see happy people on stage not happy people onstage okay not exercise sitting heap well I just did push against my desk and felt my stretch my calves I did put my together in front of me and pushed stood up straighter you can have this job but could you smile and indicates to me that really I don't want that job that to me is an imposition way to know what you can do is to try so the notion of say pushing back of the isometrics anybody can do this there may not be and you went to audition for the rock cats and they tell you to smile there's a young lady you really dance very well indicating uh-huh tarps also choreographed the film's hair and Amadeus when the Tony the deal strength in the body there may be a lot of pain in the body but the body can still move against itself and have some indication that it is on what one really has of your own which is your intention what is your intention now it is also true the rockets are in the busy our bodies have remembered the course of least resistance work less now work more it's not just the physical there into somebody or bring up your leg and slap it expanding your space as you get older instead of pulling back in look I sat in many different ways different times in the book we're Lazy we all are lazy it's a part of being a human being and it takes an effort it takes a conscious effort to continue moving forward and two demanding a little more space than taking a little less space Okay it's a crowded bus gotta be careful about the elbows into the bad news is you will never be you might as well start somewhere like here now we love that phrase you also talk about you very young dancer share that does not see hoarding or possessing as an ultimate slash goal but that the business of sharing over and then you swing your arms to one side and the other you say it doesn't have to be that it can be illustrate yourself Jutta hipp out when you're talking become little moves right I think that's one of the problems a lot of folks wait for when they know exactly how to do something or when they're an expert or competence attic it's simply having the nerve to visualize the endpoint you want to accomplish not accepting that it might fail other I think that better than your mom's together which is resisting yourself find another object anything a wall the floor and just push as hard as you possibly can you may know a heck of a lot about your field yes but it's wise to assume you still have something to learn well and plan I you know just the openness that is being you say pick a friend share something that will either fascinate or instruct the other Everyday Daily Mirror you've had a fall at very I would say late in life for a dancer you had your first serious injury I think it's sixty nine going on to- Broke your metatarsal assume no it is going to be as I see it and then visualize every single move that is going to be necessary to accomplish that how a young age I did not understand those dense complicated maneuvers and just decided this was not a life that I wanted to pursue live from there it can move forward some of the exercises they feel like yoga classes where you know you put your arms up and then you flopped what a great idea again I'd like to be a fly on that wall Twyla Tharp what is it that keeps you moving curiosity who was up to everybody else on their own time to figure out whether they wanted to smile or not I was not going to tell them that right we'll look us that you walked out of that room or anything he plans every single step of the way I mean it sounds like you're just saying be mindful mindful is big word planning as perhaps more mundane and pragman and said I don't feel so well I feel this I feel that I feel feel feel I go forget it with the feeling go do go do something do will soon I'm curious I find nothing to be worse than the restlessness that comes of feeling bored so

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The Swing Voter We Don't Talk About; U.S. Travel Restrictions To Cuba

Here & Now

41:41 min | 1 year ago

The Swing Voter We Don't Talk About; U.S. Travel Restrictions To Cuba

"From NPR and WB YOU are. I'm Tanya Moseley. I'm Robin Young. It's here now in Des Moines. Tonight six Democrats will take the stage in the last presidential candidates debate before the first twenty twenty vote in Iowa which is now just twenty days away poll showing the caucus wide open the top four contenders Joe Biden Bernie Sanders Elizabeth. Warren the people to judge will all be on stage tonight. As Will Amy Klobuchar and Tom. Star Domenico Montanaro. NPR senior political editor and correspondent. Is here I- DOMENICA. Hey thereof rub so. In last month's debate Buddha judge became the target and survived now warning Sanders who've been something of a like minded ceasefire and agreement. You you know not to attack each other are trading barbs. Let me just try to lay this out. You tell me if I've got it. The Sanders Campaign told volunteers to label Warren. As a candidate of the elite but Bernie Bernie. Sanders says. He didn't approve that then last night. Warren accused Sanders of telling her privately that he didn't think a woman could win the presidency now in a statement Sanders said. That's it's ludicrous He said the AIDS presumably Warren's who were not in the room are lying sanders said he said That trump was a sexist sexist liar who would weaponize the fact that she was a woman and then he said of course I think she can win. Hillary won by three million votes. So how big a deal do you think this is going to be on the stage tonight. We'll you certainly have a disagreement there between the two principles of the campaigns. This is not just volunteers going around making these accusations. They've risen to the level all of the candidates. And if you read between the lines. There's clearly some overlap. There between what Warren said in her statement that Bernie Sanders told her. A woman couldn't win in their meeting meeting in two thousand eighteen and we'll Bernie Sanders is saying they're in that Donald Trump would weaponize the fact that he'd be running against a woman so that is is going to be a flashpoint sanders is going to have to walk a very delicate line in explaining it. Warren is also going to have to you know kind of make a case for the the whoever leaked that information whether or not how she comes across so look the optics of it are going to be really interesting lines for both of them to walk and you're right they have have for months. Had this kind of detente where they were just not going to attack each other because they see each other as allies in progressive movement. But they know that there. There's a big ven diagram of voters and if you're going door knocking and someone says to you know I am a I'm on Elizabeth Warren's team and your volunteer for Bernie any sanders you have to make some case to say why that person should should should abandon Elizabeth Warren. And that's certainly going to ruffle some feathers but did maybe warrants campaign also missed up here because you can Google Bernie Sanders saying woman absolutely can be president. He's been saying it for decades. Well you know sure sure. But that's that's a little different than What happened in two thousand sixteen kind of as Warren puts it as punditry right where? There's been this debate over over the last couple of years since the twenty sixteen election on whether a woman could win. Even though Hillary Clinton won three million votes as sanders points out in that that there are some Who believed that? It made it more difficult to win in the states that Donald Trump had one. Now I'm certainly not making making case one way or the or the other for whether that's true or not. I don't think you can quantify it exactly. I know the Clinton campaign certainly thought that there was some sexism involved and we've heard from Democratic voters who are a little skittish early on to vote for a woman but Elizabeth Warren seem to win them over and prove that she could win by the fall when she started surging in the polls and. I think that's where we're at where I had a sanders person close to centers earlier in the year. Tell me that they're not GONNA Attack Warren unless unless they get down to nearly the final two and that's where we are with the two of them in the top four Amy Klobuchar by the way probably also have something to say about how a woman can Point out right but a lot else might be going on tonight. Sanders has stepped up his criticism of Joe Biden for his vote in the Iraq. War Vote to go to war at a time now when Democrats want to take the lead and criticizing president. Trump's targeting of an Iranian general for reasons that are not quite yet clear clear. You've got Tom Steiner on the stage and some people saying wow how did he. Last be of the six cory booker dropped out. People are wondering where his voters will go. What will you be looking for tonight? Will certainly you know that Warren Sanders dynamic is going to be interesting but who does that benefit you know. Joe Biden and Pete Buddha judge potentially intentionally could benefit from that and you could see footage chime in and talk about the fact that Warren has been hitting him on backing away from big ideas when she's backed away from a pretty big idea in medicare for all so you could wind up seeing something of a triangular or quadrangular. Firing squad here With the top four candidates and then You know Kobe sharp. Being able to sort of try to chime in as well and try to be a voice. Lisa reason is what I would expect. She has a lot on the line. She's from a neighboring state in Minnesota and she needs to really have a very strong showing in Iowa to probably probably pierce one of those top four in order to be able to continue her candidacy. We have to mention. You also have a trump rally in Milwaukee tonight as the next phase of impeachment unfolds. Nancy Pelosi Telling House members. She's going to deliver those two articles of impeachment tomorrow so the trial might start soon but we also have this confusion about Iran. I just want to ask you about defense. Defense Secretary Mark s Spurs interview with NPR. Yesterday at first he said the. US doesn't have legal authority to strike in Iran because of actions of Iranian backed militias in in Iraq because of the two thousand two congressional authorization of Military Force and then Archbishop Piero and the NPR crew. Chase down the hall by an aide. WHO said come back come back? And and they were asked to review expert who reversed his answer he said yes the. US DOES HAVE THE AUTHORITY TO STRIKE in Iran under article to the constitutionalists. Listen if it is consistent with the command chiefs of Thorns under article two to defend the nation are people in our interests. Yes we do your thoughts on that to Mexico they're very tenuous authorizations I mean the am was not intended for strikes that lasted you know for almost two decades later article two is also fairly elevate. It's about imminent threats and defending the security of the country. And that's why we have heard these sort of evolving or conflicting stories stories over the last several days on what the reasoning and rationale was for taking out general soul Mani. So you know I think. Some of the the Democratic candidates on stage are going to be asking where why hasn't I haven't the American people in their words gotten a straight story. And why do you have to send an aide running down the hall to do an interview for such an important question. They want to clarify and make sure that that he was expressing. Exactly what he wanted to express knock it himself in trouble with the president he go to Medical Montenero. NPR senior political editor and correspondent. Thank you. You're welcome Cuban. Americans are divided over new restrictions on travel to Cuba announced by the trump administration secretary of state. Mike pompeo asked federal transportation officials to suspend charter flights to all Cuban cities except Havana. The move follows an earlier order that halted regular. US flights to Cuba's provincial cities as NPR's Greg Allen reports. Some Cuban Americans see the rule as part of the president's reelection reelection campaign at Miami International Airport that people waiting in line for flights to Cuba or easy to spot. They usually check multiple bags large large screen. TV's even as. I saw a set of car tires since October. When the trump administration cancelled regular airline service to Cuba's outlying cities the only way for visitors to fly the Cuban airports outside of Abana on a charter flight in his announcement Secretary of State Pompeo set in sixty days all? US charter flights to nine provincial. Cities would also also end at the airport. We Morales was waiting in line for flight to Santa Clara with six. Big overstuffed bags are just a lot of stuff to my family because since the restrictions going on then it's harder to not go to Havana from Havana to Santa Clara's go take four hours together. So it's much harder than than it would be before trump did this pompeo says ending. The flights will limit the economic benefit. The Cuban government gets from US visitors. The Morales says the first to feel the pinch will be Cubans Cubans rely on aid from family in the states and makes sense to restrict the government activities and and probably an communism over there but at the same time. You're hurting the families or people who live here other Cuban-americans though especially those whose families came here in the sixties and seventies support the restrictions and any move to make travel to Cuba more difficult. Carlos era teaches religious studies at Yale. He fled Cuba as an eleven year. Old in the early sixties. He's critical of Cuban Americans who traveled to the island sometimes sometimes several times a year spending money that he believes ultimately helps keep the regime in power. They don't care if it's permanent they don't care to a change anything and it's not going to change if they keep going back and forth and pouring billions into the Pompeo says the administration now wants is to limit the number of charters to fly into Havana. Vivian Mana route has been dealing with the ups and downs of. US and Cuba travel restrictions since one thousand nine hundred eighty s when she organized her first charter flights to the island. As for why these are being imposed now. Manorama believes there's a simple answer. Politics community is completely divided over this issue shoot there is no humanitarian reasons. There is no sanction reason it is all done for twenty twenty elections. No other reason Gamma Gra near a sociology. Professor at Florida International University says the Cuban Americans most affected by the new restrictions are those who arrived in the US in the last twenty years and there are also the least likely vote exhibiting a hard line towards Cuba is a known entity. If you do that you drink coffee seato and you say you know we're going to overturn the Cuban government you can probably calculate that's GonNa get you hundred thousand votes as for Cuban-americans Americans with family on the island once. US flights to outlying cities are no longer possible travel professionals. Expect many will begin doing what they had to do. In the eighties and nineties. Fly Qaba being Mexico Canada or other countries Greg Allen. NPR News. Miami we often hear their terms swing voter bandied about during election seasons there an elusive bunch that political candidates vie for are traditionally defined as voters. Who may not be affiliated with a particular party or hoop depending on the issues will vote across party lines? But there's one kind of swing voter order. Our next guest says we don't often consider and their decisions could make or break a candidate's chances Abram kindy is the director of the anti-racist Research and Policy Policy Institute at American University. He recently wrote about these swing voters for the Atlantic Abram. Welcome it's great to be on the show. Well thanks for being here well. Well let's talk about this for a moment when we think of swing voters. We tend to think of the kinds of people that I just described. But you're talking about another kind of swing voter. Tell us about them. Sure I think when when most Americans and even most political campaigns think of a swing voter they're thinking of someone who swings from voting Republican to Democrat crat or vice versa. The Thinking for instance that that Obama to trump voter that voter who voted for Obama in two thousand twelve and and trump in two thousand sixteen. This is the prototypical swing voter almost totally white. But I actually sort of wrote on what I call the other swing voter. And these are voters those who are swinging between voting Democrat or not voting at all and and I'm distinguishing them from people who almost never vote their specific civic group of people who who look Democratic candidates who don't really even consider Republican candidates and decide whether they're going to vote for that candidate or they decide to to vote third party and this group of other swing voters are predominantly young people and even people of Color and especially young people of Color and and they swung the two thousand sixteen election as much as these white swing voters who had voted for Obama and then trump. Let's talk about Their significance how big is this contingent. I mean is it enough to tilt the election towards one side or another as we enter twenty twenty especially when you consider the makeup of the Electoral College which I think if you look for instance at the prototypical Obama to trump voter and many political analysts have talked about that they helped swing swing the two thousand sixteen election in favor of trump. That was about six million voters But four point four million Obama voters voters did not vote in two thousand sixteen and an additional two point. Three Million Obama voters voted third party which which amounts to about six point seven million voters which actually more than the number of people who voted for Obama and then trump you focus in your article on the Democratic version. The swing voter does the same category voter exist on the Republican side. Are I think so and and I and so in other words you have people who consider the Republican candidate and if they don't like the Republican candidate they don't vote and so they swing between voting. Republican are not voting at all. And this is a sizable the number of Americans. To and just as it's critical for Republicans to focus on those those swing voters it's critical for Democrats to focus on the people who swing from voting Democrat to not voting at all. I WanNa talk more about what that looks like but I want to ask you about something else you say that the Democrats have to combat the GOP voter depression and suppression that is choosing a candidate. those swing voters can get excited about and preventing or rolling back voter suppression from your view is one of those more important than the other. Is it enough to just do one. I think you have to do all of the above. And and and so when we look at for instance the prototypical other swing voter again voter. Who's WHO's WHO's swinging from voting Democrat to not voting at all even Panther Party? These are typically young black voters and then when we look at for instance who the Russians primarily targeted with drilling in two thousand thousand sixteen election. It was young black voters when when you look at who is most subjected to to voter suppression policies. It's typically young voters of color. And so what happens is if you are young voters of color and you're not excited about up the Democratic candidate. It makes it that much harder better for you to vote for them if you also have to overcome voter suppression and controlling on Social Media It's interesting you bring up. A the Russian disinformation campaign even though we reported on their targeting of black voters in particular. That seems seems to be something that. We're not really focused on that. Potentially foreign actors actually see exactly what you're talking about. Oh without question I mean they they see these a young black voters as swing voters and they recognize by. They're not voting or by their voting. Third Party they can swing elections and they recognize that that these young black voters may not be excited about a moderate candidate. That has a a difficult racial show record and they can then expose and and manipulate them into non voting by information or even disinformation about that particular candidate. And and that's what happened in two thousand sixteen. Let's talk a little bit about the debate tonight. What would it look like in practice for the candidates to center these swing voters? Well when you look at these young black Voters even young voters or even Voters of color. You're talking about people who Specifically overwhelmingly support for instance twelve dollar minimum wage. You're you're talking about people who actually in two thousand sixteen young black voters the two major sort of issues that they thought were. The country should be talking or B B B taking seriously. We were police brutality and racism. So you're talking about people who are very concerned about what the Democratic candidate is going to do to combat police brutality Taliban and racism. You're talking about people who generally support aggressive action against climate change. You're talking about people who generally have progressive the ideas and and want progressive policies. which are the candidates? Remove you has has done the best job on this. When the recent poll that that came came out for instance that sort of assessed black voters and and what candidate they were most likely to be supporting of of course it was widely reported? How of course Joe Biden was? Who's doing extremely well with with every segment of black voters by by large margins except upped young black voters? That was the only sort of new group of of voters who he was behind in by double digits to to Bernie Sanders and so I think just just like in the two thousand sixteen campaign which young black voters were were supportive of Bernie Sanders. They seem to be very supportive of him as well and and again these are swing swing voters right and and so if they really liked the candidate they're more likely to vote then an older black voter. WHO's more of a regular voter and it's going to vote no matter the candidate? I want to ask you about the importance. Placed on one demographic specifically suburban white women a lot of political analysts and pundits and pollsters especially in two thousand eighteen have talked about the important role of white women suburban Voters played in the democratic victories. But there is is definitely history. Here it's easy to centralize those voices which often sometimes marginalize is the people that we're talking about these young black swing voters Do you see this as a damaging tactic. Is there a possible way for candidates to speak to them both. I think there is a way for for candidates to speak to them. Both and I think part of my essay in the Atlantic was not only to to get people to recognize the importance of these other swing voters but also to think through why they are not recognized as important. Why are we constantly trying to standardize the white voter? You're in the body politic and what I mean by standardize value them more than than than other than other voters and it just so happens. Americans have always done that right. From the beginning of our republic. Americans have been standardizing valuing white voters more than other groups as opposed to seeking ways to to to value all voters equally. Not only because we're committed to equity but that's actually the way in which Democrats win. The argument may be though that that by focusing in centering. Those young swing voters that. We're talking about you might isolate the white vote. I'm just guessing that's the fear. Well actually. I'm I'm working on a follow up essay into this To the first essay on the swing voter and it and I was studying studying some some data that looked at those Obama to trump voters who then voted Democrat in the two two thousand eighteen midterm election. And if found that these voters again these and they were almost totally white. These white swing voters who voted for Obama then and trump than Democrat in two thousand. Eighteen will overwhelmingly support a medicare for all they were overwhelmingly opposition to the trump trump administration. Leaving the the Paris climate agreement they will overwhelmingly in support of a twelve dollar minimum wage. They will overwhelmingly commonly in support of a millionaires tax and ironically their sort of rates of support or opposition to those policies. Were very very similar to the support or opposition of other swing voters right and so so you're talking about liberal and and and young white voters who swan for trump. They're actually very winnable for Democrats by pushing for policies and initiatives that will also wing other swing voters. That's Abram kindy he's director of the anti-racist Research and Policy Institute at American University. He's the author of the book. How to be an anti racist? Abram thank you so much thank you. There's increasing pressure on Iran today. The day as Britain France and Germany triggered the dispute mechanism in the nuclear agreement. Now they say it's because of Iran's new violations of that agreement Iran Iran says it's been stepping away from the court in response to president trump pulling completely out of the deal and imposing sanctions. Even though at that time Iran was abiding by the deal hill. President trump imposed more sanctions last Friday following the Iranian attacks on military bases in Iraq that housed US troops and there are layers of sanctions on Iran. So to get to a sense of the scale and their impact on Arabians we want to bring in Olneyville she. MSNBC ANCHORING ECONOMICS correspondent Ali on Friday president trump said in a statement. This order order will have a major impact on the Iranian economy. What are the newest sanctions on? Just what shape is that economy in. It is very hard to keep track of sanctions on Iran. What's what's been pulled off after the deal? What's been put back on? But the new sanctions that president trump announced on Friday through secretary Treasury Secretary Mnuchin target a Construction in Iran manufacturing textiles and mining. And they also sanctioned eight top officials who were thought to be involved in Iran Strike Mike on military bases in Iran in Iraq that housed US troops but the sanctions. The monetary sanctions are imposed on. Anyone who owns operates trades with with or helps any business in the sectors of construction manufacturing textile and mining. When you think about that that's quite a lot of society well and so how is Iranian society? What's been the impact of the sanctions? So there have been some version of sanctions since nineteen seventy nine since the revolution but really in two thousand thirteen. When America got involved in the Iran Iran deal the way they the way they put pressure on Iran? They took them off the swift system. That's the society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Transfers. It's the way money gets traded around the world so carpet store in New York buys Iranian. Carpets they pay through a a an international bank transfer system. Iran was removed from that and basically that added that acted like a sanction on everything. Because you didn't have to subject food or medicine to sanctions. People couldn't buy things from overseas. He's and Iran's response to that was to build a resistance economy where they aggressively invested in domestic production of a lot of these things. But you can't you can't reinvent everything you import so we just had a very very negative effect on Iran's economy since two thousand thirteen and we should say many Republicans are saying that the Democrats handed handed over billions of dollars gave all of this money to Iran. They didn't it was money that He hasn't seized in frozen and released when the nuclear deal was was struck but other people questioned whether or not you know. This government really pays attention to the sanctions. They do yeah. I mean look at some point. Every country has because You know one of the things. Iran does for instance his subsidizes gasoline. And it is a way to keep arrest of population satisfied when you have cheap food or cheap gasoline That half of the subsidy on gas has gone away. Fuel prices are up two hundred percent and Iran's in this weird situation that it's got a shrinking economy and massive inflation. Elation because it's money is devalued. Those are the two worst things that can happen in an economy so as much a tight control as the Iranian regime has over society the lack of prosperity and financial stress. No matter where it is in the world causes people to protest. And you're starting to see that happening again in Iraq and you started to see it before the the recent attacks as well we should say the EU countries that triggered this dispute mechanism. Safes not to walk away from Iran. It's trying to find a solution. I'll evil L. She. MSNBC ANCHOR economic correspond. Thank you all of our world. Were shaking this week. One one hundred seventy six people were killed on that. Ukrainian International Airlines flight shot down shortly after takeoff in Iran by a missile strike. That was a mistake. Devastating for friends and family chilling for nervous fliers already haunted by plane. Crashes like one a decade ago in Libya in which just one one young Dutch boy survived. That story stayed with author and Napolitano. She wondered how strong is the human spirit. How much do we count on? People like the little boy to demonstrate that for us to live. It inspired her to write a fictionalized version of a crash with a twelve year. Old Boy named Eddy who loses his parents Prince and beloved brother on a crash of flight to L. A. and as the only survivor he gains the beautiful and burdensome hopes and dreams of the families families of those who died and weaves together those two narratives survivor Edwards struggled to figure out why me and back in time those Dune passengers as they fly toward their fate. A war vet a young woman who finds out on the flight she's pregnant dear. Edward is getting early. RAVES author end Napolitano. Donald joins US FROM NEW YORK. Welcome thank you so much. Take us back. What was that terrible crash that so obsessed you it was in two thousand and ten? It was a flight from South Africa bound for London and it crashed in Libya and there was only one survivor. It was a nine year old Dutch. Boy named Ruben van the sow and basically his seat was found about a half mile away from the rest of the wreckage and he was still buckled in and he had a punctured lung and a broken leg but he was otherwise fine and his brother and his parents had been on the flight. Lighten everyone else had died immediately and I was. I could not read enough about the story. I had two little boys at the time a one year old and a three year old and there is a photo of Rubin in the Hospital Hospital and he is so beautiful and broken and yet alive and OK that I I felt like I needed to make a world world in which he could walk forward and have a life in which something like that. If it had happened to one of my boys that I could imagine a future for them. Well that's what you say in the afterward that it was also inspired by thinking of your own two boys and you know we think of family and what would this be like. But a lot of people can't go toward that thought. You know they wanna to stay far away from it as possible here you spend years making yourself think. What would this be like? What was that like? I think that's preoccupation with like like what your worst nightmare would be and then finding a way to make it okay. So it was trying to create a world that was so so imbued with kindness that there is a way for this boy to find a way forward and we don't want to give away too many plot twist but let's just give a little of the narrative he's a New York City Kid home schooled by his dad along with his brother Jordan. Who He adores? His older slightly cooler brother plays the piano shy suddenly. He's in a hospital hospital bed and people are asking him. How are you doing? And you're right. Edward is unable to answer any of these questions. He can't consider how he's feeling. That door is far too dangerous to open. Did you research because after reading your book I did. Google and there are articles about soul survivors. There's one George Lampson junior in one thousand nine hundred five the only one to survive a crash that killed seventy one in Reno Nevada. Did you research what survivors go through. Yes yes I'm a nervous flyer. I never thought that I would write a book about a plane crash so I had to do an extensive amount of research. I spoke to a pilot. I did a lot of reading. I read national transportation. Transportation Safety Board Transcripts which is the national organization that after every major tragedy they publish a document that says basically what the issue was. What went went wrong? I read and talk to as many people as I could because I was coming from a place of very little knowledge and also I I wanted it to feel true. I didn't want sensationalize the crash. I want it to have the weight that it actually has in the people's lives who lose someone and the people who are on the plane themselves. You take us through through this terrible cascade of mistakes that leads to the crash but back to Eddie Eddie becomes Edward. It's as if almost eddie has died ride with his whole family. He's adopted by his aunt and uncle. who have their own pain? His and of course lost her sister at his mother. But she's always been trying to have children not successfully His uncle becomes obsessed with researching the crash along the way when they're first trying to keep him away from public that's so fascinated with him. He he sort of gets treated a little bit like a hotel guest. Did you research that as well. How people don't know how people what to do while I I did? Read a lot about soul survivors reiver's but more it was coming from a place of even if your spouse dies and you enter a room. People do not know what to say to you. And this was magnified times a million and he was a child as well so that adults couldn't even begin to understand where he might be and so they're so careful around him and that leaves the importance of. There's a girl who lives next door named named Shea whose his age and he ends up sleeping on her floor because he needs to be by another kid because he misses his brother so much and also because she treats him like a normal person. Because she's a child herself at one point he just can't go to a hearing in Washington. DC about the plane crash and she says well no one can hurt you. I mean you're already. We lost everything right. Yeah I mean she speaks the truth to him whereas the grownups are more withholding he also has in addition to the guilt. And we'll talk about that. He has this his PTSD when he's forced to go to gym class play basketball people bumping into him. It's like a plane crash. All over again I mean he has has a physical response. Yes when he's in the hospital after the crash one of the doctor says to the aunt and uncle that the the effects could last for years and it could affect his smell has balances understanding of the world around him. You just don't know win. The symptoms were going to hit and how they were going to hit and really. He's twelve when the plane crashes and when the book ends he's eighteen and it takes that long of all these tiny steps both forward and backward of him trying to make his way to a world where he feels connected again where he's able to love again and and able to accept love because it's it's not a quick process. I mean it just wouldn't be it's yours. I mean we watch them grow Taller Taller and taller. Yes still wrestling with this. You're just another moment with Shay Koshi so blunt She says to now Edward. He shouldn't worry about taking another flight because he's already crashed and statistically impossible for him to crash twice and you're right Edward Barely registers. What she said he's been sucker punched in that moment by memories of his brother and he knows he has to ride the memories south the only way out of it is through it so he sees Jordan beside him on? The plane knows that the smallest truest reason he will never fly again is at the last airplane seat he ever. Jason has to be the one beside his brother that brings us to this guilty. Feels like why me obviously another consequence of you know being Silas arriver and he younger brother too so of course as his therapist points out to him his brother was fifteen and he was twelve and fifteen year olds have more developed personality than twelve year olds do and so Eddie along with missing. His brother with every fiber of his being also feels that his brother had more to offer but then he does so. He has to work through both emotions throughout the book and in all the research we did you probably on the same thing. The one way to get through is to do something for someone else and no. We're not going to give it away. But he sure does but in the meantime there's a couple sidebars here people who just want to make him something he's not. He's just a kid when he leaves the hospital. For instance there's a mob scene so many eyes stared. Edward Seen Looks like a Picasso painting hundreds of eyeballs. And then a smattering of limbs and hairstyles. He realizes he's famous. You've written that you were fascinated by the social media part of this. Yes in two thousand and ten actually was the first time that social media had become kind of what we understand it to be today so when that crash happened The real crash there were young girls who had posted Pages for Ruben. With pictures of him and talking about how devastated they were and how they hope he was. Okay it wasn't just the journalists reporting. It was everyone I mean I think people were looking for connection and they. They're looking for meaning and so they were trying to put that on Edward inappropriate place to put it since he was a young boy who had just law story it would be inappropriate to put it on anybody. Nobody can who the families of the victims want them to be. And you have a great response. I won't say which character tells Eddie this is but at one point someone says Oh. You're nothing special. There's absolutely no reason why you survive this. And it's such a relief. Yeah it's a huge gift. Yeah Ha Hub for you and Apollo Tanno. Did you lose some of your fear of flying. No I probably about the same. I'm still a nervous flyer. I think that I have a I have a greater appreciation and for how amazing it is that we can launch these giant buses up into the air and fly where we WANNA go. I think that is truly awesome but I also look around around the passengers around me and wonder what their stories are. I feel like I'm aware of connections everywhere I go and in the air certainly no exception. That's so interesting because that's what I did. I just every time I met a new character while I was reading your book off line. I would look around and think to myself I should. I should look. I should look at all these people around me. You know. We're in this together. And Yeah let's see them let's see them And Apollo Tanno editor of One story magazine. Her New Book Dear Edward. It's really quite something and thank you so much for talking to us about it. Thank you so much. More than three dozen. Democratic lawmakers are demanding that the trump administration explain why it has not released east billions of dollars of congressionally approved disaster relief to Puerto Rico. The group wrote and signed a letter to the administration which was delivered yesterday. This as has thousands in Puerto Rico are still displaced after a powerful series of earthquakes. NPR's Adrian Florio is in San Juan. Hi Adrienne Hi Tania. Thank you for joining us. And you've been on the ground in the most affected areas to the south What have you seen so right now? What we're saying is thousands of people basically living on the streets sleeping every night on sidewalks or encampments that have sprung up on the sides of roads? Roads are on hillsides or in these big sort of open air filters that local officials have Set up and the reason there's so many people living outside is because they're afraid these aftershocks have continued People are afraid that their houses might come tumbling to the ground with them inside and so people are refusing to go back to to their homes Listen to a woman. I spoke with one of these roadside encampments. Her name is here's what she had to say. The other one opens onlooker personnel argued. I sold them going on by his bid must have AMO bay. They'll see them in the real. You know what I'm saying is that you know there's so much uncertainty in people's lives right now. They don't know how they're they're going to resolve this situation whether they're going to be able to move back into their homes. Her apartment for example was destroyed and she has no idea what he's going to do but on the other hand she said that at these roadside had encampments. They've been getting a lot of help. From just everyday citizens Puerto Ricans from across the island who've been mobilizing to go and take food and toiletries and clothes and sleeping bags. EXA cuts to To people who've been affected the people of Puerto Rico have endured so much in the last few years with hurricanes and now these earthquakes quakes. I can imagine that it's taken such a toll on them and while there are community organizations and relief groups that are there. Can you tell us a little bit more about relief and group stepping up to provide shelter for these people who are outside. Yeah well I mean. There's not any sort of formal shelter that is currently being provided to speak of You know like I said citizens from across the island have been coming into provide tents and sleeping bags eggs. These are all things that are being donated The government has set up these open air shelters and in the last couple of days. The army has actually been setting up these large large tent cities five of them across the affected region and officials are encouraging people to basically move in to these tent cities and indication. You know that this situation is not going to be resolved anytime in the immediate term because again these aftershocks continue and there's a lot of inspection and that sort of thing it needs to happen at people's homes before people can move back. Puerto Rico's Governor Wanda Vazquez Last week asked President trump to approve a federal disaster stir declaration that has not happened yet. But this is important What's the latest yeah President trump did approve was an emergency declaration ration- which makes some money available for the response to the earthquake but would a federal disaster declaration would do is make a lot more money available including money to for example. Put people up in in hotels to resolve some of this issue of the shelter that you were just asking me about also too in the longer term help people repair their homes but but the president hasn't done that yet fema yesterday. I believe said that. That request is apparently still under consideration. And we don't know whether it's going to be approved but because Puerto Rico's government is effectively bankrupt. It probably won't really be able to help this region recover unless federal money is made available. Just won't be able to afford it right. I mean we've been talking so much to about earthquake preparedness. We were hearing numbers that ninety percent of the buildings in Puerto Thereto are not earthquake proof. I can imagine that earthquake readiness is now. A part of the political agenda as it as it hasn't been before that number ninety ninety five percent of the building's not being sort of earthquake resilient refers to a comment that the education secretary here made when he was asked about how many of the public schools were up to code and his response. Was that something around ninety five percent probably were not yes. People here are talking about what it's it's GonNa take for homes and public buildings and private buildings to be brought up to code. It's a huge task In part because for example. If we're talking about you know people's homes is an estimate that something like fifty to fifty. Five percent of the House is important Rico. We're built informally without proper title without the necessary permits. There's a there's a big issue of it sort of informal housing here and you can probably pretty much be guaranteed that most of those houses are built up to code and so it's something that local officials are gonNA after rebel that's NPR's Adrian Florida joining us from San Juan Puerto. Rico thank you so much. Thank staying here and now is a production of NPR earn. WB You are an association with the BBC World Service. I'm Tanya Moseley I'm Robin Young. This is here and now from the early twentieth century through the Nineteen Seventies. Millions of black Americans left the south author northern and Western Cities The great migration is now the focus of a new illustrated history. I think that a book with illustrations more approachable to a wider audience. And I wanted to make sure this got into the hands of as many people as possible. That's next time on here now.

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Batman #32 & #20: 80 Years of Grayson

Capes and Lunatics

46:14 min | 1 year ago

Batman #32 & #20: 80 Years of Grayson

"This episode of Care Lunatics is brought to you by tweaked audio awesome headphones go to tweaked audio dot com and use the coupon code. Southgate get thirty percent off reshipping in a lifetime warranty. We can get there through the link on our website. Southgate Media Group dotcom Luke American your lesson Cova Lunatics podcast uncast. Hello and welcome back to another episode of the Night Wing News. That's rate it just last week. Anyway we're here for part two of our eightieth anniversary. Dick Grayson celebration. I am Phil Joyti already as always and we said last time this time going to be covering Batman Thirty two Batman Twenty from the forties. Oh forty something back in the day. uh-huh so yes. Why thirty two I because again it's like you say like an updated well? The first updated origin of decoration origin story ended. It's like all right so yes. As we mentioned last week I dot Com and some commerce over games but now they have to specifically be like this all ages comic But there was there was generally thought to be a cycle This before that kids would read like like Ajax comics. Kids would age in comics which is still true. I mean people get New People Amish just now. People don't really ever age age out but new new kids And since gone through so much more disposable jeep It would be hard for more a kid in the forties to probably say. Oh Man I love Robin. What's the story? Probably GONNA kids. Couldn't be like Oh yeah here is re this detectives thirty eight even though it's only like five years ago December January nineteen forty five January of nineteen hundred six. But what we've got is but again back then you probably had a high hi turnover eight to every right. Yeah so this is Robin Second Story. He is he's old news now. He's not Character fine We all know Robin Young. Abbot and everyone is familiar with his reckless grin is double make air. Courage gymnast skill. Yes even is corny. Buds we take Batman. We say Robin knows with our magic. Is that but there was a time. When when robins courage and Nimble Line were in doubt that story unsold until now so we present for the first time anywhere? Zora of making hang over decorated boy wonder drum roll please a now second round origin and Which starts out pretty much the same? He's he's an acrobat. He's working with his parents but in both In both of the original origin in this one they make sure to know that Dick is on the ground the when his parents performed there. Just did you find triple spin. And of course that's when the ropes break and His parents are his parents are dead Dick Hears about you're saying bad. Things dislike no Batman pops up like. You can't go to the police yet dick. We need proof getting it will be my job that's right addicts like home. Batman like somehow already knows who Batman is in it again in the batmobile. Oh bill looking sad parents are dead and Batmans like we have things in common parents. Were murdered by gang sue. That's that's why I'm Batman the. Why can't I be a sort of Batman reasons? Same maybe I can help you be sort of Assistant Batman's like it's not that easy danger. You teach me. I learned fast. Give me a chance to get back those rats who killed my mom and pop and Batmans thinking. What did I let myself in for work? Yeah you should have thought that kid into the battle okay. I guess you deserve that chance because we see than we get the montage again and then than we are Batman or Robin. I'm in helping kill Kill excuse me helping capture Boston go. And no one dies on. So they've already cleaned up their act. Yeah they're they're they're not even like on skyscraper anything that looks like they're like in the middle of the street. Yeah they're in the street so if he gives someone in fall they'll be fine down so you know And then again Dan. Bruce says we'll take your parents ev- edge now you can go back to circus life. Dick Says No. I think I would want to be a goal fighting crime. I can hardly wait for our next case us like okay. Yeah Yeah I know. They took out of court or maybe a corker wasn't cool already by nineteen forty six arm to imagine and then in being a Weirdo is like oh about the next case. Dick I only work with me only chance your parents this but now is the end of Robin scrambling to help you. Bruce in like this is just stirring up needless drama. Sure your tackle them because you were mad mad clean through so many members like on you're GonNa be afraid like Oh we'll head it's going to be afraid on thought about Matt Bruce but I I can't have you on my conscience. It's I like you too much and then nick is like makes the silliest again like easing nineteen forties argument. It's not like what I need this outlet. Su Ho. Keep me from becoming angry or like I wanna do truth injustice in also you know they didn't take the NFL. I think we're time space is like but if I if I can't if I don't start keeping Robin I might have life and Huma Coward because clearly that's the worst thing like well you're right. I Bet I guess I'll train more. We'll see bulow. No exactly it's because it's so I mean it's called the story's pretty good but like it's so contrived at least at least they show him showing him the Teaching him detective skills right and then now he's doing detective work. Mark Chemical Analysis checking out slugs in the microscope. And that means like okay. It's time for your next says Scotch Montana recite. welds up to your. Whether you'll keep it or not but commissioned gives them some props odd like he wrote the good work son says thanks launch a duly deputised officer law enforcement job. That kid in the mask Aja they go and then we have our classic things so I do think overall the good job showing that Robin Smart But they do pull the the classic thing that they often do in the early comics which is like oh I have this great you. Let's go rambling. I don't get it but oh yeah of the Harvard. You've been for Batman Pause yet when you made that Pun. It made me realize. The guy's not a quaker. He has wis leave it to nineteen forties. Not all sensitive to be. I mean they're giving the audience figure it out. I mean that's another reason. Robin was there. It's like Bam two yes okay. And they're all and picard game. They go car game and they're starting to beat people up Batmans even make it some ponds Man Robert Gates void hostage. Because that's class. And they tie Batman up indicate robin away but never fear then Robinson's the rest of the story showing how smart he is now so so he manages to put a sign on the car that says stolen so the cops pulled over and they throw robin out. Ns which is Wrigley because of course Leslie Thompkins also having she comes about until the eighties. Muchly you much later adaption So when ron gets dumped into the street they just take him to the hospital will and if people aren't very respectful and do not take his mask off dry to determine determine who he is and said like like okay. You're good yes let's Leslie. Thompkins would not appear until March nineteen seventy six the mistakes. Okay yes so. It says a lot later They just take him to the hospital. he's good none of Gore's law they even though I mean who knows how long it's been apparently not that long because it's still nighttime and of course Robin old if I watch myself Bam the jam. Maybe they've killed them. Oh the A wise guy. He's crying and then he's like a matter with me. I gotta look for a clue it does all that good work puts us his training from the mental training that Rabbit Abbott Farm. But then this one I love. He's standing in the road. How about a hitch them in never did teach me to drive? So I can't take the Babbel Hill in which you because we don't even know how old he is again. There are always very cagey about that. Although it's been six six years but of course this is an Obrero story so knows exactly was can we could have been back in the day. Oh yeah because they don't want him grow up too quick at this point right that I met like driving laws so yeah So and then we have a little joke. The Guy He is the ride with is a real Gabar like Oh man and then he just dropped him off and he strides strides across the roads. That rabbit farm ready and again proves outsmart is by covering up the Jimmy. You guys get smoked out in Boston gets out like Ron and the guy tries to shoot him any shoots off a little piece of his hair. Because of wild wants from the forties robin gets smacked ahead my cop in Nopakat not by a million Who It's good to have a thick head of hair protected you see? Here's here's so thick protected from bullets. Jeez but I'm looking at I'm Don Universe that digital copy was that like the last page of them just like smacking lagoons around. Yes so then. Yeah Yeah so then. Robbins like Well after that Boehner I pulled also classic outdated antics slang yes Like you're a fool at which I assume he means getting myself captured Batman's like your food. You think that you made a mistake but you made up for it you're gonNA use it plenty and so yeah that that's the end there. It is the story that was never told a store that straits. It takes more than costumes. Make a Robin Boyd. Wonder Dr Do. They mean to put that in there because they were like twenty kids trying to fight crime a- like Oh what have we started dupay. Coward put a costume on kipnes spray. A Classic Jones Robin getting his getting his training but still all pretty fast like definitely as time goes on they lengthened the training again like we talked about last. Episode Sodas like back in those days. They never knew people were going to get the next day she sell most of all. These stories were contained in that there are again. It's mostly kids reading it and that it's not going to become. I mean Batman is you know that mini Rahman there's a big cultural icon icon con now. The jokes they never had any idea that might than we become like that so I don't think they probably really didn't feel that they needed to. Oh you know dot every I and cross every so I look at someone in the chat room. Luke said I wonder if hospitals have actual policies on mass tears that is an excellent facets. More like what about like shout endangerment right. Yeah well I mean yeah. That's that's the thing of course is I think you can tell them that this was written or kids Pfoa to enjoy in. Yeah just be fun. Oh you know whatever she better to entertainment because this. There's lots of things that happened that they need that. They've on answered. Because Yeah it's usually child endangerment like why on Earth as soon as Robin shows goes up in the hospital thrown off a moving car the commissioners. Yeah not okay. No Oh he's just like oh good luck son. But I mean geared towards kids met it like Robin so like it you know it would be devastating to give they were like you know actually is trout endangering you should not be doing this one of the willing suspension of disbelief. We'll just suspend a promise gradient yes Robinson terrible idea but I love Rahm it. It was it was the forties I know is a willy's isn't pretty intense willing suspension of disbelief. I think that nobody figures out and again I mean well maybe wasn't so far. Fetched the the next story. I mean we gotta go back a little bit the Batman Twenty but Bruce Wayne Loses the guardianship of that is true with that. Well I think one I think that actually that the is twenty in an article in the book which I'll let you she'll later but a in the forties kids were doing way more work than now. I need so often decreasing uses the classic. Newsboy newsboy thing. So yeah I mean I'm not saying that he will definitely I mean Jonah Edelman was still nothing. I'm pretty sure in the in the forties but yeah I mean kids were doing. It's worth doing work like selling newspapers and stuff Some things that you know Arlington accent less accessible today. Beausoleil said it was four kids. So that's why they do. I mean that's why you know so many me in so many waie books. It's you know like home games. Why the kids convenient? That's a terrible idea. Obviously you know. Totalitarian dystopia hoping society now Yada Yada Yada also macbook is four. Kids are mute for young adults so people need to be young adults in the book so that they're interested in this story because you know open we make more than like. Why is Harry Potter? was like the whole Lord. That really feels like Shamin adults job. The chosen one well so it's kids so yes yes so that sticks. Second Order into remind any new readers misses out dictate Robin member Circus in he knows what's up because Bruce train him any knows. Jujitsu coke okay. so He's good to go. You can't just throw on. You can't just throw on a costume. Although the thing I like of course about this one is some of the later ones. They don't emphasize it as much. It depends on the one. You're reading but like Robin is smart and I think you know there are people who don't so much like the Robin continent the nets. That's fine I like it. You like it but not everybody has to like disease but Iran is a smart kid. Me It's not like bruises just taking so random I mean like the kids train any knows at a so. It isn't just Robin. Well I mean Robin doesn't I don't know I think Robinson drag that me down. Obviously I'm not on that not on that on that side And so I think it's good because they're pointing out in this SEWRI. That Robin is doing detective work. Yes sometimes he has Emotional moments where he said the kid then he gives it together you know together and conducts an investigation finds clues figures out. He needs to go to the rabbit. Farm Bam saved like. He's an asset healer. I honestly don't think Batman would be as popular as he is today without the help of Brahmin definitely. Yeah he might not have made it out of the sexual. You might not have made it out of the forties because there were a lot out of there were a lot in the in the forties. That didn't the debate that didn't make it through. I'm Robin was really popular As Fun fact I don't think. DC Universe has any of these which is killing me. 'cause I need to see crazy quilts first disappearance. But I'll rod his own in the forties. which I think was starting probably right around the time of starting around forty six but he he had star? SPANGLED comics. Phobia is own his own his own seizure So yeah that's one of the fun facts. Is that why Robyn actually appeared more golden age comics than that man. Right because Batman. Robin Roy Together. We'll find There's Caisley story in Batman Where he's on his own but like they'll issue robbins in every it's okay so you just got the eleven Bavin starts out with eleven more but during the Golden Age starts making comments ray of like fifty two issues pursue that Robin and some of those do have Batman in Bunt not all but now so there we go and please. I'm sure you're not listening to this. PODCAST UP HAMAS flames re of the Robin Archives. Because he got I you really need to see the origin of crazy will or put these starr's mill comments on DC universe. So you'd think for the eightieth anniversary they would do that. I know you would think they are going out with Robin Omnibus. But it's on the nineteen seventies robin which is fine. I've already `priority I'm stoked. But they came out with a Robin Golden Age Omnibus. I'm the boss. I would also be about that all right all right. Let's go to twenty. I love this one so much. Are you ready. Yes yes okay. Why did you have any other things to say about the second origin? I don't think so. Good all right The story in Batman Twenty Bruce Wayne Way Muses the guardianship of degrees in south so much because it so many of the things that I love our company. 'CAUSE I love prison day father son relationship and this one has it so much and it's so huge and as Alfred unhelpful found get some Alfred. Yeah in this as you can tell. It's early 'cause Alfred is still fat. Alfred uh-huh as opposed to skinny Alfred. This one is from nineteen forty three. I think yes December this one is also December forty three January forty four. Sorry Okay Batmans coming out six a six month year So one read this one Soda Soda But yes so it's like a reminder that me until Game Dick Grayson whose parents died threat on the tram. Peas says that day the mutual affection affection between this man and boy has been as strong as APP between father and son but now that comradeship is finished Unpleasant duty to relate that swain loses the guardianship zip of decoration. But it's so cute and they're like having a pillow by come on up cute anonymity go downstairs. There's an digs relatives of showed up. It's suppose his aunt Clara in George which I will say one thing that I feel like in this version. They really are his dad's brother and the wife but I will. I'm not sure they're not. They're not specific they don't really investigate it But I think it because what happened. I think it would have been a nice touch if they were like if it's revealed you know that they actually are not days relatives. They're just pretending data's they haven't the parents plan so but he's like hey I'm burgers like also the whole like in modern days. I mean did you could very easily adapt this one as well as But then there would be like you more intense looking but yes. They're like wait if your if your relatives where have you been in all these years and they're like Oh. We were in Europe and we were able to come back with like that's very nineteen forties thing I mean one is during World War you although that's not mentioned but also like nowadays hold water. If you're like you know your you know your brother just died Europe while get your but on a plan and get over here like this is not really being a continent. Away is not come for three years. So but then they're like oh we'll take him and Brazilian know exactly like Oh. I don't WanNa go bruised. Olympic me can't take Dickey my son I will let you Jordan Clar- like Oh. Yeah so we'll see about that boom court I know and then they go to court and Bruce is like like my own son. I've even changed my will case in point debt fickle inherit mine tire fortune. Your honor I love that boy. We don't take him for me. So beautiful ooh Antics like Mr Wayne. Trump man could want a better friend. Sounds like you'd be a little more intense with that But then yes we have come back to bite them in the but the issue that POPs up so often in other Kinda origins and fan. Pigments that Bruce Wayne is as they say. A nightclubbing shift was Cafe Society Playboy Bird Burn. And so as Bruce Bruce thanks like I can't tell the judge that my playboy act as camouflage for man like yeah. Obviously you cannot do that. Of course as would would be a big issue now which is not then is like As soon as you were Batman they would take takeaway but obviously then. It's just like no-one no-one Batman so I can't say anything exactly goes of course. As partner Resolution Batman puts in a good worker made in everyone's like oh we'll Batman says you're good then like your good mass man sure exactly so. Oh yeah then. Of course they pulled all like oh he needs a mother and father in law. The judge is like well. It's got to go with Uncle George Grayson and very sad. This is why he's packing his stuff up. Take a look around the crime better. Check the motors tomorrow. Checking out checking out the penguin umbrella and then yes. Yes a hog dog. I mean I just love when he's packet and he's like oh I guess Batmans GonNa be working alone now so I guess I'll just take my cost you being a dope another kid it off the street and replace me. Yeah that wasn't even on their minds in this one. But they're hugging golly bruce unrest. I'M GONNA stand in it easy. Dick be good soldier which I think might be mentioned I know jail belt roads hoping he's mentioned before maybe walk Daily Robin oxidants. That's what it is But that might be the one of the first instances if not diverse of Bruce referring to a robin as a good soldier So like later that becomes a thing but here. It's probably more of a like you know. I don't be said that you have to go live with your Rando. Uncle just popped up out of nowhere So yeah he says easy. Dick be a good soldier older antics. I hope you'll come visit and then also I think this is a cool touch comics also visual medium. How it got got the big bloom but bruises said and he's like whispering grinds like you buy and so they really tiny in the balloon on? Oh I got the nice touch. It was like really powerful. But that's interesting. You said that I thought of that. I mean he was too young to go off the actual war but it was almost like you know him getting shipped out. Yeah so yeah. I don't think the soldier now. I don't think that the soldier records it it's not in reference to Robin. It's interesting that this becomes a thing later. Like obviously author Jason What's what's on the memorial case right but anyway like I said then I'm thinking it's really powerful? The big speech bubble with a tiny words the kid goodbye and then I love this or recover Batman work I had to pretend to be playboy. Now it's made me lose the person I love the most. It isn't isn't fair. It isn't fair you're right. Bruce is not fair but also I was like oh I love it when I love. I love it when these things happen Then of course assign how nineteen forties. Batman is a bit different Alfred. Like hey here's your cave. You gotta go on yourself. And he's like you. Yeah right after. I can't spend my time brooding sitting sitting right in front sitting right in front of the window. Here's your Cape Sir yes true. Well let's hope the state is down. It doesn't look now but I was holding on the other side. He's only going away from the windows side but yes but also Brazil you're right. I can't keep brooding later Bruce. Become such master Bruder and then Another thing partially reminder reminder that Batman Need Rahman because he's off his game when he goes to fight Foley's of dues at the library they'd Robin come sweeping in. Beverly gets his game. Big Some great puns about lions. There was no one. There was no one to the puns. Exactly and then thanks sneaking out sneak back in then we have the big reveal. Tell something is amiss because Oh Clara is not a doubt Burnett with glasses. She is a sexy blonde. So you know she's trouble will blunt. I know an look. She changes from her matronly green dress into this hot red one. Oh you know you know what they're trying onto signal there then. The big reveal uncle. George says Mr Wayne how would you like to buy back Dick Dick Grayson oh Sweet so y you you don't care anything about take you just wanted to. You could still in back to me like a piece of property. No-go George like exactly. It doesn't even pretend like you're right but I wouldn't advise you to go to the police because they'll just assume you on sour grapes. So you're back to me like chicken exactly so bruce is mad again it's like basically I won't negotiate with terrorists. Notice go threaten Emma's Batman up in Albany like why did you abandon work royal in any number. I love this. He's like great idea. Hell out your genius. Alford quite so Sir Eric quite so Alfred and then Bam threatens than back while they're I'm sitting there guzzling all from their decanters so you also know their various people and he has a gun. My God my my my a gun to you really are bad man. Aren't you So but then uncle George to bring it all together George Allen Fatso Yes fatso goalie. So then Batman gets captured by patio and they a stick him in that air compressor things for divers. They're going to press him to death with compressed. Air Is inventive. We'll say and so now it's up to offer to save the day and he goes and gets Dick go cancer bats owes goons goons threatened with rats. which wouldn't be me talking as well rather creepy And then go and boss up fast. Gang and Robin Martin is again when he's out Renault. Don't open the door or roots and get the Benz events. They have to lower the pressure down slowly the also Albert shows. How smart is that? We have a check off. Gone moment ear Batman Batman Robin when they were in the when they were in the on their tour looking through the looking through the strobe Jovis and was like hey members umbrella paying job bullets out a good time. It's been mentioned. Boom one umbrella. Does Albert bring with him. Uh with umbrella that shoots that bullets new the same it. Can you imagine how the Penguin would burn. If he Nunez is umbrella had saved Batmans life indeed and then the cops are called they bus up Fatso and a bust up George. The words in Clara who immediately they start getting at each other she called George Worm like you talked me into this George. There's like shut up before I put your face so then people are like ha ha. What a what? A loving couple sword orgasm the very next day because now justice move swiftly In Gotham. He's like getting town you to kick Out Dick's going back to Bruce Wayne and as I said Mr Ryan Dick is yours again. The judge incidentally. I'm inclined to agree with the Batman. You've visited me before and said that in spite of your playboy Activities you are really a good man and so I like well. He should know right. That's that is so weird Dick. Well at least you know before. Continuity changed many times here look crooked uncle running around out there. I don't think they ever came back. That whatever part of me wonders Mike I I. We're updating this story out have the angles not real. It's a it's a ploy because Nokkala like little bit were Devin Grayson did in the adoption issues. This zere attorney Where the GRANDPA the GRANDPA's shows up and it's like he's not real no but duplicate Dick Fleming? Even now the courts would be disposed to award. Someone do Blood a blood relative to come up with some sort sort of better excuse for why. They've been out of the fixer but presumably they would come in like more earlier on. You know not a couple years not a couple of years later you oh boy they were still a little bit acting like time actually passed in the same way that it has in the real world. It's been years I'm like Oh my God it. It really hasn't been years but you know. Nowadays using years in our years is like one month in comments on. That would have been eight years. Yeah we'd be on like our Twenty Fifth Robert Like R v Vietnam. I know I was GONNA say Dick would've probably been batman than retired by no. Yeah definitely definitely I mean 'cause I like to go with digs like eight ish on those suggestions chance in some later things that maybe about eight now When he when he started so if you assume he's a born in Nineteen thirty two saw oh yet he's eighty seven years he's he's eighty seven years old Or even if you just go with like he was born as an eight year old in nineteen forty. The eighty not gonNA be Bamiyan when you're eighty down outer so anyway. Oh anyway I would have. I would have to be fake. They would be pretending to be Dick Relatives so they could get money you know. Put the squeeze on Bruce Wayne kind of kind of think But again I think that's just like an wavy SUVs like it doesn't really matter Yet he's crooked. Whatever but yeah moving on next exactly nice kind of thing? 'cause I grew some relatives that pop up occasionally like Uncle Bill Up. It's like that's who raised initially that's raised now Or they teach them with Alfred because after crisis I think they even said in zero hour. He lose kind of fix the paperwork so they can stay with Al Frisky right. Yeah yeah although and then I think later on they're like that's what was in the parents will but I love this one so aw much because it has so much great rouge Sandik bothers saw like that's basically what it is drivers. They father son story. which is like my I babe John Mara so all but also has some classic parts that's for all you know again you see that Dick Dick is smart that he's like Oh wait? We can't just love Bruce Out Obama. No excuse me. We have to reduce the pressures. He doesn't get the band's final thing and actually it's very well written. I mean like I said they check off gun. The umbrella gone. They are using legit literary devices. Ness never love. You said they comics. I mean I know people thought they were contract then but calm is. Let's it's literature. I guess I don't know if it's a good story. Yes and they do and I. It's a testament honestly fleet to how a really good the writers are. I mean they've got two plots going on. You're still manage to wrap it up in ages Maybe not even that. It's just it's impressive. Also how much they were able to do in in his in his like one issue stories. I mean this isn't even. This isn't even a whole issue now because it's in a Batman so it's four Hello that came out but I managed to catch a crow investment Gang in bustle crooked uncle Jordan Ankara. Uh Line they both implicit all in one issue isn't good writing right there. Oh Yeah I mean. MODERN COMMERCE LA Times will stand around talking. There's the talking here it's like. Oh okay yeah I mean there is tough like stuck. Going on. They moved is a much quicker pace as much. It's is a much bigger much quicker pace but considering how quick pace it is. I think that's why I love it so much because it's much quicker pace. But they they still take like an entire page of Dick and Bruce Means said in like you know hugging and crying and stuff just the show how they they like each other and you had to show that they're happy family they show it in one like Oh happy trio. In having pillow fights isn't laughing so cute they get it done fast. Yeah it is interesting Sometimes yeah I think with the Marin County it's I mean they want them to. I mean they want them to have so much more complex. Storylines me 'cause you always think something like harsh. They're always always this sort of stuff Yeah I mean he's a gangster Doug Games or things. There's there's no like deep thing there and you know George Clara. They just want a million bucks. That's it so it's not a lot of work to uncover the voters I kinda I think we have sometimes immodest of it does seem that they also drag things now for the trade paperback yeah to make us may make the money to make monies are anything else. Anyone if you're listening to podcast Mike and you haven't read it. Please read it. I really love. This'll recommended reading list. But yeah I I pulled up the list just so if people WANNA rate to the next episode we do in teen the teen titans fourteen from nineteen sixty eight and the Titans fifteen sixteen from nineteen ninety nine great. Yeah those are some yeah. So we're we're kind of Begley going kind of chronic kind of chronologically like we're doing the early stuff and then we're GONNA do Dick as robin like stuff written later because you know he was Robin in the Robin up until eight four and then he became an but then people are like Robin Year one. I mean that was what likely nineties early two thousands something so. Yeah you'll see when you read. Why were doing those issues together? That's right and then the episode. After that obits the classic new Teen Titans Thirty Eight. Who is Donna Troy showcase of Dick's detective skills? Yes it I don't see I mean granted. Apparently that's also that we like are inadvertently highlighting in Texas field. I mean yes. There are. The golden's overages some issues where I read. I've read the mom talking. Keep reading the ball. There are somewhere a little side. I like a round the boy wonder but there are also definitely ones where here he is. So so yes so so send your thoughts on All those capes lunatics at go dot com caller voicemail. Six one four three eight two two seven three seven. That's six four thirty eight CAPES APES are. Do you have a list of what we're GONNA do posted anywhere I keep me into. I'll maybe I'll do that today. The people can see what we're favorites that are not on the list. Which I'm sure you do? Send Men Rabi Mimika. Squeeze some extras in there. You go maybe you can come on and do it with us. Oh there you go. And and follow social media all of our social media find it all in one place linked tree that's Lan KTAR dot ee slash capes lunatics and. Remember number. Pick up the GRAYSON. Boy Wonder It'd be a nice companion piece. When you're listening to this podcast and Pod life the book for you? PODCAST anyone interested in podcasting or just creative people I think he gets something out of it. Tweaked audio hunter killer support the sponsors check out the Amazon link in the show notes To Send somebody to Southgate Media Group because cost to put these up all right and I know you Never WanNa plug doc anything I know this but yes yeah read these stories exactly. I'll I'll put the list up original Jane. Yeah sixty nine nine on. Yes you take it easy to remember next time. Fourteen fifty up different verse different areas. Yeah late sixty eight hundred fifteen sixty ninety nine. Yes all right right. Kristen said next time same time same channel this weekend.

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Chicago Nurse On Caring For COVID-19 Patients; Ethical Issues Raised In A Pandemic

Here & Now

42:54 min | 1 year ago

Chicago Nurse On Caring For COVID-19 Patients; Ethical Issues Raised In A Pandemic

"From NPR and WBZ. Jeremy Hobson. I'm Robin Young. It's here and now. Senators are back in Washington today. House members don't think is safe quite yet. Congress has already approved trillions of dollars in economic relief but the big decisions about reopening the economy being left to governors and in some cases mayors. So let's bring in the mayor of New Orleans where as many as one in four workers have lost their jobs and in Orleans parish alone more than four hundred have lost their lives joining us. Now is New Orleans Mayor Latoya Cantrell mayor. Welcome thank you so much for having me well and right now your stay at home order is set to expire less than two weeks from now on May Fifteenth. What are you going to need to see from the data to actually ease restrictions at that point? Well One is absolutely Saying a decline in new cases in which we're starting to see that But we are developing our benchmark in regards to what that needs to look like for the city of New Orleans specifically As well as increased testing capabilities a while we have been testing here about six percent on a range of six percent Of all of our residents here which is very high. We want to be at a place where we can maintain and even expand that level of capacity because we will have to effective contact tracing And it doesn't happen without an increase percentage of tests being available and readily available so that we can Really box the virus in while we have been living in an environment where the virus has had us. But you know boxed in meaning at home and as we look to shift towards reopening it has to have a strategy to where we're able to identify who that contact tracing immediately be able to isolate Corentin to box in that virus so we do not get back to community spray it in when it comes to. I'm sorry to interrupt but when it comes to contact tracing your your state has announced plans to hire seven hundred contact tracers but according to NPR's reporting that would get you only about halfway to the number of tracers that the state of Louisiana would need to start reopening right also understand this as relates to contact tracing. It's not just something that government have to do or has a responsibility to do. If the businesses themselves that will also contribute to the responsibility of contact tracing they will know who comes to their establishment. They will have to be able to identify and traced and help us box in and to prevent community spread so the thought that contact tracing is solely government Lead is a fath- narrative. I don't see how government Who Plan itself in every business Throughout I know the city of New Orleans and it just that's that's That's unrealistic so It's going to have to. We're going to have to build a robust contact. Tracing strategy that incorporates not only government but the businesses themselves that are wanting to back up. Okay and how much pressure would you say that? You're at this point to reopen. Because New Orleans when into the pandemic with the country's highest unemployment rate and since the pandemic began economists estimate the state's unemployment rate is about twenty five percent. Are you under a ton of pressure just to reopen now? Oh Yeah I've I've received some pressure some pressure points that hit a little over two weeks ago but was able to counteract very quickly As not being bullied you know about. It is going to be driven by the data and not the date and so with that temperatures have had somewhat cooled down and also with the realization that contact tracing is not just something that government led that there is a responsibility of the businesses. That are pushing To reopen so. I've kind of shifted a little bit of their thinking. In terms of turning the map around a bit and having them focused on what their contracts con TAC tracing plans will be and also how government would be able to hold them accountable to those plan because again the idea and the need is to prevent community spread. And that's something that were coming out of not something that we want to go back into because we will have to shutdown again mayor just just thirty seconds here but how does this compare to Katrina in New Orleans during Katrina. It was something that happened specifically. Not just in New Orleans so with Hispanic it's worldwide it's global and it's the United States being Really the focal point It also expanded the focus on disparities in health disparities that are prevalent in urban environments in our urban cores across the United States of America during Katrina The laser and the focus was just on New Orleans plane. That is the mayor of New Orleans. Latoya cantrell mayor. Thank you so much for joining us today. Thank you so much well to Belgium. Now which is lifting some of its locked down restrictions as infection rates decline. But this small country has been hit hard by Cova nineteen nearly eight thousand deaths. And they've been using new technology to help with social distancing Ram bit a company which focuses on the maritime industry has created a wristband. That's being worn by dockworkers in the port of Antwerp. John Clemens is rom bid CEO. John What does this wristband do? Hey Robin thanks a lot for having us. Oh the wristband will keep people safe of the issue is that there. Is this new economy. The one point five meter. I think you guys say the six feet economy where people want to be kept away from each other so that they cannot stretch the Vitus further. The keeps people from each other and still working safe. Well because what it buzzes. When workers get too close to each other correct the vibrates and the closer you get the harder it starts to vibrate and when you go back to the SAFE POSITION. It stops vibrating. Now Look we know you've already created responds for port workers and they wear them in case of a hazard or to keep them out of certain zones in that last one John. It sounds like you know a dog collar that Oh when they get too close to the invisible fence. They can't pass it. Isn't that same technology for the workers to keep them out of a maybe more dangerous work zone? Yeah and that's exactly how we came. We came to this idea. We were creating geofencing type of solutions to keep people in or out of certain zones. And that's why we had already the base technology in a record time of a couple of weeks. We adjusted our software to make sure they're going to work safely again. Well we've of course are thinking that this technology has been used for people under house arrest. They have ankle bracelets. They can't take off or in South Korea. Which has been terrific at tracking citizens with covert nineteen? There's a bracelet they wear to see if anybody's left their quarantine if they've been asked to go into quarantine so some serious uses for this technology but you know what. I mentioned that it sounds like a dog collar. Have you had people object to this notion that they're treated you know kind of like animals that are confined behind an electric fence and people are capable of keeping six feet away from people? Yeah so I WANNA put one one thing straight. How are we? There is no way that people are being tracked from a location perspective per se so we have communication between the different bracelets and those bracelets themselves do not communicate position. That is no radio technology whatsoever to communicate outside of the Because I agree with you. Things like privacy as you know Europe. Take those things very seriously and of course we would never have had even a possibility to go with this kind of solution to the market if there were privacy concerns so we don't think those things very light but you know yeah and I hear you and we WanNa make that clear. There's an old gathering of information here but but what about that notion that people are being zapped? I mean it does have a whiff of treating people like animals and I'm wondering if people are thinking we don't need this. We can make these decisions ourselves. Yeah of course the last thing they WANNA do is treating people like animals. We talked to a lot of workers and they say it listened. When we get into the swing of things we might forget that safe distance kind of new way of working. And that's why they say it it actually is going to help them especially in the first couple of days couple of few weeks. Stay safe while working. And we believe that over over a period of time. They will keep a safe distance naturally. Well WE UNDERSTAND YOU'VE received requests from five hundred companies and nearly one hundred countries. So do you see it being used? Let's say you pick one up when you go into the supermarket and just slip it on. So you don't have to think about social distancing when you're shopping we actually created this device for workers in a in a more business environment. Of course we get these requests. Can we handle those? Yes we could. We WanNA give priority to those companies who can also use the bracelet for safe working under a crane for example in a board environment if people WANNA create these geo fences around a bracelet so that people can work in safe environments and. That's why we are working first with companies who can use it in that perspective versus only for social distancing What a great great idea. There John Botha's months the CEO of Rom bit the Belgian Tech Company. That's developed this wristband to help workers see when they've come too close to another worker. We'll have a picture for you here. Now Dot Org John Thank you. You're very welcome. Thanks for the Opportunity Robin and have a great day own. I love to scroll through my twitter feed I feel privileged to be made privy to such an outpouring of humanity and recently a tweet with a photograph of a beautiful but tired looking young woman. Her face covered in welts stopped me in my tracks. Both my patients died today. She wrote back to back codes. My face hurts but my heart hurt worse. Her face was bruised by her N. Ninety five mask. Her name is Dominique pure wrote and she joins us from Chicago and Dominique. I'm so sorry. Could you tell us as much as you can? What happened that day? Well so I actually ended up at this hospital Through a sort of relief corps that the State of Illinois has created called Illinois helps. I knew that it comes with risk but for me I'm single. I don't have any children so I figure there are people that are really do want to help. But they're afraid of you know bringing the infection home to their families which I completely understand so I don't really have that concern. It's just me and the dog So I figure if I could sort of be someone that could take the place of someone who was afraid because of those reasons I just wanted to be as helpful as I can during this. I know there's been a huge outpouring of people who are working neighborhoods and helping with groceries and trying to support our other essential workers who are not just hospital workers So I signed up for Illinois helps to see if they could be direct me to hospitals that were in greater need and these patients are sort of the sickest ones and things happen. Very quickly So you know morning Was the first one and was not expecting it at all The team that I'm working with is great. Unfortunately we could not save that person and Probably half an hour later The other one so it was just a very overwhelming day. There's just not time to process things because you know after a person dies we have to. Do you know our post mortem care. And for these particular patients that carries a little more intense just for infection control purposes. So it it was. It was a long day. Yeah Oh you know so many things here. It sounds like you're thinking something slipped through my hands right now but are you also thinking. This is someone else's family. I mean they're not there. Oh absolutely yeah yeah. Yeah Yeah I mean that's the worst part about all of this actually is that These patients are alone. And it's just me so When type of thing happens you kind of have to Walk that line between being their caregiver and being a family member. Sorry it's just hard yeah You know we hear about nurses go out on social media and say you want us to give us send me a picture all bring it. Do you feel you have to do something We Are you know showing them cards at their families have sent or pictures or trying to face time with family which has been really helpful for everybody. So it's a little bright spot and all the craziness. Yeah I'm thinking of that moment. I mean you're not a priest you know but yeah sure you like have A. I don't know just something to acknowledge that moment Yeah you just try to kind. Hold their hand and wait for you. Know the maters to turn off and sort of Be Gentle and As carrying as you can to hear you say to hear you say what you just said. I'm sure that meant so much to so many people to know for them to know you hold their hand. I mean that's what I would hope someone would do for my family. If I couldn't be there okay. Look we're hearing the toll it's taking and you'd be. I'm sure be first to say. Don T deflect it to the patients the families but I. I have to ask where sure you've heard of Dr Lorna Breen. This is the top emergency room doctor. New York who both worked in the emergency room and then was a victim of covered. Nineteen you know. She took her life. Her father said there was absolutely no sign. That hers needs to be a story about the whole cove in one thousand nine hundred takes both the disease and then the people working around it the PTSD that health workers are going to have maybe already have. We will never know what happened with Dr Green. But I'm wondering how that story resonated with you and your colleagues my condolences to her family. That's so awful I remember seeing it. Come across the screen in the break room and we all kind of just nodded like you know like all kind of understand the weight of it. I mean we all have experienced death in our careers. That's not something that we're strangers to. This is A lot more intense and lot more. I guess furious like it just feels like I'm from the Midwest so very familiar with storms and tornadoes and to me the best way to describe it. Is that like roar that you hear and a Tornado The impact of this illness a nurse brought the country split right now places of opened. There are people who haven't seen it at all. What would you want them to know? Well it's been really frustrating for me to see. There have been a lot of people some of my family included that live in. You know more rural parts of the country that are. It's not as bad as people are saying it's a hoax. It's this it's that at first you know I would try to engage and maybe try to educate them a little bit. I don't know I mean we've just gotten to a point where people are either on one side of the line or the other but we just don't know enough. You know three weeks ago when I started this job everybody was on hydroxy. Chloroquine and then the Literature came out to say that that is not helpful. And May in fact be harmful so no one's on hydroxy chloroquine. We have to have a way to treat these patients consistently that works. And we just don't have that. I mean we definitely are doing everything that we know how to do which is called supportive care which basically just means that we support your body with IV fluids and IV antibiotics and maybe a ventilator. So that your body can maybe get better on. Its Own. But we don't have. There's no miracle cure for this nurses need. What's the best thing that we can do for you all know? Gosh I've heard thank you more in the last probably three months than I have in the nine years a nurse but there are so many other people that are involved in this environmental services and respiratory therapy and pharmacy and physical therapy occupational therapy people that help us do our jobs so they definitely deserve just as much recognition The thing that we would appreciate most is for people to listen. Like don't argue. Don't try to prove me wrong. Like I. The thing that has been the most disheartening is. How many people are just accusing me? And My colleagues of lying and I think that happened to you. That happened to you after you posted this. Oh Yeah I'm there are several comments. Where people are you know. I'm a liar and this is a hoax. And you made this up for you know Internet clout. It's just Frustrating when people try to just smudge me by saying that that because they didn't experience what I did or they weren't in the room with me or they couldn't video record me that I must have made it up and I just wish that people would when a physician or a nurse or respiratory therapists or whoever who is in the hospital every day taking care of patients and taking care of covert patients Says you know. Please stay at home. Please wear masks. Please limit the amount of times you go out. Please don't sit in circles with your neighbors. You know I know that it's hard. It's been hard for me is hard for everyone but really those are the only tools that we have left to try to slow the spread of this and too slow enough that we can figure out how to manage it. I just wish that people would listen buzz. Really that's what people could do That's nurse Dominique Perrault in Chicago Tweeting recently about losing to patients back to back and we wanted to listen to what her experiences like Dominique. Thank you so much. I wish you all the best. Thanks so much for having me and if you have nurse you'd like to thank maybe this one leave a common dot. Org this is here now from NPR and WBZ. I'm Jeremy Hobson today. Fashion Retailer J. crew filed for bankruptcy protection after reaching deal to restructure debt. With its lenders. It is the first major retailer to take this action amid widespread business shutdowns across the country for more let's go to Jill Schlesinger business analysts with CBS. News and host of Jill on money. Hi Jill Hello so J. Crew barely escaped from filing for bankruptcy back in two thousand seventeen. Why are they in such trouble? Well I think the most important part of your intro was the debt. So J. crew carries one point six five billion dollars of debt and that actually resulted from a previous transaction. Essentially the company used to be a publicly traded company. It was then taken private and in order to take a private the equity group. That did that borrowed money and all of this debt has been weighing on this company year after year 2017. They almost filed to get relief from that debt but did not and as a result. Now what they're doing is they're taking the debt and they're turning it into ownership or equity. So what will happen to the J. crew stores when businesses are allowed to reopen well? I think what's really interesting is that we don't know first of all that in chapter eleven. What they're hoping to do is renegotiate. A lot of these deals come out of bankruptcy but we don't know how many stores will survive so there are one hundred eighty two different Locations for J. Crew. There's another one hundred forty made wells which is another part of this family and one hundred seventy outlets of the J. crew brand. I don't know how many of these stores are going to make it back and I think that they're going to have a smaller footprint. We don't know which ones will survive. And which ones will be shuttered. Who else do you have your eye on? When it comes to retailers that could follow a similar path and there's been talk about JC Penney or Neiman. Marcus yes both of those very much widely in the news. We know that macy's and the gap have renegotiated a lot of their deals. All these retailers really have come into the pandemic period hobbled by trends that have been going on for twenty thirty even forty years. We know department stores have been struggling. One marketing expert said to me that coming into the to the pandemic department stores were in the seventh inning of their lives. There now in the bottom of the knife but many of these stores can come out of this period again smaller footprints but they may have these brands that they licensed to others. So I'm also keeping my eye on Nordstrom as well and some of the names that I think are going to slide through the these middle tier retailers that just are losing out to the online brands but also losing out to the idea that many people are going to be very comfortable shopping online when previously. They weren't well. You mentioned macy's macy's announced plans to reopen stores in some places starting today. Yeah I think this is certainly ambitious I think that there's a real issue around if they open. Does it matter because maybe we weren't going to walk in there anyway? Maybe the pandemic wasn't this big moment in time where it makes a business rethink its business. But it accelerates all the plants that were already in place and I think that that's likely to be the trend that we see specifically in these retail brands. I'm also interested in these fast casual brands. Let's see if people are going to be so quick to go to a forever twenty one and if those brands survive Jill Schlesinger business analyst with CBS News. Thank you great to be with you. Jeremy we occasionally take a look at some of the ethical questions raised by the pandemic how the tests are run. The restrictions early on we watched protesters in Washington state angry. They couldn't get into a nursing home to see a loved one. There remember. That seems like so long ago and now people across the country are outside nursing homes looking in one of them ethicist art caplan. He's head of division of Medical Ethics at New York University School of Medicine. His mother Nataliya died in the Saint Patrick's Manor Nursing Home in Massachusetts a week ago today from Colvin. Nineteen at the age of ninety six. Are I know you were metaphorically? Outside looking in was your sister who was trying to give her care from here in Massachusetts described her as a pistol. Your mom. She's sure sounded like one. We were so sorry. Thank you yet. She was a pistol I know. Some people may be thinking ninety six good life perhaps not a sad. It was sad she was still enjoying her life enjoyed Going out to restaurants loved getting her hair done loved dressing up love music all the arts and craft she did. She was mentally with it and she loved the visits for my they. They really meant a lot to her. She was in there frequently well and then. She had to stop as visited nursing homes. Yes stopped and your sister said that your mom just really declined precipitously at that point and there are people we remember those protesters. There are people still saying. Can we make exceptions here? If they're going to be sick anyway if they're old anyway. Talk about the ethics. I mean I want to talk more about your mom and thank you for being to talk just a week later but did you ever question the ethics of being denied entry to the nursing home. Oh Yes yes. So when she cut this thing maybe three weeks ago she went into isolation by sister tried to visit her by going to a window outside a room and tapping on it holding up signs urging her to drink and eat but she stopped eating the feeling She lost her. Appetite is part of the symptom in that seems to be one of the consequences of the virus but again now she's in a room. She has no access to anybody meals or kind of brought in and the staff runaway freight of covert and. They're not necessarily with the right equipment. And you have no exercise. You have no nothing. She was clutching the phone hoping that one of US would call her. So you've got to really understand how sad the situation is what isolation really means and yes. I thought. Can't we get gowned? Can't we get basket? We go in there to at least have goodbye but the protective order was in round so that doesn't become an ethical question. It becomes a practical question. It does and you have issues of well who could go in could religious chaplain. Type Person. Go in would be better for my sister to go in the respecters of going in a lot of people with a mother or Dad. Grandpa would say. I don't care what the risk factors are going in. I gotTA hold their hand. Have My last words? You know. It's even difficult in these situations. We think of facetime being ipads but then have them in these nursing homes and they don't know how to work them certainly the resident so some of the means that we use zoom and so on. Just aren't there will be as an ethicist. You say. Yeah there are questions about why? Why can't I go in and see my grandparent? My loved one but the answer is because there are people in there as well and talk about that part of this the E. pluribus unum part of this. Everyone's actions aren't just their own actions. Nursing home is a tiny little community. People are coming in all the time. When you're not an coverted room to do something or someone to change a an optima bag but these are temporary nursing homes or come to the forgotten part of the healthcare world. So what I'm saying is they're moving virus around inside the nursing home if you get an outbreak arrest before disaster. I think eighty people died in a home in holyoke Massachusetts. During the same time. Last week there were ninety reported dead in the New York City nursing home. The conditions in nursing homes are great. And when you worse than them by having to keep cova positive people with part time staff it just becomes like an incubator for disease by the way. Did you become resigned? You the ethicist wrestling with this question with your own mother in the nursing home. Did you become resigned to know? It wouldn't be ethically right to go in now. I did I did. I accept it in a you. It was going to be too hard for them to manage that at the home frail. Move out so that wasn't a possibility either. Well you've also taken a stand on an ethical issue in human vaccine trials. Some volunteers are being injected with a test vaccine but researchers aren't exposing them to the virus that is rarely done in a human pilots. That's what happens in animal trials. They're just GonNa follow them and see if they come in contact with a virus somehow will vaccine. Fight it off. You say that needs to change right now. Really expose humans to this deadly virus if we're GONNA get out of this horrible pandemic which is taking hundreds of thousands of lives in North America. How many around the world we're going to have to speed up vaccine development. You hear some politician saying trump say today six months there is never going to be a vaccine and six months because it would take a couple of years to show that it worked if you just rely on immunizing people and then seeing whether naturally eat they get sicker. They don't mind proposal. Is We get volunteers? Who Consent to get vaccinated in young age groups of the death rate is very very low from the disease deliberately then challenge them with the virus that would speed up the process by years. Well I mean again. The ethicist is asking what your question would be. What's best for the planet not necessarily the individuals I mean. How do you gauge that? So partly it's how do we cut deaths by millions potentially over many years if we let the volunteers do what I'm suggesting. And then even the volunteers we could take them from young age groups that are high risk exposure people who might be first responders healthcare workers who are nursing home workers are getting exposed anyway at pretty high levels so if you knew what was going on you knew in their infected. You could follow them closely. Then I think you get your answer and people said to me well. Who's going to do that? Well actually I think they're about ten thousand people so for mine who volunteered. Yes in fact. There's a bill in Congress asking regulators to approve these so-called challenge trials for the criminal virus vaccine. There's a website one day sooner dot org more than nine thousand ten thousand people. Globally have volunteered to take part. But you know people volunteer to sell their kidneys and things and we don't let them do that. Although by the way we do let them donate their kidney. And the risk factor. They're dying is about the same as what we're talking about for a young person. Kovin but I guess I'm saying there are some things we don't allow because of concerns the individual. You're saying that the concern here is on the side of our future and for that reasoning. People should be allowed to do it. I wrote I think people should be allowed to do it to protect so many more of the rest of us. It's really altruistic. Act obviously there has to be fully informed. They have to. I wouldn't pay them because I don't want anybody suggesting they're doing it for money. And what them to do it for pure altruism and I think they could really contribute to getting us not just deaths from this thing but getting people back out and the economy going and all the rest of. It's not just who's going to die 'cause they get infected. It's who's going to die because they can't put food on the table. Kaplan we started by noting. Your Mom's passing from cove in one thousand nine just within the week. What do you say to people? And we're seeing the protests. Who say. I'm not going to wear masks. I mean Vice. President Mike Pence apologized for not wearing a mask. But people who say. I'm just not going to do it either. I'm against government tyranny or has become a political symbol people who are rejecting the social distancing. What are the ethics there? I'd say you're right to go. Get a tattoo. Seems weak relative to killing grandparent's? There's really no other way to protect the most vulnerable by engaging in the social distancing the an Washington the masks and I I hear what people say about. They don't want to be told what to do. But I think that comes at too high. Praise if you'RE GONNA wind up having the kind of Holocaust we're seeing in the nursing homes. Well people didn't like seatbelts either for awhile are Kathleen head of the division of Medical Ethics at New York University School of Medicine and most important for this conversation. The Sun one of the children of Natalie Kaplan again art. Thanks so much for speaking with us. We wouldn't be talking about. We've talked a lot about the healthcare side of this pandemic but for many Americans. The most pressing issue is economic more than THIRTY MILLION. People have now applied for unemployment benefits which does not count the many who have tried and failed to apply for those benefits and many are unable to make their rent payments for the month of. May It's already made the fourth dark Thompson has been looking at how this pandemic continues to hit people economically he senior editor at the Atlantic and he joins us from Washington. Hi Derek Hi Jammie so at the beginning of this crisis. Politician said don't worry so much about the economic stuff because it's only temporary and everything will come back roaring back just like it was but people have been unable to work for almost two months now in some places. Many Americans don't have the savings to get them through that. Yeah I would say do worry from the beginning. We had a pretty clear idea that this was going to be a disaster. And I think it's fair to say that from a labor market perspective. It's been about as bad as feared you're talking about an unemployment rate that's probably around twenty percent that's twice as high as the worst month of the great recession. It's almost as high or maybe exceeding the worst month of the Great Depression. Meaning it might be the highest unemployment rate in American history. To the government's credit. There is a plan to make sure that people have money even if they're not working and it's a three-part plan I you have the twelve hundred dollar checks that are being sent out to the vast majority of Americans at least those in the middle class. You have beefed up unemployment insurance which is helping a lot of Americans make closer to what they would have made if they were formerly employed in the economy fulltime. And then you have the payroll protection program. Is the government paying companies to not fire their workers. You put all of that together. It's a patchwork safety net but a patchwork safety net is definitely better than no safety net at all and this has been the government's response to what is truly an unprecedented labor market crisis. Well Derek it's one thing for so many people to be getting unemployment benefits and having the uncertainty that goes along with not knowing when they're going to have a regular paycheck again. What are the economic consequences? Though of so many people dealing with the level of income that is different and lower probably than what they had before. You know it's interesting. Because at the beginning of the crisis people talked about this being a supply side crisis that means that the US wouldn't be able to get all sorts of electronic equipment or agricultural products from other countries because those markets are being. Shut down what we're seeing right now. Is You just pointed? Out Are the beginnings of demand-side crisis. You have Americans who don't have enough money potentially especially if they're not getting jobless benefits to pay for essentials whether it's food tore the paper you know health care if they need it. I think that what we're seeing in woods truly. The most concerning thing about this is that if the federal government can't give individuals money to live soon we could see starvation. We could see people struggling to make ends meet and we could also at sort of the broader level see a demand side crisis intersecting with the supplies head crisis. And that's really the beginning of something that's not just an economic recession. It's more like an economic depression. What about on the business side today? For example in Florida they're allowing many businesses to open up at partial capacity in that state. Twenty five percent capacity these businesses. Still have all their expenses. Many have not gotten loans or grants from the government. Although some have can we really get back to a situation where everybody's able to get their jobs back where everybody was able to be employed as they were before if businesses can only be operating at partial capacity for the foreseeable future? This crisis is really cleaved. The economy into there's a handful of companies that are doing sensationally. Well if you're delivering almost anything whether it's pizza or all sorts of products like Amazon instant card but there's a lot of other businesses that are in the face to face economy that just can't operate right now and my concern for them is twofold. I I want them to be able to their breath in a no oxygen environment. That's right now where you have. Stores shutdown people cannot walk into them. That's a no auction environment. And Right now. They need to hold their breath and get through it. But as you alluded to the reopening of America when it comes is going to be a low oxygen environment. It's going to be a period of time when restaurants can't be full capacity. Movie theaters can't be full capacity. Stadiums might have to be empty. And that's why we need a two part plan. We need a plan like P. to prepare for today's no oxygen world but we also need a plan for the world that's GonNa come after that we're companies are going to have to operate at twenty five fifty percent capacity when we already got a sense of that over the weekend Warren Buffett said that he had sold all his shares of Berkshire Hathaway his company had sold all of their shares in the four largest. Us airlines. He says he doesn't know if three to four years from now people will fly as many passenger miles as they did last year. There are too many planes. Sounds like that statement may apply to more than just airlines dirk. Buffet said you've got too many planes. I think you could say we've got too many fill in the blank for a lot of things. We have ten times more physical retail shopping space per capita than Germany. We've three times more than Canada. So we are massively over retailed and as a result. I think that only because of the crisis keeping people in their homes but also because of the coinciding growth of e-commerce. You're going to see a lot of physical retailers. Not Be able to hold their breath during this depression. You already saw today. J. Crew filed for bankruptcy. We're going to see a lot more of those because there is just too much retail space and America's going to have to constrict it's retail space going forward that is Derek Thompson senior editor at the Atlantic Derek. Thanks as always thank you and here now is a production of NPR. Wvu Aren't association with the BBC. World Service. I'm Jeremy Hobson rather young. This is here now.

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July 18, 2019: Alaska Police Shortage; David Crosby Documentary 'Remember My Name'

Here & Now

42:09 min | 2 years ago

July 18, 2019: Alaska Police Shortage; David Crosby Documentary 'Remember My Name'

"From N._P._R.. News in W._V._U.. Are Boston Eric Westervelt. I'm Robin Young. It's here now the president double down on his attacks of four democratic congresswoman of color at his rally last night questioning their love of country telling us how to run it how to do this. How do you know what if they don't love it? Tell them believe it and later when he spoke of Congresswoman Ilhan Omar the only one of the four born outside the U._S.. In Somalia he called her antisemitic. She has questioned the power of Israel Israel and this happened. Send her back. N._P._R.'s senior Washington editor in correspondent Ron elving joins US Ron <hes> this week most Republican lawmakers refused to criticize the presence tweets earlier this week saying that these women all U._S.. Citizens should go back to the country they came from <hes> against three were born here but what's been the reaction to his supporters. Taking up last night discomfort Robert I think that even among some of the president's strongest supporters in the Senate and house there is discomfort with that chant and with the notion which is widespread that we're going to hear here that exact chant at every donald trump rally for the rest of this term of his presidency he is going to bring up the subject and people are going to pick up that chant in much the same way that people chanted lock lock her up in two thousand sixteen in reference to Hillary Clinton and the president's implication that she was lawbreaker who needed to be arrested in jail. You're saying the horses out of the Barn and optics count and this is reminiscent of you know Brown shirts a you know in Nazi Germany will some Republicans have distance themselves here's G._O._P.. Senator Lindsey Graham looking a little as you said uncomfortable speaking on to C._N._N.. This morning all of these congressmen won their election. They're American American citizens. This is their home as much as mine and I believe their policies will change America for the worst and that's the debate for me. Is that argument working <hes> because we've heard Republican voters say it's their policies that they should leave. Leave the country for for questioning America. The problem here is that when Lindsey Graham says that they are as much American as he that they have as much of a right to be here as he does that view is clearly not shared by many people who were at at that rally last night in North Carolina or many of the other people you can find on twitter and other social media responding to the criticism of the president for saying these things about duly elected United States Congress persons who are citizens of the United States three three or four of them born here. These are things that have been not just beyond the Pale but <hes> in some people's view unlawful for the president to say <hes> this well it's disturbing because he is literally mischaracterizing these people as being something other than what they are now of course we have a huge debate going on on many levels as to whether or not the president can be held accountable for things that he does that are outside the Pale that are outside the general a legal statement of what but you can say about other people even in your official position but of course this is just one more example of how by disrupting all of the normal standards disrupting the way Washington has worked the sort of comedy between the parties and by comedy I mean C._E._O.. UH-HUH M._I._T.. Why that that that old word that people would use for the uneasy relationship but nonetheless courteous relationship between political adversaries that we've had back to the very beginning of the republic well? We'll be hearing about this <hes> over the course of the day but meanwhile in the House Republicans and Democrats teamed up to strike down a key affordable care act tax what was it what does it mean. This is a tax that was going to kick in <hes> in twenty twenty true so it's not an existing tax. Nobody's going to get a tax break that they've been enjoying. This is a tax that had been imposed as part of Obamacare as a cost control measure. Not Everything in Obamacare was about cost control much of it was about providing insurance to people who don't have it and making it possible for people who can't afford insurance just to get it but at the other end of the insecure scale where for example a full family policy might cost people thirty thousand dollars a year paid for by their employer or paid for through their union contract or paid for by themselves but the really high end cover everything very few co pays kind of insurance which was referred to because it's so fancy as a Cadillac plan now of course it doesn't have actually anything to do with cars but this was going to kick in in two thousand twenty you too and it was meant to suppress the cost growth in healthcare and we haven't seen whether or not it would do that because it hasn't kicked in. It's been delayed several times now. Apparently it's not going to happen at all because following up on this House vote there seems to be working majority in the Senate to pass it there and we can assume more or less that president trump would be willing to sign anything that did anything to change obamacare. Meanwhile Republicans and Democrats also joined to table and impeachment effort but at least one hundred <hes> lawmaker said they WANNA consider it further so that maybe hasn't completely gone away N._p._R.'s senior Washington editor in correspondent Ron elving. Thanks as always thank you rubbing racially charged police shootings and allegations of abusive force get a lot of media attention but there's a less less well-known crisis in American policing today many departments across the country simply can't find enough men and women to fill their ranks sixty six percent of departments nationwide have reported a drop in applications in Alaska. The problem is particularly bad. According to a new report out today from the Anchorage Daily News and Propublica one in three communities in Alaska has no local police protection of any kind. Some departments are having to hire people with criminal records including sex offenders Kyle Hopkins from the Anchorage Daily News. This is one of the lead reporters on this story and he joins us from Alaska Public Media in Anchorage Kyle welcomed here now. Thanks so much kyle you found that many villages have no police protection almost all Alaska native communities has the state always struggled with this issue or is it gotten worse in recent years. We believe it's as bad as it's ever been. <hes> one of the things we found is that is that no one really was was keeping track of how many communities in Alaska had police and who those police officers were and so one thing we've tried to do with this reporting for the first time really provide a snapshot of Okay You know in these small Alaska towns he small Alaska communities. How many of them have some type of law enforcement? We found that there's at least seventy places that have a school that have a post office but have no local police of any kind and then what this latest story explorers is the idea that in some places that do have police. It's because you know city leaders face this choice of you know either. We have no one or we hire somebody who really anywhere else in the United States probably would not be working as a police officer. Yes some of the officials you talked to spoke of a lack of jail space a lack of housing using also burn out and low pay and constant turnover these big problems there now having to resort to hiring folks with criminal records right. We visited the village of Stebbins which is on the on the Bering Strait. It's a place where about six hundred seven hundred people live it would have no police if it weren't for this small police force of guys who what we found all have domestic violence convictions <hes> in a couple of cases there were recent police officers officers with convictions for sexual assault. There is a registered sex offender who worked as a police officer in that community for for the for the first three months of the year and these are officers who in some in some cases are doing the same types of things that that you would have a police Lisa doing in a major city you know they're they're arresting drunk drivers. They're putting people in jail there you know they have authority and the ability to take people in the custody and and what the city's tell us is no one else is applying because for all those reasons you mentioned that that police departments are struggling with recruitment you have that happening in rural Alaska but then you also have this element of you know this is a place with no running water no flush toilets it can only be reached by by a boat or a plane and you're asking people to arrest. I you know their friends and family and neighbors and so it's you know it's a it's a pretty undesirable job. It also seems like your reporting highlights. You know what you guys call a two tiered criminal justice system that may leave many Alaska natives simply protected what I would say that was one of the foundational elements to to the stories that we're working on this year. Is You know we're looking at Alaska's high rate of sex crimes <hes> sex offenses. Ah which is a problem that has persisted throughout my lifetime in Alaska and it seems to continue to get worse everything we try. It doesn't seem to work and so we wanted to explore why that is you know our our people in Remote Alaska communities receiving leaving a different <hes> level of public safety and justice or or justice at all compared to to those of us who live in the city's Kyle. This doesn't seem to be a just a budget issue Alaska's one of the richest states in the country. It has a sixty five a billion dollar savings account thanks to oil royalties and because of mineral royalties residents get a personal payout each year sometimes in the thousands. Why isn't the state use some of this wealthed better fund public services including law enforcement man? That's that's the subject of kind of like a civil war. That's happening in Alaska right now. Where there's a real fight over what the size of state spending should be <hes> and whether or not you know the money that we spend on services like the public safety but but all services should <hes> should be reduced in order to provide these oil wealth checks that we all get as Alaska residents <hes> and you know that it's a fight between our governor and the legislature and what? What I've heard from <hes> some regional leaders from some Alaskan native leaders is that they would like to see you know less tax credits for oil companies and more spending on the areas of Alaska where those natural resources come from which is which are the remote mode and Rural Areas Kyle Hopkins reporter at the Anchorage Daily News who contributed to the Daily News and PROPUBLICA report on Alaska's law enforcement crisis cow great reporting? Thanks a lot thanks so much in here and now is supported by daily harvest daily harvest delivers carefully sourced chef crafted smoothies soups harvest bowls overnight oats and more all built on fruits and vegetables each single serving Cup can be prepared in minutes. Kaley harvest is designed for convenience so you can load up on fruits and vegetables first thing in the morning before bed at any time in between learn more about daily harvest and get three cups in your first box when you go to daily harvest Chris Dot Com and use Promo Code now that's Daily Harvest Dot com use Promo code now. Eh that's sweet judy blue is just one of the many hits from crosby stills Nash and young as a member of that band as well as the birds birds. David crosby became an integral part of the American soundtrack influencing generation of rockers and singer songwriters but after several giant albums world tours and broad success both bands dissolved in Akron David Crosby lost years years of music to a heroin and cocaine addiction as well as a prison sentence on drug and gun charges now in a new documentary David Crosby remember my name the seventy seven year old takes an unflinching look back at his life crosby's interviewed by filmmaker and rock journalist Cameron Crowe Crony of across became by the N._p._r.. Studios in New York to talk with me about the movie. I think whatever it says I think it's it's very honest Phil. That's the the one thing they asked to be man. They didn't ask much. They did ask that. I you know I give it. An honest shot cameron cameras no me since he was fifteen he knows Merola bodies buried a teenager as David says when when you first met them when crosby stills Nash and young precip the stage in the airwaves talk about the impact their music had on you just as a young guy I couldn't believe that so much was being accomplished with a minimum of guitars and a maximum of you've great songs and they're all sung with such passionate wasn't kind of disconnected pop music made to just be on the radio and that's it these guys were really feeling it and as a young guy I was looking to that so when I started we're doing interviews. David was one of the first guys I wanted to talk to and to my remarkable surprise he was the most generous interview you could've imagined for a fifteen year old fans last journalists to get and I <hes> <hes> I actually have never stopped interviewing David and this film is a chance to do one more tough round of of interviews and because he was there and the camera was going and it was very personal experience. I did feel like I could ask ask him anything. He asked me to harness questions ever been asked in my life and the result you know we went into it thinking about it the same way cameron doesn't want to shine job. I don't want to do a shy job. We knew that I have had a checkered history and we knew that I am not a perfect person and we're okay with that. In the film you go back to some of the places in Los Angeles and elsewhere where crosby stills Nash for Scott going. Let's take a listen. That's the house our house was written about right there. It is very very refined house cats sheets that interior like they're the yellow white win back through that window. That's the kitchen as crosby stills. Nash was born right under that like did you guys know right away that you had the makings of a band that would be as huge as C._N._N.. And see US N._y.. Became crosby stills Nash when you read way as as soon as we sang one a stephen socks you know he's a great songwriter as soon as Nash top part. We said Oh yeah okay. That's that's what I'll be doing for awhile <hes> Neil much much less sure but Neil Neil had been in springfield with Stephen and so I think he had mixed feelings but we all knew he was talent. The real meter the matter in crosby stills Nash wasn't what everybody thought it was. Yes we had a great sound a great vocal blend and but the real meat was in the songs it was the juxtaposition of my songs with Nash Songs with stills hit songs and Neil when we were trying to decide I this is in the film. I said this in the film. It's absolutely true. Neil sang me some of those socks. When I'm listening to the songs that he was writing? Oh Hell yes are. What do you have a favorite Neil young song? Maybe help us. It's a great film but you voice a lot of regrets in any regrets about burn burn bridges about time wasted being wasted regrets about becoming addicted heroin cocaine. I mean you're very honest in the film about those dark times is the film for you something of an apology or an attempt to make amends Sir not. I don't think apology you're making amends. It's more like a catharsis. It's more like if you want to learn from your life. Okay you have to look at things. You're proud of that you. You naturally do that but you also have to. Look at the place where where you made mistakes. You can't can't flinch. You can't candy coated so I had to you see in the film at one point. I heard a lot of people I did. I've heard a lot of people I've helped a lot more. <hes> I just have to be able to look at it and understand understand it and learn from it. I I'm not beating myself up out of about any of it. Please don't get that impression. I I'm not truthfully. I'm actually pretty happy with the Guy I am now. I'm trying real hard to be decent human being in a like it. I have to mention this because your struggle struggle with drug addiction is a theme of film. I lost a a friend to heroin on July third he'd been in Rehab twice and had been sober for many years but relapsed in an overdosed and while I'm sad about it I'm also Kinda pissed off and I know that's not really rational because addiction is a disease but the anger is is real and it's there and Kinda WanNa slap him and say what the hell were you thinking yeah. I know I know that failing and I'm wondering what was the the slap in the face for you. That turned around from heroin got you sober Ab. There's a certain moment that you have when you know you just simply can't go on then you do whatever you're going to do. Some people go to prison <hes>. It worked going to prison work. I don't recommend it hard hard the hard way to kick because they don't give you an aspirin. They couldn't care less. The laughed at me thought it was funny. Hey rockstar. How're you now Cameron Crowe? What do you take away from your conversations with Crosby in making being this film confusion was actually like a beautiful non studio kind of experience is very homemade the way we did the foam and that was really inspiring to me but it also just being able to be around cross for an extended period of time just being around him? I see really how to maintain nobility against many odds. What you see is his greatest musical legacy? I I love this song glory you his last album. I love that but he knows me well enough to know that I'm a freak for if I could only remember my name his first solo album and then of course when you're making the film we went back through the bird stuff which that's stuff just holds up like crazy crazy. It just doesn't raise still sounds breathe. Yeah I like to see when it goes to animation. You're kicked out of the birds and you say but I'm taking one of year in my weird tunings with me that was true but then when we actually had to go to Roger mcglynn and Chris Hillman and get them to do their like animation lines right they went from being horrified to be like yes. It's how those lion king people do it. That's Fire David again dip for me. One of the most was pointing moments in the film is when you talk about what's happened to some of your musical friendships and relationships. Let's take a listen all the main guys that I made music but won't even talk to me all you. All one of my Gosh could be an accident mcguigan. Nash Neil and Stephen All really dislike me. How do you think our hope that your openness in this film might provide some kind of path towards reconciliation with with some of these people oh dimly in the background? Maybe some I don't really it's not why we did it understood you. You have to understand I'm not. I don't really think those guys are going to watch this movie. I hope that they do see it because I hope that they can see who I am now we the four of us were horrible to each other many many times it was fully competitive band and and we were competing all the time in spite of that we made some incredible music which I'm very proud of and I really got understand. I don't have any bad feelings in my heart about any of those guys but I really can't stand. Chain around waiting to have a therapy session. I gotta be making music now. While I got in the five minutes I got I gotta play a song. I do have to ask what do you think ultimately undid the early camaraderie friendship and musical Magic Jakov C._S. anymore. I think the same thing did it in the birds. I think what happens with dances. You're in love with each other when you start. you think you're really terrific and wow oh look what happens when we do this together forty years later when devolved evolved to turn on the smoke machine player hit the Joyce not there man if I had stayed with it. I would be filmmaking lots of money but I wouldn't like music anymore. At the end of the film we hear you making music with a a whole new band of of musicians. That seems like what's keeping you today it is that's so put gas tank. I gotTa Tell You I just I love the process of creating songs and singing and recording them and and playing them live. I love it. I love it. I love it. I eat it for lunch. I wrote my hair. The new documentary is David Crosby. Remember my name Cameron Crowe Interviews Crosby for the film and also help produce and make Cameron Crowe. Thank you thank you David Crosby. Thank you for speaking with us and for all the music over all the years. I have to thank you and N._p._R.. For being my companion on many ride alone an inconspicuous monument in Washington D. C. Marks one of the country's most pivotal road trips across country army convoy the began a hundred entered years ago this month and helped inspire a transformational infrastructure investment Jordan Pascal from member station W. A._M._U.. Has the backstory to the zero milestone busloads of tours mill about in shorts and t-shirts just south of the White House. They wait to take photos near zero milestone. What did you guys come over here? See Today the White House not not zero milestone. Do you know about this milestone. We didn't come to see that never news here. Visitors set water bottles and umbrellas on the four foot tall granite monument. They lean on it when they're tired. Zero milestone doesn't get a lot of respect. This is one of the most significant monuments in D._C.. And yet no one's really seen it. That's he cox of the Federal Highway Administration and a self-proclaimed history near this historical event that this particular monument commemorates gave us modern America. I it was the thing that sort of set the twentieth century in motion. It was here on the Ellipse one hundred years ago on July I seventh nineteen nineteen when officials unveiled Zeo milestone the commemorate the start of a journey a group of nearly three hundred soldiers in eighty trucks embarked on the army's. I motorized cross country. Convoy motorized vehicles played a huge role in world war one which ended less than a year before the army needed to know. How long would it take or how hard would it be to move troops and equipment from the East Coast to the West Coast? Should we ever be invaded. No one really knew the thirty two hundred in Mile Trek to San Francisco was test of endurance. Most of the Middle America only had dirt roads. The sixty two day drive was awful in every way shape or form rickety would frames no shock absorbers in solid rubber tires meant a a bumpy journey breakdowns were frequent and when it rained roads turned to mud it could take days to get on stock but when the convoy rolled through towns it was warmly welcomed by more than three million Americans. It was a little bit like watching probably an Armata U._F._O.'s fly into town. It was something most people simply had never seen and on that trip was a young Lieutenant Colonel Dwight D Eisenhower the future president saw firsthand how poor the roads were in his formal report to the government he had strong words about the need for better investment. Peter Davies author of American Road talked about it on C. Span in two thousand two it would be very simplistic to say that because he went across the continent in nineteen nineteen in Nineteen fifty-six c. start saying inlets have emphasized seeing the Autobahn Germany in World War Two was probably more of an inspiration for the interstate but Eisenhower's experience on the convoy had lasting impact. He never forgotten here's President Eisenhower pitching the interstate system awesome in Detroit in one thousand nine hundred four. We are quitting ahead with a great road program that will take Nathan Out of Hispanic Weight and shackled of secondary role dollar this country and give us the type of highways. We need for this class. The photo remember that phrase all roads lead to Rome. Does your milestone was meant to be the epicenter of American roads back in Nineteen nineteen. The points which all roads are measured just like the golden milestone in the Roman Empire but that idea didn't last long here's Tikey Cox again about a month later Tennessee decided to do the same thing as so the entire premise behind this zero milestone and its intention absolutely fizzle but the the little monuments still marks the beginning of changing country even if tourists ignore it today for here and now I'm Jordan Paschal the juxtaposition of two stories this week we caught our attention today. Federal Judge in New York denied bail to wealthy financiers Jeffrey Epstein accused this month of sexually abusing trafficking dozens of underage girls in New York and Florida but more than a decade ago Epstein avoided similar trafficking asking charges in a controversial plea agreement brokered by Alex Kosta then Florida's attorney now the former Labor secretary a Costa's deal allowed Epstein to plead guilty to lesser charges of solicitation of prostitution. Even though the young woman he lured to his home. We're not prostitutes go to cushy wing of jail nights only out during the day and registered sex offender and the other story on Tuesday Attorney General William Bar announced the Justice Department would not bring federal civil rights charges against the New York police officer who used a chokehold to forcibly seduce Eric Garner in two thousand fourteen. Let's take a listen to that arrest. The Garner's last words I can't breathe became a rallying cry against police brutality so no federal charges but now Garner's family is calling on the officer Daniel Pantaleo to be fired. We wanted to take a step back now and ask what these two stories say about race privilege and the state of the criminal justice system in America today did you that we're joined now by Paul Butler a professor of La Georgetown University informally he served as Federal Prosecutor Paul Professor Welcome thank you it's great to be here. I so disturbing to hear that tape again but to we know two very different cases but what were you thinking as these two headlines converged so the only person connected to the era Garner case who's gone to jail is Ramsey Orta. He's the man who used his cell phone to make the video of Garner's homicide the video that we just hurt hurt what I think the epsteins stories about is equal protection of law and the failure of poor people and minorities to receive that equal protection too often there has been violence against a person of color especially by police officer those cases don't receive the same kinds of resources as when other people want the police and prosecutors to step in you know there's this famous song by public enemy that says nine one one is a joke in the experience of minorities law enforcement is very focused on locking them up but not as interested when people of color seek to help police officers brought to justice justice. I'm going to say in this. We'll maybe get to later in our conversation but you know there are police in the Epstein case in Miami who wanted to do more but they were you know <hes> pushed out of the picture by officials higher up. We'll get to for that but in Eric Garner's case N._y._p._d.. Internal Affairs investigators determine the Pantaleo had used to choke hold <hes> which is not legal they recommend in disciplinary charges which never materialized. There's also an ongoing N._y._p._d.. A disciplinary trial <hes> earlier this year Dr testified that the chokehold triggered asthma attack the killed Garner <hes> but we just heard William bar say no federal charges overruling his own civil rights division prosecutors they wanted an indictment and but bar side of the New York prosecutors who didn't you were once a Federal Prosecutor at D._O._J.. Your sense of that so the federal prosecutor in Brooklyn said that he didn't think that in a trial they could prove wilfulness the the idea that officer Pantaleo knowingly broke the law but the experienced trial attorneys in the Civil Rights Division of the Justice Department said that they could prosecute an win the case and I think that that's right eight and nine hundred ninety eight the Department of Justice one case against an N._y._p._d.. Officer for killing a man by putting him in a chokehold and in the Garner case they had that videotape that the whole world noticing of Mr garnered getting knocked to the ground officer Pantaleo putting his hands and Garner's neck and choking him to death all over a misdemeanor arrest because Garner allegedly <unk> was selling a tobacco cigarette aren't getting tax. That's petty crime young poplar compare that a little deeper to the to the Epstein case I mean it's hard not to see that in both cases y'all white defendant and a white police officer were given a favorable treatment over you know vulnerable low income. I'm young girls many of color and a black man selling loose cigarettes too many doesn't this just reinforce that there are fundamental issues in our criminal justice system that were just broken so if the Garner cases about equal protection of Law Epstein. Epstein is about equal justice under the Law Epstein got a whole lot of breaks that low income people don't get for example. He was allowed to be placed on work release and we think about how this works again. His deal is that for twelve hours a day he gets to go to this office and work well in fact the office was for a foundation that was created by Mr Right before he started serving time after he served his time the off the foundation went out of business so it seemed like it was created just to give him a nice place to go for twelve hours a day and you know sometimes people say well. Is this racists. Is it classes. It's not as simple as that so in Florida they told Mister Epstein Okay we might go along with this but you have to have a officer of security officer from our office with you. Every time you step out of this jail sale Mr Your Epstein the billionaire said no problem he paid one hundred twenty thousand dollars in order to have this security officer accompany him and obviously that's not something that the eighty percent of people who are locked up who who before they were locked up live below the poverty line. That's not something that those guys and women could afford or I mean as we said Eric Garner's case he didn't even get beyond the street corner with the police but what are you. What do you think it says that now the the charges the trafficking charges against Epstein now of from the same period two thousand two to five? I believe <hes> same young women some others are joining their new lawsuits and everything and now Epstein had offered to live in his mansion which is apparently the most expensive in Manhattan and hire private security offered the same things. He didn't apparently get that today. He didn't get bail. What has been a change at least on the end of the wealthy having power in the system? This is a very high profile case. The judge understands that we look at the actual data are not sure it's fair to say that there's been a shift and how <hes> rich people get treated to be fair. Many of the considerations that Epstein received are appropriate for many defendants so in the Florida case the prosecutors didn't throw the book and him even though they could have they offered him work release. He didn't have to serve his full sentence in all those we know are helpful at making someone return to the society come home from President. <hes> with more resources is to do well. The problem isn't that Mr Epstein got <hes> some breaks the problem is that he got those breaks probably because he's a rich white man who could afford them and if other defendants where to receive that same the quality of services we'd all be safer as you said they'd have a better chance of being reintegrated into society yeah exactly Paul at the end. I'm sorry well in the last minute we we have. I'M GONNA look at solutions a little bit. I mean there are some progressive of district attorney's in cities that are trying to make some bold changes in the criminal justice system on sentencing on reducing sort of tyranny of plea bargains. Where do you see the most effective reform happening city and state or the federal level when looking at the big issues big fundamental issues what we know all that the reform isn't gonNA come from the federal government for a civil rights cases like the department might have in the case of Mr Garner <hes> under attorney-general bar the civil rights cases brought by the Justice Department are sixty percent down from the old vomit bombing missions on Obama administration and fifty percent down from the George W Bush administration but the fact is that ninety percent of criminal cases are state cases and there's lots of reforms going on in the states to reduce incarceration association mandatory minimum sentences? The war on drugs is incredibly racially selective lack folks don't use drugs more than anybody else but they get locked up way more than other folks and you know with Mr Epstein. He had some some of the best attorneys in the country Ken Starr he had Alan Dershowitz <unk> low income people could get quality defense that would make a huge difference in bringing us equal justice under the Law Butler professor at Georgetown how long former federal prosecutor as we can't help but notice to headlines <hes> no charges no federal charges for the white police officer accused of chokehold killing Eric Garner but then again no bail for Jeffrey Epstein Paul Butler. Thanks thanks so much for taking a look at it with us for having a recent E._S._p._N.. Report highlighted a growing number of injuries in the N._B._a. and the story by E._S._p._N.. Senior reporter Baxter homes said there might be a link between these injuries and Youth Basketball Leagues many players who eventually make it to the N._B._A.. Take Part in those youth leagues like Pesca is here now sports analysts he host the daily podcast the gist at slate dot Com Mike Welcome back. Thanks for having me so this E._S._p._N.. Story introduces to Guy Name Tim di Francesco strength and conditioning coach for the L._A.. Lakers and he thinks these young players coming into the N._B._A.. In his words are ticking time-bombs from an injury perspective Mike tell us what what he's talking about. Well a lot of these players come in at nineteen years old twenty years old but the amount of mileage they have on them and the amount of high impact Playa metric jumping and intense three sixty dunks is equivalent to what an adult of pretty grown adult of ten or twenty years ago would have on them. <hes> players at a young age are asked to specialize and any evidence and the <hes> the academic research into this is growing more and more unequivocal which is that early specialization is really bad in a number of ways David Epstein as a whole new book about this and he kind of looks at the idea of tiger woods versus Roger Federer and Tiger was this golf prodigy who only golfed and Roger Federer was obviously he's a great tennis player but he played all sorts of Sports and Epstein conclusively shows that the sampling sampling period the greater diversity of the amount of sports you play <hes> has a number of beneficial effects in terms of just being gooden sports and being mentally into the sports but especially on the wear and tear on young bodies and the N._B._A.. Is really beginning to see this well Ed but Mike has has been going on or is there something new our players. You know maybe skipping college and maybe that's bringing them younger into the N._B._A.. Is there something else going going on now. Yes I mean it is more exacerbated than it's been in the past so last year. The League total minutes missed were five thousand minutes the year before that at the N._B._A.. Sorry N._B._A.. NUMBER OF GAMES NOT MINUTES GAME's loss to injury or illness was also five thousand minutes and it never surpassed five thousand before so we're really seeing an unprecedented number of games lost and the reason is in seems to be among other reasons that they're playing so much more basketball. It's not just the when young players come into the league. There's no off season for a lot of these guys. They play and trained really hard. I think it has something to do with the fact that the salaries are just so huge and so the incentive is there to get into the gym loose weight work on a shot but it's just basketball basketball basketball and unlike Kareem and Magic Johnson who had real off seasons uh-huh unlike Michael Jordan who golf during the off season into play that much basketball these guys have so many miles on their bodies so many minutes that are recorded in the record books but also what they're doing in the offseason offseason and the proof is there. It's just showing up in terms injuries think about the N._B._A.. Finals Game Five Kevin Durant goes out due to injury. He'll be lost next season game. Six the Warriors Klay Thompson goes down due to injury. He'll be lost next season and all the big signings this off season you gingery concerns with everyone right durant for the for the nets you even have Kawhi Leonard going the clippers but he missed twenty games due to injuries and almost all of the season before Lebron on James He is you know Miss twenty-something Games due to injury for the first time. There's so many injuries in the N._B._A.. Well Mike how concerned is the is the league about this and what are they doing about it. <hes> Adam silver is concerned and what he's trying to do is introduced some guidelines and I suppose just he worked with U._S._A.. Basketball set number of minutes four seven year olds to ten year olds and then for high school kids. They say don't practice more than three to four days a week on the lower levels as though the A._A._U.. which is the catch off? Raise the youth leagues. They chafe a little bit. Oh it's really nice for the N._B._A.. To give us some advice because they want good healthy players but the reality of what we have to do is the parents really wanNA channel the kids into basketball. All the kids are <hes> intent about playing basketball the it's so hard to get a scholarship. The stakes are so high there are a lot of societal pressures to specialize even though that might and in fact it's increasingly shown to be a maladaptive <music>. Adaptive behavior can really stupid question. No there are no what's play. Oh metrics. Oh it's the jumping volleyball basketball you say jumping bitch okay so here's the second part of the stupid question is a possibly Sibley I written we only have about a minute here but possibly the sneakers or the courts I mean we think those things were advanced and it would mean less injuries but or fewer injuries but is that that was stupid question that was in basketball well. Actually I wanted to report on shoe that was supposed to <hes> sneaker that was supposed to decrease ankle injuries and in fact it did it increased knee injuries yeah the the human body is such that there's going.

David Crosby Alaska officer president Eric Garner Nash Neil Jeffrey Epstein Cameron Crowe United States America basketball heroin Anchorage Daily News Washington Democrats Robin Young New York David donald trump
Light Spring Recipes; Black Pastor Conducts 'Unchurched' Funerals

Here & Now

40:53 min | 2 months ago

Light Spring Recipes; Black Pastor Conducts 'Unchurched' Funerals

"From npr and wbz. I'm robin young computer. Odell this is here now. American and iranian officials are not at the same negotiating table today but they are in the same city negotiations to bring the us back into the iranian. Nuclear deal are getting underway in vienna. The deal restricted iran's nuclear program in exchange for sanctions relief in two thousand fifteen but former president trump pulled out slapped even more sanctions on iran. And since then. Tehran has increasingly violated the terms of the deal. Jim walsh is here and now security analyst. he's with mit security studies program. Jim good to speak with you. Good to be with. Peter the us and iran not really on talking terms here. They're not going to be in the same room house. This negotiation gonna work well. We're gonna use intermediaries you'll remember this. Nuclear agreement with the us and iran had actually several other parties. Russia china britain france the european union and they will be the go between so when the us pulled out of the deal wasn't technically allowed to sit in on a meeting of the agreement so the remaining parties are meeting today in vienna. They are all members of the of the agreement and the us is just outside of the rooms. It's not a member of the agreement and then you'll have people shuttling back and forth in some of the early reporting suggests that they are making progress and they're gonna move from this sort of thing to setting up working groups to try to hammer out the sequencing. Because and we've run into this before peter going back to two thousand thirteen two thousand fifteen sometimes at the un when the two leaders saying they want to meet with each other. But then don't it's a matter of who goes. I neither one wants to go first. So someone else is gonna have clear. The path for them robert malley The biden administration special envoy for iran spoke to morning edition today and he talked about the country compliance with the deal or lack of. Let's listen what every day that goes by. Then more out of compliance because they have obviously increased the their stockpile of enriched uranium. They are experimenting with centrifuges. That are more advanced than the ones that they were supposed to be using. So this is kinda starting from a tough spot. What are the sticking points in this negotiation. Well it's tough and it isn't tough. I mean in some ways. It's the definition of low hanging fruit. It's not like they have to negotiate a new agreement. They already have an agreement an agreement that they all have already signed. That everyone agreed was working at the time that the us pulled out. So it's sort of there but it's the politics. It's the politics back home in tehran. The politics back home in washington. I think we have a president who is very much focused on his domestic agenda and his political counselors are focused on the domestic agenda and of foreign policy. Folks are sort of catching up but you're quote from raw mali's an important one. It is true that each day that passes is a day that iran builds up more of its nuclear capacity. But i would say each day. That passes is also a day makes it harder to get back the agreement. And we don't want to face a situation where we fumble this away. No agreement Iran is unregulated pursues. You know whatever it wants. Without any regulation or restriction and we and we find the the politics too difficult too difficult to get back to where we hoped to be. So i hope the president ex quickly because i agree every day that passes poses more danger to that point There's some analysis from cnn. Today that says essentially the us and iran are in the same place. They were six years ago. When that agreement was signed the us would rather have an economically secure iran rather than a nuclear iran and tehran would rather have sanctions relief in a strong economy than a nuclear bomb. Neither side certainly wants a war. Do you agree with that. I do agree with that. And i think you know at the end of the day. These are voluntary agreements. Countries only stay in agreements. If they think they're getting something out of them that they're better than the alternative. And i think that's why we got an agreement from countries that don't like each other very much and continued to have problems in their relationship. Why did they do it because it was in. Everyone's self interest and best interest. I think that's true here but what colors that and what will color that in. The future going forward is politics. I mean president agenda fan. Rohani's there's a presidential election coming up in iran. So yes even though i think interest will prevail. The politics may make that difficult. So if that's the case now have less than a minute here. Is it likely that we're going to get a deal out of these talks. I think we will again. All the hard work is done. You know and i experienced tells me if you go back to twenty fifteen thousand thirteen and two thousand fifteen when we ran into these sequencing problems when they were even more extreme because we didn't have an agreement no one wanted to be seen in the same room with one another. We manage to find a way to get it done so i think they will manage away to get it done but it could get away from them so we'll have to stay tuned. Certainly will jim walsh here now. Security analyst thank you so much. Thank you peter. Well in arkansas. As early as today lawmakers behind that bill that would ban doctors from administering gender transition treatment to children could override the republican governors veto esa hutchinson veto. The bill yesterday house bill. Fifteen seventy would put the state as the definitive oracle of medical care overriding parents patients and healthcare experts. This would be and is a vast government overreach if state lawmakers override the governor. It would make arkansas. The first state with such a ban doctor erin. Strong as a pediatrician in little rock who sees several transgender patients. Dr leaders at the arkansas chapter of the american academy of pediatrics. Tell us that this bill would interfere in the referral process when a patient child expresses these transgender identity questions. You won't be able to pass them onto a specialist. What are your other concerns. This is in my is really an unprecedented attack on the doctor. Patient relationship and It's a concern because it involves our most vulnerable used in my eyes. I do really wanna thank governor hutchinson for his leadership in vetoing this armful bill. But i really don't like the idea of politicians stepping into the exam room with me and the families. I'm seeing And trying to limit necessary care for my patients. Well as we understand it would also ban doctors from prescribing hormone therapies or puberty blockers or perform transition surgeries. Which you understand are already banned in your state on children under eighteen but we understand a particular concern for you is that it may not grandfather children already getting therapy correct. We're really talking about a very h- you Kids who end up with any kind of own all or puberty blocking treatment in our state. I'm the majority of you know. Come to the scare. Actually after puberty has already begun but the fact that this blocks me from sending kids for definitive care as really disconcerting see. You're saying the younger children are not seeking these therapies or puberty blockers. But do you understand how people might fear that they are and that children don't understand the long term implications of such a treatment supporters of name. The bill the save adolescents from and there are people who are concerned. It's something that can't be versus. Children change their mind. Can you respond to that. So gender affirming care. The backbone event is just providing an understanding environment and a supportive environment for these kids in their families. I promise you that none of these us choose to go through the struggle of questioning their identity and their gender and they need a healthcare provider who is understanding and can help through that process but others point out these puberty blockers can be reversed. Certainly so you might describe puberty blocking drugs and something that simply buys kids time to walk through this journey of a gender identity and like i said berry children under the age of eighteen Really are placed on puberty blocking drugs at least in arkansas And i just have to point out that the backbone of this from my perspective is the mental health care side of gender. Affirming care in not able. As a general pediatrician refer kids or even mental health care in population who is an extreme risk or anxiety. Depression suicidal. Id asian you know that is really pudding. Huge burden of harming rhys gone to a very at risk population of patients. So you're saying that the the biggest fault it sounds like you see with the bill. Is that a pediatrician. Like you can't refer these kids that kind of mental health. That they need that the puberty blockers which are would be banned in the bill can be reversed. But you're saying you're not even seeing children certainly have this kind of therapy and few are having an even later in their teen years transition surgeries already ban. So what do you think is going on here. You know your governor governor hutchinson said that this is part of the culture war in addition to having as you said politicians in the in the room with the doctor or parents it should be between parents and doctrine child. What else do you think is going on here. If a lot of the stuff is being banned isn't really even being used. I'm not a politician. I'm a pediatrician. And is a nationwide effort to someone to pick arm and it's really really a sad situation. Aaron strong a pediatrician in little rock. Arkansas who does see transgender patients responding to the bill in that state doctor strong. Thank you thank you so much for your time. Scientists at the broad institute known for its cutting edge work on the human genome has an ambitious new plan. They wanna use artificial intelligence to tackle some of medicines. Biggest challenges like preventing the next pandemic or unraveling the mysteries of cancer. It's part of three hundred million dollar initiative roads. Eric and wendy schmidt center. Let's try to figure out what it means. One of the centers co-directors is here. Dr caroline euler welcome. Thank you very much for having me. We're excited to have you and help us out. I in lay terms. What do you mean when you talk about using machine learning to discover more about human biology. Yes a machine. Learning as we know it has been super successful in very different tasks like in computer vision. Or recommend your systems like netflix and amazon right ed recommending new products or movies to look at and how it's doing it is by being able to see through huge amounts of data that one human could not do and to find patterns in the underlying data sets. And so if we're thinking about what is the problem that we have in human biology and medicine is that one doctor will not be able to look at all these different people at the same time and so here machine learning could help to be able to integrate. All of this different data sets that are actually available to find new patterns. That could then help to develop new drugs that could target ziza's and actually be able to move you back to the normal state would kind of data sets. Are you talking about. Yes so the amazing thing in biology is what has happened over the last years as first of all the human genome sequenced. So now we know all of the parts. In addition we don't just have sequencing data. We also have a lot of imaging data so think of all of medical imaging data but also at the single cell level and super resolution imaging data. So let's be clear. Let's say i go to the doctor. And i get a scan or my blood is drawn or something like that and a biopsy is taken. Is that what you're talking about exactly yet. So these data sets like i'm talking about so in biopsies dare for example. He would have imaging data or on the blood. You could get data of all of the cells that are inside of the blood and this could give you an indication of what the that you actually have. You would like to be able to integrate. All of these different data sets not just from this one patient but actually from all of the patients that have ever been seen. You know. i'm curious. You said that we do this for something like net flicks which an algorithm tells us machine tells us what we want to watch next. Why haven't we done this yet in medicine so there is certainly a lot of efforts for actually doing this medicine as well. These problems are so much harder like for net flicks or personalized ads like increasing to click rates. All you need to understand this this you know you have to be able. To predict well veteran person will click or not. You don't need to understand the underlying mechanisms and so in biology. Say if you want to develop a drug you actually need to understand what this drug will target inside a cell so that it can move it back to the normal state what we call the programs of life and so that also leads to very new machine learning questions and these are exactly what we also think what the center will do is actually changed the kinds of questions that people will study machine learning. Okay so you have huge piles of data in a machine starting to process trying to figure out what clues can find. Then what i understand. You're talking about looking for treatments for cancer for heart disease genetic disorders but also like a pandemic. so let's talk about cancer. We can use data from pathologists. Where pathologists have already looked at it and said this is the disease state. And this is the normal state. however we don't just need to do classification. We need to for example. Be able to do this earlier than any pathologist can do so. How can we figure out how this cancer cell had looked like earlier. In the time point when a pathologist wasn't yet able to distinguish it from the healthy state how do we build straw built models. That can do that. And you just ask me about the pandemic. we're all learning from this situation right and so it will for all of us be easier to do it. The next time around you know in the future we will actually be able to have these teams already together to fight these kinds of situations much more quickly and effectively maybe more specifically for some problems. That might actually be directly. Relevant in this setting is develop machine learning methods to better identify new drug targets by understanding what he sells do. We're also seeing these long term effects that we really don't understand yet of people who were already infected so drug development will be really important covid nineteen also going forward and for now there is really not a very good drug for treating people with long term effects. But even you know people still getting the virus right now. What's the dream couple years down the road when you've had a chance to work on this for a while. What's the dream. What do you hope you can cure. Yeah so think instead of going after one particular disease. I think that the real dream for me is that we are able to build this community at this interface between biology and machine learning and data sciences more generally so that we have tools to actually be able to attack many different diseases at the same time so training a super important building community super important building common language among these people don't caroline euler co director of the broad institute's new three hundred million dollar initiative to use artificial intelligence to solve the mysteries of some of the biggest and most dangerous diseases out there. Dr euler thank you so much. Well thank you very much. For having me and i go out to phoenix. Where an auto repair garages schooling women on the ins and outs of auto repair and maintenance. Just think of that for second. How many female mechanics have you seen from member station k. J. z. z. Catherine davis young. Pay the shop visit at the girl gang garage in phoenix in the middle of the shop. There's a nineteen sixty one volvo. Tv five forty four. It's a funky little car with a curvy. Cartoonish design but it doesn't look like much of anything right now it's strips down to bare metal in the early stages of complete restoration. Janna warnke is working on smoothing out the surfaces around the passenger side door. She hasn't done much bodywork like this before. But she's a former salon owner and nail technician so the filing tools. She's using feel surprisingly familiar. If it needs to be smooth. I'll find the way a. He traveled all the way from seattle for the chance to train in the girl gang garage. She's been going to school to learn to be an automotive technician but says this experience has been more welcoming than other shops. She's worked in so there's a lot of skill building that we might almost be intimidated to ask and we can do all those things here. More readily and that female friendly atmosphere is exactly the point. Says bogey tyner one of the garages founders for most technicians working in the field. We've never met or worked with another person like us. The bureau of labor statistics reports women made up less than ten percent of automotive repair or maintenance workers. In two thousand twenty some industries have pushed for more gender equity over the past few decades but will tyner says auto trades still. Aren't doing much to reach out to girls and young women. The average jane doe is not getting the opportunity to pick up a plasma cutter or a welder or a wrench. And it's something that they enjoy. We'll tyner it says as a girl. She didn't get many of those chances either but still. She developed a fascination with volkswagen bugs she wanted to learn all about them and the only time women showed up and volkswagen magazines at the time was when they were wearing high heels in bikinis but she says being discouraged from pursuing. This career path made her want to do it even more she went to college plans becoming a lawyer but eventually came to arizona to get automotive training at the universal technical institute she started working in the industry and even became a host of the tv. Show all girls garage end from top. And then we'll be able to wrestle the stretch out relatively easily two thousand seventeen. Tyner came up with an idea for a project. She wanted to lead a team of women on the full restoration of a nineteen fifty. Seven chevy montage pickup and it was initially thought of that. It was going to be a one time thing and then it became very apparent that there was a lot of interest. Ninety women from twenty three states around the country took part in that restoration. Many had never worked on cars before among them was shonda williams. Her background was in design and marketing. But she got so hooked she wanted to go into business with latino was like. This is an invaluable thing to me to be able to have this type of experience. How can i work with bogie to kind of make this available to as many women as possible now latina and williams have been offering women car restoration opportunities and low cost classes at the girl gang garage for three years. Twelve year. old monet. Her chisha comes to the garage with her mom marcy every week. She says both her parents are into cars and now she is too so i always kind of grew up around it. The interest hadn't really hit me until i was a lot older. Eleven she says working with the equipment can be difficult and frustrating sometimes but her mom says the challenge is what keeps them coming back to see that be such a positive thing for her and her to take such ownership of the stuff that she's doing and to watch her grow is probably more rewarding for me than being able to be a part of it myself and as for that nineteen sixty one volvo p five forty four teams of women like marcy and monet and janet will keep coming through the garage to put it back together. Get it running paint it and eventually the girl gang garage bill tour at around to car shows but the says showing off the finished cars is just a bonus what it's really about is the process and the connections in the community all that and the chance to bring a few more women into the industry for here and now i'm katherine davis young impious support for here and now and the following message come from zuhdi. Why spent months coating when you can build powerful customized applications in days zuhdi offers an affordable solution to build apps for your business apps that integrate into all your current systems and data sources and you're zuhdi subscription always includes unlimited apps and unlimited users. Learn more at zuhdi dot com. The news is about more than what just happened. You need to know why it happened. Who made it happen how it's felt to the communities you care about. Npr's daily news podcasts. Consider this gives you all of that with context backstory in analysis on a single topic every weekday. It's not just information. It's what the news means. consider this from. Npr treasury secretary. Janet yellen is calling for a global minimum corporate tax rate. Here she is speaking to the chicago council on global affairs yesterday together. We can use global minimum tax to make sure the global economy thrives based on a moral level playing field in the taxation of multinational corporations and spurs innovation growth and prosperity. The timing is no coincidence. The biden administration wants to raise the us corporate tax rate to help fund its infrastructure. Bill robin farzad is host of public. Radio's full disclosure. Robin welcome back. Hello what is this. Global minimum tax rate that yellen is talking about. it's a baseline levy across nations. Of course it's easy to dress this up in talk of the strength of institutions and fairness and innovation but it's not about foreign policy or international development's about tightening up the fence around us based multinationals in by extension. Here is talking on behalf of the white house which is trying to push a two trillion dollar infrastructure plan through congress. How are those two things related. President biden's looking to raise funds for some of the lofty goals in this massive bill by hiking the us corporate tax rate from twenty one percent to twenty eight percent. Peter it had been at high as as thirty five percent before trump and the gop led congress. Had this massive cut in two thousand seventeen. You might recall in the two thousand sixteen election. There was rhetorical alarm about Tax inversions these companies primarily in the us relocating overseas to reduce their tax burden. And and we saw some of that play out in terms of tax relief. Well okay a global minimum corporate tax rate The thinking goes would prevent companies from shopping around the world looking for the best tax rates in any given country. What do we communists say. I mean we know what yellen says about it. But what do other economists say about whether this is good policy. Well seventy economists for what it's worth. They've sign onto a letter saying it's time to actually do this. And spend big on. Infrastructure rates are low the countries in this reset. But then they're right. leaning economists. Were arguing that much of the infrastructure plan has really nothing to do with roads rails. Airports that it's a giant boondoggle of course Corporates are gonna corporate strategic tax avoidance. It's an age old game of cat-and-mouse wall street special advisers island nations miami. You look at the effective rate that giant very profitable. Us firms ultimately pay on the lower tax rate. Sometimes it's a fraction of twenty eight percent. You have to wonder how this would even work in practice. I just had to go back and remind myself how many countries there are around the world. Something like one hundred ninety five countries you know. You're not getting places like north korea or iran on board. And i know that sounds like a silly example but is it even possible from a logistical point of view. To do something like this. How would it work. I to wonder i mean. Let's say you're avoiding the twenty eight percent rate here. Who's to say. You can avail yourself of some loopholes that remain abroad as well as currency strategy than other cross border tax shelters to give yourself a small rate in spite of whatever accord the united states signs with the country. You're in how can you control for corruption revenue recognition. I wonder how much of the yellen announcement. Peter is telegraphing electric here that we want corporations to pick up most of the tag the tab for this massive infrastructure plan and if you're another country when you gladly accept any foreign tax over nothing so it's brutally hard to monitor and enforce but it sounds great deed that hosted. Public radio's full disclosure. Thank you so much. Always my pleasure. Pastor irene munro is tired. A black pastor in boston. She's been conducting zoom funerals often to a day since last march twenty-fifth seeing firsthand the cova data that shows communities of color are the hardest hit. She repeats that well-worn saying when america catches a cold black community gets pneumonia and adds when america gets cove it more black americans die and pastor monroe says it reminds her of the aids epidemic of the thousand nine hundred pastors like her new way before a government report in nineteen eighty six that the face of the aids epidemic in communities of color would be heterosexual women today. It's also black heterosexual women but in both times. She says the traditional black church is often turning. Its back especially on other victims those in the lgbtq community pasture monroe. Has this past year. Been like you've depicted so adequately that i am tired. You know one part of pastoral care. It's helping people through this valley of anxiety. Fear and death with me doing funerals. You want to do where it maintains dignity and respect for their loved ones but they zoo men but yet there's an incompleteness absolutely about it. You said to me that you serve people who are largely. You didn't say who largely feel uncomfortable. Mainstream churches you said who are made to feel someone uncomfortable and mainstream churches. He mean i get what's now the church and some of them wish not to be but certainly the lgbtq community. And i need to say this. Within that particular demographic group we are not getting an accurate number not only in terms of the community but of trans women and men who are dying. But i also get the homeless and because of the religious landscape changing. I'm getting the nuns lineas. And i'm also getting millennials. So again i get folks who for a sundry of reasons are not in the traditional church. We've talked about the nuns. They're not affiliated with anybody you know but but with you. I mean needing something in the end as you said in the nineteen eighties. We had a president who didn't even other the word aids until years after people were dying. So there's some familiarity there it largely targeted gay men which is why people were so shocked in one thousand nine hundred. Eighty six when report came out showing that it was heterosexual. Black women who were dying in large numbers. Can you remind us why that was absolutely first of all when aids first came out. We didn't have a name for it. And then finally when they were depicting the aids epidemic it was believed to be the province of just white gay men but because again the way in which you know health disparities running our country black. Lgbt folks were just not in the data but those of us who were on the ground pasturing. We were funeral. Leising these folks and because of a culture what we call being on the down low. We knew of sisters that were dying of the aids epidemic. Had nothing to do with blood transfusion now. Well let's explain something you just said for those who haven't heard the phrase the life of the down low men in the african american community. Their wives did not know practicing also a gay lifestyle so they were passing it on to their wives. It's hard to even explain how much shame there was around this disease. At the time you know people hiding their dying relatives in a back room a synagogue. That's right or they weren't what they were doing they. Would i remember one of the elders of my church back then and she said oh my son died of consumption and i'm saying what is consumption so it would be certain types of code. Words will so the shame of the black men in particular i. I'm almost thinking that maybe you see a parallel now with the people that you're seeing. Who are trans. We thought that the church became more comfortable over the decades. Are you saying it. Hasn't no you know it's very interesting. We we still have very few what we call traditional black churches that is open to lgbtq parishioners and so some of the similarities alike. This you can't go be funeral is in a lot of the black churches here or for that matter. Even be funeral is in funeral policy. At the beginning of this pandemic there were missing bodies. Some of the folks said you know they would have a home going zoom home going and they would say well. I know my loved one is dead. We haven't been able to recover. The body might be in a refrigerator somewhere if you when it rolled out it was just pandemonium now. I thought i was prepared for that. Because i have done funerals for nine eleven where you had missing bodies. I've done funerals. That family has not gathered. And it really troubles me. That just as there was a stigma for aids in certain communities black and immigrant communities. It's a stigma. Having this pandemic in fact their lives and by the way since we raise the notion of living the download lifestyle. We should say that. There are many historic reasons for that going back to slavery and the emasculation of black man but here we are talking about the resulting. Shame and as you say the second largest group of black americans dying from kovic second after black. Women is trans youth and adult. You say that when the data comes out this is going to be worse than any subgroup within the african american community absolutely absolutely and in that rubric is runaways. And so a lot of the the trans people. At least that. I know of our young adults who have run away from their homes. They have created a kind of community similar as folks during the aids epidemic and so only their friends that little community that they reside in is w- how we do a kind of proper home going for that person. A lot of the young kids that i've done. I'm certain that their parents don't know that. Maybe their child has transitioned and by the way why today would six gender heterosexual african american women be the number one group affected by covid nineteen. Well i mean i. We don't have a good survival rate in general when you look at the social determinants of health i mean you have health disparities environmental racism. Many of us are on the front line. You know one of the things you can always count on. When we're in a crisis. Such as a pandemic the fault lines that existed in society before the pandemic are exacerbated during the crisis people talk a lot about the suspicion within the african american community of the medical establishment because of things like the tuskegee experiments. But i'm thinking of the african-american female doctor who got cove nineteen and was in a hospital and was using social media to send posts about what she thought was lack of care and she was sent home and died of covid nineteen. This is a doctor and the hospital made a tone deaf apology saying well. Some of our staff or intimidated by her. There's a discrepancy very glaring. And one of the reasons is they think african-american are of different biology. We've heard stories of medical students. Believing that i'll skin is thicker. We've heard that given our life of trial and tribulations that when we talk about pain we can. I tolerate it. Or if we're asking for more. Painkillers is because we just simply wanna get high. It's the whole idea of other ring us even within the medical field and it doesn't matter whether you're a doctor because i'm i'm married to an er physician and she can tell you that when she's outside the same thing that the doctor that just recently died the same kind of treatment she gets that so there's no hierarchy if you are a physician or if you're educated if you have healthcare if you live in the right zip code. That's boston's. Reverend irene monroe. She's been conducting zoom funerals for members of the black. Lgbtq immunity also people just outside of traditional churches and she is tired Reverend monroe thank you so much work. Thank you tremendously for having them stay. You may have heard those studies showing that we ought gained weight during cove it by some estimates two pounds a month while if you count march to march twenty four pounds gyms were closed. Kids needed their mac and cheese. We ate with. They didn't need and now as more people are venturing out in the nicer weather. Well a mask can only hide so much. Let's eat a little lighter here. No resident jeff. Kathy gust has a few dishes to help us do that. She joins us now. Hi kathy hello robin. Welcome back now. I missed you. I've missed you by the way i would say. One way to lose weight is have major surgery. Nothing could be avoided. Yeah i got a new knee and so did our colleague. Karen miller mitts. And we both did it at the same time. And karen is pretty much turning invisible. She's lost so much but that's not a way to do it. You have been talking about this cove. Fifteen it's college students. Get the freshman fifteen you say. We need to snap out of it. Tell us more well i. This is not meant to be a segment preaching dieting. This time of year people start thinking about warmer weather and eating differently. I want to propose that we redirect our food cravings to slightly lighter fresher more seasonal food and try to maybe say a temporary goodbye to the comfort food that we've been living on for the past year right right. This isn't about. Dieting is just adjusting. So let's talk about some of these recipes spring vegetable couscous. Down that yes. This is really becoming favored around here. Couscous is made from semolina wheat. And it's nutty and slightly sweet but it's a great convice for other flavors. So i saw take a lot of spreading vegetables leeks and carrots asparagus. Sweet peppers should taki mushrooms and one of the tricks with shifting. Your what you eat is that you want big bold flavors so i add kumon and ginger and turmeric and harissa. Which is tunisian chili. Paste or hot chili flakes and cooked chickpeas into a very light vegetable stock. Pour that on. Top of the couscous. Sprinkle it with some sweet golden raisins and it is so delicious and light and fully satisfying straight. Now we'll have everything here now dot org but that automatically and by the way just real quick. There's different kinds of couscous. There's the pearl that's more like the round Yeah that's israeli couscous. This is more of a quick or instant couscous. So it's very fast meal and you do get that wonderful nutty texture. You could use the round israeli couscous as well yeah okay fish is a way to eat lighter and roasting one of your favorite methods cooking so we have a combo here roasted salmon dish. Be still my heart go. This is lovely because the fish is tender and flaky. You surrounded with cherry tomatoes and chopped scallions but the trick with this dish. Is i make a spring green sauce. This is made from spicy. Ruge leaves parsley scallions garlic little bit of green chili and some olive oil. And this is a minute sauce. You world up in a food processor. A blender wonderful on steamed vegetables terrific on salads grilled fish or meat. Really a sauce that goes far but on top of this roasted salmon dish. It's a winner okay And you know people are roasting one thing lots of roasting pan roasting during covid but people starting to think about grilling Solids about a salad with meat falls. Well this is a dish called lamb. Coffee with a greek style. Spring salad kofi is very popular. Turkish and middle eastern dish. Think of it like a cross between a meatball burger and kind of free form sausage. So in this recipe. I combine ground lamb. You could use ground beef. You could use ground chicken with all spice and garlic and try to reagan or mint and you skewer it onto a or metal skewer and yes you can grill it or you can do it in your broiler at home and then you make a kind of greek style salad with cucumbers sweet peppers feted cheese tomatoes and rubella ful multi flavored and textured salad and you put the coffee grilled sausages right on top of it and if you wanted to. You could mix some greek yogurt with scallions and lemon juice and have it as a saas to go with very quick and simple super satisfying and again also lighter. You know they have to ask you. We only have about a minute here. We'll have all these recipes at here now doubt or but it really has been astonishing. Newspapers have these huge sections. I mentioned pan. Roasting all these pan dinners that you can do and You know you and others are helping people just really let me cooking. Became such a party. Cove it do you think that's gonna last. I hope so. I think a lot of people realize that by cooking they could control how much money they spend what they eat and really tailor food to their own liking as we go back and support our local restaurants which we need to do. I hope everybody keeps cooking. And what a great season to do it in here now. Resin kathy guns. Thanks so much. Thank you robin and here. Now is a production of npr. Wvu sociation with the bbc world service. I'm robin young. It's here now.

iran us biden administration arkansas jim walsh yellen robin young wbz robert malley Rohani esa hutchinson tehran vienna governor hutchinson aids cancer Depression suicidal wendy schmidt
April 17, 2019: Hour 1

Here & Now

42:46 min | 2 years ago

April 17, 2019: Hour 1

"Support for here. And now comes from ember wave presenting this message ember wave, the revolutionary new personal thermostat ember. Wave is designed to make you comfortable in any environment. Learn more at ember wave dot com and use the code NPR to save fifty dollars at checkout from NPR and WB. You are I'm Robin young. I'm Jeremy Hobson it's here. And now as we await the release of the Muller report tomorrow, we're following other developments in Washington. President Trump use his veto pen for just the second time yesterday rejecting a resolution passed by congress to end US military system to Saudi Arabia for its war in Yemen. The US is providing billions of dollars in arms to the Saudi led coalition fighting Iran backed rebels in Yemen in his veto letter to the Senate, the president called the resolution and unnecessary dangerous attempt to weaken his constitutional authority the resolution did not have enough support to override the president's veto. Although it did have some Republican support joy. Joining us now is Senator Chris Murphy democrat from Connecticut. He's a member of the Senate Foreign Relations committee. Senator welcome thanks for having me and first of all your reaction to the president's veto of the Yemen resolution. Very disappointing. Not surprising the administration's been pushing hard against this resolution for over a year. And of course, if the administration wanted to get out of the war in Yemen, they do it on their own. The problem is this is a human rights catastrophe in Yemen, ten thousand civilians have been killed by this bombing campaign eighty five thousand children under the age of five have died of starvation and disease, and compounding, the misery is the way in which the Saudis are now targeting dissidents and political activists some of them US residents citizens and locking them up and potentially torturing them. It's time for us to get out of this Saudi led coalition. I was glad that Republicans and Democrats joined. Gather to pass this resolution. The first time we have ever used the War Powers Act to call for the US withdrawal from your or abroad, and I'm disappointed. But as I said not shocked that the president is veto it. I I assume that they're you're you're referencing Jamal kashogi, the journalist the US resident who was killed in the Saudi consulate last October. How much of your vote for this resolution was about kashogi? None of my vote is about Kashoggi's because I think independently the United States remaining part of a coalition inside Yemen is a national security disaster. This is a war that as I said has led to a humanitarian catastrophe has allowed for Al Qaeda and to get stronger inside Yemen. The United States has no security reason to be part of this coalition, but others voted for our resolution to get out of the Yemen. Civil. War as a message to the Saudis, relative to the murder of Jamaica Shoji, and the the the imprisonment of several other Americans who hold joint Saudi and American citizenship. And so there is a general unrest in congress about the fact that Ed ministration refuses to deliver any consequences to the Saudis for the way in which they are behaving and this resolution for some I think with intended to be that message. Now, we'll have to go back to the drawing board after the veto. Meanwhile, doesn't congress have War Powers? Why why can't congress decide when the US gets involved in conflicts overseas? Congress does in fact have the responsibility decide when the United States goes to war, but there's a long history of the executive branch moving forward with military action without congressional authorization, but you still need enough members of congress to override a presidential veto to restrain. That military activity. Of course, elections are the other way that you can check a president who's engaged on authorized military activity, and I have a feeling that the Yemen war as it grows in in its public profile will become a bigger issue heading into the twenty twenty election. Finally, Senator twenty four hours from now, we're all going to be talking about the Muller report. Once it is finally released. What are your expectations? Do you think that it is just going to be redacted from beginning to end, or do you think your we're gonna learn something from it? I asked me twenty four hours. I mean, I guess my expectations are low in germs. How much information is going to be released to congress? It's ridiculous that we're even talking about reductions when it comes to the report that's released to the congress. I have top secret clearance. I every single other members of congress have the ability to see both classified and unclassified information. And the idea that the attorney general is going to withhold certain pertinent information from members of congress who have the duty to decide whether there have to be consequences for the executive if they violated the law is repugnant. I understand that the version released to the public, and they have to have some reactions to protect sources and methods. But I am going to be upset if there is one single right action in the report delivered to congress. And of course, we are all expecting that to be a case that Senator Chris Murphy, democrat of Connecticut, Senator thank you for. Appreciate it. Let's Paris now thirty employees working at Notre Dame cathedral before Monday's fire have been interviewed. According to the Paris prosecutor who says there's no evidence the fire was intentionally set. So we await investigations, but meanwhile, we were struck as we watched people watch the flames how few were watching through recording cellphones as if they needed to see with their own is one person who did watch through lens was seasoned war-fatigued offer, my the dome white who also covered the terrorist attacks in Paris in two thousand fifteen she sent us some powerful pictures. You can see them at here now dot org. She joins us from Paris. And Maya you have seen so much through your lens. What were you thinking? While you watch Notre Dom. Oh, I wasn't thinking. I never think Robin in a in a case like this as a photographer you can't allow yourself to feel or have any emotion. All you're looking at is the picture, and this is. Away for war photographers to be able to cover this. You cannot allow yourself to think we're looking at some of the pictures now Notre Dame it self is almost sepia toned. It looks like it's from a different time. But with the flames and the the light the flames are throwing it's almost like blood has been thrown across the building. And then in some of the pictures, you have almost like white laser beams. What's that will? That's the water. Should it's true. The Wolter in these white leaser. It's exactly what I saw on. I'm glad you're seeing it as well. But especially the picture where you see the water hoses crossing each other. It really reminded me of something symbolic of church these cross and the red sepia tone seems completely unreal. I think if we had seen this in a movie, we wouldn't have believed. It's you turn around two. And we see the faces of the. People gathered in some pictures. They're singing hymns, we know they gathered to sing hymns talk. What you saw in those faces while those people are really watching an event this heart-wrenching to them. And although I cannot allow myself to feel they can they was a very strong shinning of unity of solidarity pretty much like after Shirley, though, people gathered together the didn't know each other necessarily what what strikes me is that a lot of these who are singing our young people. And this is a face of friends that you don't see unless you go to church because the Christians are not very visible in daily life. And and then they were witnessing disaster. Among all the French residents. We all are affected by this clearly, well, you mentioned Paris attacks. And we thinking how much you've seen through your lens? This is the cafe in stadium. Attacks in two thousand fifteen and at that time, you would charge under French criminal law for photo that you took France has much tighter restrictions on photographs French criminal law forbids, the publication of photographs of survivors of crimes or terrorist acts without their permission in your case. You took an incredibly powerful photo of a victim who said had passed all the charges against you were dismissed, but not before a trial who's very painful time. But to us we were thinking, you know, Charlie updo, the Paris attacks, you you're a war photographer, and yet you've seen through your lens so much on the streets of Paris. Yes. Exactly. It's true that I have photographs. So a lot of conflicts lot of disasters. It's true that when I came back to pay I came back for more sheltered life. And it seems that the conflict has followed me and disaster have fallen me. And I. Never expected it. But I am trained to cover these kind of situation to the point that I did Joel that cost me months of trial. And although I was the charges were dismissed it. It's a trail that deeply hurt me. But I did nothing wrong. I did my job. And I did my job like I do it anywhere in the world. I didn't pay too. And maybe Parisiens have a better sense of their right to their image sometime. They have an two cents of the right to the image. But I believe that everybody had a sense of the drama that was unfolding before with nothing done burning. Did you have a sense? I am photographing history. Of course. And I was talking to neighbors. What's the day today? We have to remember that date April fifteen two thousand nineteen these at date that will Mark history for us in France, maybe in the world as well. Well, April fifteenth is a day that has a lot of resonance here Wolfson. It was the marathon bombing many other events on the fifteenth. That's Parisian news. Tiger for my Vitton. White will have many of her dramatic photographs at here now dot org as Notre Dom was burning my. Thank you so much for speaking with us. Thank you very much. This is here now. The musical Haiti's town officially opens today on Broadway. It's retelling of the Greek myth of Orpheus ritzy. Orpheus a young dreamer and songwriter. Your it ac- his muse who captured the attention of Haiti's brings her into the underworld. Orpheus follows your at ac- down to rescue her. The book lyrics and music Haiti sound or by singer songwriter a nest Mitchell it's directed by. Rachel chavan. I saw it last year in London before the cast picked up and headed for. Join now by some of the cast members of Haiti's town Patrick page who plays Haiti's, welcome. All right. Thanks and read Cardi who plays Orpheus high Reeve. Hi, jerry. And Eva nobles AGA who plays Eurydice welcome to you as well. Thank you for having us. And I want to start just by asking you because so much of this show involves the music of the show which was written by an AS Mitchell. How you feel about sort of taking this old tail and and making it new with with this music, and I'll I'll open it up to any of you to talk about that. I think the great thing. But Greek tragedies they exist to teach us about ourselves. And so our show had places it in an undetermined time within sort of a club setting. So it feels like it does have a timeless element. But in a different way than they Greek miss, it feels new because of the songs, but you're right. It's it's undetermined, maybe depression, maybe even earlier than that. Yeah. And the music from me was the thing that attracted me to the project to begin with it was unlike anything I'd heard on Broadway before more like things, I listened to it home like Leonard Cohen, Tom waits. Jeff, Buckley, Joni Mitchell, it had a sound that just hooked me in and songs that I wanted to sing and songs that I wanted to listen to I tell everybody that my dirty little secret about the show is that. Although I've now been involved with this show for a period of three years and performed it many times. And rehearsed it, many many many many times I will still when I go to the gym put on a song from the show to work out because I liked the music that much even what about you. What attracted you to this show? I think the fact that it the music is very expressive. So no matter who's listening to it and with their musical background that than when they were growing up or what influences them most. The music is kind of a free for all you take. What you get. And you let it wash over you. And it's such an experience for the singers and performance as well. It sounds different to me every night. So it's hugely fresh every single night. I was going to wait to ask you about this Patrick. But since people have just heard your voice, we have to talk on how low it goes in a show. I mean, it's just when you speak. It is this deep voice, unlike any other, but in the show, you have to sing very very. Hey little song or give me a Saul busy may not gain stale. Yeah. Wrote this crazy role which is the king of the underworld. And you know, it is truly we call it. Sometimes a folk opera, and I'm never sure exactly what that means. But in terms of the way it stretches the singers Boyce's, you know, I don't have to do a whole lot to embody the king of the underworld because NASA has already done that with where she's written the role. So he sings in a way that you don't normally hear someone saying on stage. And that tells you right off the bat. Oh, he's he's supernatural. He's not a human being. And in a way, she's done the same thing with Orpheus Reeve has to sing these airy high Diculeng high knows? It's actually really exciting for me to be involved in a theatrical project that allows you to use those parts of your range because it is quite unusual on both the low end Anaheim for Patrick, and I, but it's it's it's great because I grew up listening to a lot of female singers, and Bobby mcferrin was a huge influence on me. And so for me, I it's quite it's awesome to have a chance to mess with that on stage, and if the ethical sitting, well, the other thing is it really brings forward the idea that your character with those high notes sort of the idealist, and you Patrick are are kind of the realist, you're you're down on the ground. Old opera tradition of base being the heavy imitator being the hero. You know? And it's and yet completely modern in this context that word modern Eva, how do you take a character like yours sort of scrappy and make it modern and relatable? It's wrapping up modern. Well, in the original myth, your energy doesn't really have a voice she kind of just waifs around. And then goes back down underground. And I think what's incredible. Is that with the people the creative on the team? They've really allowed me to express it in a way that she is very scrappy and punky and she's a survivor, but she also uses her instincts to make certain choices without giving too much away. And there's also a beautiful love story. And that's also I think as modern as you can get with portraying falling in love everyone can relate to that. So yeah, I just it was nice to give her a voice and for her not to be victimized in this play. No, you're doing this show in the United States at a time. When obviously we've been hearing a lot about building the wall. President Trump talking about building the wall in your show, which was written before President Trump started saying that you. Patrick, your character has people building a wall. And there's a song about it. Oh, the wall. Keep three children. Feel. All of us. Yeah. I mean, in addition to being an extraordinary, poet, lyricist and composer, it seems that an as is a bit of a prophet, right? And she's taken this idea of wall and a wall that can never be finished which must always be worked on and put it into the show. But she said once you know, that any similarity between that wall and any current wall being built or or pretending to be built in the United States is purely archetypal, but there's gonna be a reaction in this country that is going to be probably different even than than overseas. Just because of the the conversation that's going on right now, it is different. But anytime you have someone who's trying to hold onto power, which is what my character is doing even trying at. That moment to build up his own sense of himself its own sense of power because his relationship is threatened with his marriage, a political things come from personal things. So he's feeling threatened in his personal life. He goes out on a holds a rally in which he gets everyone to chant about building a wall. What about the politics of it? Well, I think I agree with Patrick, I think that the physical walls, we tend to create as humans tend to stem from emotional walls things walls that we build against intimacy, and togetherness unity all those things. I mean, there's so many walls, you can build that prevent you from feeling something. That's that's where I think it starts in our show deals with those things. I mean, you know, love fear hope trust doubt and the world now is so complex and moving so fast. And so scary that it's not surprising to me that people would want to think. Oh, well, there's a solution. Will simply build this barrier. And we'll keep all of the good people inside. And we'll put all of the bad people on the outside. And we'll be safe. That's that's what Haiti's is appealing to. Hey, these appealing to everybody's desire in particular Eurydice desire to feel safe and comfortable at the expense of feeling loved feeling creative in feeling free. She can have one or the other at least that's the bargain that I offer her until Orpheus shows are that necessarily. It's not like that. You can you can perhaps choose love, and creativity and freedom, and you can still have some sense of security. I want to just ask each of you finally what it is like to do this show night after night after night after night for so long. Oh, it's great. You. Discover new things every day. Don't you think? Yeah. You certainly do. And I mean, we we were very lucky that with the company we get to keep with amber gray, Andre de shields. And our team, you know, a NAS Rachel chaff kin who really is. You know, a genius the energy that the audience is now giving us this is my fifteenth Broadway show, and I have never ever seen any reaction like this from an audio. What do you mean it's like being at a rock concert? It's like being when I would go see Bano engine you to, you know, the the energy that the audience is feeding to the stage the energy we have three four five hundred people waiting for us at the stage door when we come out because they don't want the experience to end they want to have just a little more contact with the people that I saw on the stage. So I know something very specialist happening that has Patrick page. We've also been speaking with Reeve Carney and Eva nobles zodda. They are all in the musical. Haiti's town, which is on Broadway at the Walter Kirk theatre. Thank you so much to all of you for joining us. So. Anyway, and you can find out more information about the show at here. Now. Step in. Suitcase full of some seventy. This message comes from here. And now sponsor ember. Wave ember wave the revolutionary personal thermostat. That is designed to help you feel cooler or warmer at the press of a button ember wave can put you in control in places like you're freezing office uncomfortable. Airplanes restaurants, trains, cafes and more named one of time magazine's best inventions of Twenty-eight teen. Learn more at ember wave dot com and use code NPR to save fifty dollars checkout ember wave control your comfort. And let's check in Colorado where public schools are closed in. A man hunt is on after the FBI announce last night that eighteen year old soul. Pisces flew for Miami to Denver on Monday immediately. But a pump action shotgun. They say she is infatuated with the nineteen ninety nine Columbine shooting and is on the loose the twenty th anniversary of that shooting in which twelve students and a teacher died is Saturday. Jenny Brune dean is a reporter at Colorado public radio, Jenny. How did this teenager get on law enforcement's radar? Yes. At a press conference last night. It turns out that law enforcement in Miami had been on this case, we don't really know much more about how she came to their attention. But they let the law enforcement here in Colorado. No yesterday morning that Seoul pice was in town and should be considered a credible threat. And that's when law enforcement here took over. We're also reading that her parents reported her missing on Monday, she didn't come back Sunday night. And when the Denver post called their home and if agent answered there, so obviously concern in Miami. But that also raises the question, Colorado, we understand has some tougher gun laws after both Columbine and the Aurora theater shooting. If there was concern about her in Miami. How is she able to buy a pump action shotgun and munition as soon as she landed. Well, she's eighteen years old. She's of age she's not on the radar of anybody in. Terms of having any felony convictions. Her dad, I guess was quoted as saying she has a mental health problem. But that doesn't appear to be anywhere in the system as of yet Colorado just passed a red flag law just this week in fact, so yeah, she she's legally able to buy a weapon interesting of a red flag law. So somebody police can take the gun away from someone if it's a thought that they might harm themselves or others. And we also know Columbine high has now one of the most fist keta security systems in the country, but it's still close along with many other school systems. What's the sense there of security? Yeah. About thirty school districts are closed today. Some of them quite off the Denver metro area. In fact, so they're putting an excessive precaution. But Jefferson County in which Columbine is located has probably one of the most sophisticated high alert systems for responding to threats and threats probably listeners would be surprised to know how common they are across the country for exa-. Apple safe to tell which is an anonymous reporting service were teenagers to report threats last year loan sixteen thousand tips twenty seven hundred for suicide attempts sixteen hundred bullying and six hundred ninety two or for planned school attacks. That's in Colorado alone. You know, we heard about that safe to tell line from the former principal of Columbine highschool. Frankie Angeles will link to an interview with him at here now dot org. But when we spoke to him, you know, he has PTSD so many of the adult children that were in the school during the shooting. Have it? What is the mood in the city? Now knowing that there's an armed young lady who has a fascination with shooting. Well, I think it's safe to say there's an anxious mood. Columbine started receiving heightened interest in their school kind of disturbing fascination with Columbine upwards of a month ago with up to twenty people a day visiting. Outside the school wanting to take pictures of the school. And so I would say parents are quite nervous and anxious. Well, yeah, that's disturbing to hear a head of the nursery Jenny Brune dean -education reporter for Colorado public radio. Thank you so much. Thank you. Early spring snowstorms mean that many ski resorts in the mountain west are still open and some plan to be into next month in Colorado alone, more than seven million people will have hit the slopes this season. And there will probably be injuries every day. Now, you might wanna know how many injuries or where they happen. But as an investigation by Michael Deo, Anna at member station K U N C in Greeley, Colorado found resorts don't share information about all their injuries. And that means people can't gauge their risks from resort to resort. I met Jacob keepings house in Castle Rock south of Denver. Was like. Like, I found the twelve year old through some of the few incident reports the state requires on ski related injuries your but was not on in your holding onto the back to that year. Stay. Last February keeping fell out of a chairlift on his first ever ski trip. He says he never got seated right? And the lift just kept going up the slope. And so you're holding on what were you thinking all time? Well, I most of the time was I will I may get he was taking a class of the grand be rant resort and western Colorado. Another kid about his age was also in the chair trying to help him telling him to hang on. I was yelling top of my lunch. He was hoping someone would hear him and stop the lift. And I thought I was dead. Not dead by was going to die. Jacob has never told his story before turns out. It's a familiar one nine year old boy was taken to the hospital after falling thirty one feet mature lift at the Aspen highlands ski resort over the week. That's another boy who is hospitalized after falling earlier this year. Also this year a six year old girl fell from a chair lift at the door or resort near boulder. Leading a group of moms there to demand safety improvements. The resort said it's reviewing its policies calling such incidents extremely rare. But the company's response set mom Lee, Fisk, thank you for your feedback. We basically stand by our public statement that says we're reviewing all of our policy is and this was rare. But the problem with that, of course, is we don't know how rare was 'cause we can't get the data to find out. Just how many of these incidents take place on Colorado's slopes K when she filed a freedom of information request with the state's passenger tramway Safety Board. We. Learned that seventy four people slipped or fell out of chairlifts between twenty thirteen and twenty eighteen and about a third of them were kids under eighteen we also learned that these injuries are only a tiny sliver of ski and snowboard injuries across the state and resorts aren't required the publicly report most injuries, they do release. Some injury information to the Colorado based national scary as association a major trade group. Dave bird is director of risk and regulatory affairs. The rate of catastrophic injuries per one million skier visit remains below one. In one million more than two hundred ski resorts across the country report their worst injuries to the industry group, a broken back broken neck ally faltering head injury paralysis paraplegic that's thing in the twenty seventeen eighteen ski-season bird said there were thirty seven catastrophic Inge. Series. He couldn't break down those numbers by resort or even by state. He also couldn't say how many other injuries on the slopes are considered less than catastrophic. The individual ski patrols at skiers are tracking those in analyze everything from a slip and fall a parking to cocoa burn in the lodge to sunstroke two tornado C L really the resorts polish those it's. No, not that. I'm aware of it. And I think that there's good reason that they don't the range of injuries does isn't gonna tell you much you'd have to put it into context with their individual skier visits, and that's closely held marketing, you know. Eagle mountain skier a hypothetical skier, it doesn't want its competitors. To know how many skier visits they had. That means there is no comprehensive data to determine exactly how many people are injured on resorts. And what kind of injuries they sustained. So I turned to the State Department of public, health and environment. Biostatistics this is Kirk bowl. Speaking bowl has a little known hospital insurance claims spreadsheet, it is massive and in it. There's information on all kinds of ski and snowboard injuries. Fall from skiing fall from snowboarding or hitting a tree while skiing or snowboarding. Those types of things or at least a collision of some form in twenty seventeen in Colorado. There were five thousand six hundred sixty emergency room visits related skiing or snowboarding and five hundred ninety seven hospital discharges. That's roughly the same timeframe as thirty seven catastrophic injuries tracked. By the national Ski Association. There are limits to the hospital data it doesn't link injuries to resort but four physician and safety watchdog, Dan, Gregory. There's a clear disconnect between what the industry says about injuries. And what the public really knows in the interest of the ski resorts to play down the accident and injury risk at ski resorts. Gregory is president of the snow sports safety foundation, a nonprofit based in California that he founded after investigating the snowboarding death of his daughter in two thousand and six while the ski industry questions whether hospital information is as reliable as peer reviewed safety studies based on reports from Representative ski area's Gregory sees things differently. If a patient has to be at mid to the hospital in today's world because of an injury that's a serious injury. We don't admit people of for for minor things and people go to emergency rooms usually for fairly. Injuries. K UNC's investigation found tens of thousands of ski related emergency room visits and hospital discharges since two thousand eleven and the data is just sitting in a state government, computer, the public can access the information, but the state doesn't publish it. Gregory says that's a problem state leaders need to address it's also a public safety risk that public policy makers are not aware of because the data's not out there for them to be made aware of it. His organization has worked for years to require resorts to file public plans. That include details about injuries, and what's being done to prevent them. So far, none have. And at the moment. Gregory is pushing legislation in Maine to do that. It's an idea that resonates with Lee Fisk one of the moms from boulder demanding more accountability from the ski resorts. I think a lot of parents would choose their passes. There ski school be somewhat safe for their kids. She'd like to see resorts publish injury information in the same way that schools publicly track student achievement. Don't just get to say family friendly. And have that me nothing and for those who are hurt pursuing a case in court is difficult. If not impossible that was the case for about a dozen families. We spoke to for this story, including the parents of Jacob keeping both ways that I reached out to told me because I had signed the waiver at the ski school that they were totally in the clear there was nothing. They could go after them for that team. Keeping Jacob's mother Jacob was relatively lucky. He was only bloodied and bruised after his fall from the chairlift, but was left struggling with severe anxiety all told his medical and therapy needs cost the family about five thousand dollars. They never did find a lawyer who would take their case to court. Mill was sure was. To I would defense. I didn't even want as when you reach out. I was like there's an incident report audited know that two page report written by the resort and sent to state officials says to the best of our knowledge the child turned sideways on the carrier to look behind and then slipped and fell to the ground. You think it's fair for them to say this report that it's easier. No, it was all their fall, in my opinion, the keepings felt lift operators weren't paying attention. As Jacob got onto the lift Graham, be ranches incident report said it launched an investigation after the fall, but the resort declined our request for an interview to learn more about whether any specific safety changes were made for here. Now, I'm Michael the Anna in Greeley, Colorado. And if you want to see more details of the K U N C investigation. Go to here now dot org. You can actually check individual chairlifts at resorts in Colorado. Uh-huh. And see how many accidents there have been? And spring and lucky us here. Now resin chef Kathy guns says in the studio to celebrate the season with three dishes to bowl us over bulls. Get it see what I did there. I think very clever. Hello everything's in a bowl. That's that's a hot concept. It is an a ball. And I like to think of myself as someone that doesn't succumb to trends and bowls are big trend. You've probably seen them in restaurants in magazines. And here's the concept. Here's why it works. Why it's not just a trend. You have all these delicious elements in one bowl. How is it different than putting it on a plate? Well, ultimately, it isn't. But it would be a lot more boring on a plate. I think the idea. Here's what you do. Okay. You have a bowl, and you have to think of this like a savory smorgasbord of textures and flavors and colors. So you start by taking a grain the grain could be. The simplest white rice. But more interesting would be Brown rice or black rice or an heirloom variety of rice. You could use couscous or Isreaeli couscous farro Qinhua keen wa my least favorite grain of just come clean. No. But lots of people keen wine. Keen wise. Great, ripples sweet potatoes. Next comes a protein. This could be grilled salmon, grilled chicken, tofu roasted vegetables. So we're layering we've got our grain. We've got our protein. Then if you want very simple sauce, a me, so ginger lemon CHAI Chimi chara. And then you could slap a poached egg on it. You could put quick pickles on it. Let's let's start with what you have. Because this is exactly what I've done. There's one here with just vegetables. Look, it's not just that definitely Jared vegetables and it specifically spring vegetables, I took leaks and spiritus beautiful spring. Vegetables and roasted them I also had some brussel sprouts. And I roasted those up till they got really crispy I love when the leaves fall off, and they kind of Brown and getting crunchy I roasted cherry tomatoes, and I cooked a pot of farro, which is a whole grain hold week that shaped a little bit like barley, skews me and drizzled the whole thing with the lemony chives in gret. The other thing about these balls that we need to say right up front is you could mix and match these any which way you want. If you have leftover white rice from last night's dinner. That's your base, but these roasted vegetables, you can make big batch and use them in any way, isn't it. Beautiful. If I say, so get -freshing. Okay. The next one has some chicken does the next one is a chicken and Isreaeli couscous bowl and the green sauce that's mixed into the couscous and also drizzled on top of the chicken is a green salon throw scallions sauce. Throw salon through garlic Skauen parsley olive oil into a blender food processor worl- it up saute, some chicken FIS. I have some Ruge la- leaves there. Again, we're playing with textures and flavors peppery, raw rubella leaves pickled some radishes overnight through those in just pickled radishes overnight. Have art is that it is. Okay, ready? Yeah. Boil vinegar water pinch sugar pinch of salt done put in a jar throw in some onions or scallions and radishes. That's why I say, I'm just pickled some radishes you too can pickle radishes spears of raw cucumber, you know, you could add the roasted cherry tomatoes to this flavors colors textures. That's what these bowls are all about this rock. You cover has the skin on it, which I like, but a lot of people don't like that. Then they can take it off your. Your. No, I those are the long hothouse English cucumbers. They're clean the skin, and I really like it. But of course, you can and the third bowl. Maybe one of my favorites is a broiled me, so ginger salmon, take filet of salmon, you rub some white me. So into it chop, some ginger ginger slivers broil it, and then I can't remember what I put that on the one that was dark rice, that's the black rice. 'cause I love how nutty that is texture texture texture, then we make a sauce with ginger and me, so and scallions and we add beautiful KADO slices some being sprouts. These are sprouted peas you could add cucumbers again radishes seeds nuts. You know? I think it is different from a plate. Don't you? It's more like a soup without the soup or salad with with grain instead of completely a one bowl meal. I mean, it's right there. Again, if you're working with leftovers, you can really play around if you cook some of the things that head of time, they come together very quickly for a Wednesday night meal, and you can just keep playing you could crumble cheese on top or scallions or toasted chickpeas writer ready. Yeah. Come on, you could serve this for dinner party. Well, and I might be Saturday night. And it's going to be yours, and I'm gonna claim in his mind. It's one year four here to make you look good. And this has been our segment with a resin chef Kathy guns. Germany, and I also refer to it as lunch and have all recipes here, now doubt or and black rice. I'm going to use black rice in whatever. I really feel like it must be much better for you this. It is. Okay. It's all in here now dot org. You can see all these recipes, Kathy. Thanks. Thanks. Senior. And here. Now's production NPR WVU artists with the BBC World Service. I'm robin. I'm Jeremy Hobson. This is.

Colorado US president Patrick Yemen Haiti congress Orpheus Reeve NPR Senator Chris Murphy Jacob keepings Robin young Senator Democrats France Paris President Trump Jeremy Hobson Connecticut Denver
January 1, 2019: Hour 2

Here & Now

41:55 min | 2 years ago

January 1, 2019: Hour 2

"From NPR and WBZ. I'm Robin young. It's here now Jeremy Hobson off today. And we wish you a happy new year, but we'll be happy week. Democrats take control of the house on Thursday. They'll vote on two bills that would put an end to the government shutdown. One would fund the department of homeland security and offer the president some money for border fencing, if not his wall the other would fund the rest of the federal agencies that have been mostly shuttered for the past eleven days now in an interview with Fox News on New Year's Eve, President Trump said he was ready to cut a deal with Democrats if they funded a wall, I'm ready to go very important. A lot of people are looking to get their paycheck. And so I'm ready to go anytime they want. No, we are not giving up we have to have border security and the wall is a big part of border security. The biggest part joining for the latest NPR White House reporter, I used to Roscoe Aisha happy new to you as well. Although we're not so sure how happy things are going to be in Washington. Tell us first about the Bill that would fund homeland security. This is at current levels. And it's only through February eighth. Yes. So this would just kinda give them a bit of breathing room. Because it's DHS the department of homeland security where the real kind of beef is between Democrats and the president because he wants funding for some type of wall or barrier on the southern border. And so that so that would just be kind of stopped the gap. And then you would have another selection of bills that would fund basically the rest of the agencies that have been shut down that aren't really controversial. You know, these are house bills. The Democrats control will control the house starting Thursday is the thinking that they will pass in the house, but then not in the Senate. So yes, so the thought is in the Senate Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell has said he will not take up any Bill for a vote unless President Trump supports it. And as we just heard President Trump is saying without a wall, we will not support it. So it doesn't seem like what they're voting. One in the house will go anywhere. Speaking of Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell, we're has he been during this. It's a government shutdown. Well, seems like what happened was you have the Senate passed a Bill before the government shutdown that didn't include funding for a wall? It seemed like they had an understanding that Trump would sign it. He decided he would not and we ended up with the shutdown. And so basically, the Senate said until the Democrats and the president reached an agreement we're not gonna vote on anything because it's not going to work unless they all get on the same page. We'll talk about that possibility of indigo. She Asian because we all remember in December the president said he proud to shut down the government for border security. This was in that sit down in the Oval Office with Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi. And in that moment, he also said he wouldn't blame the Democrats for a shutdown now, he's blaming the Democrats entirely for the shutdown. And yet he stayed in Washington did not go tomorrow Lago did not go to Florida for. A break or for his cherished New Year's Eve party. And did he not reach out to Democrats to Democrats not reach out to him? How does that normally work? Well, it it seems like the talks have not really been ongoing. Like there had been a stall in the talks and really Democrats are saying they're not gonna give anything for a wall. And that appears right now to be unacceptable to the president. So there just hasn't been any given take over these past couple of days, and we have said this before, but you have people like Senator Lindsey Graham saying why should Democrats give anything if they don't get something? I mean, there's an understanding in congress that that's usually how it works. But you know, the president is fulfilling his campaign promise. That's what he says. Can he get out of this without anything short of at least the five billion that he wants for the wall? I think that he could probably get out of this without a the five billion. The question is can you get out of this without any funding for the wall, which as you said is a central promised to his campaign. So is he going to be able to offer something to Democrats or will the Democrats feel pressure to give him some type of money for a beer? I think that's the real question right now. Well, and you've got the Smithsonian museums set to close tomorrow across the country, hundreds of thousands of government, employees and contractors will lose their first paycheck January eleventh were getting news at places like Joshua tree. Campgrounds the parks are open, but unstaffed and Joshua tree has just closed its campgrounds because the toilets are near capacity. They've had volunteers trying to stay head of things there. They can't. So it would seem you know, pressure's mounting for lawmakers. A. Yeah, you're going to start seeing the real effects of this shutdown. We've had holidays in. So things were kind of quiet, but you have the USDA where the offices that offer loans to farmers. They were able to stay open a little while they're going to have to close now. So if you're a farmer, and you've been hurt by tears, you really need some money. You're not going to be able to get it. You have the IRS where many people are on furlough is about to be taxed filing season. So this is going to have some real implications. That's pure Wade has reported Aisha Roscoe used to thank you. Thank you. We'll to Utah now which just saw its first New Year's Eve with a new strictest in the country drunk driving law last week in Utah's DUI blood alcohol. Limit was lowered from point zero eight two point zero five other states are considering the move and the National Transportation Safety board wants it nation. In wide saying studies show people are noticeably impaired after just one glass of wine that's around point zero four which is the limit. For commercial truck drivers supporters of Utah's new law say it will save lives. But our next guest says the data doesn't back that Robert Gerke is a columnist with the Salt Lake Tribune Robert years, a hugely Mormon state, but many more than say this isn't about morality, it's about safety. You say what? Well, I mean, Utah ready has one of the lowest DUI rates in the country, largely as you mentioned because of our predominant Gordon population with there's not a lot of drinkers here. If you look if you dig into the data, though, there's in this point, oh five point. Oh, eight range. There's really only about two accidents year fatal accidents year. And so we're targeting a very small problem, frankly with a very big punishment. Which is you know, these these DUI's carry a very severe penalties. You lose your license for eighteen months. You pay large fine. Your insurance premiums go way up and we're doing this in pursuit of trying to save potentially when one life year. These accidents also frequently involve other issues, two thirds of the accidents involve either drugs or alcohol, excessive speed or youth drivers who aren't supposed to be drinking at all anyway. And so it's a very small segment of the fatal accidents on our roads that they're targeting. Well, you write about one the only fatal accident in two thousand seventeen where a Utah driver's blood alcohol level was between point zero five point zero seven nine. And it sounds horrific. You know, somebody who was driving and hit someone on a scooter and killed them. If in fact, though, you could've saved that one life. If that one person driving hadn't had one drink, isn't that worth it? Well, I mean, I think we should also note that the driver on the scooter tested positive for methamphetamine, and so as I mentioned, you know, most of these accidents do involve drugs of another kind or they do involve drivers who are driving in excess of twenty miles an hour over the speed limit. There was an incident in two thousand fourteen where driver was traveling seventy five miles an hour in a forty mile an hour zone. Went off the road flipped the car drove into a house and killed two passengers and is a tragic accident. But I don't think that we can say that the driver being point. Oh, six was the cause of that accident because clearly there were other factors involved. Well, I believe you speaking to us about this from home where your dog is weighing in on his well, but you point out that it could be nearly a thousand Utahns arrested for DUI is next year because of this new law, and that's according to forecasts from the legislatures budget office a thousand. People losing their licenses possibly jobs paying huge fines. But the police are saying that they're not going to be relying on the Breathalyzer. They're going to be still looking for impairment. So, you know, there are people with a glass of wine a point zero five level who will be driving impaired. At least according to a visual from the police shouldn't they be off the road willing is it's interesting. You mention that because we did try to test this to see how many drinks it takes for an individual to get over point. Oh, five it's very very difficult. Not just for the person drinking, the drinks to know when they're appoint. Oh five, but it's very difficult for the law enforcement to be able to discern. Whether somebody's point oh five or not. Yes impairment will be the standard. You have to be weaving or violating some other law in order for them to pull you over. But once you're stopped, you know, then then it's a very subjective measurement of whether or not you are safe to be on the road, and whether or not they do give you the Breathalyzer. I also frankly get a little uneasy when the law enforcement says trust is will, you know, we're only going to enforce this in these narrow circumstances. I mean, I'm a white male. And so I don't have a necessarily a fear of the police or I haven't, but there is a potential there for this to be used as an excuse to stop people or two then proceed to the next step of giving them a Breathalyzer, interesting them. And so it's a very subjective. Measurement is what it what I'm trying to say. Well, and there are people who disagree. We wanna mention Representative there. Norm. Thurston from Provo? He believes that the current law sends the wrong message would which is it's okay to drink and drive as long as you're not buzzed. I mean, there are people thinking if you wait till you're buzzed which is raising the level. I mean, that's crazy impairment begins with the first drink. If you're drinking don't drive you say, well, then maybe you should have passed a law that was zero zero right? If the my point there was if they're going to make a statement that we don't want people to drink and drive and make the law. Don't drink and drive. You know, saying some risk is, okay. Some risk is not. And then not attaching that to the actual data that we've seen on the roads is it makes it an arbitrary figure that we're putting going assign to this and it comes with again, very onerous penalties. Chavan Kirke a columnist for the Salt Lake Tribune on Utah's new blood alcohol. Limit of point zero five percent, the strictest in the country. Robert, thank you. Thank you. Happy new year. So what would we be eating in two thousand nineteen? We'll kale be so twenty eighteen will you be sipping cheese t from Taiwan? We here. It's already hot in San Francisco, and what is up with mushrooms with Karen Neilson job to spot trends. She's vice president of trends and marketing at CCD helmsmen, a culinary innovation firm and Emeryville, caliF and CARA you start with the Australian influence. I'm trying to think what that is. I don't think I can think of Australian cuisine. What is that? Well, think about avocado toast and recognize that that item was very popular in Australia before it was popular here. Also think about overnight oats and porridge we say overnight, oats. Is that soaking them overnight what right which is already very popular on social media. You'll see all kinds of recipes for soaking oats, plus seeds, different types of grains, nuts fruits strike fruits, and you soak them overnight and they're ready to go in the morning. We, you know, I I. Can just hear someone saying, oh, please. I mean, that's why they make Quaker, you know. I can see people reacting to this idea of we have to have new trends and food. The New York Times did a piece to is what to expect in two thousand nineteen that this idea of healthier and more. Do it yourself is huge. If definitely is more and more people are really figuring out what they want to eat for themselves, and what's going to work for them. So for example, that could be one of our other trends cheeses, made from plants or very often from cashew nuts, and we see more and more plant based cheeses and choices. Whether it's a cream cheese or a fresh cheese or a pub dipping cheese or even a multiple Mozarrella type chief we're going to see more choices like that next year. Well, and the New York Times again points out that the plant based main course is really hot. And for instance in Los Angeles somewhere in the city council. There is proposing a law that would require a vegan protein entrees would be available at at movie theaters. And when you. Talk about diets one of your colleagues if someone at least in this field. This is Hannah Spencer. She also tracks the food service industry for the company Mintel said the Kito diet might be on its way out something called peak in think. Yeah. Yeah. What's that? It's it's crossover like paleo vegan. And it's things like this. I have to say the do 'cause if you is to roll. But so that's going to be focusing. Not on things like grains and highly processed sugars, which all kinds of people are deciding they're less interested in and a bigger focus on really good healthful, fruits and vegetables cauliflower has become kind of the new kale. And we now are seeing cauliflower pizza crust all over the place. Okay. And somebody just fainted somewhere. You know? No don't do that to my pizza crust. But people are what is going on with mushrooms. I'm hoping down the road to speak with Paul Stam. It's who is a my college. Who's apparently super hot right now his book? My Cillian running is subtitled how mushrooms can help save the world the times picks it to as the it vegetable you pick it why one of the things we're learning is that mushrooms have incredible nutrients that can really help us and really especially people who have a plant based diet, but also mushrooms have both this combination of these fantastic nutrients as well as the mommy taste, which makes food tastes savory and delicious. We're starting to see mushroom powders that bring medicinal benefits to foods. Whether it's a snack bar or cereal some of the mushroom supplement companies are now working with food manufacturers to infuse those foods with a little mushroom magic. There's also mushrooms that are being grown under light. So that they have high levels of vitamin D which. Which is something that many people are looking for many mainstream folks are trying to get more vitamin d in their diet. And so I think we're gonna see both this nutrition from kind of medicinal mushrooms that help with mental focus anti-stress give us a little boost as well as those vitamin d mushrooms. And then just flavorful. Mommy, rich mushrooms in all kinds of moments of the day. Okay. So mushrooms are going to be hot hotter than they already. Are you talking about food meat fruits joining vegetables in being meat substitutes? So you can grill and shred them. You've got people using seafood things like crackers, so more seafood. What would tell us about cassava and Casse Kara? So those are two interesting ingredients that we're going to be seeing more of a so the cassava root is a tuber native to South America. It's also known as the yuca root. It's turned into tapioca. Which we're very familiar with. So it's a very starchy group that in South American countries, especially Brazil that route is turned into a fine. Starchy flour that is used as an alternative to wheat flour. And so some of the things that we're starting to see made from cassava root include grain, free items like tortillas and Brazilian cheese rolls, which are a fabulous kind of cheese puff made in their very chew week because they're made with tapioca flour. But we're also seeing cassava being turned into like an alternative potato chip just like a sweet potato chip or a potato chip. Now, we're going to have cassava chips. And so that's one new international ingredient that is sort of turning up in our diet. And then cuss Kara is the dried husks of the coffee cherry. So when coffee beans are picked there's a a fruit on the outside that is left to dry, and then we extract the seed and that that in. Inside little seat is our coffee bean, but the husks on the outside also have great levels of antioxidants a little bit of caffeine and in very neat flavor. And so we're starting to see bottled beverages and beers and spirits, even teas made from cuss Kara in a resourceful way. And this is part of the bigger trend of avoiding food waste of mission based brands discovering an ingredient or group of people that perhaps will benefit from those types of you know, what used to be a byproduct of the coffee going industry can now be value added ingredient that enables those coffee growers to benefit from all parts of that plant, and these bent beverages are also quite tasty and give you a little caffeine boost speaking of beverages just real quick the times, and you know, fortune magazine. Forbes a lot of people are looking at what's ahead because there's a financial interest in it. Do you? Agree with the thinking that young people who drive a lot of this are more interested in spirit free cocktails. They don't want as much alcohol in their drinks. Yes. That's very true. And this is a trend that I've been tracking since twenty thirteen and it also came over from the UK. There was a big trend in fun of taking a break in January. Something called dry you airy where people would have a dry month of January to make up for probably all the overindulging one does in December. But because they are such interesting and delicious drinks available in bars. And in restaurants, there is definitely an interest in enjoying some these in a way that you don't become impaired, and you can continue to enjoy your cocktail without the kind of ill effects of too much alcohol. Fascinating couple of things eggs, which you know were out for a while. Now, they're back in and by the way, that might have everything on our list here in my quickly go by the wayside, but they're back in high protein breakfast, but they're going beyond. Breakfast. They definitely are. And what this really corresponds with the interest in protein as well as fewer carbohydrates, and this kind of fits back into your paleo trend, although not the vegan trends, so again, it gets very confusing, but the interest in eggs a lot of it is hard boiled eggs different types of little egg bites. The Starbucks is done an amazing job with those sous vide egg bites they're selling which have no gluten very few carbohydrates. There's a new brand called peckish that is selling hard-boiled egg kits with a couple of hard boiled eggs. And then some really interesting seasonings that you can put on your eggs, and those I expect to see those inconvenience and grocery stores next year, again really meeting that demand that is out there for a really healthy fi protein snack his Suchy so interesting because there was a time when people didn't wanna buy hard boiled eggs from convenience stores because they didn't. Trust it. But now as you say, it's new companies coming out with new approaches to that. Look, you say you work with innovative companies. So how do you do this? I mean, you know, speaking of eggs is chicken or egg. I mean, are you trying to drive people to these things because the companies are making them or are you genuinely seeing these trends and alerting companies to them, it's transit. We're seeing we are looking at places that are influenced both by Trenton health as well as culinary arts. We looked to see what chefs are doing what's happening on the ground some of the edgier things. And then we look for connections to what consumers and eaters are wanting. So we observe these things and then share the flavors the benefits that interesting types of formats that we're seeing with companies that are trying to innovate and create their own new products to sounds like consumers are leading. Look just as you look at the industry. We've talked about nine of the trends that you pick. What's one thing? Like an overarching trend in the industry also wanna listen to about it's very much plant based eating continues to be the overarching theme and of the nine trends that we put out there's three or four of them that fit into that plant based eating and it's really encouraging. How folks are getting so excited about finding some of these new plants festivals? Whether it's mushrooms, whether it's tomato pretending to be a he tuna in a sushi roll, it's very exciting. And hopefully, also delicious care Nielsen vice president of trends and marketing CCD helmsmen their culinary innovation agency the food trends for twenty nineteen. Karen, thanks so much. Thank you and happy new year to you. This message comes from NPR's sponsor, indeed when it comes to hiring. You don't have time to waste you need help getting to your shortlist of qualified candidates fast with indeed post a job in minutes. Set up screener questions then zero in on qualified candidates. And when you need to hire fast, accelerate your results with sponsored jumps new users can try for free when you sign up at indeed dot com slash NPR, podcast, terms, conditions, and quality standards apply. Just a few minutes into this new year twelve thirty three A M eastern time this morning to be exact Nastase new horizon spacecraft flew by ultimate Tuli an object four billion miles from earth further away than any other object ever explored by humanity. Here's Alice Bowman mission operations manager after new horizons sent back signal a few hours ago spacecraft. We've just accomplished the most distant fly by. We are ready for science transmission at two hundred UT see today. Science to help us understand the origins of our solar system. New Killy Beatty, senior editor at sky and telescope magazine has been watching all of this. He's at Johns Hopkins applied physics lab where the new horizons mission operation center is Kelly sounds like quite a moment. Boy, it sure was and it was a little bit tinged with anticipation and concern because not because the spacecraft might fail. But because they really didn't know exactly where in space. This object was it was only discovered four years ago, and very very little is known about it. It's not a planet. It's in the Kuyper belt. What is it? And what's the Kuyper belt? These are literally pieces of stuff that are left over from the formation of the solar system there about half again as far away as Neptune is from the sun. And this one is only about twenty twenty five miles across it is literally a Rosetta Stone that can teach us how the solar system came together possible. I we reading that this might have been there at the beginning. Exactly. So and you know. What we're looking for is. It's probably an icy object like a comet that hasn't come close to the sun. It's been in the deep freeze way out there since the beginning. So it should have all of the chemicals on it that it formed within. That's what's really key here. So these people must be so excited, you know, with the new horizons. It also flew past Pluto in two thousand fifteen sent back the sharpest images we've ever gotten a Pluto where else is it heading. Well, it's heading out of the solar system. Escaping the sun forever. This might be the last object that new horizons get gets to see we've only seen the barest glimpse of yet. Because the best images have yet to come down. But it looks a little bit like in the fuzzy image that we see a little like a bowling pin? Stuck together a peanut if you will. And that tells us something about its dynamical history. But until we get the best images which will start tomorrow, we we'll just be guessing. Well, eighty senior editor kind telescope magazine. Thank you so much for being right on the story for us. Today and congratulations to scientists everywhere. He's see Robin Thicke Kathy you and by the way, speaking of which this music, it's called new horizons. It was released today by Brian May, you know, he's the lead guitars for Queen. But he's also an astrophysicist. He was a contributing scientist to new horizons go to Twitter feed he's been following all of this. This is the song. He wrote for this today. The refugee act was signed into law by president Jimmy Carter in nineteen eighty created to help victims of conflicts in the last fiscal year. The US admitted twenty two thousand four hundred ninety one refugees from more than sixty countries one of the lowest amounts on record. And most of those admitted came from the Middle East and Africa, for instance, about three years ago when the Democratic Republic of Congo in central Africa was plunged in a two decade long civil war. Francois elise. Any luta Shabani and their families sought refugee status in Texas. They're now both students at the Margaret long wisdom high school in Houston. And we wanted to see how they're faring hint better. They might be because of a soccer field and a great nonprofit. They are at K h f in Houston elude. Are you there? Just move Francois you they're years Merrill. Okay. And do I understand Francois? Born in Congo now eighteen and Ila born in a refugee camp your Tanzania victories game. And you're now seventeen. Both affected by the war in Congo. And both have come across somebody named Charles wrote Trammell who coaches you both Charles a you there talk. I Charles about revision, which is your nonprofit, what does your group do? So revision is a program that works with disconnected youth. So we're always trying to build kinship with young people who might not experience that otherwise, which is what draws us into the juvenile Justice system. It draws us into the foster care system, and it drew us to create a soccer field. Eventually, drew you into the huge refugee community in Houston, and to Francois and illu Francois start with you illu tell you can chime in. What is a soccer field mean to you? So okay, feel is like my home is even more than at home to me. Yeah. Why explain why is that is that Francois? Explain why for me Sakai's serve is really big patients who me since I started playing when I was five I was pushed to us something, really important and our soccer. Well, Andy luta, I can't imagine when you came to this country again born in a refugee camp in Tanzania. Can you explain how strange this country must have felt to you? You said the soccer field looked like home to you. But compared to what like what are some of the things that were so strange to you wouldn't use to see buildings like that. Yeah. Every time to go to town. Maybe those familiar sometimes you have to work from faraway. We do you have. No like, no best. You might see a car, but twelve it caught over there. You have to be really really rich. You're a lot of money. Yeah. So you here you're seeing cars and buses and huge buildings. And then in the middle of all of this a soccer field. So charles. It sounds as if this became a magnet for young people like Francois and Andy Lootah. Right. So we opened on Sunday after church, and we said any high school age soccer player. Just come and play pick up games on the field. And a lot of young men came who are from the same background that at Luton and Francois are from you, also, I'm sure have other children of immigrants probably Latinos Houston. Absolutely. Let's this mix. Like, it's just created this magical chemistry because they don't all come from the same country that didn't all grow up together. They don't all even all speak the same languages, but we have this bond that I've never experienced before. I understand that again you were born in a refugee camp your mom's in a wheelchair disabled during the civil war in Congo. How are you helping out at home? I'll be helping do a lot of stuff when mom sometimes I have a two coke can house in do some. This stuff translate translate you English sometime when she go to some offices 'cause she don't speak English. I help translate. I'm imagining there's been a lot of stress for you living living in a refugee camp near a striking out in the US as refugees. But do you feel like when you're on the soccer field? Does it does it feel like a different you drew review like different because anytime even when you walk in you might be going to restore even if you see a loaded thing look like a boat. I'm gonna just start kicking. I'm studying budging come into soccer field. Anything that looks like a ball. Trying to fit like something that look the bull always trying to score with like a box in the street is but in in your native countries, Francois. Didn't you use things like wadded up tape and stuff for soccer balls? So this comes natural to you Francois. When that's you something to that. We're hearing that when you're on the soccer field. Some of the other teams can be cruel. What why what happens to be honest soon as we step in the park of the fill every person on the on Dr perk. This looking at I don't know what's wrong with that. But we don't pay attention on them with just we keep moving to what we can do. We'll charles. I I understand that one match got particularly ugly. I mean, people are yelling, not just racial epithets. But in a couple of occasions you've had players parents talking. You know, yelling things about these kids being refugees that unfortunately, happens quite a bit. And there was a particular game. Game. It was a final of tournament where the players and the parents were just being really very racist. In what they were saying, it was very emotional for all of us because it's hard to know what to do in that situation. Well, honestly, Robin that day I was very emotional at the end of that game. And I brought the kids over into a circle we typically meet in a circle after the game. And I just said this should never happen. But it does this is America. And there is racism, and that doesn't mean that. It's right. It's not right. But, unfortunately, this is the reality that we all live in near a hand transplant any Lita. I understand you've also seen some of the good that can happen in this country. Dick sporting goods awarded money to keep the soccer team afloat for a few years because I guess revision was struggling through. Yeah. What did you think when that happened that I think it was one hundred twenty thousand dollars? Those are good donation to us goes at that time like mostly every player didn't know what to do. 'cause some of us were already affected with the Harvey and stuff by hurricane Harvey. Right. Yes. So did they know what to do all they could think of his come together be around each other and giving hope Charles what do you do with that money? We've been able to get a van that gets us to and from games and practices. It's allow us to go out of town. So we've taken some trips to San Antonio and actually to Missouri to play soccer games. And have college coaches take a look at our players. It actually allowed us to get six of our players onto a college team in the fall, and it really it continues to allow us to feed the kids, which is really really important food, insecurity is a huge issue for a lot of our players. And so every time that we're together for practices or games. We're able to feed them we'll talk about the college part allude a year younger, but. Francois. You know, you're applying for college next year. Soccer. I hear what it's doing for you. It's a it reminds you of home, it makes you feel great about yourself, you know, athletic and out. They're all good. But is this also something that's you think as a pathway to your future. Discover what what want to do in college and stuff. So it's a pathway to college. Also eluded. I understand. It's a pathway out of neighborhoods that may not be safe. You know, a thing or two about things that aren't safe having lived in a refugee camp. But tell me about that part of it. Oh, my neighborhood some some shooting be happening. It was this night who is living in a style hitting guy shot outside in. I was a little scarecrows. You might come through the window. I mean, I'm good because I don't I don't be there. All the time. I'll be on if Soka fit every time 'cause I spend a lot of my time in school in soccer, Charles. This is the goal correct to keep people on a different path. Absolutely. The the reason that we wanted to start this team. Honestly was because a we saw the potential the talent that they had and be you know, the the pressures of the neighborhood were starting to get to some of our players. There's a lot of gangs in the area and some of those gangs. We're starting to put pressure on some of the players to join them or hang out with them smoke weed, and we we just didn't wanna see that trajectory. Happen because these kids can make it on the soccer field. Well, meantime, you guys I hear our good friends while your the team captain. Are you guys good? Tell me what have you won? We're right third place to throw place in Texas. Yeah. Well, so third in the state. You should be proud. Yeah. Well, we wish you the best of luck. And thank you so much for talking to us. Thank you. Francois. Lease in Leticia, Bonnie refugees from Africa living in Houston and their Safran coach Charles wrote trauma L from the nonprofit revision the whole sacra team will play in the south Texas State Cup competition beginning in March learning through the end of may best of luck. North Korean leader Kim Jong UN says he's ready to meet President Trump again to talk about denuclearization. But he also warned Washington not to test North Korea's patients with sanctions and pressure Kim deliver that message in his televised. New Year's speech last year speech kicked off that unprecedented diplomacy which included the North's participation in the Winter Olympics hosted by South Korea and eventually Kim's historic summit with President Trump in June Jeanne Lee is director of the Korea program at the Wilson center, gene. Welcome back. We're wishing you a happy year. But wondering what kind of year you see for US North Korean relations? You were watching today. What jumped out in Kim speech yet? You know, these New Year's day speech is by the North Korean leader are so crucial. I have spent the last I don't know how many years waking up early to make sure new watch these because they set the tone, not only four North Korea's domestic priorities. But also they sent a message to the outside world. We were really watching this closely because it's been weeks of stalled diplomacy between the United States and North Korea lots of questions about where the momentum from that Singapore's summit last June where it was headed. And so this really set the tone, and I think it's it was reassuring for Washington and Seoul to hear Kim Jong tell his people and really tell the world that he's still committed to this process. So I think that it's it's going to be dramatic. It always is with North Korea. But at least we know that he is sticking and sticking to some of those principles and goals that he laid out in two thousand seventeen and it hasn't veered off that track. But how do you not believe him it? Let's just remind ourselves that these are two men that hated each other President Trump made fun of Kim calling him rocket man at the UN in two thousand seventeen Kim said disparaging things about Trump. But then in two thousand eighteen Trump said he fell in love with Kim. A talked about the beautiful letters that Kim wrote to him, but his administration has cancelled meetings. With high level North Korean officials. So what do we know about what he has done about nuclearization, if anything it's important to be cautiously optimistic I like to use that phrase because I think it's it's it's fine. And it's absolutely necessary to be somewhat skeptical because Korea has gone back on its word many many times in the past the United States has as well. And so I, you know, this is a little bit of a tug of war. We have been engaged in a game of chicken with and worth greens. And so we're going to see both sides reluctant to be the first one to to make that initial first step toward denuclearization. And so we I do think we have to be cautious. But we should also be great for the fact that we have some room to work with here. And that he hasn't gone back to the rhetoric that we that we saw obviously in two thousand seventeen. So I think that there are a couple of cautionary notes he is referring again to the complete denuclearization of the cream peninsula as the goal. And that's a very different definition than the denuclearization of North Korea. And so that is always a reference to requiring that the United States withdraw its nuclear umbrella over South Korea. And so this might seem like insider language, but that's always the kind of language that we look for when we look at this. This is he he did though I have to say give him credit. He did say that he would not make nuclear weapons again as you point out. How do we believe him? I think we need to be skeptical. But also try to hold him to his word. And what are you? What what sense? Do you get that the Trump administration, which is missing some key members right now, but the the Trump administration might consider reducing sanctions or congress might these sanctions is obviously the big concern from North Korea. They cannot move forward economically unless some of these international and US sanctions are lifted. And so we will see very pointed language from North Korea regard. Those sanctions the United States has said that they need to see much more progress on denuclearization. I think that the United States will be looking for concrete measures very very concrete shows of commitment to that process before any sanctions are lifted. What? So he spoke for a long time. Was there anything else that jumped out? I mean is he reading a new book is he is there anything else that the jumped out that he might have said, well, it's funny that you mentioned the books because just the fact that he gave this televised broadcast in his library is something that I took note of at you news, wearing a suit, and almost I should just point out that this is very reminiscent of his grandfather the eternal president of North Korea. Kim Il Sung who gave this type of New Year's address. But over the radio Kim Jong UN's father, Kim Jong Il who ruled for seventeen years until two thousand eleven never gave a broadcast the north queens. Never saw him give the New Year's day address at a podium. Or in a library. Even over the radio. It was almost published in the newspaper, so very different style that Kim Jong in his projecting. And that's really notable. I mean, this is propaganda. But kind of message that he's trying to send his people that he's Thawra -tated. But that he is comfortable in his skin and also to the outside world he's trying to project himself as someone of a normal leader. I have I have books, you know, I would love to take a close look at what what books are out of shells. I can tell you that the he does have the complete the collected works of his grandfather kindle sung. But this is this is something. That's that's notable. It's it's meant to send a message not only again to his people. But also choose to us Jeanne Lee, director of the Korea program at the Wilson center, gene. Thanks so much. Thanks for having me. And here now is a production of NPR in WB. You are in association with the BBC World Service. I'm Robin young. We hear wish you a happy new year fingers crossed on some of these headlines. Please join us again here now.

soccer Francois elise US vice president President Trump North Korea NPR Charles Utah president Houston Robin young Senate South Korea Kim Jong Kim The New York Times
January 22, 2019: Hour 2

Here & Now

42:24 min | 2 years ago

January 22, 2019: Hour 2

"This message comes from here. And now sponsor indeed if you're hiring with indeed you can post a job in minutes, set up screener questions then zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard, get started at indeed dot com slash NPR podcast from NPR and WBU. Are I'm Robin young. And I'm Lisa Mullins. It's here. And now a portion of the US government has been closed for business for thirty two days. Now this week. The Senate may weigh in on President Trump's plan to end the shutdown. Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell is expected to introduce a Bill that includes the president's offer to protect temporarily some undocumented immigrants from deportation that would be an exchange for five point seven billion dollars from congress to pay for a border wall. The president touted the plan over the weekend. This is a common sense compromise, both parties should embrace the radical left can never control our borders. I will never let it happen. Walls are not immoral. Let's bring in NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis. Susan Democrats are calling the president's deal a non starter because of that wall funding. So I wonder what you think the chances are that it can get the sixty votes. It needs to pass the Senate. I don't think that there's much expectation at all that it's going to be able to get to that threshold in order to get a vote on the Senate floor. I, you know, I think it's the the president's calling it a compromise. But it's important to remind people that this was not a offer. That was you know, we're Democrats were consulted on it. It was an offer that came that was devised by the vice president Jared Kushner has top advisor and son-in-law and the Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell. So this was Republicans agreeing with Republicans that this was a good offer for Democrats. I think Democrats just feel very differently about that. But the president has conceded that the wall doesn't have to spend the entire two thousand miles of the southern border and to further apparently further Sweden, the measure the Senate Bill also includes a twelve point seven billion dollar allotment for natural disaster relief. And that's something else. The Democrats have been pushing for so. Why would they oppose it? I certainly think the inclusion of things like that disaster relief money, which is not contentious and has a lot of support is partly intended to make this a really tough vote. You know, I think that the president sees this as something that can continue to put a significant amount of political pressure on Democrats over the question of border security, where Democrats pushed back is that they are willing to provide significant amounts of money. They've offered billions in return for things like immigration judges more border control more border, control agents, more security at ports of entry. But it really is comes down to this sort of political knife fight over the wall. And the fact that the president has backed down from the two thousand mile original insistence. I think to a lot of Democrats is a political sign that he doesn't feel like he's winning this debate either inside the beltway or outside the beltway. So I don't think that they in this climate feeling right now, they're the party that needs to fold and are Democrats offering any kind of movement of their own. It is fair to say that I do think a lot of Democrats, particularly moderate, Democrats and new House Democrats that were elected in a lot of these center, right or conservative leaning districts are increasingly nervous. This doesn't look good for them. And there's a group of House Democrats today who were working on a letter to house speaker Nancy Pelosi asking her to back down a little bit on her insistence that the wall won't get a vote and ask a return compromise. That says, hey, if we all agree to open up the government, we should at least tell the president. He'll get a vote on the wall. We're not going to promise him the wall. But will say we'll give it a debate. And we'll give it a vote and see where it's at. I don't know if leadership's going to go for that. But I think the fact that you do see this pushback from some in the democratic rank and file does speak to the fact that Democrats aren't entirely confident that this isn't going to have some blow back on them. And and there's a real recognition that, you know, the government's been closed for a month and real people are starting to real feel real pain and the job they've been hired to do is solve this problem, and they need to solve it. That's a really good point. And I wonder if you can comment on that more because your watch. Getting this from Washington from the inside. But, you know, very, well what's happening far outside the city. People are laid on a house payments trying to get temporary work while they're on furlough in stealing themselves for yet another payday with no paycheck. So for Americans, these are urgent and really distressing issues. But there seems to be a disconnect with Washington. Can you explain why there doesn't seem to be a sense of urgency there? You know, I talked to a lot of individual lawmakers who really do feel the urgency. I talked to one congresswoman last week who said she's not sleeping at night because she's hearing so much from her constituents about the inability to do things like pay their mortgages, you know, it's important to remind people that these hundreds of thousands of Americans going without paychecks are really just collateral damage in this fight, right? Like, the so much of the government that is not being funded right now has absolutely nothing to do with the fight over the wall and border security. They're basically just being held hostage over leverage. So that's a real reason for a lot of people to get angry and for a lot of politicians to start to feel. The pain. You just have I think on both sides. And I don't mean this e- equivocating, but both sides have their political incentive to keep up. This fight for the president. The wall has become the absolute physical symbol of his presidency. And they see it as a really high stakes battle of if he gives in here could fundamentally hurt him going forward and on the other NFL Democrats who way they just want an election in which they believed that people told them do not give in on this issue. So it's not so much that they don't feel the urgency. I think that they feel that the urgency is so great to their individual party basis that this is not the issue that you compromise on. And I think that's why we've it's gotten us into the situation of the longest shutdown in American history. Susan Davis NPR's congressional correspondent Susan, thanks. You're welcome. Let's go now to Huntsville, Alabama where more than half of the economy is tied to federal spending. There is a big army arsenal the army fully-funded, but there are many federal agencies within the arsenal. There's also the Marshall space Flight Center, this is huge. Build and test engines and vehicles for NASA because of the shutdown most of its five thousand employees are furloughed will pastor Travis Collins and his congregation have been trying to help. He's with the First Baptist Church of Huntsville, they gave out more than sixteen thousand dollars in grocery store gift cards at an event for federal workers. Pastor welcome. Thank you, Robin. Thanks for having me. Well, and thank you for what you did. Because it sounds awesome. And we understand you were listening to NPR, and you was riding and you heard a chef chef Jose Andres who's done this before. But in this case, he opened a relief kitchen for federal workers. And you know, he said, look if I can even save them one meal Bill. Yeah. That's right. And the statement was made that this one, you know, to the grocery Bill is one Bill maybe they won't have to worry about. And so I got to the office wondering what can we do? And within a couple of hours got a call from a friend at Marshall space Flight Center who said that they were pulling together as volunteers they were pulling together several agencies in the community to help and needed a place to host it, and we have a large conspicuous place. And so it seemed it was obviously a no brainer. The afterthought was we'll while they're here. Let's let's do something for the grocery Bill. And so what you did was take thousands from your church. Emergency fund added a couple thousand more that church members had given you maybe past the plate around a little bit more. And we're able to give these grocery store gift cards fifty dollars each for every furloughed federal worker. What was it like to see the people stream in? Well, that was it was it was overwhelming. We. We didn't my only regret is that we didn't set aside more money. We we really didn't anticipate the response. So I looked out there at twenty before twenty minutes before time to open the doors, and there were had to be three hundred people in the hallway waiting to get into the large hall where we were hosting the event, and it was just almost overwhelming we gave away those those grocery fifty dollar grocery gift certificates in thirty minutes, and we hit anticipated giving fifty dollars for singles and one hundred dollars for couples and families. But the line was so long that guys made a quick decision said, hey and ask the people in line. Hey, could we just give everybody fifty and the people were were wonderfully cooperative and said, yeah, sure go farther, so but even at that. Thirty minutes, and they were gone loaves of bread. Divided them up. But look as we said there was the Alabama department of labor that was their local food banks credit unions. There are so many federal workers there. We're hearing that contract workers aren't coming into town to work for the government. So hotel usage down restaurant usage down. But talk about the chain affect that. This happens on the other businesses that are affected when those five thousand workers don't have money to spend. And so there are so many ANSA Larry stories that are connected to the primary story, and there's just a sense of anxiety uncertainty obvious frustration because even those who are not directly impacted have friends who are or everything from like, you said restaurants, too, dry cleaners are impacted by this. So what are you as a pass to do about this? I mean, I know you don't want to Wade into the politics of the moment. We'll first of all there's another meeting on Thursday where several state leaders are getting together to ask what is the next step? Because unfortunately, this looks like it's going to drag on we were all hoping, of course, that it wouldn't. But with at dragging on we're gonna need to offer more than fifty dollars gift certificate. So there's a big meeting on Thursday to ask that question. Maybe a movie night. You know? Hey, that's no joke. So the Thursday, the big idea going into Thursday is a fun night for families with kids because they you know, his mommy going to have a job is daddy going to have a job. And so that is the big ideas going in. What what if we do, you know inflatables and chicken fingers and just do fun to lower some of the things I didn't even if it's different different approach than offering grocery money. What are you gonna tell your parisioners on Sunday when it might be the second Friday with no pay paychecks? The timing was such on Sunday. We're the topic of the day was joy. And so I asked how do you? How do you have joint talk about joy on a day? When so many people's futures are uncertain, but the point I tried to make his sometimes joy is choice. Not any motion, you sit around and wait on I think a lot of people around here who just having to choose hope when. There aren't a lot of reasons for hope coming out of DC pastor Collins. Thanks so much. Hey, my honor rod. While it may be winter here in the US and freezing in part. It's summer in Australia, which means it's hot and people are jumping in the ocean. Well, recently, Ben Brock Johnson, host of the podcast endless thread, the show featuring stories from the online community Reddit heard about something disturbing in the ocean. Okay. My name is Dr Theresa Keret. I've spent my career Cy fi researching that deadly and dangerous a few years back. Dr Theresa credit was underwater in full diving gear off the Great Barrier. Reef in Australia. Dr carrots research is difficult because before she can do her research. She needs to find her research subject. They Sarhadi check down there. An invisible animal in an isolation. That's not even neyland a stack that's needle in a forest on this particular dive a few years ago. She thought she'd found the needle in a forest. She always makes efforts to protect herself. From her special research subject, including special diving gear, but on this dive, she found a flaw. We will fully covered we gloves full sites. S who woods a whole lot. I had come up from a dive and was getting into the buffet. And as I put my hands up onto the bite actually a bit of wash wash down in between my love and my site and a crazy sort of freak accident pace of tentacle actually washed down the inside of my with that woulda rape here is where Dr credit has a big moment. Feel like I've got hot kind of stabbing pike is being prodded into various parts of my body like random, none of it really makes sense. She realizes something very bad has just happened. So does her research partner, Jamie Seymour. We got an hospital. Now, we have to go now and the drive is not long, maybe ten minutes. But by the time we had the hospital I was literally on the hands and he's trying to get myself to a hospital bed. There's actually video of what Theresa correct is going through. It goes away. So really looking Tolkien. Status, dude minister, sooner amounts of painkillers as you give someone who's in the fatal car crash, I had about five times Umana morphine for my buddy. Wait and just this feeling of not being a sit in my skin like I just wanted to take my skin off. I just couldn't be in mind ski and everything just hit you bodies feelings betraying, you know, when I'm going to be free of this and am I going to be free of this? It's that feeling of potential doom, which is just very very scary, this feeling of potential doom. This is weirdly something that is echoed around the planet by people who have been hit by the same animal Theresa's research partner, Jamie has been hit two and his feeling of impending doom was so bad. Jamie says he asked for cure. No, doctor would administer we had a film crew day. So the whole pretty much the whole. Eighteen to twenty four hours ease on film. And I don't remember any of it. If someone had to give me a gun ought to just go and thank you. I'm off the planet. Jamie and Therese are experts in their own very specific area of focus toxin -nology. They study all kinds of venomous animals, but the one that Jamie has the most love hate relationship with hands down is this one I'm afraid to try to pronounce it, myself Irukandji. I I'm not sure how to say it. It's no bad. It's not bad. All you need to do is put an Australian accent on it. That's not an off. This is sort of just you know, sort of Mike it sound really bad and come up with Irukandji. It's a whole class of small box jellyfish. And the world is still learning about them where they are what they are in what they do to you box jellyfish bar. Well, buck shaped and box jellies of which there are fifty species are powerful swimmers when you think of normal jellyfish think of them as like. Like, the little Prius is of the cow willed. And when you thinking of box jellyfish thinking them as a Formula one GP's now most people think of jellyfish I swim around and they blunder into things and catch pry big box jellyfish, actively hunt, they prion and track them down. He actually fish. I mean these seriously sophisticated animal so Devi semi d- box jellyfish has twenty four hours of which twelve of them image foaming. So they've got lenses people's and Britain's. No that I didn't know. Oh, yeah. He'll eat fish, see. These guys do box jellyfish to the interesting. The is look inwards. So they had three hundred sixty degree vision looking through them selves stings from Eric Kanji. Give rise to something called the Eric Kanji syndrome, which is a strange combination of what starts out as a tiny pinch and builds into days of vomiting, extreme pain heart attacks, lung problems in the weirdest symptom of all unique among the venoms of the world, a creeping crescendo wing sense of impending doom. Jamie says that Eric Kanji syndrome is interesting too because it's a tributed to stings by small box jellyfish all over the place both geographically and genetically industry reload. We have good data for at least possibly ten species of small box jellyfish that give rise to Aera Kenji syndrome now depending on. On the size of the animal, whether you'll stung bought the tentacle or whether you stung by the body of the animal, whether the animal is young or old whether it's from canes or towns will weep up somewhere else. Is gonna depend on how you again to react. It can be as mauled as I don't feel well through to you'll gonna die. That's really interesting. Why is that? Why why does it very feeding on different species of fish? We think so what they eat impacts the the venom. Then if you skip out of a strike here and go to any coral reef area any way in the world that laws between the tropic cancer. And the tropic could capture cone, you get your Kenji taught animals that give rise to Irukandji syndrome, and I again all have slightly different venoms. We know that in Iran ten to fifteen percent of cases, it he's going to get worse than just pine. You can end up with what referred who's pulmonary Damon? It's a fluid on the lungs. You could end up with increased blood pressure. A healthy. Adult has got a blood pressure of one twentieth. Icty we've had Irukandji patients where they blood pressure goes to sort of, you know, to to ten to twenty of a a hundred and what that does is load up the pressure and oil vines, and Autry, and if you have a weak spot somewhere in Autry, and if it happens to be for example in your head, and it blows we can't cite it and the two dates we've had from Keynesian drive anywhere in the world have been exactly that. There are cures that exist. List? They're just inconsistent. Here's Theresa again when we don't night. Nearly enough about the venoms and how they working there's no one treatment fits all. Because we literally dealing with it a large amount of different Spacey's, and they present so differently as well. Impatience? There's only one commonality among people who have been stung the doom part in the beginning Jamie couldn't figure out whether it was physiological or psychological originally thought all of this was psychosomatic. And there was a psychological component to it. The doctors a bicycling going. Well, look, we cannot give you any more moving because if we do we're gonna kill you. So you'll just gonna have to rod this out. So you know, it psychosomatic God this is going to go wrong. What's wrong? Now. I've been the eleven times, I know exactly what he's going to happen. And that feeling he's still the there have been multiple reports of people with air Kanji syndrome, asking the doctor to straight up euthanize them, even when they understand intellectually Howard, dick euless of an idea that is these feeling of being painting doom. It's we think it's sort of like a flight of fight response. So that if I scare you you get a big adrenalin rush. And so what happens is you blood pressure goes up hot right goes up and you'll buddies responses get something's going to go wrong. That's what we think happens with your Kenji, Ben. And when you stung that not you get these release of adrenaline, but not just a little bit full half a second. But a lot of adrenaline over a period of fifteen twenty twenty two twenty four hours part of why Jamie, and Theresa have been studying these creatures in Australia is because there's an impact there. They represent a friction point for the local tourism economy. It's pretty contentious. So it's not an animal that bond lodge goes backwards by the impacts of humans in the environment. It goes the other way, and as we put more more people who would have more people are to gets done. Are there any positive things that could come out of the study of these jellyfish? Oh, absolutely. For example. If we if we go back to. Books jellyfish with pretty suit? And we've got a component adult of the venom from big box V that will cure athritis. We can certainly cure arthritis in mice with components of that minimum. And one of the things that we think that we can get at Erie Kenji venom is switching on if you will inflammation channels in the human system. Jamie says the complexity of Irukandji venom and its connection to the human immune system means it could be potentially used for everything from irritable bowel syndrome to asthma. We just have to get better at understanding the group of jellyfish who stings results in Aera Kanji syndrome, which you're like dream scenario. They're the one that I really like at the moment that we playing around with is the potential KUA for arthritis. I mean, can you imagine somebody and few assigned to the Mike? We can maybe get rid of seventy to eighty percent of you'll pine from Thrace mean that to me would be phenomenal. It really would you can bear me in the grant and OB. Happy man, whether or not a miracle drug made from Aera Kanji venom, ever surfaces, Jamie Seymour, and Theresa Keret seemed optimistic their research will continue the reason they say that as climate change impacts ocean. Environments Irukandji jellyfish are expanding their territory from the tropics north and south for here. And now, I'm Ben Brock Johnson. Then brought Johnson hosted the podcast endless thren. This message comes from here. And now sponsor indeed when it comes to hiring. You don't have time to waste you need help getting to your shortlist of qualified candidates fast. With indeed posted job in minutes. Set up screener questions then zero in on qualified candidates. And when you need to hire fast, accelerate your results with sponsor jobs. New users can try for free when you sign up at indeed dot com slash NPR, podcast, terms, conditions, and quality standards apply. Today, the supreme court handed the victory to the Trump administration. It allowed restrictions on transgender people on the US military to go into effect that Trump policy bars people from serving if they identify as anything different from their biological gender. There are some exceptions the court allowed the policy to take affect temporarily while legal challenges move forward. Meanwhile, today, the court also agreed to hear its first major gun rights case in nearly a decade NPR's, Legal Affairs. Correspondent Nina totenberg is here to parse this out for us Nina's wanted to start with a big picture, what do today's actions? Tell us about the posture of the court right now. Well, the action in these cases today strongly suggest again that the already conservative court is now moving further to the right with to Trump appointees justices Cavanaugh in Gorsuch, joining three other conservatives and feeling reasonably comfortable in their positions. And why don't we take the transgender case? I will talk about gun. Later on what exactly did the court do today? So in the transgender case a bunch of lower courts ruled that the administration had not presented enough evidence to justify essentially a ban on transgender people in the military and those lower court judges barred the administration from carrying out its policy while the case is litigated today. The supreme court by a five to four vote did the opposite. It allowed the administration to go ahead with its policy while the case is litigated and the liberal justices to send it, and so the bottom line here is that the Trump ban now goes into effect and that five to four vote strongly suggests that the conservative majority is likely to uphold the policy months or years from now when it gets to the supreme court for a decision on the merits, and I should note that these five justices are are supporters of a strong executive, and that's likely why they will uphold it I would guess in the long run. So take us then to the gun rights case today at. The New York state rifle and pistol association and the city of New York what is the issue, and why is the court taking up gun right's right now. So when the supreme court decided in two thousand eight and two thousand ten that there's a personal constitutional right to own a gun for self defense. In one's home. The vote was five to four with Justice Anthony Kennedy, the deciding vote Justice Scalia wrote a long opinion for the majority. But the critical section inserted. I'm told it Kennedy's insistence satisfied sensually that state and local governments could still could still enact reasonable regulations. Now since then the NRA and its supporters of brought plenty of gun cases to the supreme court, but the justices stayed away from the issue one suspects because four of the conservative five thought that Kennedy would approve many of these regulations as reasonable so now Kennedy's retired replaced by Brad Kavanagh who's written that the second amendment right to bear arms is pr-. The absolute, and we come to this case today at issue in New York City is a law that bars. People licensed to have handguns from transporting them outside the city, for example from taking their guns to their second homes. The folks challenging the law say it's too restrictive and should be struck down under the supreme court's previous decisions now as you can see they could easily win a narrow victory because the New York law is they say the most restrictive in the country, but the court could also open the door wide to striking down many, more gun restrictions. So as they say in cliche land only time, we'll tell NPR Leila. Ferris correspondent, even toed and Brig nice detect. He was always nice to talk to you. The Oscar nominations are out and Netflix is celebrating the studio received fifteen nominations, ten alone for Roma Alfonso Korans, black and white film about a year in the life of a middle class family in Mexico, which was nominated for best picture and best foreign language film, and is tied with the favourite for most nominations overall other nominees for best picture Black Panther black klansman bohemian rhapsody green book, a stars born and vice let's take a closer look with John horn, host of the KPCC show the frame John good to talk to you again. Happy to be on the show and talk net flicks. First place that in context for us. Well, I think the important number right here is Roma's theatrical box office revenues zero they have not reported any box office on this film. Because most theaters wouldn't take the film because it was on the streaming service. And yet it is tied for the most nominations with ten now Netflix has spent billion. Nhs of dollars producing an acquiring content, and tens of millions of dollars on its Oscar campaign, and it's clearly, you know, yielded some results they did not make Roma they acquired it when it was close to being finished. But still to have the most nominations of any film and to have fifteen nominations total which is more than they've had in the previous four years combined is quite an achievement. Okay. So keep an eye on Netflix. But let's talk about Roma. I mean, it's also important to say, it's a beautiful film. Inspired by women that writer director Afonso clone knew in his childhood. You talked with him on your show the frame here. He is speaking about his camera work tried the camera to be a subjective. Not even know genitive is almost like a goes that he's subserving looking at the past and gliding through the past. That's the I wanted to come to very state even when it's moves not having any shaky kind of situation. I wanted to feel more like Morris if he's hunting you and. That's what the film does and talk John about the woman at the center of it. She plays a housekeeper we understand. She just kind of wandered into the auditions and has been nominated now for best actress her name is y'all eats up ratio. She didn't know anything about Hollywood. She didn't know anything about phones car Rhone. In fact, when she first met Affonso Koran her family was concerned that he was involved in human trafficking, and she had not studied acting what L phones it was looking for is somebody who looked like the woman who cared for him while he was growing up and y'all eats the is not only an incredible performer. But I think she really embodied the person that Affonso was trying to conjure from his memory. And I think it's worth noting to that in the supporting actress category. Marina de Tavira who plays the mother, and the story was not expected to be nominated. And she was as well, this is an incredibly personal film to all fons. Oh, as he just said, he shot it as if it was a ghost. It was I think a difficult movie for him too. Right. It was a difficult movie for him to shoot because with so much about his childhood. And yet, it's an incredibly beautiful film. And it's so specific to his life. And I think so many people read into it experiences from their own life that it's follows the adage the more specific you can be the more universal your work can become so again, the star of elites operate CEO now nominated for best actress along with Olivia Colman from the favorite one of our favorites. Lady Gaga for a star is born Melissa McCarthy for can you ever? Forgive me and Glenn Close for the wife. She plays Joan the wife of Joe a famous novelist played by Jonathan Pryce. He wins the Nobel prize. She starts rethink her life. Let's listen to a scene where he confronts her. They're about to go to a function and she's been out all day smoke. Smell it. I went into a cafe and was filled with smoke. You've been brink into. Yeah. I had a vodka and day. Yes. Joe in the middle of the day. You know, Johnny. You can't be doing this. You can't be showing up at functions with alcohol on your blue are the star of the big show. So why anyone possibly care what the hell has gotten into. I don't like to be lectured to I'm not a child let has gotten into you who do you see as the frontrunner in this race for best. Actress has been Glenn Close. I think in a lot of ways, but given all the attention that Roma's getting I think you can't discount you'll eat to the other thing that I think is worth noting is the favourite tied with Roma for the best for the most nations with ten your Coleman is nominee in this category. For playing the Queen in the film. The fact that a movie like the favorite, which is certainly unconventional. It's a period film told when it a distinctive way by its director Yorgos Lanta MOS, the fact that it has as many nominations as Roma I think is really reflective of the way that the academy itself has chain. Ging over the last several years. The academy is added more than a thousand new members almost all of them much younger much more diverse than the veteran voters. And I think the fact that they're recognizing the favourite Glenn Close is a kind of a classic kind of old school Oscar pick in terms of performance. But I think if you look more deeply into that category. And certainly in supporting actress, we're both Emma stone and Rachel vice our nominee for the favorite you start to see how the tastes of the academy are shifting as newer members. Are joining the ranks also in actress in a supporting role Amy Adams for vice Regina king. If Beale street could talk, and you mentioned the three other nominees, but what about a best actor Bradley Cooper is nominated for a star is born. But he wasn't for director you surprise. Yeah. I think that's in fact, very bad news for the best picture prospects of a star is born typically, you need to do a couple of things to win the best picture Oscar, and that is you have to be nominated as director of the film, and you have to be nominated for editing star is born was. Not nominated for directing or editing. I think that hurts. It's chances a lot. I think this is Christian Bale's prize to lose. He starts vice that got a lot of attention, including best picture. And and I think in a mild surprise best director for Adam McKay. So I would say Christian bale for playing Dick Cheney advice is probably the person to be although bohemian rhapsody keeps chugging along. This is not a movie that was critically embraced. It has been a global hit Rami Malik was nominated for plane, Freddie. Mercury in the film bohemian rhapsody was nominated for best picture everybody. Discounts his film, and it keeps doing incredibly, well, even with prominent critics organizations. Well, you mentioned rally Malik you spoke with him. He's been talking a lot about the aesthetics, including the teeth. Let's listen, you know, I needed the teeth. The teeth were something that was a first moment when I thought, oh, I never thought I looked like him. But this is going to help. This is going to help immensely. It was something that Freddie was very insecure about and I wore them from day one. I felt insecure, but I felt a little bit closer to him. So there's Romney, Molly because you say that film bohemian rhapsody just keeps getting awards and press but sodas green book, and I want to mention that Vigo Mortenson from green book is also in the best actor category along with Willem Defoe at attorneys gate. We mentioned the other nominees and Mahershala Ali nominated for actress supporting role for green book green book, there's been a lot of controversy. Peter Farrelly, the director kind of co-creator had to apologize for some of his ridiculous off maurik sexual harassment behavior years ago, the family of Don, Shirley, the real jazz artist at the center of the film says it's not really as true as it claims. But yet green book keeps barreling along the only controversy on this film. Nick Villalonga who co wrote and co produced at the story is based on his father's life travelling with Don, Shirley, the jazz, pianist and Nikola Longa had to apologize. Is for recommending and commenting on a tweet that President Trump put out a falsely claiming that Muslims will were celebrating the streets of New Jersey on nine eleven and yet this film one another huge ward over this past weekend. It won the best picture prize from the producers guild of America, which has a very good track record of predicting the best picture winners. I think audiences like this home a lot more than critics. Do. It certainly been polarizing there's been a complaint that it's kind of a white man's version of what it looks like to suffer racial discrimination that said it just keeps going along. And there's a lot of people who really liked this film, and I wouldn't count it out yet. There are a lot of people in Oscar world trying to diversify and they may be willing to you know, look away from the criticism because it is kind of a feel good racial story, which they may want to embrace talk about that the economy diversifying itself or trying to think the academy is always looking to honor movies that it thanks are not only well-made, but also have something to say. And I think that's why a movie like star is born is probably not in a good place right now. But if you look at movies like Black Panther, certainly black Klansman's by Cleese film. You look at green book for her shawl Li I think by the way is going to win the supporting actor Academy Award for playing Don Shirley in the film. But yes, these are important movies about important ideas. Even if their problems surrounding them much more in the case of green book than black clansmen. So I do think the academy likes to honour films that have something to say and that are important today. And that I think is very much in green books favor right now. Especially with the thousand new members who are younger and more diverse. That's John horn, host of the KPCC show the frame, John. Thanks as always pleasure. Thank you. And the Oscars will be handed out on February twenty fourth Betty, the snacks. We've got a story about two ministers who are trying to redefine what it means. To fight racism talking about race can feel like navigating a minefield the ministers outside Denver used compassion. Spirituality and laughter is a roadmap. Colorado. Public radio's Marie Awad spent some time with a soul to soul sisters. She has our story. The first thing you need to know about Reverend Don Riley divall and Reverend to one a Davis is that they don't have a church. They don't need one says Riley devolved the work that Thuan or call. Do we could not do in the confines of a congregation or even a denomination? We had to create our own thing. And do it how we feel it how we feel called? She says both of them already put in their years as pastors in the African Methodist episcopal church, then they retired defined their non. Off it soul to soul sisters three years ago. Davis says in order to do the work that they do fighting racism they had to play by their own rules. We don't need someone give us permission to do the work. But we are creators, we are co creators, and if we can't co create and doing that work, then do your thing. God bless you wish. No ill on you, you rock and do what you believe is anti racism work, and we're going to do this. And what is this? It's facilitating conversations predominantly among white people about racism about how it works all the different ways it can manifest itself. And most importantly, what a white person's role is in the task of dismantling racism at first they would give presentations to congregations, but Riley divall says not everyone wanted to hear what they had to say heard a lot of hurtful things a lot of hurtful things, and we just decided absolately not that's not healthy. That's not. Itself care. We're not going to open ourselves up to being treated like that nowadays the pair. Let people come to them, and they have to the tune of more than eight hundred people just last year, they run multiple programs now, including one that's still involves congregations. Another called facing racism is a four week intensive there's lots of reading from writings by Malcolm X to rap lyrics is okay. And it is loving. And it is responsible for us to be like, it's not mean, it's not my word to educate this person at a session. I attended people discussed wanting to confront racist family members or ask for advice on how to navigate tough conversations with friends. No one was called out. And no one was judged again Reverend to wanna Davis we are encouraging critical feeling in critical thinking, so you can think differently in this world. So we are again exempt. Defying and embodying what it is to experience difference in how to do this dance the two also emphasized that the work of combating racism is ongoing. So there's a facing racism alumni group that meets monthly Debbie Zuqar is a facilitator with facing racism will we get kind of a big load of software as white people that gets downloaded. And now, we're beginning. White people are increasingly interested in understanding what was handed to us Zuqar says Solta souls approach works because it's compassionate and loving. No one is there to be singled out or called a racist. She says people come to the group to learn and to grow looker has seen it herself. I mean, one white woman just looked at dawn onto wanna and said, oh, I just got it that you care about your children as much as I care about mine and the wound is felled deeply silent. It was so honest, and it was. Was really brave of her Riley. Duval says it's moments like this that show the impact of Solta souls work. Giving permission getting permission to be in. The midst of challenge is beautiful for folks is an opportunity that most folks do not get do not have and people are hungry for appreciate and that appreciation shows the organization is growing and the next installment of facing racism will be bumped up from a four week intensive to five weeks, and that's by popular demand for here. And now I'm Anne Marie Awad and staying with race this quick correction yesterday. We took a look at the incident last week, and at the Lincoln Memorial that went viral, I with an image of a Catholic school boy seeming to stare down a tribal elder Relator learned that there had been a group of four black Hebrew Israelites. Taunting the boys this is a movement that belief. Leaves blacks are the chosen people. There are extremist branches these followers in Washington had been calling the boys school shooters pedophile, incest babies, reportedly for an hour when the tribal elder and other native Americans from an indigenous peoples March came across them, the tribal elder told morning additions, David Greene that he assumed it was the larger crowd of white young men who were attacking the four blacks. Meanwhile, we said the boys were taunting the native Americans by shouting, build the wall. Here's our correction. That's what some who were there said. But as the Washington Post reports nowhere on video of this entire incident. And that be heard, and we should have said that as well here now is a production of NPR and WVU are in association with the BBC World Service. I'm Robin young. And I'm Lisa Mullins. This is here and now.

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May 7, 2019: Georgia's Abortion Bill; 2 USC Students On The College Admissions Scandal

Here & Now

41:45 min | 2 years ago

May 7, 2019: Georgia's Abortion Bill; 2 USC Students On The College Admissions Scandal

"Here. And now is supported by ember. Wave which offers the following message ember wave a new wearable that can help you feel cooler or warmer with the press of a button. Find your own thermal wellness at home or on the go. Learn more at ember. Wave dot com ember wave balance through temperature from NPR and WB. You are I'm Jeremy Hobson. I'm Robin young. It's here. Now this morning, Georgia governor Brian Kemp signed into law one of the most restrictive abortion bills in the country. It bans abortions after a doctor can hear a fetal heartbeat, which is at around six weeks of pregnancy before most women know, they're pregnant that makes this so-called heartbeat Bill, but it also grants person who had rights to an embryo and fetus, here's the Bill. Sponsored Georgia state rep headsets slur at the signing ceremony living infants there is an equality act is a Bill that recognizes something that many of known for years, it recognized that science tells us. That children in the womb or living human beings that are worthy of full legal protection. Georgia public broadcasting politics. Reporter Steven Fowler joins us in Steven just remind us Roe v. Wade the law of the land allows for abortions until the fetus is viable outside. The woman that's around twenty four weeks. So at six weeks this Bill is much earlier. But it also at grant person hood, what would that allow Georgians to do, Robin? What this would do is give that embryo person hood status, that means that a parents could claim that embryo on their taxes, and some state level census counts could count an embryo within the state census. And so what it would do is basically you're considered a person now after you were born once you were a baby. But this Bill moves that back earlier to once a doctor can detect a heartbeat wants that heartbeat is the tech. Did it is now legally and economically considered a person? And there were some concerns from district attorney's that a mother's. His doctors pharmacists could be subject to murder prosecution. If in fact, they helped end a pregnancy after six weeks, apparently the bill's authors say that they would be subject to criminal prosecution. But there are also concerns about pregnancy ending naturally. Well, sponsor Republican Ed set for that. We just heard from after the Bill signing answer that question and said that categorically that would not be the case he says that the law actually would strengthen protections for women who have miscarriages, and that there wouldn't be any fear of prosecution for a miscarriage happening or any sort of natural occurrence that may happen, and that mothers don't need to fear any sort of legal action for what happens. Well, there are exceptions in the Bill of in cases of incest rape, which have been reported to police or in the case of the health of the mother but similar heartbeat. Bands. Have been signed into law in seven states including Mississippi, Ohio, Kentucky, so far all. Have been challenged. None have gone into effect and President Trump recently weighed in on the abortion debate making false claims about so-called late term abortion laws here. He is at a rally in Wisconsin last month, the board the mother Mitch was a doctor. They take care of the baby they wrap the baby beautifully. And then the doctor and the mother determined whether or not they will execute the baby. I don't think so. Of course, with the president just described there is untrue that would be homicide. You can't birth a healthy baby. And then kill it. Some think that he may have been confused with stillbirths in which a baby is born deceased, but his comments are also being seen as part of a push to get these bills passed and get them all way to supreme court, which now has to Trump conservative nominees on board the court. What's the thinking? There is the thinking is the presumption there that this will go to the courts. While the bill's sponsors here in Georgia say that all they can control what happens in Georgia. So they wanted to pass a Bill that would be best for Georgian, but both supporters and opponents of this Bill do seem to think that Georgia's Bill is designed to be that test case for the supreme court. Interestingly enough, it doesn't actually have anything to do with the abortion provision or the heartbeat provision. They think it's that fetal person hood language that could be the different hook so to speak that will get the supreme court to consider Georgia's case, and ultimately potentially make a decision about Roe versus Wade. We're he ACLU of Georgia says it will fight this new law in court. It's ready to go to court, and there have been other opposing voices raised Georgia's one of the leading states for movie and television production. Is there a sense that there will be a Hollywood boycott? Well, what we've seen Robin throughout this legislative session is a lot of opposition. Of a lot of different groups. We've had medical groups. We've had the democratic groups come out we've had Planned Parenthood come out, and we had on the last day of this legislative session of protests, led by Hollywood actress listened Milano and some local film and entertainment industry workers here in Georgia. And they said that this Bill if it signed could send a message to Hollywood that Georgia's not a hospitable state, and even though there are some large tax credits for the film industry to come film here in Georgia. There is a push by Milano and some local workers to get these big companies to go to states that in their words respect the rights of women. Steven Steven Fowler covers politics for Georgia public broadcasting will voters in Denver deciding today whether to become the first US city to decriminalize the use of hallucinogenic mushrooms the measure on today's ballot would bar officials from spending resources to impose criminal penalties for personal use and possession of the drug. Joining me now is Avery. Lil from Colorado public radio. Hi avery. Hi, Jeremy and first of all just give us the one. Oh, one on magic mushrooms is still assignment mushrooms or psychedelics that can cause loosen Asians and along with several other psychedelics. They were made federally illegal in nineteen seventy souls Ibon is a schedule one drug. So that's the same classification as heroin and cocaine, obviously, some people who use them or using them wreck your recreationally, but there's also been quite a bit of research in the last couple of decades into their potential medical use specifically for mental illness and the US Drug Enforcement Administration. Does warn though that large amounts of slow Siping can cause panic attacks in psychosis. And that an overdose can be deadly. Now this initiative that's on the ballot today. Invent Denver doesn't actually legalize the mushrooms. The goal is just to d- prioritize to the greatest extent possible. The criminal penalties for using. And possessing the mushrooms how how would that work, right? The municipal election, obviously, can't change state or federal law. So. So the ballot measure if it passes it will still be illegal to possess or use like Delic mushrooms but this initiative could reduce drug arrests. So essentially at a directs law enforcement to focus his attention on every other crime, including jaywalking before it enforces laws that make magic mushrooms illegal. Jaywalking would be a higher priority. Interesting where did this initiative come from? What's the argument in favor of it? So the group campaigning for this measure is called decriminalized Denver, and they try to get the measure on the ballot last year and failed. But this year, they got the signatures they needed so they're pointing to potential medical benefits and the FDA granted so's I've been based treatment for depression breakthrough therapy status. That's a process that expedites the development and review of new treatment. Johns hopkins. Researchers also found some evidence that suicide and could help treat some forms of anxiety and depression and the campaign manager, Kevin Matthews actually, credits solicitation with saving his life. When he struggled with depression. So people are pointing to those to the potential meta medical benefits is what they're. Rounding their campaign, and what about the opposition dippers mayor Michael Hancock opposes about initiative beyond that there's not much if any vocal opposition coming out of Denver. The public had the opportunity to submit comments on the ballot initiative and no one submitted a common against it. Probably the most prominent opposition voice has been this intense institute, and that's Colorado Christian university think tank based in Lakewood, Colorado, and that's just west of Denver and Jefferson County, and they're concerned about safety as well as the area's reputation as sort of drug haven is there any indication of whether this is gonna pass today. People in favor of the measure have certainly been more vocal than those opposed. And we know that the decriminalize Denver group got more than five thousand validated signatures from city residents to get the question on the ballot. But more than seven hundred thousand people live in the city of Denver. So whether or not they've gathered enough momentum for the initiative to pass. I don't think we can say until we see the results and up avenue. The reason that everybody is paying attention to this so closely today's because Colorado is one of the first states where Merrill. Wanna became legal? And now that has happened to all across this country. People are wondering whether this idea of decriminalizing hallucinogenic mushrooms is going to become something that other states do right? And there's definitely interest in other states. The Republican lawmaker in Iowa recently proposed a Bill to legalize slow Sivan for medical use inter move it from I was list of controlled substances in a group in California tried to get a criminalization on their question on their ballot in two thousand eighteen but they didn't get enough signatures. So whether or not it's gaining traction. It's certainly has some interest that is Avery Lil from Colorado public radio as we wait to see what voters in Denver decide today that could be the first city to decriminalize the use of hallucinogenic mushrooms every thank you. Thanks. Jeremy will Robin. The Oscars of food were doled out last night in Chicago. This is the James beard foundation holding their annual awards, and it turns out that the nominee that we profiled last month right here on. Here. Now was a big winner. Freshened you. So we figured it out. We're like this one looks like a good one. It's Ashley christianson of Raleigh North Carolina who was named outstanding. Chef she's the owner of several restaurants in the Raleigh area and talked with me about the inspiration. She gets from the city where she works. We live in a place where we truly experienced seasons, which what's what can be more inspiring to to creative dishes and every week. There's something new and there's something fun to be inspired by tour with. So there you go make your reservations now. Yeah. Exactly. Exactly. And by the way, this is this is the second time in an annual tradition. Last year. We've profiled this pastry chef in Birmingham, Alabama dollar miles. And then she won the James beard award for best patients. So. Getting touched for must go out and eat at an interview more ships. One of the schools at the center of the college admissions scandal is the university of southern California more than half of the parents accused by the FBI of trying to bribe their kids way into college we're targeting USC, and as it happens. That's just the tip of the scandal. Iceberg right now at USC. So what has all of it meant for current students? There. Joining us now is Yvonne ah Jiang who's this year's valedictorian. She's from Ohio and graduating with a degree in public policy and global studies have on a welcome to here. Now. Thanks for having me. And also joining us today is Trenton stone who's the student body. President for the undergraduate student government of USC he's from Colorado and is currently a sophomore majoring in philosophy and cognitive science with a minor in business finance Trenton. Welcome to you. Thanks for things. Rodney today. And I know that this is a busy week for you because a final. So we thank you for taking the time to talk with us. He Ivana lemme start. With you because you're graduating, how do you feel about the college admission scandal? How is it hit you as a student at USC, certainly? So I think since my freshman year at USC, I've always kind of been in circles of activists students and friends who have always tried to push the needle with the university in terms of diversity inclusion equity in ways to take advantage of all the resources at the university for all students. So I think when the scandal came out, my friends, and I were honestly just not surprised it didn't quite come as as much of a shock to us certainly was disappointing. And and it is disappointing to have like family and friends and everybody come together this Friday in the light of all of that. Why is that do because you think that that some of the people who are going to be on stage with you don't deserve to be there or what? Well, and this'll be this'll be something that I think all mentioned in my speech as well. But I feel that there could be a more on his conversation about what the priorities of the university are. And I think those in power just don't have that same perspective of I I attended some of the presidential search committee hearing sessions, and there it was just a the folks on the committee. There was a lot of I'm a twelve generation Trojan or whatever that is. And I'm not I'm a first generation Vietnamese American. I'm not a first gen student, but coming from a background where my parents were forced out of their country and had to rebuild a life here, and my mom had to drop out of community college because I was his she was pregnant with me. Yeah. There's definitely it's it's disappointing. But I'm happy to be validated. I guess for my achievements. And I hope that in the future. We can put a spotlight on this underrepresented students I campus as well. But it also makes it all the more disappointing to to think that somebody may and fought their way into the school. Absolutely absolutely, Trenton, what about you. How has the college admission scandal affected, you personally know things on a for sharing that I think for me, I'm in this position. Now for about a month. I'm two years into USC and still have two more years to go. So I think a lot of what I've been focusing on is how do I deal with my first half of college? And then how to move forward and not only reconcile with our past. But really focus on a future that can drive change as you might have might have heard. No, there's a lot of change in leadership. We have a new president and many new senior administrators and deans across USC. And I think really what we want to focus on what we wanna do is make sure that the changing leadership isn't just a check Mark that you know, we're gonna make change. But that that truly does happen. Do you think that the system can? Truly be fixed. When you've got people that are wealthy and powerful who want to make sure that they can be at the front of the line to get in. Yeah. And I don't wanna be overly optimistic. I think there will there always be challenges. But I do think that now the culmination of scandal after scandal just in the last two years since I accepted, my admissions offer there's been multiple scandals, and I think all of its culminated nounce this point that change truly can happen. Everyone across the university in a cross truly across the US, especially with his admission scandal recognizes a lot of institutional challenges across the college ecosystem. And so I think there's now a moment to make that change. But I don't think that it'll be perfect just in this next year. I think it's a long time. And I think it takes people like vonda the forefront really driving not change. And and being there to really hold people accountable to to make that change in progress. Okay. Well, let's talk about some of those other scandals that you're referencing there. There have been scandals rely. Dating to sexual misconduct. One involves George Tindal. The former campus gynecologists has been accused of sexually abusing patients at the USC. Student health clinic over three decades, he continued to see patients until twenty seventeen and resigned quietly with a payout. The is facing hundreds of civil suits from former patients because of Tyndall, Ivana, what did you think when you heard about that scandal? I was really crushed. Because as a student who uses the health center as a woman on campus. It was really scary. I think to think that that could have been me and to be honest. It was many of my friends in last summer. I was interning Senator Feinstein's office. And was just browsing through weekly reports and happened to see a blurb on the scandal and dollars just it was really crushing. I think for me and the other USC student who was interning there at the time. And and to know that you know, I had been abroad the previous Masterton of that. I was coming back to a campus that was going to be grappling with this. And it was disheartening. But yeah, so that was a dark moment. I think for a lot of students will in Trenton after the Tyndall revelations you learned that your own former campus, Dr Dennis Kelly, who's a men's sexual health practitioner had been accused of sexual battery and harassment. He was known for counseling. LGBTQ patients. And denied any inappropriate behavior. But several men have come forward with a lawsuit against him and US see what about that one. How upsetting was it? To learn about that. Yeah. Yeah. I think that added onto the tender situation and I received a note from Dr Kelly in July of last year after our president resigned in may about his resignation from his post. And then it wasn't until February that the the scandal broke that he had from from the lawsuit that he had been potentially harassing an an assaulting students in our health center. And so I think for me personally, having been a patient of Dr Kelly, and as a student on campus, it really just added onto this complexity in this multi leveled situation at USC, and I think it really just showed larger systematic issues across our health system rather than simply just you know, one bad egg in this health center. So both of you have had to deal with your fair share of college scandals. During your time there at USC. But aside from all of that have you been able to you know, focus on being a college student. It's a once in a lifetime opportunity. I'll start with you vonda, and just, you know, keep focused on learning and socializing and doing all the things that college students do. Oh, definitely. I mean, I think yeah. I've been able to like I said I've interned in Senator Feinstein's office. I've been able to work in study abroad in places like Uganda Nicaragua because of the opportunities offered through USC. So I think there are people in USA who want us to take advantage of these opportunities and want us to reach our full potential, and I've been very fortunate to be a part of that. And I think it comes down to bringing that spirit. I guess what it what it means to have that college experience of taking advantage of academics extracurriculars and an opportunity to travel, and I think that's there. And I think we just need to understand and get all those on the same page, I guess about wanting that for every single student at USC and not just a privileged view. And what about you Trenton have you been able to focus just on being a student? I think that's always the foundation of of why we're at school. But of course, student government and in different endeavors, do take a lot of time and end up pulling a lot of myself away from academics. But I think being able to focus on a as a student. You know, there's unparalleled opportunities at USC similar to on. I've been able to participate in so many different programs and trips and really just to develop so much as a person. So I think while these scandals in situations. Pose a very interesting challenge, not only for students, but for the larger university, the university continues to operate in and be a great place, a great hub for academics and extracurriculars and professional development. And so, you know, I love USC. But I think that that even, you know requires more of us to be able to make sure that we're part of that change, and that we don't just you know, right off the university. But that we can be a part of what needs to happen over the next coming years. If on what's next for you after you graduate. I'll be going back home to a high of. For the summer just to take a break for the few months, and then I accepted a fellowship through Princeton in Asia to teach English at college in Vietnam for the next year. Well, and then after that, I'll think about grad school, but yeah, it'll be fun for the time. Yeah. And trend what about you know, your two years away from graduation? But what are you thinking about for your future? Yeah. Yeah. This summer. I'm going to be doing a lot of work for this position. We'll be in LA for about half the summer, and then I'm gonna head to Cambridge University to research program of the faculty member there. So I'm super excited about that. And then after that, I'm just gonna continue with my education finish out in the next year as a as president, then I'm really excited for my senior year just to be a regular student and kind of just enjoy enjoying my time at USC and make sure that everything finishes out. Well, and then after that, we'll see what happens that is Trenton stone and Ivana Jiang. They are students at the university of southern California. Ivana is graduating this week. Thanks to both of you Ovonic. Congratulations. Really appreciate both of you talking with us. Thanks so much for having. Yes. Thank you. So much. This message comes from here. And now sponsor ember. Wave ember wave the revolutionary new personal thermostat that is designed to help. You. Find thermal wellness in any situation ember wave can put you in control of your comfort in places like you're freezing office uncomfortable. Airplanes, cold restaurants, after a workout at home and more named one of time magazine's best inventions of twenty eighteenth. Learn more at ember wave dot com ember wave balance through temperature. Markets here in the US took another dive at the open today after US Trade Representative Robert lighthizer promised yesterday that the president's threatened tariff height on Chinese goods up to twenty five percent from ten percent will happen just after midnight Friday despite that threat today. China's government said its top trade on voi- will be in Washington. Thursday to continue trade. Talks alley villes. She has MSNBC anchor in economics. Correspondent alley we want to get a sense of what's going on here. Well, it's it's a complicated situation. The Chinese team, you know, decided to sort of pull back from the talks a little bit and Donald Trump decided to get tougher. He decided that he's going to pose new sanctions. So the Chinese team is now coming to Washington on Thursday and Friday. Remember the sanctions are the the increase. Sanctions are meant to be imposed on Friday. It would seem at this point that Donald Trump may have the upper hand, but the point is in both cases in the case of China and the United States. Both have had things that have made them feel like they're in a stronger negotiating position over the last couple of weeks. And so everybody's digging in as opposed to getting closer to a deal. We'll tell us what that is. Why does he feel stronger while the United States stock market performance economic growth, low unemployment Donald Trump is sort of getting the message that the tariff war, the the trade war that he started is not having a particularly negative effect on the economy. It's certainly costing American consumers a little bit more money, but it's not fundamentally affecting the economy on the other hand, China is trying to reestablish. It's global dominance through something called the belt road initiative. One belt run road, you might know it as or the new silk road, and they had a major conference at which forty different heads of state were there, and it sort of boosted China's confidence that the world wants to do business with China. So it can take tougher position with the United States. So I think China may have overplayed its hand on this one threatening to pull back on the talks. Donald Trump says he'll impose more tariffs that is the biggest sticking. Point for China. It doesn't want more tariffs on the president's top economic advisor said yesterday that China is reneging on some commitments. We know that the US wants a list of law and regulations that will need to be revised for China to comply with the deal. They won't have a checklist there. Beijing is balking at that. But what do you make of former Trump advisor Steve Bannon bet in the Washington Post today, he lays this out really start terms. He says we're in an economic war with China. He says his advisors might be pushing him to make any kind of deal just doesn't lose voters. But Bannon says, you know, it should be a tough deal and sodas democratic Senator Chuck Schumer, the tweeted out, hang tough. She'll there's there's not only by partisan support on being tough on China. There's global support right? If President Trump hadn't started a trade war with all our partners like Canada and the European allies. Everybody be louder in their support of Donald Trump. There is definitely feeling. The Donald Trump has taken on China in a way that prior administrations hadn't done Steve Bannon. Really lays out a very strong argument in an op Ed in the Washington Post about how the new world is is America versus China. I don't I don't know that I that I can justify the solutions. He comes out within that we shouldn't make deal with China. But he does lay out the reasons why it's really important at the United States. Not look for a short term or simple deal. But look for something more comprehensive. What he sees as a more comprehensive deal is not necessarily what everybody else sees. But he does make the point that this is a big global battle. China is the dominant other player in the world. They are growing, and they are ascendant MSNBC anchor economics correspondent, he's also co host eventually and rule and telling us a little bit about a story. We will be following this week Ali. Thank you. Thank you. The metoo movement has been a game changer for many women, but what about men will in Wyoming. There's a new victim advocacy group that's designed to allow men to discuss the problems of sexual violence with other men and help them become better advocates for women. Why owning public radio's Maggie Mullen reports from the mountain west news bureau safe project in Laramie is a cluster of beige buildings a mostly residential neighborhood. Lee garish answers the door. She's worked here for the past year as victim advocate. She tells me that historically there haven't been a lot of sexual assault and domestic violence prevention programs that reach out men, but it's kind of a up and coming buzz right now is engaging men in the work end underneath Maillance in. It's a buzz garish wants to be a part of. So she developed the safe men program as an experiment. It takes ten men from the community and puts them through an intensive training. Over twelve months, though me about once a month. We're trying to have them be basically gender-based violence almost experts in a whole year. Which of course, we're not going to accomplish gear says there's a reason the program is spread over a year. Fewer to condense into two weeks that'll be very depressing two weeks. And I don't think it'd be really enough time to process that. And there's a lot to cover Geir says after an initial meet and greet. They get down to the stark realities. Are we talking about sexual assault work? We're gonna be talking about stocking child abuse community organizing, basically, everything that falls under the umbrella of gender-based violence. I know there's a problem that's Jason safari when he heard about the program he jumped at the chance of getting involved. How do I address it? How do I become active against the problem? If that makes sense, and I didn't have many answers to that. Safari says there wasn't really a space where he could talk about things like gender-based violence with other men, and that's a huge part of the idea behind the project to create that space. If it feels like a stupid question or something that you feel uncomfortable asking, that's okay. Because that gets the conversation going uncomfortable questions like why does someone experiencing domestic violence stay with their abuser. Or what are the nuances of consent? The project looked for men from all kinds of backgrounds. Safari is an academic advisor at the university of. Wyoming. There's also a teacher in the group of business owner therapist someone in the medical field and a police officer detective sergeant taunt Smith doing with gender-based violence more frequently than most people I had a lot to bring to the table. Smith is coming up on his fifteen year anniversary Laremy police department. He says a lot of his case load involves sexual assault in something he and other program. Participants noticed is how frequently people misunderstand sexual violence. We realized that society has really relaxed views on what constitutes sexual assault and domestic violence, but Smith is still optimistic about shifting those views. And so as garish she says once you learn and get involved with sexual violence prevention, it's like flipping a light switch and sometimes lights, which is hard to turn off its something that you are always going to be a aware of something that you're always going to want to do more and no more. Out. And I think based on the men in our program this year. I can definitely see that. Being the case for them. The safe man program turned away fifty applicants who wanted in on the first round of workshops garish hopes. It's just the first of many for here. Now, I'm Maggie Mullen in Laramie. We are in full blown spring stuff appearing in produce sections. You may have no idea what to do with maybe rhubarb those green and pink stocks that if you bite them are whoa here. No resident Jeff Kathy guns is here with recipes to tame that tartness Kathy. Correct there to go Tim, the tartness, you know, I grew up on Long Island a while ago. And we used to pick rhubarb from the side of the road, and oh well and chew on it. And early was dot is hers. Our I mean, most people don't like eating raw rhubarb because it is just a pow of sour, right? But what is this? What is it technically? It's vegetable, but in nineteen forty seven in a New York court, it was declared a fruit, and it went to court and went to court what fruit or vegetable has been declared that you know, but in ninety four to seven it went to court, and it was declared a fruit because it's most often cooked as one in the US and. Then there's some long winded explanation about how businesses who imported the stocks saved money on taxes because it was no longer considered a vegetable, I don't know. But let's talk about the good part. Yes, we shall we? Because you have some dishes here, and oh, I can't wait. It can be an sweet or savory dishes. Absolutely. A while ago. I did a recipe here for grilled rhubarb with pork chops. I put raw rhubarb on the grill and brushed it with maple syrup, and it softens and sweetens the thing about rhubarb is that because it's so sour it needs to be balanced out by sugar. The problem is most people at too much sugar. So when you eat rhubarb, all you taste is the sugar. You have a strawberry. Rhubarb crumble in front of you facility. Very simple. I cooked the little rhubarb in a little bit of sugar, but it cooked down in soft. Dan. And I mixed it with some fresh strawberries slices and made a topping with my favorite granola, which has nuts. Little bit of ginger. That's it may get ahead. I popped it in the freezer. The morning. I took it out put it in the oven. And now you are eating sl. Sure. 'em. This is amazing. And it's very very simple in a great way to take advantage of rhubarb by sweetening it, but not overly loading it. Okay. And then what are we have over here? We have a rhubarb cake. The recipe comes from my dear friend, Rebecca Scholz. It could be made in start to finish in about an hour and a half, you cut rhubarb you sprinkle it with sugar, which softened sit you could use ginger or cinnamon beat up some butter, and eggs and flour and buttermilk buttermilk gives it this rich taste without it being very heavy. You know, I was just going to say, it's so light, it's very light cake. And then I just took some strawberries, sprinkled them with sugar overnight, and you have a pretty elegant desert, by the way, how do you did? Those strawberries overnight to have like a sauce what they do is the strawberries on this sugar become friendly and the juices from the strawberries are released and you get this almost natural sugar syrup. That's all you have to it. Okay. It's called maceration when it's a wonderful five minute. Cooking term that will make you feel very special with the big word. Okay. Big word this this is a drink. So I thought what about a rhubarb soda? So here's what I did. I took a quarter Cup of sugar and they put it into saucepan for five minutes. Now, don't get scared. I made what's called a caramel. So I let it cook. Until it just starts to liquefy. Then I added a tiny bit of maple syrup sugar alone sugar alone. Okay. Make care amount. Yes. Okay. It's like burnt sugar is what it is at the maple syrup. Then I added a Cup of water, and I had this gorgeous, caramel sweet syrup. Then I add a two cups of. Large rhubarb chopped up and let it simmer for a few minutes. And I added it with ice cubes and soda water. And you have the most refreshing drink of the season. You know, that's a challenge. I'm willing to take let me see. All right. You're on most refreshing to see right here. Now, let me let me take it up a notch. You could add a little bit of apple cider vinegar, and it would be a shrub which would just make your soda a little more interesting. And then let the party begin. You could add rom you could add tequila but just on its own. I would drink that morning noon in. Yeah. It's nice and light and no aftertaste completely. Boy, we will have all of this adhere now dot org. What do you store rhubarb and Honey shop for it? When you're looking for rhubarb, the best place to go as farmers market where you wanna look for tender thin stocks, the fat ones tend to get fibrous you can cook with them. They're delicious. But the tender thin ones are really special and you want to look for a. Stock. That's got a deep pink almost reddish streak through it. The pale ones are a little bit undeveloped. The important thing is that sometimes they're sold with the leaves still attached the leaves are poison. I was just going to say because it's you know, if you see on the side of the road people have said, it's poisoning. It is the leaves contain something called oxalates acid, which is a poisonous substance. And something you want to stay away from. I'm glad I survived my childhood. Exactly. Right. So many of us, and you always here to keep dogs away from rhubarb lamps. And that's exactly why you want to cut off the leaves wash them and dry them and refrigerate them and the last over a week. You can also cut them and freeze them, and then you can cook with them all year fantastic, Kathy. Again. Thank you, happy spring. Uber goes public on Friday in the company is expected to be valued around ninety billion dollars. That has a lot of Uber drivers as well. As drivers for the company's main competitor lift saying wears ours drivers in cities across the country, including New York, Los Angeles in Washington DC are planning to strike tomorrow to call attention to wage cuts and business model they say is exploiting workers for more on this. Let's go to our weekly guide to the world of tech Recode. Cara Swisher is editor at large at Recode and joins us now. Hichiara? Hi, how you doing doing? Well, so the organizers of this strike say they want major reforms to the industry to make it fair dignified and sustainable, what did they want over to do? Well, they wanna come a bigger cut. I mean, I think that's really at the center of it is how much does Uber. Take from each drive or in. How do they parse out drivers? And what are the formulas? So that these people make more money an hour up to seventeen dollars an hour versus what they say. Which is that given the cost of the cars and everything else in the way. Uber runs the system is that they that basically were riding their on their labor without them being paid fairly. It is that something that Uber. Could do if they wanted to do it right now given that they've got this big IPO coming up. They're going to raise a lot of money. Well, there's two things there's the big IPO in the fact that if you look at the numbers that Uber is showing in the IP was they lose a lot of money. And so one of the costs. Of course is drivers. And the question is sustainable economic model is really the bigger question. And so that's the question adding cost to or will be even more problematic for the IPO. It's already down. I think it was used to be valued at one hundred twenty billion now it's ninety billion. And so even though that seems like an enormous number people are definitely worried about the economics of of these businesses. Is it a sustainable business model? I mean, you look at Uber. And you think they must be able to make a ton of money with everybody using Uber all the time, and they don't have a lot of costs because it is just basically the drivers who were putting wear and tear on their own vehicles. Well, no, they've been growing all over the place. So I think one of an and adding to their businesses in. So if you just look at the numbers. No and neither does lift. And that's why lift is had such a difficult time on the market because of these these enormous losses and Uber's our quantum larger. And so that's the question is how do you? How do you get to profitability? These companies. Do they have to how long they have to grow? There's a lot of competitive pressure between the two company. For example, in the US market. And then Uber is global. And so it has competitors. All across the globe are things getting worse for the drivers themselves. They talk about wage cuts or do they just feel that they have a better hand right now with these IPO's? Well, I think in this in this new Connie this ride sharing economy, you have you know job. These jobs are not they're not employee's. And so sometimes Uber Uber says they give them all kinds of benefits and things like that. And most of them just want more money from when I talked to them when you you know, when you ask anybody in a car, and so there's all kinds of benefits that they say, they're giving them. And I think the question is can again, I said, can you build a sustainable business where these people are not employees? So Uber doesn't have the responsibility of them as employees, even though they call them partners. And so with these partners want is more of the economic cut. And if they take more of the economic cut Hooper's business is not valued at quite the numbers that that they're being valued at the. It's a really it's a it's a. Problematic situation, and it's very much under Cup of the idea of what happens when Thomas driving moves into here that becomes a much better business because they don't have to pay the drivers at all. Because he's autonomous cars other. That's very very far into the future for into the future. Th-? There have been a lot of calls for more regulation of tech companies in general, do you see more regulation coming for Uber? And lift as lawmakers say, you know, we we need to make sure that there's there's regulation that says the drivers have to be paid X amount or have to get certain benefits. Well, I think all that can't avoid a lot of regulation. The question is who's paying who's paying for this this wealth, it's being created and where it's being transferred to when some of the founders of are gonna make you know, ten nine ten billion dollars become become that wealthy that the drivers are alleging. And I think they've got a very good case for it that it's off the backs of their labor that their labor is being exploited in order for other people to get wealthy. And the question is what are they owed? Are they owed? Are they part of? What made Uber grade? Of course, they are. And what are they owed is part of that? What stints do you get about where the customers will stand in all of this if Uber drivers and lift drivers decide to go on strike, even if they do it regularly or more frequently than they have been our customers going to say, okay, I'm not gonna take an Uber. I'm not going to take a lift or they're going to say, look, I gotta get where I'm going. I'm I'll do what I have to do. Yeah. That's the problem. I think people like the low prices right away. When the prices go up, you start to go on that costs the same as a cat, the prices are stored nearly low, and so I think that's who's benefited the most is our customers have gotten these sort of a free ride, and, you know, Uber's making the making the argument that law these people most of the people drive only a little bit, and they do it to supplement income and all these arguments are not correct because most people make money and they're doing it for different reasons. You know, I think it has to all sorts out. But in the end riders that get these incredibly low prices are the ones that benefit the most. And that the questions will these prices go up and will they? Continue to ride if these prices go up and will they stop writing in order to try to help the drivers. And that's that's the whole point of a strike. If people will go along with that. And and not use Uber as much that's Swisher editor large Recode care. Thanks as always. Thanks a lot and here. Now's the production of NPR WB. You are in association with the BBC World Service. I'm Jeremy Hobson. I'm Robin young. This is here now.

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