24 Burst results for "Robin Young"

"robin young" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

02:14 min | 2 weeks ago

"robin young" Discussed on WBUR

"W bur. I'm Robin Young and I'm Peter wrote down. This is here And now, not long after the sun rose over the Sonoran Desert in southern Arizona, the other day, a group of hikers set out on a mission. They marched up Iraqi hillside in PSA Worrell National Park, armed with metal bars and pick axes. They were volunteers, most in their sixties and seventies. And they were going to war against a tuft of brown yellow grass. Well, I got it. Sometimes you just go back and check Marcie shots is a Sonoran Desert Weed Wacker, her enemy and invasive species called Buffalo grass that's taken over this hillside and threatens to choke out native desert plants across the region. Shots, bends over and wax the base of it with a pick. It's tough work, and she shows me the bottom of the plan. She just ripped from the ground. You could see that the total RuPaul is comprised of just tons and tons and tons of these individual. Root ball, Huh? Huh? You gotta get all that really get it by the route. Very, very careful Shots has been sweating under the desert sun pulling buffalo grass for 13 years. It's sort of Thomas. I had a life and death thing. I think for this for the Sonoran Desert Random hiking has been ruined for me, because if I hike in an area that's never been clear than all I see is Buffalo grass, and it's just so discouraging. It's more than that Invasive Buffalo grass is also turning the Sonoran Desert into a tinderbox. This grass came from The plains of Africa, and it was brought over in the thirties. Julia Row has a pick ax in her hand to she's an expert on invasive species with Tucson's Arizona Sonora Desert Museum. Was brought over because it's very drought resistant. And at the time we were having drought problems here and delight problems with overgrazing, and so the grass was brought in to try and and deal with that. Where was the grass put? I mean, it was It was down in the grasslands down in the lowlands, and it wasn't really until Probably the nineties that people started noticing it escaping up into the wildland areas. Okay,.

Sonoran Desert Robin Young 13 years Julia Row Peter PSA Worrell National Park sixties southern Arizona thirties Thomas Iraqi tons seventies nineties Africa Marcie Arizona Sonora Desert bur Tucson RuPaul
"robin young" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:39 min | Last month

"robin young" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Robin Young and I'm Peter wrote down. This is here And now at this point, more than three million people a day are getting Corona virus vaccines. And if you squint into the distance, you might see a day when life gets back to normal. But what does that even mean anymore? On the one hand, I long for things that used to bring me joy. But part of me is also dreading going back to a life that was full of social obligations. Work commitments rushing rushing rushing Life has changed so much for so many people that the thought of emerging from the pandemic is bringing some of us a mix of joy and apprehension. We heard journalists and authors Celeste Headley talking about some of this recently on NPR's life, Kid podcast. He's a journalist in an author of the new book, Do Nothing. How to Break Away from overworking over Doing an under living Celeste Welcome, and I wonder if you've been hearing from people who are feeling unsure right now. I have. A lot of people are feeling really anxious, and it doesn't really surprise me because people feel anxious about small talk. Always so when you aren't using your social skills, you know, like any other skill. It's like riding a bike, right? Just imagine that you haven't written your bike in more than a year. So be kind to yourself, because when you first jump back on that bike, you might be a little wobbly for a few blocks. But you will get back in the rhythm, and it's kind of that way with social skills. I know that people want to be protective of their alone time and not get overwhelmed. You know, I read somebody tweeted out that you know there's gonna be a lot of awkwardness. Now that all those times we've said Oh, yeah, Let's meet up after the pandemic are those you know those I o U's are finally coming due. Um, but I know that feels a little bit scary to people at the same time. Those authentic social interactions. That's not what you should be afraid of, like meeting people in person, those of the kind of things that that actually incredibly good for you, biologically and mentally. You know what I think is really interesting is that I think for a lot of people relationships have changed a lot in this pandemic, And maybe it's even like the priorities that we have. For our relationships. You mentioned the idea of the overdue coffee date that you've been promising for months now, like in some ways that feels after all, this, like less important now, I'm not saying it is, But I'm saying it feels kind of less important than having like a chance to sit down with your elderly parents again for the first time because we were suddenly know what that feels like to not and not have that available. Yeah. Oh, I think it's totally correct. You know, if anything else I hope that people come Out of this. And are a little more intentional about their social choices. Because in the days before Covad 19. It's quite possible. People chose to have the quick coffee with the friend because that was easy and avoided for a really long time having that more lengthy and more meaningful Dinner with their grandparents. And I hope that calculus has changed. So that people can really think to themselves. Okay? I only have a certain amount of social energy. Where should I invest? It? What about work? Celeste? You wrote this book, breaking away from overworking and over doing everything in life so many people if they've been lucky enough to keep their job. Have suddenly been presented with this fact. They're not rushing into an office. What about this idea of going back to work? So he This is one of the places which I'm a little bit pessimistic, and the reason for that is because we kind of doubled down on a lot of unhealthy habits during the pandemic. The early research that we have The data that we have right now shows that actually people working more hours during the pandemic than they were before and taking more meetings than they were before. And this is what worries me is as people get back to work that they're actually going to sustain these very, very, very unhealthy habits that they've developed in which they allow work to claim their entire household. Meaning that when people got sick of sitting at their desk at home, they would just pick up their laptop and moved to the kitchen or pick up the laptop and move to the living room, which unfortunately is what you do when you're trying to teach your brain that your entire house is for work. Mm. Right. Like.

Robin Young Celeste Headley Peter first more than a year NPR more than three million people first time Kid Corona virus Do Nothing Celeste one to Break Covad 19 places life,
"robin young" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:53 min | 3 months ago

"robin young" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Robin Young and I'm Tanya mostly, And on this inauguration day, it's here now. Joseph Robinette Biden Junior do solemnly swear that I will faithfully exit President Biden was sworn in today as the 46, president of the United States with a call for unity, and he addressed those who did not support him. While those who did not support us let me say this. Here me out as we move forward. Take your measure Me and my heart. If you still disagree, so being that's democracy. That's America. The right to dissent peaceably when the guard rails of our republic is perhaps this nation's greatest strength. You hear me? Clearly? This agreement must not lead to this union. I pledge this to you. I will be a president for all Americans. Oh, American Vice President elect Kamila Harris was sworn in as the first woman and first Black and South Asian American vice president. This is two weeks to the day after an insurrection by mostly white pro trump extremists. And just a day after the country marked 400,000 deaths from the coronavirus, Let's bring in NPR political reporter Juana Summers, who joins us now from Washington Welcome Leather. Wanna? The president called for the ending of the uncivil war. That's in his words that pits red against blue and rule versus urban what stuck up to you most about his speech. Yes. So as a politician, President Biden is someone who has made the challenge of unity of bringing people together. Ah, hallmark of his campaigns, and that was certainly on display here. It was very evident and the words that he very deliberately chose. He saw it in the speech to begin the process of bringing healing and unity to an incredibly fractured nation. I believe he described this as a historic moment of crisis and challenge. He made clear that Americans are united in the same fight against these swirling crises that the country faces in terms of the corona virus pandemic that has killed so many Americans. The economic challenges that have so acutely felt by so many of us As well as the ills of racism and racial unrest that we have seen play out that this country has been reckoning with for some time but very powerful Lee this year. He clearly wants to be someone who is a president, he said. For all Americans And you mentioned the economy. He started with the economic fall out from the pandemic. Let's listen. Millions of jobs have been lost. Hundreds of thousands of businesses closed. Cry for racial justice. Some 400 years in the making moves us..

President Biden Vice President Joseph Robinette Biden President Robin Young United States Lee NPR Kamila Harris America Tanya Juana Summers Washington reporter
"robin young" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:35 min | 5 months ago

"robin young" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Robin Young is here and now tucked away in the Corona virus relief bill among the much needed unemployment relief and the one time $600 checks for Americans. Is a new deduction for corporate meal expenses. Now there's a 19 fifties madman cocktail culture term for these business meals. It's the three martini lunch and they were 50% deductible. Now it's 100%, a tax break championed by President Trump is a way to help restaurants in the pandemic. Just one of dozens of tax breaks sprinkled through the more than 5000 pages of this bill. Robin Farzad, host of public radio's full disclosure has read them all wealth. Maybe most him, Robin, Start with this tax break for the three martini lunch 100% deductible. Why That sweetens the pot. I mean, corporations are now look at this. It hasn't been 100% deductible since I believe the 19 eighties. I mean, Gordon Gekko was doing it. President Trump came out. For it In the spring, he remarked, They'll send their executives. They'll send people there and they get a deduction. That is something that will really bring life back to the restaurants. I think make them harder than before. Well, and Democrats did not want this, but they gave it up for something else, or they took it for something else. What did they get? Well, Democrats traded it for relief on the earned income tax credit an additional child tax credit s O that will prevent the tax code from punishing people who weren't able to Hit a certain threshold of income this year. So both credits are kind of a backdoor way of getting extra cash when you could only kind of negotiate for a 600 or $300 payout, otherwise right and what our restaurants saying in response to this idea that you know everybody arguing that it's good for the economy, what restaurants say and what of economists say. Of tax considerations are not the first thing that comes to mind when you're dining out. Clearly Cove it is the biggest damper on you know the full ticketed sit down restaurant experience right now. And if that's what you are chiefly worried about in there far more direct ways to rescue and backstop restaurants, which we know they're in a depression, So there is some gratitude, no doubt in the National Restaurant Association. It said. That's fresh. Small business funding in the paycheck protection program is going to help their members. But you're also seeing please firm or direct relief. So many of these restaurants are not going to be able to survive the winter and hang on just long enough for a full fledged Host vaccine returned to kind of dining out with desserts and wines and tips and fully staffed restaurants. Right well, the bill also included other tax benefits that will stay in place after the pandemic is over. Can you just give us the laundry list in the minute? We have Yeah, I mean, it's a priority for each party the legal protections for businesses operating during the pandemic. Republicans really had sought that there's direct aid for state and local governments that Democrats and some GOP lawmakers had had pressed to include this kind of some last second pork barreling their provisions for flood control in the Army Corps for Amtrak for mass transit bailouts for Um you know, mass transit operators that are deeply in the red. So Ah, Lot of this is being looked at as a stopgap for president elect biting and whatever he could negotiate with the Senate that is or isn't of the other parties. And, by the way is that three martini lunch deduction shooting up 200%. Is that a permanent tax credit remains to be seen. If that can be clawed back. I think it is going to remain controversial. It is being looked at at face value is something that helps the restaurant industry. But the 50% thing.

President Trump president Robin Young Robin Farzad Robin Gordon Gekko National Restaurant Associatio depression GOP Senate Army Corps Amtrak
"robin young" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:38 min | 8 months ago

"robin young" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And you are I'm Robin Young. It's here and now the markets are clawing back this morning after the Dow finished down more than 500 points at the close yesterday, Also today, Fed chair Jerome Powell and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin are testifying before a House panel about the need for a new Corona virus stimulus package. Spring, and Robert Farzad, host of public radio's full disclosure. Hi, Robin. How are you? I'm good. So yesterday that was not good. The Dow falling by more than 800 points. At its lowest point in the afternoon markets over a little better, the S and P 500 rising for the first time in five days, the Dow climbing back. Is it fair to say, though, that this dive Was because of the lack of the stimulus package that Mnuchin and Powell are testifying about. I mean, it's September October is almost here. So if not for the pandemic raging on an election just a few months away, we get Washington now transfixed on another bruising Supreme Court nomination battle, and that Yes, Robin. That's going to poison the mood for any sort of cooperation to get more fiscal relief done. And today we saw Fed Chairman Powell on the MIC. Noting that the job market is on. Ly regained about half of the 22 million jobs that were lost just in March and April. So we're in a deep hole. So the political convulsion is adding to all of this because they know Nothing much is probably get done. Tech stocks also rebounded slightly after sliding in recent weeks. They've been doing well it earlier in the year. So what's going on there against all odds? I mean this run since the spring if you think about it, the tech heavy NASDAQ has searched from around 6600 to a high of 12,000. And that was in just months in the teeth of the pandemic, so you're bound to see a correction. Now we're closer to 11,000 in the grand scheme of things. It's not the worst thing. Yeah. How about the oil industry? All this uncertainty, oil prices rising over the summer. More cars did return to the road, but we don't know what's ahead. You know what looking over Britain and we're going to talk about that in a second, but You know they're having their second wave and new restrictions. So talk about the oil and street. If I had told you to start the year that Exxon Mobil, the prodigal child of standard oil would have been booted from the Dow Jones industrial average that so many airplanes would have been mothballed that cars are just sitting idle outside as we all work from home. So right now, the fear is that another leg down in the global economy, you're seeing covert infection rates shoot up in many influential top 10 economies That's going to be get Mohr demand destruction, in the parlance of the energy sector. Yeah, but then how does Europe impact all of this? Rising infections There are you know people are really in shock and the markets are as well and then we see the Prime Minister Boris Johnson in the UK announcing new restrictions today, he said they could last up to six months. Eso what's what, in fact is that in nominal terms, the UK is the world's number six economy, So it has outside's cloud, not just on the U. S. But across Europe. And in developing frontier economies across Subsaharan, Africa, so for that size of economy to visit its deepest recession on record after all GDP there fell by 20% in the second quarter, that's goingto worry the world and a full lock down now to end the year. Versus London's import importance to immigration to transcontinental air and rail travel. Yes, that's going to be felt across the global economy. Okay, just a quick lightning round here we've been talking about TIC tac China is announcing it'll blacklist foreign companies that unfairly treat Chinese companies. Just a few seconds. Thoughts on that. Yeah, And so a company like Cisco, which is the nemesis, for always should be worried. Every multi national.

Jerome Powell Robin Young Steve Mnuchin UK Europe Robert Farzad Boris Johnson Exxon Mobil TIC tac China standard oil Ly Supreme Court Chairman
"robin young" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

10:43 min | 1 year ago

"robin young" Discussed on KQED Radio

"B. U. R. I'm robin young and Jeremy Hobson it's here and now California governor Gavin Newsom has announced a framework for a partial re opening of the country's most populous state it would hinge on expanded testing to see who's been infected more protective gear and regulations on social distancing in everyday life that might mean waiters with masks and disposable menus and Jeremy the mayor of San Francisco supports that plan now in San Francisco just fifteen people have died from the coronavirus far fewer than other major cities and a lot of the credit has gone to mayor London breed mayor breed first declared a state of emergency on February twenty fifth when her city had zero confirmed cases this was the same day that a CDC official announced the possibility of a severe outbreak three declared a state of emergency several bay area counties including San Francisco went to shelter in place before any other areas in mid March and mayor London breed joins us now mayor take respectively in March that very early shelter in place order again a regional order issued by health directors across counties but sounds like part of your success as mayor was listening to federal and local officials it definitely had everything to do with listening to the people who are on the front lines of this pandemic people who understand the science they were instrumental in in my decision we were reducing the number of events with a certain arbitrary number of people which I didn't think would make a big difference but it did I think prepare people for what was inevitable and that is the ultimate shelter in place within the city and in March well some people are crediting you when you banned gatherings of more than a thousand that meant the Golden State Warriors couldn't play that started a domino effect with the NBA at you know shutting down I know you were listening to local health officials who had many of them a history decades ago of the aids outbreak you know people knew what happened when the bath houses weren't close soon enough so you had that pressure for one side but I'm sure from the other side you want to hear from people saying this is going to kill our economy definitely because I I'll tell you in San Francisco Chinatown in particular and businesses that are owned by the people who are of Asian descent they were already feeling the effects of discrimination because of what was happening in Wuhan so they were already struggling and there was definitely a lot of push back from the hotel industry from our businesses from retail but based on what we saw there was no other choice but to prioritize public health over the economy at that time because of what we knew the impact could be if there was a significant outbreak in our city but I I want to caution people that even though it may look like we are flattening the curve the fact is there are still people who are walking around who have the virus if we get too complacent we could see a resurgence that could exceed anything we thought was possible we still have some challenges with our shelters in our congregate living settings that sadly will lead to increasing the numbers that we we already are saying in a way that makes me uncomfortable well and you mentioned the homeless population there's been a math major outbreak at the city's largest homeless shelter I'm sure they've been moved to hotel rooms or yeah be clear about unfortunately the fact that the homeless challenges that we faced before this pandemic have it become increasingly worse those problems of mental illness and substance use disorder they don't just go away because there's a pandemic we are moving people into hotel rooms and we are experiencing a lot of the same challenges with sadly people who suffer from substance use disorder when you have a drug problem there is no way that we are going to be able to hold you hostage in a hotel room it is not as simple as sending out staff people to monitor and manage these situations because those people are scared themselves we have to be able to protect our work force they were asking to put their lives on the line and a lot of people are doing it but there is still a lot of fear this is a pandemic that could impact anybody at any given time and there is no easy solution and we're doing what we can based on making sure we have the capacity to manage and contain the challenge will never have to ask you it's a population that you may have some insights about just a little bit on your own story you were raised by your grandma in a public housing project your own sister died of a drug overdose so you're probably painfully familiar you got a brother in jail you know what do you think you bring to an understanding of human behavior at this time reality I bring reality sadly I have family members who have struggled with addiction and who still struggle I've been frustrated by it for years and what I had to realize is that sadly many of these people who are suffering with this disease they are not necessarily going to use the same kind of logic that you or I would use in making it this in in our own best interests so I'm not going to be able to put everyone in hotel rooms and think that's going to solve the problem because it's not San Francisco mayor London breed just a few seconds here at the end you're speaking to your constituents there what do you want to tell them well first of All I Want to say to the people of San Francisco thank you I am saying the best of people in this city there are a lot of people that are following the social distancing order but also I got a note from a neighbor saying I'm your block captain if you need groceries if you need Aaron's run or if you need somebody to talk too long to shoot me an email on here for you that's alright that's organized a block captain my goodness people are amazing and I appreciate that and when you as a citizen of the city you our region you try to help your neighbors and do what you can it does make a difference and it is very much appreciated we are all in this together and we as a city will get through it and it isn't over a San Francisco mayor London breed thank you thank you very much robin and by the way to clarify it last night San Francisco lawmakers unanimously voted to force the city to lease seven thousand hotel rooms that would house most of the city's homeless in under two weeks the mayor had previously been focusing on housing only high risk homeless people and has leased just two thousand rooms so far well the corona virus pandemic has taken a terrible toll on Italy with more than twenty one thousand deaths but the government there is slowly easing lockdown restrictions joining us now from Rome on Skype is the BBC's mark Lowe and mark some stores are being allowed to re open what are the new guidelines well the shops that can reopen as of this week Jeremy bookshops station restores and baby clothing stores across the country and some businesses including computer manufacturers and paper and called for many factors can also restart but many regional governors across this country are twenty regions and it's too late I have decided that it is too early so for example in lots you know which is the region's when I'm speaking to at the moment roams its capital the the governor of lots as has the data one data he's one of the bookshops he thinks it's too early for that so bookshops have remained closed and in the northern regions was hit by the current virus outbreak all of those shops are remaining closed so it is a bit of a stock gets phased out break nothing about shows you that there is no desire to be premature and that speak louder war reads the anxious yes shopkeepers many shopkeepers want to re open they want to restart their livelihoods but there is also fear about opening too soon and whether that could lead to a second spike in the virus but do people feel that the peak has already been reached of the outbreak there in Italy they do because the numbers are showing that I mean in terms of the infection rates it is now increasing every day by about two percent one or two percent in comparison to your seven eight percent a couple of weeks ago so that shows you that you know the the the the implants are the numbers guy the west is is behind its sweet box even though the peak has been reached to end of it appears on the cover of a stabilizing the decline is very very gradual and Italians on the whole do not want to preempt this by opening things too soon it feels almost like a kind of symbolic rewards for people walk by opening these few limited's sexes of shops rather than a tangible easing restrictions that set it free the government here is fully aware that its knees facing a prolonged economic depression from all of this so at some stage they all gonna have to slowly kind of dip their toe back into normal life mark I want to ask you one more thing because before you came to your current position as a correspondent in Rome you were in Turkey and before that you were in Greece when you look at the case count in these countries Italy is over a hundred and sixty thousand cases Turkey a country that people are very worried about because it's more of a developing country more than sixty five thousand cases grease down around two thousand cases what do you make of that wire these countries experiencing this so differently well in terms of Greece is a variance in comparison Greece what is often much more country eleven million people work compared to sixty million people actually bots it was very quick to implement a complete lockdown and that has proved to be remarkably successful creases got one of the lowest infection rates in Europe and lowest death tolls in terms of Turkey well they were slow to recognize that Turkey was going to be hit and turkeys are very nationalist place and add the text of the official rhetoric was you know we we we we aren't we wash our hands while we take precautions etcetera now that seeing the impact on the on the curve in Turkey is very boring so each country's experiencing their own outbreak in this they will try to learn from each other but I have to say that it's elite you know in terms of the national locked down and now easing.

B. U. R. Gavin Newsom robin young Jeremy Hobson California
"robin young" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:27 min | 1 year ago

"robin young" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From NPR and WBUR Boston I'm talking mostly I'm robin young coming up as Americans are told this could be the saddest weakened a generation's there nine eleven doctors in Pittsburgh say they found a way to prevent more covert nineteen deaths none of us are going to know how effective our vaccines are until we get them into clinical trials also so many have lost or will lose loved ones to come at nineteen how will our ways of dealing with grief have to change I would almost encourage us to think about how we can connect not just your immediate loved ones but to other people who are suffering the same kind of dissonance and in the Middle Ages he survived several plagues and then put him in his place the plague William Shakespeare coming up here now the news is first live from NPR news in Washington I'm Lakshmi saying with Americans possibly facing the toughest week yet New York governor Andrew Cuomo says he's further cracking down on those who violate social distancing rules with the state approaching the peak of coronavirus infections and peers Windsor Johnson reports the number of confirmed coronavirus cases in the state has surpassed one hundred thirty thousand with more than forty seven hundred deaths under Cuomo says he's extending the state's social distancing guidelines through April twenty ninth and is doubling the fine for anyone who violates the policy two thousand dollars speaking at his daily briefing the governor also said the state's health care system is at maximum capacity people can't work any harder the staff can't working harder and staying at this level is problematic and if we are plateauing is because social distancing is work almost as hospitals are still in dire need of medical supplies including protective masks gloves and ventilators as the state approaches a peak in the number of coronavirus infections Windsor Johnston NPR news Michigan's been watching how New York is handling the outbreak as the midwestern state prepares for the same the state is reporting more than fifteen thousand cases and at least six hundred deaths from covert nineteen doctor today called on the chief deputy director of Michigan's health and Human Services says the choice convention centers getting ready to service backup for area hospitals so we believe at the end of this week will be able to start seeing patients at the TCS center doesn't mean will immediately see a thousand patients but we will have enough staff to start seeing our patients as they were transferred from other hospitals data show the disease appears to be disproportionately affecting African Americans this racial demographic makes up roughly fourteen percent of the state's population with African Americans account for more than a third of coronavirus cases in the state Wisconsin governor Tony Evers has issued an executive order to postpone tomorrow's prime June ninth the GOP controlled legislature had resisted a delay the U. S. supreme court's been asked to weigh in the intergovernmental panel on climate change is giving scientists an additional six weeks to review part of the panel's latest assessment we have an update from NPR's Rebecca Hersher the I. P. C. C. is currently working on its sixth major assessment of climate science the massive report takes hundreds of scientists and years of revisions that usually happen at in person meetings around the world that has all changed because of the pandemic the I. P. C. C. says the group of scientists who were originally supposed to submit their edits on a chapter about the latest physical science will have an extra six weeks to do so because of the pandemic disruptions another group of climate scientists who were supposed to meet in Ecuador in mid April to discuss the chapter on climate change mitigation will instead have a virtual meeting the full assessment is expected in mid twenty twenty two Rebecca Hersher NPR news this is NPR live from KQED news I'm Brian white one of the bay area's largest refineries is cutting back on operations and selling key parts of its infrastructure to deal with the major drop in demand for oil stemming from the corona virus pandemic KQED's Ted Goldberg reports sheltered home orders aimed at slowing the spread of the corona virus have led to a huge drop in travel as a result both the demand for gasoline and gasoline prices are plummeting and that's hitting the bottom line for oil companies including those running the region's refineries PBF energy which recently bought the old shell refinery in Martinez has announced it's selling to hydrogen plants the facility for hundreds of millions of dollars the company is also reducing spending at the Contra Costa county facility state energy officials say California's refineries are taking in and processing less crude oil for gasoline diesel and jet fuel I'm Ted Greenberg KQED news the Palo alto city council is taking its first look at its potential budget short for falls from the corona virus pandemic today although some small businesses in the city's downtown area have shut down and laid off workers technology companies might have an easier time of converting to work from home but city council member listen this says the shelter in place orders can still have a negative effect even if you're used to working at home businesses really flourish more on person to person contact no matter whether you're a tech company or not no function better with human interaction long term a city financial report projects up to a twenty million dollar loss to Palo alto's general fund this.

NPR Boston robin young
"robin young" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"robin young" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Dot com from NPR WBEZ what I'm robin young is here now and today the French find finance minister rather Bruno the mayor said that if president trump imposes tariffs on French products as threatened the E. you will retaliate trump is threatening terrace in response to attacks France is levying on some US tech firms including Google and Amazon and this that comes as both countries air the competing visions for NATO at the NATO meeting this week in London but such as friends earlier this week trump announced new tariffs on some products from Brazil and Argentina and he signaling that he might wait longer for a trade agreement with China to which the markets responded by dropping leave L. she is the MSNBC anchor in economics correspondent high alley I robin and start with friends Tom threatening a one hundred percent tariff on wine and other luxury goods in retaliation for France's new digital tax we got about so France levied a three percent tax on companies that have at least a hundred and forty five million dollars in global revenue who do online sales in France but are not based in France there about thirty companies affected by this and most of them are American tech firms like Google and Facebook there's some Chinese and British and even some French businesses affected but it's it's part of a global push where countries are trying to deal with the fact that tax codes are not written for the internet so what do you do with a company based in a low tax haven or place that they're paying their taxes too but they make a lot of money in your country additional taxes a solution seen by some companies but because most of these big digital companies are American America doesn't tend to like this is interesting because internally within the country there's concern that people are buying things online and taxes on so we have that question here as well but here's president trump really kind of lashing out of these countries many other countries doing this Turkey Italy trump said they could be next in line I'm terrified and one of the rationales for the terrorists were hearing this week is currency manipulation a trump announced those new steel and aluminum tariffs on Argentina and Brazil because he as he said the concurrency manipulators but we know Brazil's also stepped into supply soy beans to China because China stop buying from the US because of the trade war so yes what's going on here so I it's it's hard to call Brazil or Argentina correct currency manipulator spec the United States treasury which does this on official basis doesn't contain either those two countries the the rail of the peso are down because both of those countries economies are very weak Brazil is on the edge of a recession Argenteuil it denies dealing with a bunch of things including fifty percent inflation so that's typically what this is all about the the Brazil's got a free floating currency so if your economy is weak typically you lower your interest rates when you lower interest rates your currency becomes less attractive to other due to other countries now Brazil and Argentina have been selling US dollars to support their in buying their currencies on the open market to support them that's actually the opposite of currency manipulation when you buy dollars and strengthen the US dollar that is currency manipulation against the dollar so Donald trumps ideas about currency manipulation don't make sense but Brazil got most of the soybean orders that used to come from America after the trade deal and so and and we're not even if the trade deal were dropped tomorrow China's help Brazil build some of that infrastructure to supply soybean so they're going to be doing a lot more business with with China so that is part of it is that you pay back there just willing to thirty seconds yeah we think about the trade deal well a lot of people have been doubting whether one's coming president trump could keeps on hitting.

finance minister Bruno NPR robin young forty five million dollars one hundred percent thirty seconds fifty percent three percent
"robin young" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

08:48 min | 1 year ago

"robin young" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"My conversation with robin young she is the founder of robin young and company so let's talk about where the idea came from I mean I know that you had this plethora of experience and branding you knew you wanted to be an entrepreneur but what made you go this is that robin young and co yeah it's so funny because when I first started I didn't have much direction because I had I had worked in all of these different facets right so of course you know me I'm like okay we're gonna be a full service like from the get go we're going to social media and contents or Jim Branning web design the whole gamut right on so the funny part was is that it wasn't until I got more clear on my own brands on that vision and war who was I speaking this year what was really important to me that I started to be successful in my business so I'm sorry I really kind of took a step back after a couple months you know just in the in the you know mouse wheel and not really getting anywhere with it and I took a step back and said what's really important to me and what's the niche that I can carve out for myself that I really love and I really do well on it so I die teams you okay I've worked with so many start ups who you know you have to you have basically graphic designers who expecting you to come to the table with that brand strategy you have strategists to maybe to help you with the strategy part but they don't do design and then you have these major ad agencies are going to charge you you know fifteen grounds for you to get a full suite of designs with the brand strategy so I saw this need for the smaller businesses to find somebody who could not only help them with the strategy part but really connect that to that we'd have to science and and how to take that stretching communicate it in a way that's really a viable and connects to their customers so once I figure that out and I got really clear on that packaging and big in and how it was going to take that business and really make it work for a single one that's when things started to happen yes there were a lot of entrepreneurs get stuck in the beginning is is making money to stay afloat and coming up with the capital to start and grow and in your case you abruptly left your job and you know you are you just swing in and in the beginning so how did you come up with the capital in order to start and grow your business so thankfully I was smart and I I had tried this before and you know it's like years ago I had tried to you when I was when I was a stylist I was trying to make that work and I didn't I had like I'm good I've got you know a couple Hey and that and the bank account like I've got this and that money quickly ran out and all this and I had to start you know what you're saying and all that to make it work this time I was much smarter I had about three months worth of salary saved up and and and you know also my husband was there to kind of support anywhere where we had those twelve months because it is a little bit of fast right but I'm happy to say that I didn't I didn't have to raise new capital I hate you know I really grew on me and now all part of what I like teaching you know my other the other on founders that I work with other start up founders is how to really grow your brand in a lean way to make it makes sense for you yes so can you give us some examples of how you grew and a lean way that maybe are entrepreneurs can adopt for themselves yeah so I'm for starters I and I'm still a team of one but I work with freelancers the nice part about that is I think I think you know employees are kind of race at the beginning and I didn't want to have you you know being in a tough spot and might have to let them go if we had a bad month so I really worked out my pricing in a way and and sort of the way that I work with my freelancers that it not only made sense for me and my company but it really made sense for them so they were still able to do other work and what not but they would team up with me and I would bring the strategy is and that would create a really robust you know offering to my clients but it didn't it didn't force me to have to bring these people on its employees so now I'm in a position where in the future I'm gonna be able to bring in a an in house team but I was really lacking in the beginning and not have to do that in order to make my business and it's really hard to understand what your business model is because some business models required to raise money Tom do not because you can have a cash flow pretty quickly you know some require you to hire you know pretty robust team some do not when you're in more service based on often you don't have to you can you know use freelancers at least in the beginning so really knowing your business model and what it requires is really helpful who and is there anything else you wanted to add about the yeah so the other part of it I think was like I was saying carving out that niche so if I had started saying okay we're gonna do social media content strategy we're gonna do all these he says there would have been no waited to make that work because I was constantly spending time sending out you know an individualized proposals every client and it just wasn't it didn't make sense and it wasn't a scalable model either so I was like you know what that's it this is this is what it is we have two packages we still have just these two packages of strategy and then strategy with design and everybody that comes in does basically the same thing but we're very we're very clear about our pricing like there's that whole transparency we put the pricing on our website were very like open about it and a lot of people come to me and said in our house working for you do you really feel like this is the best way to go about it I'm like listen I I have nothing to hide here like this is we're very competitive with our pricing but like we figured out a way to make it work and it works for our clients so yeah I think a lot of people are scared to do that we are scared on what they're going to miss out on but that's really kind of the wrong way of looking at it because instead you're attracting the right clients that you're going to serve bass and as you alluded to eliminating all the extra work and having to you know do individual proposals and that kind of a thing yeah the back and forth was telling me I was just there's there was no way unless I hired I mean is it just you that aspect there was going to be no way to make that work for me so I knew it was taking a rest but again I think the part of what being a an option or is about you and I want to take that risk yeah so how would you say that you differentiate yourself from the competition yeah so I I think what I was saying about that combination between strategy and design so we're not just coming to you saying okay well what are the characteristics that you want to portray that creates really inconsistent very flat surface level brands we really dive deep ends you want makes you a company and like white what do you do you know what's the bigger vision that you have here and how come we position you are in a unique way from your competition so it's that combination I have really robust smart strategy with really awful beautiful design that I think makes us different what direction you think branding is going when you think the future for ending is yeah I think it's more than shots putting this really great find out like your you know your website which is basically become like your store fronts and it's more than just that now now it's about branded content and I'm really lucky and I I really grew up in the air so I our reading kind of understand it but I think it's about and you know again creating this really really smart I'm really thought full place in which you're building from that connects with your user so branding is no longer about the stuff that you sell it's about the lifestyle it's about an experienced people want something they can rally behind and we as consumers ask ourselves what does buying this state about so we are connecting with brands you know so so as a as a company you now have an obligation to really look at the bigger picture and ask yourself what's my customer experience and what's the lifestyle I'm selling here and because I think that's going to trickle into that cons well thank you so much for sharing your journey in expertise with us really appreciate it thanks so much for him absolutely I'm Alex morally and this is business rockstars trade pro what do you specialize in service or new construction Ferguson knows first hand how much work goes into.

founder robin young twelve months three months
"robin young" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"robin young" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In WBEZ why I'm robin young is here and now after the two mass shootings in el Paso and Dayton some groups like guns down America are calling on Walmart in particular stop selling guns after twenty two people were killed at that hugely popular store in el Paso Walmart is one of the largest sellers of guns and ammunition in the world for more let's bring in our legal she MSNBC anchor in economics correspondent an alley we know that Walmart stop selling assault style rifles and twenty fifteen and then after the shooting in twenty eighteen park in Florida they raise the age of purchase of guns to twenty one some he was a Republican legislators are calling for that now so what is Walmart's selling what Walmart's doesn't sell what show called assault rifles right it's not a technical term but it's been really a gun a long gun that is typically not used for hunting it's automatic or semi automatic it is not like a rifle or shotgun now Walmart does still sell rifles and things for hunting it also still sells guns for what you call self defense guns that you can carry on you so it's just this particular category of gun which tend to be used in most of these mass shootings at Walmart is not selling and also not telling the people under the age of twenty one well how is it doing because some are pointing out the gun sales aren't a high margin business for Walmart down right to the problem is if you were never in the gun selling business this wouldn't be an issue right if your sporting goods store that wasn't Dixon didn't already sell guns and then digs decided not to this wouldn't be an issue the problem is that Walmart sells and so now it's a political position after two thousand fifteen to have said that it wasn't going to do it and that is upset some people with Walmart but fundamentally if you were to make a decision about what to keep in your store because you want to make more money guns aren't selling as fast and guns are not as good a margin as toys and things for instance yeah but it did it so now it becomes maybe not just a business to its decision but an impression during the when they do this and study show Republicans typically like Walmart better than Democrats do but Democrats impression of Walmart has been inching up in the past few years people study this kind of thing yes so if your Walmart CEO Doug McMillon and you're looking at the horizon you've lives I just said you have some report Republican lawmakers for the first time calling for things like expanded background checks raising the age of concealed you have the NRA in a kind of a of an organizational that's right now yes maybe you seize the moment this could be an opportunity look Walmart is not a company that likes to take on something called corporate policy virtue signalling could just they are really big Walmart's he's more Americans than any government agency does that anybody else does in a week that is you know they they try to be as apolitical as possible the reason it's it's more favorite amongst Republicans is largely where these walmarts are right they tend to be in rural areas not in city areas increasingly they're showing up in cities which is why more urban so buyers are seeing Walmart but fundamentally Walmart is never going to be at the front of something if they can avoid being at the front of something that feels political but you're right in so far as rather than saying we're gonna ban all gun sales they're going to start to reduce the floor space that's dedicated to them that might be an opportunity that Walmart has right now and we will see a of an Emmitt MSNBC anchor and correspondent and email Walmart also has to be really.

el Paso America Walmart robin young Dayton
"robin young" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"robin young" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"On the five again, Robin young back to Lincoln heights because they've got little close to yourself five at main street, all the lanes are stopped. They're trying to clear this crash. I was also reading that it might just be in the construction zone. Either way. It's a horrible dry from the one ten if you're trying to head south on the five through the Lincoln heights area. This guy sponsored by injury attorneys superwoman super lawyer dot com just has an update on sixty. Oh, boy, we've got a right to horrible. Here. Components. All we have major problems in industry. Now. Listen up that eastbound, eastbound, sixty at crossroads statistics bought all lanes are blocked. It's going to be that way for a while even westbound now we had a major problem there as well. But now settled down a little bit. But still the two left lanes are blocked now also close in the same areas north six oh five to the sixty now eastbound if you wanted to drive to the closer, you can get off at crossroads and back on again, but e sixty east to ten six fifty seven wide open the westbound ten by the way is only about maybe ten minutes faster and between the fifty seven six zero five long delays injured at an accident. Visit superwoman super lawyer dot com. Jeff, log KFI in the sky Dougherty on the westbound ten right at the six oh five stuck truck. It's in the middle traffic lane. So you're gonna find heavy traffic on the two ten also from the fifty seven see something you can call us the route saving you time. Traffic line is eight eight eight five hundred five thousand three KFI in the sky helps get you there faster. I'm robbing banks. This hour of KFI is brought to you by sunblock, solar and roofing for southern California. Mike trout and Colquhoun hit home runs for the angels against the Toronto. Blue Jays last night on the way to a six two victory and a series sweep halos off today. They begin an eleven game road trip.

KFI Lincoln heights Blue Jays Robin young Mike trout California Toronto Dougherty Colquhoun Jeff ten minutes
"robin young" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"robin young" Discussed on KQED Radio

"WVU are I'm Robin young. It's here and now football fans are wondering the landscape unmarred in a post Super Bowl Malays nothing to watch. Hold on the alliance of American football is throwing a lifeline the new league is heading into its second weekend of games. Eight teams, including the Arizona hotshots the Atlanta legends, the San Diego fleet Mike Pence Kaz here. No sports. Analysts host the daily five guests the Justice league dot com. Did you like that image? I like you said that up those are the stakes. Yes. And by the way, I was unhappy during the Super Bowl football fans. Yeah. Well, what do you think of this new league because someone NFL bigwigs apparently were skeptical, but they came away impressed at least according to USA today. Yes. I would say the level of play was described as what you'd get in the second half of a preseason game. But that's not terrible. It's a bunch of guys who are in the NFL for reason. Although some of them probably. Could be and I understand from the NFL's perspective. Why they would like a league like this to exist? Because there's not a lot of great ways to see potentially talented players when you're watching college. They're not playing against great players, and they're not playing, and you know, pro style offenses. So it will be good for them. They shouldn't see this league as a competitor. They should see it as essentially like a quasi farm system or a feeder system that they don't have to pay for. That's great. Necessarily mean, we're at a time when we're talking about even if you love football, there's a recognition kids aren't playing as much because of injuries. I mean is expansion the right way to go. This is the point. And it's why I am conflicted. Why I am literally ambivalent if this were a baseball league or a even even another kind of Hockey League, which exist, and they exist for a reason minor leagues and unaffiliated leagues. It'd be fine. It'd be great, you know, giving fans more of the sport they want with a little bit of a lower temperature lower ticket prices in some different cities. All that's for the good. But as you mentioned football, it's very hard to say that more football on this earth. Or in America is an unalloyed good thing. I will say this though of all the levels of football or ways to convince me that football could be okay, professional informed. Adults getting paid to play football. That is the least bad form of football. Whereas I think southern college football, essentially indentured servitude in the service of football that might be the most bad form of football. And that's right now what the feeder system is. Okay. We got a minute. The af has an app it allows fans to follow games with these visualizations the league founder, Charlie ever, Saul son of dick Ebersol calls calls it Madden versus angry birds. He says that's what it looks like is that gonna push the thing forward. They do have innovations. They will for instance, you can listen in as referees make decisions that's interesting. I bet you that whether this fails or exists as an ongoing enterprise, and maybe the best they can hope for is one day some of their teams get absorbed. But I bet they influence the NFL. I bet at least with the presentation of it. And this happened with the development definitely happened with the XFL to failed leagues that influence the NFL and not the NFL fo- forward in terms of being a more innovative way. To experience the game. The the this new league is going to do that my Pesca here now is sports analysts. You also hosts the daily podcast the gist at slate dot com. Talking about the alliance of American footfall. We'll see if you know if we're talking about it in the future, Mike. Thank.

football NFL Justice league Mike Pence Kaz Hockey League Robin young Arizona WVU Atlanta USA San Diego America founder Madden dick Ebersol Saul Charlie one day
Lawmakers tour New Mexico border facilities following 7-year-old girl's death

Morning Edition

01:00 min | 2 years ago

Lawmakers tour New Mexico border facilities following 7-year-old girl's death

"NPR news in Washington. I'm Robin young as Christians around the world

Robin Young NPR Washington
New strategy defeats cancer cells that evade chemotherapy

Here & Now

05:29 min | 2 years ago

New strategy defeats cancer cells that evade chemotherapy

"When the body sees toxic material immune cells kill it, by cancer cells release sneaky, they put the brakes on the immune system, immune checkpoint blockers. Stop that from happening you basically, preventing that brake from engaging. It would it be kind of similar like cancer had kind of has like this invisible cloak that it like kinda hides under. And then you kind of take off that Claudio by think that's a great way to describe it since the cancer is no longer invisible. The immune system can mount an attack. It was a huge breakthrough in the food and drug admin. Ration- approved the first drugs to do this in two thousand eleven the science behind the miracle. Drug was developed back in the nineties by a guy named max krummel in a lab at UC Berkeley, I was very frustrated graduate student for few years trying to develop an antibody that would do something after many long nights krummel noticed. His antibody was influencing the behavior of immune cells. You can drive a car you can exceleron them or you can break them. And then it was really like playtime. He started injecting the antibodies into sick mice and essentially in the various first set of experience my antibodies caused tumors to shrink now fast forward a couple of decades to Ashley Walton story her doctors hope the technology developed in crumbles lab could be the key to killing her cancer. But the treatment was haring when Ashley started receiving immunotherapy the ninety minute drips or followed by a slew of side effects. I started getting really high fevers, I got a few skin rashes gastritis. Still her tumors were shrinking then after six months, new lesions cropped up Ashley's abdomen. So we're doctors added a second immunotherapy drug to the mix. And fortunately, she had a lot of the drugs possible side effects. Yeah. I just generally felt like the life was being sucked out of me. So you go into a really dark place for several years actually hitchhiked from drug to drug just to stay alive. There are so many advancements being made in the field of immunotherapy that even if it doesn't cure. You. It gets you to the next big thing that wild ride paid off. She hasn't had an infusion in the last ten months, so technically in remission. Yes. That's. Stories like Ashley is are really exciting to on colleges. Dr Leonard Lipton. Feld is the chief medical officer for the American Cancer Society. So imagine when we've gone from the time when we had nothing to offer to today, and they're talking about cure for some patients with advanced melanoma, scientists and big pharma are really hopeful about the future. There's about a thousand current trials to develop new therapy drugs to help more people fight different kinds of cancer about thirty to forty percent of patients still do not respond to immunotherapy remember worth the beginning of the stern. We're not at the end. We still have a long way to go. We're gonna have ups, and we're going to have Down's back in the exam room. Ashley and her mom receives the prising news at our latest checkup with Dr Dowd. So what do you think about pregnancy are trying to start a family? So I think it's time to get pregnant actually. Ashley crosses her fingers and smiles for here and now unless they McLaren. Good news here now is production of NPR and WVU aren't association with the BBC World Service. I'm Robin young. I'm Jeremy Hobson. This is here now.

Ashley Walton Cancer Max Krummel Dr Leonard Lipton American Cancer Society Claudio Gastritis Robin Young Jeremy Hobson Uc Berkeley NPR Bbc World Service Graduate Student Mclaren Dr Dowd WVU Feld Medical Officer Forty Percent
"robin young" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"robin young" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Robin young. It's here. And now a new study commissioned by coke industries suggests that President Trump's tariffs could cost American families two thousand four hundred dollars next year in the form of higher prices, lower wages lost jobs, lower returns on investments more. Let's bring analogy olive she MSNBC anchor and economics correspondent and co host aversion rule. Halley I Robin this week. We heard about GM idling five plants as saying the tariffs cost them one billion dollars before that the company said tariffs could lead to job losses. Are these plant closings the kind of thing? This new study is talking about well sort of General Motors has had problems for a long time. And that's a leadership problem at GM that there's probably something to do with trade and tariffs that are involved in this. But this study is a lot broader, and it talks about the kinds of things that will be that will cost people money or stop them from making. Money. If these terrorists if this trade war stays in place that consumers have been mostly insulated from these costs. Let's take a look the study says each household could pay two thousand four hundred more or nine hundred fifteen dollars per person. How do they what do they mean how they arrive at that? Well, there are a few things that they are looking at their look at the look at the commute the cumulative impact of tariffs. So the added cost of things that you buy because we buy a lot of imported stuff. The added cost of things that you buy that is not imported, but it costs more to make in the United States lower wages because of jobs that will be lost. As a result of the tariffs and a lower return on investment. You can see how the trade war has affected the stock market. So that they've calculated all of those costs and say that you're going to end up with the household. The average household will end up with twenty four hundred dollars more in the short term. Yeah. But then they lose right? Yes. So look this was commissioned by coke industries as we said, this is the coke family's private company, the largest in the US after Cargill annual revenue of one hundred and fifteen billion very much anti the Trump tariffs. So what do you say to someone who says it skewed because the cokes Abbas stake in this? Yes. So that's a good question, by the way, when I met twenty four hundred less your people are going to pay, but it, but as it goes further out, they say that houses will lose much more. Look, you gotta take it with a pinch of salt. It's a study. It's a it's a projection the coke brothers do not like higher taxes, and they do not like tariffs. A lot of people who don't like higher taxes. Equate tariffs with those the cokes are major industrialists. So this hurts them that said, they show you the long homework. These things all get taken with a pinch of salt. But there's no question that there will be added costs to goods if we're trading less wages are higher. In the United States that we're buying things that are made here as opposed to made in China, or the Philippines or Vietnam. It's going to be more expensive the other side of the equation is a little harder to tell will we have lower wages as a result, the president thinks the opposite. And will we have lower returns in the stock market as a result? I could argue that the stock market might be slowing now just because it's been expanding for ten years. So half of it. I can justify the other half we'd have to wait and see. Yeah. But we don't want you to guess right now. So they say two thousand four hundred good just your best. Guess what what it might be? Well, what's happening is in the initial period. We're seeing a lot of companies trying to hold off increases on costs that will change over time. So it may feel like less than that in the first year. It's gonna feel like a lot more than that as long as tariffs. Stay in place. MSNBC anchor economics correspondent and co host and rule alley. Thank you. My pleasure. We'll wait and see. You're listening to here. Now..

coke industries United States MSNBC General Motors Trump president Robin young Cargill Abbas Vietnam Philippines China two thousand four hundred doll nine hundred fifteen dollars twenty four hundred dollars one billion dollars ten years
"robin young" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"robin young" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Robin young. I'm Jeremy Hobson. It's your. Coming up. President Trump tries to change the subject ahead of the midterm saying he'll end birthright citizenship with an executive order as he sends thousands of troops to the border to block migrants who are more than a month away. Also Recode CARA Swisher on what exactly Hillary Clinton said to her about whether she'll run for president in twenty twenty and former fed chair. Alan Greenspan says the US is in the midst of a long-term economic decline from you look out and the router or were slowing down rape of growth and productivity. Why fear these stories and the lessons of mister Rogers after a tragedy in his real life neighborhood coming up here now? The news is first. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Lakshmi Singh. The office of Justice department special counsel, Robert Muller is raising concerns about allegations that women were offered money to falsely accused Moore of sexual harassment. It says the special counsel team learned of the allegations last week and immediately referred the matter to the FBI it's unclear if it's being handled by investigators who already work in Moore's office or if an outside office is investigating. Boston gangster James Whitey Bulger is dead. No word yet on how he died NPR confirms with the Federal Bureau of prisons at the eighty nine year old was found unresponsive at a prison in West Virginia. Only a day after he was transferred to the facility. The FBI is investigating Bolger was serving a life sentence for his two thousand thirteen conviction of a series of crimes, including eleven murders for sixteen years. He was on the FBI's most wanted list until he was arrested in two thousand eleven vigils continue in cities across this country this week in the wake of the Pittsburgh shooting in suburban Kansas City, more than thirteen hundred people turned out for gathering, supportive. Pittsburgh's Jewish community. Frank Morris have member station. Casey Wyan reports it has evoked painful memories for region. That has also experienced antisemitic violence a white supremacist killed three people at Jewish centers in overland park, Kansas four years ago. So Janie Hanzlick underway into the vigil says the Pittsburgh shooting hits home our.

FBI Jeremy Hobson James Whitey Bulger Pittsburgh Bolger President Trump special counsel CARA Swisher Robin young Hillary Clinton mister Rogers NPR Alan Greenspan Moore Lakshmi Singh Kansas Federal Bureau of prisons Janie Hanzlick Casey Wyan
At 5 years old, Prince George named one of Britain's best dressed

Lori and Julia

02:30 min | 3 years ago

At 5 years old, Prince George named one of Britain's best dressed

"Drama Rama no because I feel like. We could write a song no He went to, work Is one I'm going to. Have. Danny find it okay so here is this is. A little Hollywood speak Korea yesterday prince George has been. Named one of Britain's, best, dress at, five, years old so here's. The, knee socks and the Peter Pan he looks like Christopher Robin young Christopher Robin, Winnie the. Pooh books yes with, Peter Pan collars. Piping. On the edge of his always a little Br. British. Boys they don't wear pants so they're seven right Timeless Anyway of, course Tatler a British magazine is going Prince One of the best. Jazz it's one way to get us talking. About. Absolutely. Okay Shahs, of sunset res Raza Farrahan, he had this, sustain an interview he gave page six his feelings about body. Here and he said I like it a little more seventies in the, downtown area my advice is. Let hair exists for God wanted hair to. Be. Hallelujah A Louis a- Likes to have the seventy s fluff Yeah The show is coming back and what a great way to get people to talk about. It About your care right he's got a golden fused haircare line you. Know, and I quit watching the size shahs of. Sunset because you have other shows to watch basically it was a? Reality, show doer dice? Situation and how. Could you watch every franchise of the housewives. 'em at well you know, what I like this I'm. Fascinated with a Persian, rich Persian people it's. Kind of like crazy rich Asians for that reason and the first season I really liked it but then there were a couple story. Lines. That I. Just. And people specifically. People I couldn't stand and so I, didn't go back right all right yeah and that's why but now now that I know this I feel like This is I'm. Gonna. Put it. Back. DVR just to. Seize the pubic hair care just check, in with them Persians all right. Fine hurried fine okay Jennifer Lopez has she never imagined winning the MTV video vanguard. Award.

Christopher Robin Peter Pan Shahs Pubic Hair Rama Jennifer Lopez Prince George Danny Pooh Britain Raza Farrahan MTV
How years of privacy controversies finally caught up with Facebook

Here & Now

03:59 min | 3 years ago

How years of privacy controversies finally caught up with Facebook

"From NPR and WBZ. I'm Robin young. I'm Jeremy Hobson. It's here and now shares in Facebook, took a nosedive this morning dropping nineteen percent because of an earnings report after the market closed yesterday that is troubling many investors. Here's the headline the number of daily users of Facebook in the US and Canada is no longer growing. Facebook is also now losing daily users in Europe. Callum borders is senior innovation reporter at you. Are he joins us in the studio high-cal glad to be with you. And we should say that Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg described this as a solid quarter revenue is still up by more than forty percent compared to this time last year. But what is happening is this all about the privacy issues and people dropping out of Facebook as a result? It's part of it. You mentioned the number of users leveling off or even dipping in in some areas. But I think part of what we're seeing actually may be the reverse, which is that investors could be worried that Facebook is so focused on a dressing user's privacy, concerns that the business is going to suffer as a result. I'm reminded of what sucker Berg said during his Senate testimony back in April, he said, I've directed our teams to invest so much insecurity that it will significantly impact our profitability going forward. And then on the on the earnings call yesterday, he said, we're beginning to see just that this quarter will and tell us about the earnings call because Berg was pretty positive in that call, but then the chief financial officer, Dave Wehner got on. What did he do that caused some alarm? So Wehner said, our total revenue growth will continue to decelerate in the second half of two thousand eighteen. It's that continue were that I think really has investors alarmed. In other words, he was signaling. This wasn't just a bad quarter and it's behind us now and we can move on. He was saying, things are going to maybe get worse before they get better and they lost a huge amount of money, a huge amount of market capitalization in the drop. Just today. Facebook, of course, is grappling with the number of controversies how the platform was used for fake news in the two thousand sixteen election, how the firm Cambridge Analytica obtained data from. Users, and then now the company's policy not to remove offensive content. I wanna listen to Mark Zuckerberg here speaking last week with Recode defending that policy with an example Renzo I'm Jewish and there's a set of people who deny that the holocaust, right. I find that deeply offensive, but the end of the day, I don't believe that our platform should take that down because I think that there are things that different people get wrong either. I don't think that they're intentionally getting a wrong that he has since clarified that statement, but does the company need to do more now to stop the bleeding? I think we'll probably get our answer between now and November. Six, which of course is the date of the midterm election. I think that if in that period we're seeing a lot of headlines about how Facebook continues to be a platform where Russia and other bad actors can spread disinformation. That's going to continue to damage Facebook's reputation. If on the other hand, they get credit. For seeming to clean up the platform and get rid of all that fake news. Then perhaps they can begin to restore confidence of their users and investors. We should say, just for context that Facebook's profits are still up by more than thirty percent compared to last year. And today's drops have brought the value of the stock price basically where it was in, may they've lost all the gains that they've made in the last couple of months. Yeah, this may just be sort of what they would call a market correction, right? It may be that misters were just too optimistic about the future of the company. I think the broader context too is that maybe people are losing a little bit of faith in these iconic tech CEO's throw Elon Musk in there with his Twitter antics lately that stub yours. Calum butcher is thank you. Glad to be with you. Ocalan Jeremy. A longtime tech reporter while Mossberg called zuckerberg's holocaust remarked cowardly. One holocaust scholar tweeted, this is breathtakingly irresponsible and many users do on Facebook to do more to restrict and remove misinformation hate posts, which makes Antonio Garcia, Martinez..

Facebook Dave Wehner Mark Zuckerberg Jeremy Hobson CEO Robin Young NPR Calum Butcher Callum Borders Berg Elon Musk Europe United States Tech Reporter Reporter Holocaust Senate Canada Twitter Renzo
Syria: Humane evacuations

Morning Edition

01:56 min | 3 years ago

Syria: Humane evacuations

"From. NPR news in. Washington I'm Dave Mattingly President Trump says he misspoke when he questioned the conclusion of US intelligence that Russia interfered in the twenty sixteen election Crump's remarks in. Helsinki alongside Russian president Latimer Putin have been widely condemned by Democrats and. Republicans in Syria today state TV says thousands of people are being evacuated. From two Shiite villages the siege. For years by rebels NPR's lemon l. says it's part of a deal with the Syrian government in. Exchange for allowing evacuations the Syrian government is expected to release. Hundreds of rebel prisoners a similar deal was reached, in two thousand seventeen but the bombing of a bus during the evacuation killed about one. Hundred and twelve people former President Obama's education secretary wasn't Florida last night to talk about school shootings and how to respond as Jessica Bateman with member station w. l. RN reports he, visited a community where seventeen people were shot to death. At a high school in February. Arne Duncan is moving forward with a radical proposal he tweeted about in may after the school shooting. In Santa Fe Texas a national boycott of public schools he. Met with parents near parkland Florida on Tuesday night, to start planning it could last for a day or maybe longer and happen as soon. As September he says the goal is to create tension that will influence the midterm elections and produce stricter gun laws I'm Dave Mattingly in Washington I'm, Robin, young President Trump says he supports. One party his intelligence agencies but didn't believe claims that another party Russia. Was behind cyber attacks I will say this I don't see any reason why it. Would be, but I really do want to see the server but I have I have confidence in both. Parties next time here now Underway later, this morning at eleven on k. q. e. d..

President Trump Dave Mattingly Syrian Government Arne Duncan NPR Washington Florida Latimer Putin Syria United States Russia Helsinki Crump Santa Fe Texas Jessica Bateman Barack Obama Secretary
Death toll 25 in Guatemala volcano eruption

Here & Now

02:47 min | 3 years ago

Death toll 25 in Guatemala volcano eruption

"From npr and wbz you're i'm robin young i'm jeremy hobson it's here now rescue operations in guatemala which continued today after the fogo volcano erupted over the weekend thirty two hundred have been forced to evacuate at least sixty nine people have died and we're seeing horrifying images of the scene here's reporter mark stevenson of the associated press several of the stunning images are the myriad ways in which people died in this rumps and some were burned to death when buildings were set of flame by fast moving flows of lava clouds and then the most terrible thing is that the ashes mixed with water and sent it flows of what appeared to be steaming mud down the river valleys and dan the creeks even reached as far as the capital guatemala city twenty five miles away from the volcano ruediger escobar wolf is a vulcanologist at michigan technological university he's a native of guatemala and joins us on skype ruediger welcome and i just tell us about frago this is what's called a bellwether volcano well frankly it's a very typical strata volcano that has a lot of frequent eruptions it has been active since there are written records standish colonial occupation of guatemala and it and it has continued to the present so it has been erupting continuously since one thousand nine hundred nine and in the last few years since about two thousand fifteen it has had about a large russian per month so it it has had a very high level of activity and that's also partly contributing to this tragedy but when was the last time it had a major eruption are one that is like the one we're seeing now probably in october nineteen seventy four that was probably an eruption of comparable size to what we saw yesterday is this volcano different than the one that we've seen erupting in hawaii yeah it is very different hawaiian volcanoes in this particular case till away i usually produces lava flows in this eruption there were also some explosive events in but it mainly produced lava flows it produces some some ashby very rarely at least from what we know produces this kind of pyroclastic flows which is the deadly phenomenon that caused all the deaths were there any warnings for frago we know that in hawaii they were having earthquakes a lot of earthquakes.

NPR Jeremy Hobson Guatemala Fogo Volcano Mark Stevenson Associated Press Michigan Technological Univers Hawaii Robin Young Reporter Ruediger Escobar Ashby
Family members react to study showing shocking death toll from Hurricane Maria

Morning Edition

02:35 min | 3 years ago

Family members react to study showing shocking death toll from Hurricane Maria

"From npr news in washington i'm dave mattingly president trump is traveling to texas today npr's mara liasson says the president will be meeting with survivors of this month's deadly attack at santa fe high school along with family members of those shot to death he's unlikely to encounter calls for gun control in texas it's a pro gun rights state and most of the focus there has been hardening schools making them more secure against potential shooters the shooting at the high school left eight students and two teachers dead a seventeen year old student at the school is facing capital murder charges the president's trip to texas includes a speech at a republican fundraiser in houston the mayor of san juan says she's not surprised president trump has been silent about a study from harvard university researchers suggesting thousands of people in puerto rico were killed by hurricane maria not one tweet not one tweet from a man that tweets about the sunrise to say look people puerto rico we're sorry that's mayor carmen ulan cruise speaking yesterday the study published in the new england journal of medicine estimates maria directly or indirectly killed more than forty six hundred people in puerto rico that's more than seventy times higher than the official death toll i'm dave mattingly in washington i'm robin young as we head into the wedding season a wedding planner has some of the latest trends including influences from the royal wedding children instead of bridesmaids flowers since her bouquets since megan's was so small i've had a few calls about wanting to change their case and it was picked by prince harry apparently next time here and now here and now at eleven am later on this morning followed at noon by the takeaway turning a drug lords life into a tourist attraction so they go to the cemetery they go to jail for he was for one year they go to the house where he was killed what's the price of glorifying pablo escobar i'm tansy nevada and that's next time on the takeaway from wnyc and pri public radio international the takeaway at twelve noon and then just one chance to hear marketplace today and that will be at four o'clock because it's thursday so that means at six thirty this evening it's political breakdown she may be.

NPR Pablo Escobar Robin Young Official Puerto Rico New England Journal Of Medicin Carmen Ulan Harvard University Houston Murder Santa Fe High School Dave Mattingly Washington Prince Harry Megan Hurricane Maria San Juan
"robin young" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"robin young" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Welcome back to business rockstars i'm alex burly continuing my conversation with robin a young she's the founder of robin young and company so let's talk about where the idea came from i mean i know that you had this plethora of experience in branding unita you want us to be an entrepreneur but what made you go this is that robin young inco it's so funny because when i first started who didn't have much direction because i had ha i had worked in all of these different facets rate so of course you know me i'm like okay we're going to be a full service like from the get go we're going to these social media and contents regime branding design the whole gamut right on the funding part was is that it wasn't until i got more clear on my own brands on that vision and who is i speaking scale what was really important to me that i started to be successful in my business so i am so a really kind of took a step back after a couple of months of of just in the in the in a mouse we'll and not really getting anywhere with it on i took a step back and said what's really important me at what's the nation that i can carve out for myself that i really love and i really do well on so i i teams you okay i've worked with so many startups who you know you ha you have basically graphic designers who expect you to come to the table with that brand strategy you have strategists to maybe they'll help you with a strategy part that they don't do design and then you have these major at agencies heard in a charge you in all fifty grand for you to get a full suite.

founder alex burly robin young
"robin young" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"robin young" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Asked business rockstars i'm alex morally joined by robin young cofounder of robin young and co thanks for being here for having that we are gonna talk all things brandang i love the talking branding so so happy you're here and you could start out by giving us a little bit of an overview of your entreprenurial journey and i'll it leads you starting this company sure shirt gosh i don't know how much time hashtag science reader's digest version on so my my entrepreneurial journey started out on actually in market research so i worked with this company gallup and robinson you're probably familiar with gallup surveys pretty big i'm for them i did market research for a b commercial company like nike target and robbins brothers and i'm really not the most fun to work but really really important to learn how how customers hadn't responds to certain commercial aspects like tagline said editorial content and instore experiences in things so i had a really great foundation in branding on and then i switched more into the creative side and i worked as a stylists are that was the first time i moved to allay why is it that within on you know magazines and whatnot anza in then everything was kind of making the shift to digital so i followed suit i worked with two different digital agency is mostly working on influence our branson's with a with a pseudo celebrities on their branded content so this is of way back in the day before you know brand strategy year putting a brand identity was even a bang so i really had to kind of gas to me you know what would his my mike clients like brand really it was something that i kind of had to figure out on my own on and then i've i finished off by working with a major major company so ucla who's got a hundred years of experience that they have a very very like solid brandon plays fights i'm had to work within those confines and really create a way to take this existing brand and make it feel really fresh and i worked on everything from like email campaigns of social media at so like websites ran the gap at a different marketing materials so really got a very like robust understanding of how branding words and.

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"robin young" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"robin young" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The day to day with high temperatures ranging from the low 80s of the coast to the low 90s inland we'll have northwesterly winds between ten and twenty miles per hour from npr and wbur i'm robin young i'm jeremy hobson is here and now can republicans vying the votes to pass their latest obamacare repeal and replace bill through the senate that's the question today as the graham cassidy bill gets its first hearing in the senate finance it's committee joining us now is julie rottner chief washington correspondent for kaiser health news i julie i jeremy and on friday senator mccain announce his opposition to the villain it sounded like that was it for graham cassidy but it sounds like there's been a lot of wielding and dealing since then that's right there are fifty two republicans in the senate they can ford to lose two and then have vice president mike pence break the thai so mccain seems to be a definite 'no rand paul of kentucky seems to be a definite 'no um boat everybody else's still sort of in place so they're still trying to push forward hoping they can get every other republican in the senate to vote for this and thus pass it when you say rand paul looks like a definite know i've seen some reporting over the weekend that he he may be one over if they change some things about the bill while they did change some things about the and rand paul spokesman said this morning uh that he's still a now i you know you never you do never know who is in play i think were if it were pretty confident that mccain will stay in now but we're also pretty confident that susan collins who actually he hasn't said yet we'll be a now so i mean it is teetering on the brink but yes everybody is still at least allegedly in play and this vote will happen when if it does well if it does what what senator mcconnell has said all along is this vote will happen when they have fifty votes i mean that's literally the truth as someone said in know the old line is when you have the votes you vote when you don't have the votes you talk but there is this is a complicated procedure they're using and there's actually know talking time left on this bill if they were to bring it to the floor.

npr jeremy hobson senate senator mccain graham cassidy vice president rand paul susan collins senator mcconnell robin young obamacare julie rottner ford mike pence kentucky