17 Burst results for "Robin Sesing"

"robin sesing" Discussed on The Zest

The Zest

03:35 min | 1 year ago

"robin sesing" Discussed on The Zest

"Maybe a month ago I think. And I want you to try it before we talked about it but this is going to be our tipplers reserve that you can buy right here at the store only here. All right hold on. Here we go. This is a little bit. Darker than the orange liqueur than the tippers. Armscor. What is the secret? Is it wait a minute? That is delicious. There's just something. it's almost like a burnt sugar. Taste in there like a roasted taste what is okay Warren tell me what I just had. Will reduce with this process here as we aged Are tipplers in expert in barrels by itself, and then what we did was we blended it in with some of our. The Bourbon barrel the would tank. Isn't necessarily what you will you. there. So we also took that and we did a small blend with straight Bourbon So we decided to give a sneak peek of Bourbon that we have here Asian currently you know. So this is it. That is delicious. What's it called again? now is are tipplers reserved. Deserve. One thing with this land is splendid perfectly on get the taste of the as Orange Cure, but you get the aroma of a straight bourbon. It is wonderful. This was really delicious I enjoyed every drink here and. I enjoyed my tour. Only did have the sunset Julia head. That's now this is new is this out yet? full-scale distribution November December this year. All right sunset Jen let's say. Wow. That's good. That's really unusual. We also there's no artificial flavoring or coloring in there, and I think what Clara did is she she and it's a beautiful gold color and there's no artificial colors. You can tell you know here it's a little bit of a lighter Hue, but in fifty it is. kind of an amber orange color so It's really beautiful in a bottle. And you know to know that it's completely natural. You might see a little bit of orange particles in some of them to if you're if you're lucky. So yeah, I think that's a it's a good way to put it. It's unusual because it's not a normal Jenn it's completely different Very any JIM that you would find on the market. Very complex and I think that you could put that in a cocktail and you it would hold it how it's not gonNA get buried. I've been drinking it with a little bit of club soda and a tiny squeeze of an orange and it's my favorite. All. Right. Thank you so much. Thank you Robyn. Thank you. That was skip Reagan, Warren Gardner and Clara. Of the Saint Petersburg Distillery we've got the recipes for the skyway drive and the robins collins cocktails on our website because this podcast dot com. So much for joining us today I'm Robin Sesing Ham Delete Cologne and I produce zest with help from Cheyenne Jag Lau and markets. Copyright Twenty Twenty WSF Public Media University of South Florida..

Clara Warren Gardner Twenty Twenty Cheyenne Jag Lau Saint Petersburg Distillery Public Media University of Sou Robin Sesing Jen Julia Jenn Reagan
"robin sesing" Discussed on The Zest

The Zest

07:27 min | 1 year ago

"robin sesing" Discussed on The Zest

"In a coffee shop that is so seductive and Inviting I don't know but it is I even have an APP on my phone that pipes in noise from Paris coffee shop it's like you know recorded noise from Koch, it's it's called coffee think saying right and so it's just it just as like Paris coffee shop and it's the background noise or a coffee shop in there's something about it When I would get stuck on a scene or even when I was writing, you know I'm writing journalism but prior to the panic I would get stuck writing a scene or stuck in a bullock certain place I would go to different coffee shop and sit and it would always get me out of whatever walk I was an I. Can't explain it. It's the aroma of the coffee maybe it's the background noise I'm just not sure but there's something about being in a place with other people and working that for me. Gets me out of my head and injured the story. That's very inspiring to think about that. You know to think about that communal idea of writing. We've talked about coffee and a little bit about how to make it in the aroma and everything. But when you're in a coffee shop writing, do people watch I, mean do you do you get inspiration from the people that are in there drinking coughing? Sometimes yeah. Definitely. Definitely, I love to eavesdrop on conversations and you know if I'm writing a secondary character I can look up and there's somebody new they're not just my husband and my dogs and I can look up and see different people doing different things with their mannerisms and their address on but it's also just about getting lost in in your brain in a public place there's something about a. Place and you're doing your own thing but you're still around other people that you can feed off their energy I think and I found that very inspiring and I, think that fiction wise I think that that is something I miss and grieve allot from the pandemic. That is something right that we just I keep thinking we've got to get back to that to be disabled to you know give people a hug and hang out somewhere and it's getting frightening. You know thinking about win that's going to happen and to be able to walk into a place and put your computer down and grabbed the coffee and just sit there without fear I that is going to be the biggest thing for me. Yeah. I agree you mentioned your husband of it. Yet I know your husband's Italian and there's a there's a wonderfully handsome Italian guy in his book is based on your husband used the victim in the book so now Is Not. I would say that my husband is more in the vein of my first romance where the first hero was Italian. That's great experience as much more romantic the guy McAfee shop he becomes the victim and he's Employees. I didn't know if that was subliminal. down. So we're talking the on a Sunday morning here. It's a little bit drizzly outside the drinking coffee. Now actually I'm drinking green tea. Okay. Maybe, that's going to be fodder for another mystery series where agreed in A. Key, in the second book there is they do drink green tea green tea at one point has there's a yoga themed homicide. So that's kind of a running joke is that some of the people don't drink coffee and Lana is very very unsettled by that fact. So so she's got to get to that point all things to all people right with adult yes. As if it's the book and this is out December early December yes I'd want to more in the series I'm writing the second one right now and that's due in January. There was a point pre pandemic that I was really. Prolific but between the pandemic and my job's a journalist, I'm not as prolific this year. So the all my only focus has been the second book in the series cold crew corpse and then I'll be pitching other books in the series I. Don't know how long series will be hopefully it will be long. I'm hoping I have many ideas for in crime solving crime solving career I also have another idea for historical coziness three that I'm tossing around a completely separate series that I'm thinking about for the future because once you get involved in this when she started doing this the ideas come. May Do I have a list you know like when you're a reporter, you have a list of ideas that you wanna get to. Obviously not now because there's so many ideas there's too many ideas for news now but yeah, I have a list I just keep a running list of a book. Ideas Kerr. Just to get back to coffey a little bit in the book. What's Lana favorite coffee? Longest favorite coffee probably would be I think well in book two definitely the cold brew. But in book one I would say her new favorite coffee is Rosemary infused coffee that was actually inspired by a coffee at bandit here in Saint Pete, it's a Rosemary Law. And it's coffee with a hint of Rosemary I guess I guess it's rose. Moore but there's a little rosemary sprig but it's coffee and and it has a little hint, a whisper of Rosemary Fragrance and taste in the coffee and it's amazing. I love Rosemary and I know band does a lot of floral and herbal kind of thing. Sometimes they have in there they float these amazing little. Yes. He the things dried dried herbs and. Of their coffee and it's just it's really beautiful. Komo's he had just sit there and look at it for a while. Yeah. This I think I think it's Rosemary, Flora Watson I. think There is some flour in it, but there definitely is. Like definite Rosemary. Taste in that's beautiful. The other coffee that I think she would love although it's a little sweet for lawn his taste I happen to love but I think she would like Kawa hasn't Aloha Lockton. Have you tried that tormented? I'm Vegan. So I get it with coconut milk, but it's the coconut and Macadamia nut. Lot. It's an. Umbrella and it's so good. It's an Aloha lock. Check that out next time I go there. To creativity isn't the only world there is there really is and I I love doing research on different coffee shops are doing. So I can put him little details like I found one coffee shop that was putting tiny edible flowers in ice cubes, and then putting those in the coffee are wow for just for beauty sake and I put that in book two. excited. Thought it was beautiful. So now, there's this creativity in coffee, and now we've got a little mystery. Thanks to tear lush the copy lever series. I'm really looking forward to the book coming out in December. We should tell luck with it i. think it's fantastic that you sorta figured out a way to put. Florida, and coffee into an entire mystery series that's really exciting I. Appreciate you taking the time to talk to us and a gun which you a Lotta luck on this on this. Now I gotTA GO HAVE A. I do too. Thank you. That was the US contributor Janet Keiller speaking to writer Tamra Lush. Thanks so much for listening I'm Robin Sesing Ham, the Cologne I produce the zest with help from Cheyenne Jack and Martin. Hayes. Copyright Twenty. Twenty W USF public. Media University of South Florida..

Rosemary Lana Paris Rosemary Law Florida McAfee Koch US Media University of South Flor Robin Sesing Ham Saint Pete A. Key Hayes Tamra Lush coffey Kerr reporter Aloha Lockton Komo Moore
"robin sesing" Discussed on The Zest

The Zest

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"robin sesing" Discussed on The Zest

"I almost died in that people. Tell me that was close. I was close. I knock on the door. I taught the door of debt and I refuse to going. That's body was. I'm Robin Sesing. Ham and this is the best citrus seafood Spanish flavor and southern charm. Were all about food in Florida today. We're talking to chef. Rene.

"robin sesing" Discussed on The Zest

The Zest

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"robin sesing" Discussed on The Zest

"Look around to. Where is it growing? Mostly in Florida Most counties that have agricultural will have some squash grown from south-and-north squashes one of the quicker crops to grow Probably only about a forty five to sixty day from planting the seed To get to be picking if you're good grower So you will see different times in the winter. It's grown more in Miami Dade Moccoli area where they aren't quite as cold. Then it moves to central Florida. Then it will move to North Florida and then eventually up the country if you're commercial but it is one of the easier ones for people to grow in their gardens from Alicia Florida. We're in Florida. I was born in Jacksonville and I was raised in Polk County. Well let's hear it for poke it So we're in Polk County. I just have to ask. Oh my goodness now. You can get me to tell my secrets. I was raised him. Bradley Junction Oh my goodness and so anybody that knows Polk County is probably rolling their eyes about now very rural part of the county. Yeah well that's Nice so tell me. Do you have a favorite recipe for the Yellow Squash? A favorite way that you liked to eat it. Probably any type of squash casserole. I Love Yellow Squash casseroles. Okay you can get them with. You know you made with the mushroom soup or cream of chicken soup or whether it's Sour Cream. I just don't think you can go wrong when you fix a squash casserole you know. At least I do have a famous squash casserole that I make do yellow squash and Zucchini with sour cream Dry ranch dressing mix and cheese and then Ritz crackers on top and give us that restaurant I can. I can provide that on our website. I think he needs to make the recipe for next time next time. I want you to bring samples. Well Steve and Alicia thank you so much. We will talk to you next time. Thank you Robyn thank you that was Alicia. Whidden and Steven Brand of the Hillsborough County Extension Office. You'll find the recipe for Stevens Florida's squash casserole at our website zest. Podcast DOT COM. Thanks for listening. Don't forget to subscribe to disaster. It's free and that way. You won't Miss Anything. I'm Robin Sesing. Ham Delete Cologne and I produced the vast which is a production of W. USF public media..

Alicia Florida Polk County Florida Alicia North Florida Miami Dade Moccoli Stevens Florida Hillsborough County Extension Robin Sesing Bradley Junction Robyn Jacksonville Whidden Steven Brand Steve
"robin sesing" Discussed on Florida Matters

Florida Matters

12:18 min | 2 years ago

"robin sesing" Discussed on Florida Matters

"This is Florida matters. I'm Robin Sesing. Ham despite not being officially allowed to live in Florida until seventeen sixty three Jewish people escaping expulsions and exclusions were among the earliest settlers of the state. They've been politicians business leaders artists Nobel prize winners and more and what is being called. The first comprehensive history of Jews in Florida was published this month. The book is called Jews of Florida centuries of stories and its author Marsha Josipovic. Who's with me in the studio Marsha? Welcome to Florida matters. Thank you it's good to have you here. So the book is more than four hundred pages of stories and photographs going back to the eighteen. Hundreds what was your impetus for putting all this together. Well it starts back in the sixties. When moved to Florida? I was originally from West Virginia and moved to Florida. My husband was in the military we moved to McCoy Air Force Base in Orlando. And I'm a person that asks a lot of questions Jews in nor- not notoriously ask a lot of questions so I got to Orlando and I got very involved in the Jewish community organized Jewish community and I started asking like where did people come from. When did they come how long they've been here? How did they contribute to the community? How did they get along with the Non Jewish community and nobody had any answers and then I got very involved in the statewide and national organized? Jewish community? I was invited to sit on the first United Jewish Appeal Young Leadership Cabinet and I went to my first retreat in Washington and as the women sat around. We talked about how we got involved why we got involved. Almost everyone said because my aunt my grandmother or my mother before me was involved and then I realized that in Florida we didn't have those depths of generations so Jewish continuity which is the major goal of every Jewish organization and every Jewish families continuity I realized we had a major challenge here in Florida because people did not know the history. I found out that in the northeast with scholars never addressed Florida. They always thought it was post world. War Two condo commandos mentality Miami beach who cared and they really honestly thought these academics that it started post World War Two so I got very entrenched and passionate about this subject and began a two hundred fifty thousand mile eight. Your Trek around Florida set up task forces and thirty. Different communities recruited hundreds of volunteers. I did not do this alone. I had lots of help. Now you're talking about. I don't know if you're going into the mosaic project. Because I know this turned into a big museum exhibition called mosaic. Right yes that's what that's what I'm leading into. That's that's what it led to the issue was that no one had ever dug into Florida. Jewish history are you. Let me just ask you are you. What did you studied? Are you a historian you would you consider yourself a self taught historian? I'm definitely self taught. I was trained as a Dietitian. I worked in a hospital and When I it was and I realized myself that I needed to see pictures of people here. Their personal stories see their things and then they became alive and then I remembered them. I now I have you know thirty five thousand photographs that I collected and people always say to me. How do you remember the names and dates as they're like my children you don't forget your children's names and dates because become very important stories have really become part of you that you've really taken them in and I guess a lot of them just going through them really moving? Thank you especially the early early families. I wanted to ask you talk about some of these people. Who would you say? What's the WHO's the earliest family? Who was the earliest Jewish family in? Okay the the longest Continuing Jewish family in Florida is the Dolinsky family from Jacksonville. Actually they lived in this area too and there were perfect family for telling the story because not only are they longest continuing Jewish family they came from Prussia and they landed in New York in the late. Eighteen Forty S. They came to Jacksonville by eighteen. Fifty when I say they the the first first person that came was Philip Dolinsky and he brought from Europe his father and mother. His mother unfortunately died in New York but he brought his father Abraham at eight siblings to Jacksonville so there was a whole large family and this was an eighteen fifty. The family ISTEL IN JACKSONVILLE. Still Jewish into the eighth generation but a lot. I mean tentacles all over the state because I saw you said he had a hotel. In Fort me absolutely polk county he had holdings and borrow so all over the state right. That's with Jews in the early days while even today is not a new phenomenon They moved around. According to the economic opportunity. First of all they came to America. And you mentioned expulsions and exclusions originally came to America because of anti-semitism fact. It's a word. I use fifty times in my book because what propelled people to move from place to place and the cost of the exclusions and expulsions in Europe. They came to America and the Jews that came from the early in the early days from Europe. They were never allowed to be farmers. They couldn't own land so they were very attracted to Florida because it was an economic opportunity was religious freedom and they could work the land. That's why so many of the early pioneers you're saying they couldn't work the land back in Europe right on land right Europe but when they got to the United States so they got into citrus. They got into Florida was attractive because they was a way for them to be independent not have to work for someone else to support their family. And that's what they were looking for. They were looking away to support their family in freedom. So yes that Dolinsky family. You mentioned yes. They moved all over the state because as economic opportunities opened up like when Tampa opened up when different areas opened up they would moved to strike out a new fortune and one area would decline in one opportunity in one area would would be on the rise so they moved around the state but they had their roots in Jacksonville and the family is still enjoying. They're still there so were they. Founders of that synagogue in jazz one of Mars. Dolinsky was Phillips. WanNa fill brothers. Became the first president of the second congregation in the state. Which is a Hamath Hassett in Jacksonville? He was also mayor at the same time. Law The only Jewish mayor still right in Jacksonville. we've had Over two hundred Jewish mayors in Florida in the early days there were more the first one was Henry Brash Marianna in eighteen seventy nine and is because they were educated. They came educated. They were trusted. They were good speakers and people people respected them. I think some people might be surprised about that that there would be that much tolerance for Jewish people that they would elect them mayor of their town. Wouldn't you you know lot of times? You wouldn't think that. But South Carolina the same way. There was a lot of tolerance towards different religions towards the Jewish religion. Back then right. Surprisingly I spent thirteen pages of my book which is a large chunk on politics. I have a list of every Jewish. May I hope every you know I always say you know as best I could get? It took me years. I've been doing this for thirty five years. This book is a combination of my thirty five years of research so I listed the Jewish mayors all the Jews in the state legislature all the Jews in the federal. In in who have been Basler's. We've had one Jewish governor David Schultz in nineteen thirty three. As a matter of fact he was attacked because of antisemitism his opponent stated that he was Jesus Alma Pesca Pilat Episcopalian but my my opponent is Jewish and he tried to use that to you know to put him down. But he actually got elected. By the largest plurality of that time I think people would be familiar with the name Yuli and Levy County. That was an early Jewish family. Right Moses leaving no in central Florida around Gainesville okay. Moses Levy is the most important person in early Florida. Jewish history is a very important person in Florida history. He was the first developer in Florida. The form the First Development Corporation in eighteen nineteen. His Attorney was Alex Hammer Alexander Hamilton Junior. Who was the? Us Attorney for the district at that time. So he Bought a hundred thousand acres in like starts getting Gainsville area latches county orange seminole county all the way over here to to Hillsborough County Tampa. It one hundred thousand acres and he formed a colony a plantation in Mecca. Nope call pilgrimage plantation specifically to bring Jews that were already being persecuted in northern Europe before they were even persecuted in Eastern Europe to bring them to central Florida to become farmers and as I mentioned Jews in Europe. Were not used to being informed. They they were not farmers because they couldn't own land so he brought them to central Florida just a little south of Gainesville. He was a founder of Mickey. He brought he. He devoted a thousand acres to this plantation and they spoke Hebrew. They taught them farming. He brought the first citrus trees. He bought the first sugar tree. Sugarcane trees How many people? There were up settling there. There were probably about thirty five. There were five Jewish families that came Felix Wartburg of the German. Warburg family was his agent in Europe to recruit. In fact Warburg came there to live himself fact on the campus of the University of Florida. There's a Lake Warburg name for him. There's a Levy Lake which is Off The property where he has plantation but he He was the first. Commissioner of Education for Florida was responsible for the first public school and Saint Augustine. He was amazing. He was a brilliant man. He was against slavery. He was an abolitionist. He went to England and spoke out for abolition He had slaves but he believed that his slaves should be free when they became of age. They wouldn't but he wouldn't free them until they were educated. He wanted to keep families together. He if he was known as an abolitionist in Florida that would have been a problem because the Florida economy was based on slavery at that time. So he was a practicing Jew than it's worth about early to mid eighteen hundred eight. He was his plantation was from eighteen twenty to eighteen thirty five but he came into Florida in eighteen nineteen when he started buying land. But I think I read in your book that his descendants now do not consider themselves Jewish. That's that's when you ask me. Who is the longest continue to be the Dolinsky? Okay but he was of course very well known because he was the father eventually of David Levy Yuli when he got he got divorced. The family had come from Morocco and gone to Cuba. Saint Thomas in Cuba as a matter of fact. It's very interesting. Because his son David Levy who you mentioned became the first person of Jewish ancestry to serve in the US. Senate there have been. There's been a book written about Judah Benjamin Has the first Jew to serve in the US Senate but he was not. He was eight years after David. Levy Yuli and they were actually cousins and their fathers were business together in Saint Thomas. And it's interesting that both of the sons became. Us senators went from Louisiana one from Florida. So David Levy you only became the first Florida senator. He was actually responsible for bringing Florida in as the twenty seventh state in eighteen forty five. He helped draft the constitution. He had back to the plantation. He had worked on the plantation with his father. And that's where his father wanted him to be and they had many differences of opinion..

Florida Jacksonville David Levy Yuli Europe United States David Levy Philip Dolinsky Orlando America Tampa Nobel prize Marsha Josipovic Moses Levy Warburg University of Florida Robin Sesing West Virginia McCoy Air Force Base Levy County
"robin sesing" Discussed on The Zest

The Zest

06:50 min | 2 years ago

"robin sesing" Discussed on The Zest

"About dessert? Well in Europe. The theme is they have deserved at least once maybe twice a day but it's not like like we deserve. They eat fresh fruit. So they'll have some grapes. They'll have a slice of watermelon. They might have half an apple. The two people split slice. And that's dessert. That's part of their traditional everyday desert. They'll also make something like I put in. Near Blueberry very you know ricotta cheese cake. They will have that for a special occasion. They don't have. It's not a band food thing. It's not like no carbs or or no fat or knowing that this protein there there are no if it's real food it's not banned. It's meant to be enjoyed on occasion. I love that philosophy a yet they save those things for special occasions with people you know so they. It's a fruit is an in a once. Once or twice a day event her dessert and then once in a while on a on a you know Friday evening Sunday afternoon. They'll make a real special dessert like you know a grandma souffle or chocolate Mousse or the cheesecake. I mentioned you know something like that just once in a while just once in a while so when you're speaking with the fishmongers or the market stall proprietors I mean are you speaking to them and their own language. I speak fluent French and Spanish. Oh you do get by in some Italian. It's not great. My Greek is limited. I probably have twenty or thirty words. My Turkish really not so good doll hole. I Won't shame you for that. Having at least two languages really does help so besides English in addition to English now now. Where's your favorite port? Pay Freight favorite port of call yourself about how so many I mean. Take take me with you. Stephen Course. Sailing around Corsica in France was wonderful at a senior is incredible the the food was great. Eight the best food markets. Though were in Spain like Valencia. We spent a week in Valencia on the Mediterranean coast is gorgeous historic town. The market building is like out of Julius Caesar Times. I mean but it's fantastic. They you're tasting everything. They're selling olives olives and pickles and wine and olive oil and dark chocolate and all these things they have you taste before you buy them. I love that so I guess you wouldn't Sale around to the land that would be rougher sailing around literally down the French Atlantic coast around northern Spain around Portugal to dead into into the Mediterranean. Oh that's we started in northern Spain in northern France you bought the boat. They brought the boat in France and then sailed into the Mediterranean then spent a a seven months sailing. Yes so that would have been tough. There's not like an intercoastal waterway that you could've gone just it's open ocean sailing. Yeah wow that's exciting. How big is your boat or did you feed your Catamaran? Nice boat does so. There's kind of a the whole Mediterranean lifestyle though outside I guess absolutely so some of the benefit clearly comes from the nutrients in the food unmistakably mistakenly yet there's other benefits that come from how they live that are clearly make the Mediterranean lifestyle overall and make them return giant. Look good I mean just for an example. They're more active than we are in the. US they walk more. I mean typically they walk to work or bicycle to work or walk to the grocery store every day. We don't really do that. There is a process and whether you're in France or Italy or Spain or Greece people walk in the evening the before or after dinner the whole family goes for a stroll and they might be out want instead of watching a screen. Whether it's their computer television thorughout walking in the community in visiting people so there's social connection with the two and then when they eat their meals are long leisurely. I don't think think we ever had a meal in Europe. In a seven month period. That was under ninety minutes really inao leisurely no way we do that. It's leisurely and it's with people. For example. We had a couple of times workers on the boat mechanic. Or someone you know sailmaker or something. Eighteen and I'm making recipes right and so I'm saying hey. Would you like to try this. And they look at me like well yes. I'd like to try it but I don't have time to sit down for a whole meal now. They don't get they. Don't just take sit and take his standup bite or a snack. Either they sit for a meal and they talked and they communicate or or they don't eat so you know they they don't eat much breakfast. Maybe Coffee Little Fruit Yogurt. Maybe sometimes eggs on the weekend but mostly they have a big lunch and a big dinner right. Well that's I mean it's fun to hear about that kind of lifestyle to learn about it but we're not going to change our culture so we're going to have to adapt. These recipes are quicker lifestyle. We could though adapt in the sense that we eat food out a table bowl with people and not have a television or a computer screen or a phone on and we talk about the food and communicate. So I think that's something we we really should be doing for our health and be more active to being outdoors. You know. They eat food outside more often there with nature more often. I think there's several aspects aspects of a Mediterranean lifestyle that we would benefit if we tried to use more of them and I tried to put that kind of information in the book. I think it would. They have far lower rates. Having designing the pressure may do and I think a lot of it has to do with how they live. There's selling wonderful tips to start off the New Year Dr Steven Massively. Thank you so much for being here there. That was Dr Steven Massively. His book is called the Mediterranean method and he shared his recipes for White Fish Savita with avocado mango and tomato and four pairs post with wine and cinnamon. You can find them on our website possessed PODCAST DOT COM. Tom Thank you so much for listening. Subscribe to the zest. It's free and it's easy to do and if you liked what you hear give us a rating on. It Ed's I'm Robin Sesing Him. Delia Kolonin I produce zest with help from Megan trumbull. Mark Hayes and Craig George. The zest is a production of W U._S._F. public media..

France Spain Mediterranean Europe Valencia Dr Steven Massively apple Julius Caesar Delia Kolonin Stephen Course French Atlantic Tom Megan trumbull Corsica Mark Hayes Ed Portugal Robin Sesing Craig George
"robin sesing" Discussed on The Zest

The Zest

04:51 min | 2 years ago

"robin sesing" Discussed on The Zest

"That was the zest contributor. Janet keiller speaking to Dietitian Shen. Wendy Wesley go to this podcast. Dot Com for a link to Wendy's list for a well stocked Pantry. Finally finally we ask some Florida food enthusiasts. What they're excited about in the upcoming year? Here's what they had to say. Hi My name is Helen. Freund meantime the restaurant critic and dining writer at the Tampa Bay Times this year. I'm really looking forward to seeing an increased focus on natural wines both at restaurants and bars. I think that we're going to see a big increase in wine. Lists sporting smaller producers. Organically made wines or wines made with low or minimal human intervention Shen and. I think it's something that we're gonNA see Really take place at bars that are opening up with this as their main focus. So I'm looking forward to the return of the wine bar but a wine bar that's got a real focus on natural lines and you know hopefully A really good cheese and meat board in particular. I'm really excited about the opening of book and bottle. Aw and cellar masters both which are wine bars. That are going to have a heavy focus on natural lines and are opening in Saint Pete early this year. I'm in keeping Williams. Wesley Chapel Florida also known as the Fun Food Mama in twenty twenty. I am really looking forward to the Wesley Chapel Apple Food scene. It's finally up and coming release. Some really cool concepts are heading our way if you're familiar with the sparkman war channel sides Area they have really cool food container type concepts and that is headed to Wesley Chapel. So I'm excited to see what all will be popping up in the grow -Tario what's in chapel and also If you're familiar with seminal heights. The King of the Coupe is headed our way as well so it's a really pull things are happening. Wesley Chapel. It's about time and also of course for the New Year. I'm going to be looking forward to eating better. Getting on the healthy food frame. MM-HMM I have a cookbook. I'm looking at. It's called weeknights. One Pot vegan cooking it's the cold Mallard of deliciously every day DOT com so seventy five after Lewis recipes with maximum flavor and minimal cleanup. Definitely a mob win so yeah. That's what I'm looking forward to twenty twenty. Hi this is Gina Birch. I may food wine and travel writer and the Co host of great minds. It's a wine centric. podcast recorded from the Studios of WGC. You and Fort Myers so this year. I'm looking forward to trying more winds from areas that are more off. The beaten path from countries including Croatia and Hungary were getting a lot more of these wines imported now and also from different regions and more well-known winemaking countries. Let's say Tasmania in Australia. You don't think about Tasmania particularly as being a great wine producing area with some really good Pinot. Noirs being made there right now and in Italy veering away from Piedmont and Tuscany to Auto Ati Jay. This is a really cool and cool. Climate region of the country's he's border with Austria. Mary has some really unique grapes. Almost all of the winds have names that are really challenging to pronounce sound kind of exotic indifferent. And they're all really good. Hi I'm Carlos Hernandez and Tampa. You might know me from my blog Carlo. Seats this year I'm mostly looking forward to the growth in Tampa downtown Tampa getting a number of new restaurants. it's going to continue to boom water. WIDER STREET COMES ALONG EBOR cities adding a lot of new things there's new developments in Tampa Heights seminole heights and really I think what I'm really looking most for two is all love. The new things that are coming you know as Tampa continues to develop and and grow how about you. What are you looking forward to? What would you like for us to to cover? What stories would you like to hear in twenty twenty? You can let us know on our facebook page or by writing me at Robin at Zest. PODCAST DOT com the Leeann. I wish you a very happy fun and delicious New Year make a resolution to leave us a review on I tunes and let your friends know they can find us on their smart speakers. Just say Alexa. Play this desk podcast. I'm Robin Sesing Ham. Delia Cologne. I I produce the zest with help from Megan trouble. Markes and Craig George. The zest is a production of W._S._F. public media..

Wesley Chapel Wendy Wesley Tampa Wesley Chapel Florida writer Tampa Bay Florida Tasmania Janet keiller Carlos Hernandez Tampa Heights Robin Sesing Ham Gina Birch Alexa Delia Cologne Helen EBOR Freund
"robin sesing" Discussed on The Zest

The Zest

07:57 min | 2 years ago

"robin sesing" Discussed on The Zest

"Distress Center for the Performing Arts. Downtown Tampa is the largest performing arts. This venue in the southeast. That means lots of hungry ticket. Holders every day the venues culinary team puts on its own performance of sorts not only providing food for its restaurants but also catering onsite weddings meetings and other events. Delia went behind the scenes with the stress. Centers Executive Chef Ed Steinhoff in his office. Just off the kitchen chef. Ed talked about why he's constantly changing the menus and how chicken soup was the way into one celebrities. Heart My name is Ed Steinhoff. I am the executive chef at the center for the Performing Arts. Now what does that entail. Okay so at the stress we have have three restaurants. Maestros Restaurant Maestros Cafe and Maestros on the river. We also support St Cafe with all the food that they serve there and All the concession stands that we do throughout the buildings while and all this food is coming out of one kitchen for the most part. Yeah most of the food comes out of the main kitchen and we do have one small satellite kitchen downstairs where we finish it but yes for the most part all. The food is prepped in our main kitchen. I don't think of Performing Arts Center honor as a dining destination. But you're right. It is and in fact. My husband and I met at Maestros at a networking event. And we've you've been married for eleven years so it strangely plays a role in my story. Surprised to learn that. There's such serious like culinary cred happening at at a performing arts center. I think so. I think it lends itself really well to have a destination to eat at a performing arts center. You coming to the show. Although a lot of times you WanNa make a great night of it you want to get some nice food. It's great you're already on the property. You're here we have the restaurants that suit everybody's everybody's pocket book you know. We have a nice fine dining restaurant to the cafes more a buffet little bit lower price and you know we have to light a fair at on on the river. It really really lends itself well to have this type of restaurant here at the center. How unusual is that for Performing Arts Center? I think most most of them have some kind of culinary experience. I don't know that they all have what we have here. We really do a lot culinary. What what are some of the most popular dishes? The difference here is that every show that comes into town. There is a new menu for and the new menu is themed toward the show. Can you give me some examples. Yes so during the show Charlie chocolate factory one of the items that were doing is at stake but it it has a like a a chocolate Barbecue Damocles. Some shows are really easy to theme others. This one not so easy. Because it's mostly a suites suites so it's easy for my pastry chef to theme this menu. Not So easy for me. Other shows are are much easier so I'll either theme the food or the title of the food. So that you'll you'll understand that it's coming from the show. What's an example of a show? That was easy to him. The show we did with a Glorious Stefan on your feet that was excellent because we were able to to find a good niche Cuban food and we made really really Nice Cuban food for that week sometimes so making Italian theme. I think for the Bronx. I did a lot of Italian food. I do a lot of research into the characters of the show. The songs that are performed during the show so it gives me titles it gives me names and things like that and I can. I can rhyme things that go with it so in that aspect it does help me. Do you get to watch the this shows. I can usually are serve our dinner services over in time for me to change and get to the shows. I don't go to many the other because I I spent a long time here during I get here you most times eight or nine o'clock in the morning and by the time where we're done for the day. I'm pretty much ready to go home. Tom Do you feel like being a chef and providing food for these events is its own type of performance. You may think so. Yeah I I think from the outside looking in. It's almost like because we're part of the experience you know when people come in and they do see that we spent time to to the theme something and I think they enjoy that aspect of the show even before they get to the show so we were we. Hope is is to give them a good impression as they're walking in the door door and when they leave their nice and happy when they get to the show so it becomes a great full night for them. Do you feed the performance as well. Once in a while we performers we often more feed their crew if they're loaded as is at three o'clock in the morning. We're here for breakfast at four o'clock in the morning making it happen. We just did it on Saturday for baby shark their in town. We Fed their crew at like five o'clock in the morning and then we fed them for lunch and then we had him for dinner and that sometimes we'll happen even while. Wow we're doing these restaurants where even while we're opening these restaurants well we'll have catering events during the show's it gets a little difficult in in the size of the kitchen that we have. That's so funny like my three year old loves baby shark and to think that there are people up early making breakfast for the baby shark crew. It just just blows my mind. What did they order just goldfish? What do you make for baby shark crew? It was just your basic breakfast and lunch. You know a lot of performance now. uh-huh very health conscious. So you know we. We make sure. We're doing a lot of gluten free vegetarian and again we do that on all of our menus. Have you cooked for anyone. One whose name would recognize can drop any names. What are the stars eating? That's what we want to know you don't want I did make Adam Sandler. When he was here I made him chicken soon because he was sick? He was here with a show with David Spade and some other comedic actors and he was sick and especially for chicken soup and I made him. I made him chicken noodle soup. Oh that's so sweet. Someone like him. Who such a big SAR you? Would I think he has everything in the world he needs he can buy anything. There's nothing anyone can do for him. But something like making chicken soup for someone when they're sick. That's universal universal. That just feels like love. Yeah I think You know at the end of the day. He's a suit city kid who's WHO's mom probably made him chicken soup when he was sick. And he's he's on tour. What's he gonNa do and that's what he decided he wanted? So we will make anything. We don't have a will go out and shop for it and make it happen. I love that. So what's your background. How'd you get into this? I'm from New York originally from Brooklyn I own my own business. There is a Deli and bakery and we did a lot of catering and after after nine eleven. When things weren't great in New York? I decided it was time to move. Even you know we had some family in town here so we moved and and I started working in a restaurant and just kept moving up and moving up and I ended up coming here to the stress. So it's been a it's been a nice journey for me since since two thousand and two and I'm really enjoying legendary Safai Amazing Chef Edward Steinhoff. Thank you so much and break a leg thank you yes thank you blue here. Thank you for your time. That was Ed Steinhoff of this dress center for the performing arts. Speaking with Delia Cologne chef eh shared the chicken soup recipe that he made for Adam Sandler you can find it on our website the zest podcast dot com. That's it for today. Thank you you so much for listening. I'm Robin Sesing. Ham Delia Cologne and I produced disastrous with help from Megan. Trimble Markes and Craig George. The zest is a production of W._S._F. public media..

Ed Steinhoff Delia Cologne Performing Arts Performing Arts Center Adam Sandler Tampa Edward Steinhoff Distress Center New York St Cafe Tom Do David Spade Robin Sesing Charlie Trimble Markes Megan Brooklyn Craig George
"robin sesing" Discussed on The Zest

The Zest

08:10 min | 2 years ago

"robin sesing" Discussed on The Zest

"Pretty good. No that's that's throughout the year. Usually usually we get we get up to three harvests a year. At least I do but some of them are hit or miss. The fall is the one that I really count on every year the farthest you know I use honey extractor in that you can take the co- The frames our the comb you just cut the wax capping and and then it's a centrifuge spin them. The honey comes out and you save the comb and you give it right back to the bees and they repair any damage is they. Use It the question question over here told me Your name and where you're from and your question. Okay my name is I'm from clearwater and my question is how do you introduce produce kids to get involved with beekeeping or you know the I know for penelas beekeepers which would probably be the closest association for you. They actually have an April day on the fourth Saturday. They actually allow you to come in and put on a avail and gloves and allow the children to actually get in and look at the hive so there's opportunities for kids as well as long as you as a parent allow them to do that. Yeah and you can talk to. We have some people from the Tampa Bay at beekeeping unsure if they had the same thing as well they would have some ideas. They're they're over here. You can talk long opt out. We have another question over here. I'm Yvonne from Tampa and my question is Josh. You said. You're always looking for cones for your honeybees in. I was just wondering if you ever involve individual homeowners. Or they're always. If you need larger chunks I do have these on residential properties right now. I'm looking for larger properties because my my time with transportation eighteen is pretty much maxed out right now so right now I'm looking for larger properties where I can keep at least twelve colonies. Okay thank you do. You can also go out to to some of the facebook pages that Tampa Bay beekeepers and Pinellas beekeepers associated and have a facebook page and ask people there are beekeepers who are looking for for just individual land to do that with. I have a question. Do they do anything in like high schools where they you know. They do technical. Teach somebody how to fix a car to build a cabinet. Do they do anything with University of Florida. Now has actually created a beekeeping program. So it's now being a credited class but we also have schools that are doing keeping Hillsborough County as a beekeeper program that one of the teachers actually has put together so the students can go in and learn how to do beekeeping. There's a couple other schools now. If a school is to get involved they do you have to get a permit from us as from the state to have the bees on their facility but we have to looking determine where they're gonNA place the highs but yeah sure is something that can be done anymore questions. I don't really have a question but I'm a former beekeeper I live in Dunedin but my wife and I lived lived in eastern Pennsylvania previously and I kept peace for eleven years there but all the bad stuff. You just talked about happen to me. I'm sorry burl might. Of course you can't avoid those treated all the time The Foul Brood was the worst. I had to burn my eyes but I started all over again with new equipment and everything but I got out of it before we moved down here and haven't picked it up yet. So thank you. So there's a few things to learn to with Florida beekeeping versus up north no snow. Yeah we you mentioned three harvest. That's amazing because we we got a nice usually nice summer harvest in it in a smaller. What what we call the fall harvest for winter harvest? I which is for me. It was always almost non-existent chair. You'd WanNa give most of that to the bees to get through the rare feat feet feeding bees all winter into spring heavily feeding and then Treating for Mites all the time and splitting hives and so on and so forth interesting. Thanks great questions and other one over here. Hi I'm Marco just two questions if you can't control where the beasts go How can you you say this is a blueberry honey orange blossom just by the permanent of the main taste of it and also Would all spraying the homeowners do and Commercial Mersal forums does any of those pesticides get into Ronnie. Yes I love that question. Actually thank you for asking it So to be a single source honey which which is where you get your blueberry or orange blossom honey the bees half to collect nectar from about fifty at least fifty one percent of what they're collecting from when a B- actually chilly leaves. It's hive you've probably heard of the little waggled dance on A. B.. They actually go out. And once they've determined a good food source they're going to go back can tell the rest of the hive and they're going to go back to that food source but to get a single source most often. The beekeepers are moving their bees to that location where the farmer has the blueberry patch or the orange grove or in our case. We've got a lot of other different crops that the the beekeepers will actually place the hives near that now. Yes they do have have some concerns with the pesticides that are being used on the crops. The beekeepers and the farmers really are trying to work closely together and those are some of the things that the status are trying to do as well as educate some of the farmers to be planting things that will attract the bees but also learning. When and when not to spray we pray at night the beezer inside? It's a better way to spray as well. So there's a lot of different things that can be done another question over here. What are some ways that we can incorporate honey and I as the byproducts of bees or not just honey but I guess be be wax and things that I can give give a boost to the be keeping industry? You know whether it's just replacing sugar with honey or using be wax thanks for candle wax. Or what are some ways that we can support beekeeping as consumers. Yeah I think anything you do as far as buying products that come from. Bees is ultimately supporting the beekeeping industry. Inside I know for my family. We've really cut out process the sugars. We use honey and just about everything as a sweetener. I switch with my coffee. I've every morning I instead of putting sugar I put honey in it. And then with the beeswax. He's wax. My wife makes a lot of great body products like hand soaps and lotions and lip bombs and uses the beeswax that we produce as a natural solidify on those so so any. Anything you're doing that's using the bees products they make that's going to be supporting beekeepers and in In really without beekeepers. We don't have honeybees in this in this country by your honey from local beekeepers. Okay well thank you also watch your being here. We want to remind you that we are on facebook and instagram at the best podcasts. So we'll be posting some of these pictures later who want to give a big thank you to our sponsor site and Bhakkar Walker and we want to give a huge thank you to green bench meet insider and Tampa Bay beekeepers for coming here with samples. This has been so much fun. Such a treat. Thank you all so much for coming. It's been a great day go B.'s you can find all of our stories about honey and honeybees at W. USF Jeff Dot org slash honeybees. Thanks so much for listening. Subscribe to the Zest is free. And it's easy. You can search for US wherever you get your podcast ask or at the zest. PODCAST DOT COM. I'm Robin Sesing Ham. Delia Cologne and I produced zest with help from Megan Trimble Markes as and Craig. George possessed is a production of W U._S._F. Public Media..

Tampa Bay facebook clearwater Tampa Hillsborough County US University of Florida Dunedin Jeff Dot Robin Sesing Ham burl Delia Cologne Florida Ronnie Josh George Megan Trimble Markes Bhakkar Walker Pennsylvania instagram
"robin sesing" Discussed on The Zest

The Zest

27:45 min | 2 years ago

"robin sesing" Discussed on The Zest

"Barbecue is all about feel and touching your eyes it's not an exact science so training people some people get it some people don't I'm Robin Sesing Ham and this is the best citrus when it comes to the threats to honeybees environmental active this say pesticides are public enemy number one but scientists say it's complicated our special honeybee reporting project continues with look at the many dangers faced by honeybees plus this pitmasters champ and food show veteran brings her star power to Tampa we meet of the devil pig restaurant come meet us in person the death will.

Robin Sesing Ham Tampa
"robin sesing" Discussed on Florida Matters

Florida Matters

09:35 min | 2 years ago

"robin sesing" Discussed on Florida Matters

"This is Florida matters. I'm Robin Sesing. Ham Mass transit in Tampa Bay's densely-populated big cities grabs the headlines but there's a case to be made that transportation has even more of an impact on people living in rural areas where it plays a part in we have in our studio today Ron Piontek the planning zoning director for Hernando County Tom Phillips Executive Director of polk counties citrus connection and Dave Hutchinson Executive Director of the Sarasota Manatee Metropolitan Planning Organization Asian thank you all for being here so ron to describe the demographics of the people generally living in the he's out of the way rural areas that were addressing sure so we're talking about Hernando County Population Fernando counties one hundred eighty seven thousand we do have an urbanized area which is about one hundred fifteen thousand so when we're talking about the kind of people that are living in rural areas Tom describe older people veterans so it's it's it's diverse makeup so I'm from Polk County have approximately six hundred twenty six thousand individuals we have seventeen municipalities but the largest of our cities is Lakeland Florida which is only a hundred and eighteen thousand so sixteen of disabilities are are much more rural where the seventh poorest suburban area in the United States Seventeen point seven percent of our population is at or below the poverty line and and were largely agricultural had been hit hard by the citrus greening so in our rural transportation we see many individuals who are able to take advantage of the transportation disadvantaged program that's a program that is unique to the state of Florida and it is for those who are at or below the poverty line regardless of where they live in the state of Florida and they're able to utilize transportation for a variety of reasons in polk county that's limited to Nicole or medical related Robin because the need is so great just to get people to medical appointments that we are unable due to capacity issues to open that up the larger trip purposes like employment so Dave Tom described a high a high poverty population in parts of Polk County are you see being that same kind of thing in parts of Sarasota Manatee that you're serving in parts yes in to the percent of the overall population probably not not as much however the same issue with transportation disadvantage programme funding exists in Sarasota Manatee and probably statewide I suspected it's tougher in the rural areas and in rural parts of Sarasota Manatee county's because the trips are longer one of the challenges that we haven't poked with the program and I don't know few gentlemen see the same thing. The transportation disadvantage does have a mild invasive financial assessment that's required so there are many citizens that could utilize tation disadvantaged but they're just not comfortable sharing their financial information with you the transit system or what they perceive to be the government so that's a barrier that we have to spend a lot of time with seniors and folks and transportation disadvantaged to let them know this is something that they can share with us that's comfortable that will be kept confidential so tom it's a one percent sales tax increase that the that the Hillsborough County voters passed to fund transportation. I was going to ask you what went through your head when you saw that because I know you tried very hard for polk county to pass something similar so we're very excited for the Citizens Hillsborough and Polk County we did have to tation referenda we had the two thousand ten effort which was a half cent sales tax for public transportation that failed sixty forty so in our infinite wisdom we decided to go for full penny for transportation or half a cent would go towards roadway infrastructure and the other half cent would go towards public transportation unfortunately that failed seventy thirty Worse and so we understand that the taxpayers are comfortable with the level of funding for public transportation within polk county so since then we've consulted dated all of our transit into the citrus connection we've been able to return over six hundred thousand dollars to the Polk County Board of county commissioners while delivering the same level of service are Johnny has made additional investments with that money on the east side of the county so in the law from an area as well as the twenty seven corridor which has rural community such as Avin port and Lake Hamilton they've received public transportation in the fixed route system for the first time and to put that in context for your listeners the town of Gamble Tin only has one thousand three hundred eighty two people and they have public transportation so we had to get creative with our funding but we have seen and is we've asked municipalities to help fund public transportation we have unfortunately seen to rural areas that have abandoned public transportation the city of Eagle AAC was unable to afford their local match so Eagle Lake Florida no longer has public transportation and last year unfortunately the city of frost proof Florida was unable to afford their local match for their funding so well because Eagle Lake this I think is right next to winter haven piggyback onto that but Ross proof kind of out there on its own it is and so for us proof had six runs of the boss of the fixed route service and also the Ad Para Transit Sir Bruce and their local match was thirty eight hundred dollars for us to be able to provide public transportation that money was in the budget the the city budget but the city commission felt that there was a value proposition with public transportation and even though folks came and talked about how they use the System ultimately frost proof said he commissioned decided that the transportation disadvantaged system would be enough for their residents Dave you're the director of what's called the Metropolitan Planning Organization we're talking about world transportation so does most of your time gets spent on transportation manning for the cities and do you feel like rural areas might get left out of the mix in the urbanized areas we have at least some level of luke transportation services available for people to get to and from work and when you're in the more spread out parts of Sarasota Manatee and and the rural counties of the state I think it's very challenging for someone who's Lou lives sort of out in the country so to speak to get to work if they aren't able to drive ever car or they have a an issue with their car so Ron Hernando just put money into extending the bus service we did and me kind of describe the situation in Hernando county a little bit because it it's a little bit different than what we've been talking about with with Tom and Dave we do again we do have an urbanized area so we have a fixed route and we recently expanded service to include Saturday service and extended the hours of operation for the fixed route I just want to ask what do you mean by fixed route fixed route is the bus is on a prescribed route with prescribe stops people know where the stops are typical that you would see in an urban area typical door to door not door to door but we do provide a complementary door to door service that averages about thirteen two thousand to sixteen thousand trips a year as opposed to our fixed route which is about one hundred forty thousand trips per year right now there's a nonprofit mid Florida community services that provides the rural transportation service and it's important that they integrate and we integrate together so that they can get people into urban areas into the route so they can get to shopping and doctors that that actually brings up land use and I guess I would stick my neck out here and say that that has our rural areas develop and land and you land uses change it's important that some clustering of uses be allowed onto occur because then you are able to provide you know a a some sort of service to a cluster of doctors offices for sampler medical facilities which in Florida will always be important when you have cluster development and planned development than you're much your transportation Kevin can achieve efficiencies. Yeah that makes a lot of sense Tom absolutely because I think robin the one of the over simplification that I see and I think is the elephant in the room for all of us yes in the rural communities in the in the rural sections of our counties is that Goober and lift our somehow the solution for everyone however when look at going from Haines city Florida to Winter Haven Florida to your job may be at Legoland you're looking at possibly eighteen gene or sixteen dollars Uber ride each way and if you're earning fifteen or twenty dollars an hour then you're not taking home eight hour paycheck you're taking home a six hour paycheck and so I think that there's this over-simplification for those of us that live in urban areas when we go on vacation and we say wow buber was so.

Florida Robin Sesing Dave Tom polk county Polk County Hernando County Sarasota Manatee county Sarasota Manatee Metropolitan Manatee polk Executive Director Ron Piontek tom it Hillsborough County Sarasota Haines city Florida Tom Phillips Tampa Bay Dave Hutchinson
"robin sesing" Discussed on Florida Matters

Florida Matters

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"robin sesing" Discussed on Florida Matters

"Your buster buster og llano gary moore mieno. Oh is a retired history professor from the university of south florida still teaching a class on food and history gary. Thank you so much for being with me delighted to be here. Thanks you're listening to florida matters. I'm robin sesing ham. We asked listeners to share their comments about seafood and heard from robert king on facebook who echoed some of what gary mormino said he wrote what was once and almost unlimited seafood resources being fought over by competing interests and said red states unwillingness to manage growth and destruction of the natural environment depletes the availability of seafood for all groups. We also got an email from steve steve davies who argues that with red tide and other harms threatening marine ecosystems and animals. It's reckless and cruel for humans to eat seafood at all well. Many people are still eating plenty of seafood for now but there are efforts underway in our area to make the industry more environmentally sustainable. We'll hear more about about that after a short break. I'm robin sesing him. We'll be right back. This is florida matters. I'm robin sussing ham. We're talking about our state seafood industry. Just before the break we heard from food historian gary more me know about the types of fish floridians eight in the past and how development and pollution affected some of our sealife now. I'm speaking with ed child. The son of the late governor lawton child's is the owner of several seafood restaurants the sandbar in anna maria korea beach house in bradenton beach mar vista dockside in longboat key. He's also a big proponent of keeping florida's seafood industry sustainable and local l. Ed thanks for being here real pleasure to be here with you. Tell me about.

florida steve steve davies gary mormino gary moore ed robin sesing gary university of south florida robin sussing anna maria korea beach house professor facebook longboat key robert king bradenton lawton
"robin sesing" Discussed on Florida Matters

Florida Matters

13:44 min | 3 years ago

"robin sesing" Discussed on Florida Matters

"We need your voice and reach out to your alumni, and your other constituency to say, call your Representative make your voice heard. Heard and president Genshaft has been really good at doing that. An anti a strong president in terms of someone who can be that spokesperson for the university to get out in front of the cameras and say, hey public, we need help. Help us out here and people reacted. This is Florida matters. I'm Robin Sesing ham, and we're talking about university of south Florida. President Judy Genshaft who's retiring after nineteen years, I'm here in the studio with USF assistant news directors Steve newborn, and Mark Schreiner and you probably also know, Mark from the long running university beat which has been covering US f people and events for ever. For many years. So Mark, you recently interviewed president, gin shafir university beat about her retirement. Let's hear a portion of that conversation. Now it's time to leave when you're on the top I was reviewing all that had occurred during this year, but it was from the work from years before, from a billion dollar campaign for a young university like ours to preeminence, which was phenomenal to five beta Kappa to what we received from the American Council, and education, which was the transformational award. You mentioned a lot of the successes. Are there other things that you feel maybe in terms of community presence, that has been increased the economic engine? That is USF that have been on that list of accomplishments for you as well. Absolutely. We have increased our affects in terms of. Economic development and impact that we make well over four point four billion dollars every year, we know that the patents that we produce this one of the largest in Florida and in the United States is well, we know that the students setting up corporations and the faculty that setup corporations is huge every year starting the National Academy of inventors was brilliant, because this now attracts people from all over the world who didn't have a place to talk to one another about invention. What are the things that you wish you had accomplished or you would've liked to have done if you had another year or two, well, they're always more accomplishments to achieve. It's like being on a ladder and you hit a certain rung, and you say okay, now it's time for the next, but we've hit such a point that we're now. And in new era the competition that we have nationally is at a different level. So it means we have to work even harder. They're always new markers that we need to achieve, whether it's the American research library association. We still are nine in that, but we will be this year. We did get five beta Kappa, all American Association of universities. Have a five beta Kappa chapter. Now, we do is well, if you had to pick one specific achievement that really was the pinnacle for the work that you did hear what do you think it would be? I truly believe that having the title of preeminence shed that we are among the top three universities in the state, and our students success is superlative. Our research is number two in the state public or private our economic development where in a great location and just be a part. Of all the good work that has been done move. It for what are you going to miss the most about the university? A lot oh, I'm passionate about the university, and I will always want to maintain the good relationships and friendships, that I've developed, but more than that. I really and truly want to see the university of south Florida become more and more prestigious more and more open to our community in make a difference. I'll flip the coin. What are you going to miss, the least? There are times when it's extraordinarily stressful. And not having that high of a level of stress will be nice. What's next, we love this area. So we're staying in Tampa Bay. There's no question about it. You have to stay tuned is to what's next. I don't think that I'll just sit at home at all. That's not who I am. But it's a crew change in a look and see what kind of opportunities become available. And if not, I'll make some happen, are there things that you regret or decisions that you wish you would have made differently that now you have the opportunity to just kind of look back at and go, maybe I could have done that differently. Well, you know, the presidency and leadership positions are filled with highs and lows. I often say presidency is like a roller coaster ride. Tremendous highs and there there are some pretty definite lows as well. And you just have to ride that through and make sure that you never lose focus on. Your goals, I've seen you mainly that first day of class, greeting students at the Marshall center, greeting students at the other campus is making them. Feel welcome at the university. What do you think that first day of school in August of twenty nineteen is going to be like for you? I'll be una cruise ship. I'll be having fun. Good answer. What advice do you have for your successor? Stephen Krell, be yourself, do what you believe to be right. Make sure you keep preeminence, in all the metrics in front of you, and keep the university of south Florida on the positive trajectory, and go forth and be strong. What message would you have for the students the faculty, the staff, the alumni of the university of south Florida continued to show your bowl pride, and always look at the future stay focused on your goals? Last question when you took this job in two thousand did you envision yourself? Eighteen years later at a preeminent university, still leading it and getting ready to step down. If you look at my inaugural speech, I used the word preeminent institution. I'm not sure I envisioned it quite the way it is right now. But I. I had that vision that we could really make a difference here. And we could really actualize the potential that I saw at the university. We've come a long way. Do you think it's a coincidence, Mark that she waited until the university achieved preeminence a preeminent ranking from the state before she resigned that was a big deal? I can definitely see why preeminence was something that she had pushed foreign, she when I asked her it's, it's definitely one of the top three or four things that you checks off our list in terms of greatest accomplishments at USF, I was personally surprised the timing of her retirement, the announcement, its up timber of last year, only because of the idea that consolidation was still in the works consolidation needs to be attained by July of twenty twenty so the new president even during the interview process for a new president. But how we now know Stephen corral, but at the time everyone who was interviewed for that job said my number one priority coming in is making sure that one consolidation goes well to that pre. Eminence is maintained after consolidation and that was what president Genshaft said as well should be the number one priority of corral, so she's leaving a little bit undone. She is a little bit one thing that she wanted to get done that she never was able to get done, and it's based more along the lines of the, the, the factors of how to become a member of the American Association of universities. It's a small club only sixty two universities around the US and Canada are members and it shows that you are a research university, the goal for a long time as USF joining that one of the things that she kind of feels that she left on the table that she couldn't get done. So what about Judy Genshaft s- role in the greater community? I mean, university of south Florida is a big university. She's had a big impact. Obviously, she's been really busy. But can either have you comment on what her role has been to the greater Tampa Bay community? I think it, it talks about the role of how USF grew in the community. The idea now that it's has a four almost a four and a half billion dollar annual economic impact on Tampa Bay in the region. It's unbelievable. You see the growth of all, three campuses, Sarasota, manatee is looking at adding residence halls as well as other buildings USF, Saint Petersburg, continues to make that transition from being a commuter school to a resident hall school, where students, live and study, Tampa, probably in Steve, you can attest to this someone who went here in the nineteen eighties that it was. A commuter school at the time and now ten thousand students living on campus. Yeah. Steve talk about talk about the changes that you've seen since you were a young boy. I'm going to give away my age here by going back that far. But when I started in the, the early eighties, this was a I think we have maybe a third of the students that are here now it was rather laconic place, where people came to, you know lounge by the pool. They called it the university of sun and fon bottle, cap you because there is a brewery, right down the street that was really the only business here at the time. I mean you risk getting sand, Spurs walking across campus because there was nothing there, but, you know, dirt and sand and many palm trees like they have now and it was really a place where people who warrant so academically inclined came to school here, I'm probably giving myself away. Unlike today, where you have to have a, you know, four point plus GPA to get in. And when I came back to. Work here came back in two thousand one a few years later, and I didn't recognize the place. It was like my school had gone on steroids amazing growth, and even since then I mean I came a few months after president Genshaft assume the presidency and since then you can't even recognize it from from that period. I mean we've probably grown by four times the number of buildings here is incredible. You ge- and that coincides with not only president in Chaffetz rain for lack of a better word, but also the board of trustees taking affect the border. Trustees was established just before she came, and they're really put a focus as Mark can tell you on fundraising, and reaching out to the community as opposed to the old board of regents, which was more of an academically inclined board. And so, you know, we have become so focused on fundraising since. The board of trustees was established here and president gen chap really has fit that Bill quite well. And one of the things that was a goal of hers, that was attained probably about two and a half years ago or so was the idea of the unstoppable campaign, which was to raise a billion dollars in fundraising for the university. USF is one of only three schools ever to attain that one billion dollar fundraising Mark for university that's under I believe a hundred years old, and the other two are out in the university of California system. So it's, it's that idea that the growth came with this need for funding. And that funding has come in and she brought in some big gifts. The names Moumouh Moumouh or Sanni Sita Peterman, ital- Patel. And this also one of the things that she has been very good about is giving credit to her staff, and the people that around her and the people that they brought in one of the people who doesn't who doesn't get the credit at least publicly that he should is Joel Momberg, who's the head of the US foundation, who's in charge of fundraising, and I will make the argument because Joel retires later this year as well. Is that the loss of Joel Momberg? Is going to mean as much to the university of south Florida as the loss of Judy Genshaft? That is Mark Schreiner assistant news director at WSF and longtime producer of university beat, and Steve, newborn is here. Also, WSF assistant news, director and reporter. Thank you guys very much for being here. That's it for today's show you can tweet us at Florida matters. Florida matters is a production of WSF public media. The engineer is George goven. The show is produced by Stephanie Columbanus. I'm Robin sussing ham. Thanks for listening..

USF university of south Florida president Mark Schreiner president Genshaft Florida Steve newborn American Association of univer Tampa Bay gin shafir university United States Judy Genshaft Joel Momberg Robin Sesing WSF Representative American Council university of sun
"robin sesing" Discussed on Florida Matters

Florida Matters

13:42 min | 3 years ago

"robin sesing" Discussed on Florida Matters

"This is Florida matters. I'm Robin Sesing ham. It's the end of an era at the university of south Florida after nineteen years as the president of USF, Judy Genshaft is stepping down today on Florida matters. We're talking about the highs and lows of president gin Chaffetz long tenure. I'm going to say at the outset that Florida matters and USF public media is based at the university of south Florida and received support from USF but is editorially independent with me in the studio is Mark Schreiner assistant news director at W, USF, and longtime, producer of university vit. He's been reporting on the university of south Florida for many years, highmark. I Robin, thanks for having me, and Steve newborn WS assistant news director and reporter, Steve attended USF as a student in the eighties. So he seen a lot of changes to the university over the years. Hey Steve glad to be here. Well, nineteen years that is an unusually long time for one person to remain a college president, isn't it? I mean, what's been her secret to her staying power, do you think Mark thinks this thing is Robin nineteen years? I think she passed Jon Allen is the longest tenured president of USF about five years ago, Jon Allen, the first president of the university. And what I think, really worked well, for president Genshaft is that she was always a cheerleader for the university, the joke that has been going around particularly for the last year, but it was very noticeable every speech she ever gives and I mean, you probably wouldn't like someone asks her, you know, paper or plastic. She probably says paper and then she throws in a go bulls at the end. Making that the bowl logo. Yes. Which should I'm surprised one of her hands isn't, you know, posed. An but, but she's, she's a huge like I said, a huge cheerleader for the university while at the same extent a job like that you need to be politically, astute, you need to work with not just a board of trustees who you answer to, but you work well, with city legislators, and of course, with the US F system. You're not just talking Tampa. You're talking Saint Petersburg, you're talking Sarasota manatee. You're talking Polk County with lakeland in polytechnic for a while there. And then state lawmakers because of course it's a state university. It gets funding from the state, and she was very much into a strengthening those relationships and keeping strong bonds with those lawmakers and powers that be in the community constituency. It's a big university. Do you know how many people it's actually? And that's the other thing that that is really being trumpeted now is the idea. Of the growth that took place in the two decades under, again shaft, you know enrollment growing by forty percents. Oh my God. Yeah. Yeah. Right now, I want to say realize that yeah, that's the thing is that just the growth in terms of students. I want to say between the US F system. It's in the neighborhood of now, fifty thousand students on the three campuses of USF Tampa, Saint Pete, and Sarasota manatee, and then another thirty thousand staff and faculty, Mark talk a little bit about her background. She was a professor, I guess she started out, yet, she actually went to university of Wisconsin Madison, social work and psychology. And then she really focused in on school counseling when she got her graduates, and doctorate at Kent state university, and the, the focus, there was how schools reached out to students and you saw that more and more throughout her tenure with the honors college back when she started in two thousand USF's honors college wasn't even a college. It was an honors program at the time. Quickly. She wanted to set it up as a college brought in directors to run it as a college, and now the last probably the last thing that she's going to be best known for is this twenty million dollar gift to create an honors college that will bear her name, twenty million dollar gift from her and her husband. Stephen Greenbaum for this college, that's going to expand to about five thousand students, and at that ceremony in may, when she talked about the gift, one of the things she stressed was the idea that this was something that she has always been about from her education days from her days in college of focusing in add student achievement. All right. So you mentioned Mark that she came on board as president of university of south, Florida and the year two thousand and Steve, she got kind of off to a rocky start. She became president in July two thousand the next year. We had nine eleven and then soon after that the admit. Station suspended a professor by the name of Sami Al Aryan, and this was a national brouhaha and you were were reporting on that at the time, right Semioli, Iran was a professor. He started a group called wise the world in Islam institute at USF L on came under investigation by an independent documentarian by the name of Steve Emerson, who basically accused wise of being a front for a group called Palestinian Islamic Jihad, which was later declared a terrorist group, by the United States government, the month after nine eleven you gotta remember emotions were running really, really high and Ari on when on the Bill O'Reilly show, the O'Reilly factor on FOX and a Riley, basically ambushed him. And people were phoning in death threats bombing threats against USF so Genshaft and the new university board of trustees. You gotta remember the board of trustees had just been established. Replacing the longtime board of regents here, and it was a group of basically business people who are running the university. Just a lot of disruption at this time disruption they came to an agreement that they were going to fire him. They didn't actually do it at the time. And this created a firestorm of controversy from professors, who believe that the university should be a beacon of academic freedom. This became a national even international issue, and it really didn't come to a head until L Aryan wasn't died about the federal government about a year later, and they quieted down a lot of people who were defending him became silent at that point, because it looked like okay. They had reasons beside freedom of speech. They had reasons to suspend him. And you've got to remember back then the image of the university took a really big hit of we, we were being called jihad. You really a nationally. We're getting getting to be embarrassing. Yeah. Rodney plot of bad press. So Steve, you're. Reporting on this story of Al Arian and the university of south Florida, at the time and we have some archival tape of Judy Genshaft at the time. This university has been through a great deal and it's, it's hurt the university, and it's been very difficult for us. And I believe that, that severing all ties of this misuse of our university is a very important step. This university is larger than this particular case. So she did, so she survived that she went on, but then Mark, she did have some run ends after that with faculty. And again, you're going to have that, that, that push and pull at any university, where faculty and administration bump heads. Whether you're talking a pay issues or tenure or things like that, one of the big arguments at USF, which is a big argument in higher education in general, right now is the use of adjunct faculty, which are. Professors and instructors who, don't get a tenure don't get benefits in many cases are poorly paid are working basically part time jobs, as a full-time basis. So that has long been an argument anytime that's Genshaft salary came up the idea that she was at one point in time, the seventh highest paid public university presidents in the country as of two thousand sixteen seventeen academic year, that argument always was, you know what about the faculty. What about the adjuncts how you paying them? But again, it's an industry wide issue right now recently, the university decided to consolidate all of its branch campuses, and this caused quite a bit of concern among people in Saint Petersburg, especially where USF Saint Petersburg, is located. I'm going to put the disclaimer on that of the university may have decided it, it may have been decided outside the university that USF was going to consolidate. There's a lot of. Speculation on who really came up with this idea was it Representative crisp rolls, a USF alum based out of palm harbor. Was it president shafter self? She has been quoted multiple times as saying that she had heard talk about consolidation being an idea, but she was surprised when the state legislature put it in a proposal. But again, you know that there's never really been a definitive answer of whose idea it was as far as I know. But the concern was for years. And this again, predates president Genshaft, the idea of Saint Petersburg, and Sarasota manatee wanting more autonomy, maybe even at some point, separating and becoming their own colleges, while again, the state's nest necessarily was going to allow that, but the campus is ended up with a lot more atonomy under consolidation. Some of that on Tommy is going to be taken back some of that's going to. End up in the hands of Tampa. What comes with consolidation though is more money for those regional campuses. And what a lot of university officials are praising is the idea that a student now can enroll at Sarasota manatee can enroll at Saint Petersburg, and end up taking the same classes that they can take on the Tampa campus. So kind of keeping them as as strong branch campuses with their own identity. But at the same idea, making those programs cross borders across the three, I think one thing that probably in the back of president in Chaffetz mind. This whole thing was the, the lesson of what happened to the USF lakeland campus USF had a joint campus with Polk munity college for many years, and after the started bursting at the seams, literally, they USF wanted to build a branch campus. USF polytechnic is what it was called and somewhere along the line a very. Powerful politician by the name of GD, Alexander who was speaker of the house at the time is very big landowner a Polk County as well. He decided that he wanted to make this a separate campus and he used his considerable political will to basically cleave this off of the us system. And it became Florida polytechnic. It's now this beautiful building with, well, it's university state university. Right. The, the beautiful building this right on I four. But that had to be in the back of her mind. The lesson there of how to keep these branch campuses in Sarasota and Saint Petersburg in the USF or breaking off. And I thought, you know, people who are involved in that very bitter, fight must have also been thinking, well look what happened to the branch campuses. After all good thing, we went ahead and became an independent university that was one big fight that Judy Genshaft ended up losing, when USF lakeland, which became USF polytechnic. It's split that was in two thousand twelve that was that. Must have been quite a rough time. I'm not going to necessarily say that they lost because what ended up happening after, you know, USF losing. Yes, the polytechnic campus which I'm sure was a loss for the university. What happened then was the budget deal? The budget battle that immediately followed that in early. Twenty twelve where JD Alexander basically is the guy who controlled the pen and control the money was going to say, you know, what USF you fought me on this. I'm gonna punish you and he was looking at cutting funding for the university somewhere in the neighborhood of one hundred and twenty eight million dollars. I mean that is like taking a blow torch to a university. That's almost a fifty percent budget cut at the time. And I remember there was a lot of talk about salaries being cut. So it was affecting people in personal level, a lot of angst around, there was and again, that, that goes all the way from faculty down to, how's it going affect students classes. We're talking about being caught, and you saw something similar when? Then preeminence happened with the university preeminence being a mercury get into that. But just as an explanation, a metric system that the state sets up that allows for extra funding for schools that reach these levels at a point in time when USF looked like it was going to attain preeminence, in join Florida and Florida state's the goalposts got moved, and I had the opportunity to watch the board of trustees and president Genshaft at that time rally the troops, and they did something similar with this budget battle back in two thousand twelve and this is again, that political animal that political power that a president needs to use is to reach out to the community to reach out to not just your board of trustees, but businesses around the community to reach out to lawmakers in the community to reach out to power brokers and say, we need a hand..

USF president Genshaft president Steve Emerson Mark Schreiner Sarasota US Florida Saint Petersburg USF L university of south Florida Tampa university state university university of Wisconsin Madiso Kent state university Polk County professor Robin Sesing JD Alexander
"robin sesing" Discussed on Florida Matters

Florida Matters

10:39 min | 3 years ago

"robin sesing" Discussed on Florida Matters

"This is Florida matters. I'm Robin Sesing ham. We know Florida is home to over five hundred kinds of invasive species. They aren't always scary pythons though, sometimes they're cute monkeys or parakeets, but they can do harm to Florida's native flora and fauna and lots of time and money is spent fighting them. How are we doing in this battle? We have with us today to people in the trenches in this fight against invasive species in Florida. John Humphrey is a wildlife biologist with the USDA national wildlife research, centers, Florida field station in Gainesville and Todd. Campbell is an associate professor of biology at the university of Tampa. Thank you, both for being here. Thank you for having us. Thank you. So John, when animals are nuisances or they caused property damage. Your organization is the one that looks into it. What while 'Services mission is to mitigate wildlife damage issues, whether that be wildlife, and people, well, if an agriculture, while life in wildlife in the case of say, predators, taking dangerous species eggs or whatnot, so on the research side, that I work on we, we worked to develop the tools, techniques or improve upon those that already exist to, to better help our operational staff. Out there and take care of some of these problems now, I think a lot of people may not even be aware. USDA is involved in this research involving native birds, not, not just invasive species, but native birds, such as vultures and crows parents problem, and then non native species, like feral, pigs Burmese pythons black. Spiny. Tailed iguanas, monk, parakeets and other invasive species. Just correct. Okay, Todd Campbell, I spoke to you last. It was a few years ago when the Argentine Tegel was just starting to make some real inroads in this area round Tampa Bay. What's happened since then the species Argentine black, and white to curse sort of east of Tampa Riverview. This is a large lizard up to five feet long. It's a top predator. So we knew about this problem for probably a decade before we really started working on it, and, and twenty twelve I was able to get some funding. To start. At least figuring out if we could trap, the animals, and I hired a biologist to do this number of biologists, actually, and we caught about forty animals. The first year we caught another forty. I think the second year we worked on them catching forty take us in the whole river. Riverview area doesn't seem like a lot. Really doesn't seem like a terrible problem. Plus, people like taggers they liked to keep them as pets. They do on, but my experience from not only the Tegas, but the invasive Nile monitor in Cape, coral, those people are frightened, and even to the point of terrified of these things, sometimes so, both of these species are large enough that they are disconcerting at the very least to somebody finds one in their yard and usually they want to, you know, have them trapped and removed because their perception is that they're going to eat or Parma pet in the Riverview area. There's a lot of agricultural. There's a lot of chickens. And so the Tegas they do like bird eggs, a lot. And that's actually how we catch them. That's how we trapping, we use chicken eggs as bait. And so, you know, anyone that has a chicken coop or even just has a couple of pet chickens that they like to get X from those animals, and particularly here eggs, and certainly any chicks would be extreme risk from these, so for the most part, these animals are not desirable to the people that live in Cape coral or or. How is the problem is it gotten worse? I mean, have you stopped trapping have you gone onto other things? Do you know what's going on with the tag is the person that I hired back in twenty twelve Tessie after she has continued working on this, and there's a couple of hundred animals and in the box now and that's not a lot. We were not in where close to managing or certainly, not anywhere near radically in this population. So even after all this time we're still in a information phase and we've just finished the analysis for the diet of these lizards and Riverview. And we're going to present those findings, and, you know, I'll, I'll just go ahead and say, reveal it now that because a lot of people already know this, we've found gopher tortoises and their and their stomachs, and go for tortoises are endangered will there danger there. They are protected, so there there listed as. Something eating the gopher tortoise. So this, this is one of the things that really concerned the most was finding a listed species, and their stomachs. And so now I guess the next strategy would be to try to instigate support and funding for an effort to manage them. I think it'd be really hot manage the Teigen, sorry. I think it would be really hard to radically them just because of the, the nature of the landscape. It's a rural area an agricultural area. The density of residents is pretty low and access can be difficult. And there's also a lot of sort of natural areas, interspersed amongst the humanity. That's there. So finding a place to trap them is difficult at best little different in Cape coral, which is a completely urban residential area. And it's a lot of canals and roads and it's very easy to navigate very easy to move around and assess in a wear. The lizards are. And how the traps are working. But hey coral, you've really been trying to catch the Nile monitor. Yes. Right. Which I think is more dangerous. Yes. In my opinion, it is, we, we don't have any gopher tortoises in their stomachs, yet that I know of, and we've caught over five hundred fifty of them down there, I've been working on this project since two thousand three so people been bitten by. Well, I have on camera on National Geographic. I think it was. Yeah. Did it hurt? And it was a little one, but these things aren't really in neither of the takers, they're not really dangerous to people. That's not something that we really worry about. I know I know the public does. But my experience with not only the takers, but particularly the monitor's, they're really, really wary and very hard to approach. In fact, I've only got a couple of decent pictures of them in the sixteen years, I've been working on, so you're down there walking along canal and you hear a noise fifty meters away, and they're gone, and they splash into the canal, and that's kinda the gist of it. So we have had people with them in their garages that perceive the animal as being threatening. But generally after interviewing that person it seems pretty obvious that the animals just trying to get away. And it was basically feeling like it was cornered. So I don't think there's a threat to people really unless you mess wasn't like somebody trying to get one out of their pool. If you hand grab one of these. They're going to they're going to try to bite you in there. They're very good at it. We've had those geckos like Indonesian geckos that also get really echoes. Okay. Get. And they kinda growl God, they do. They say their name, they say Tokyo. Yeah. They do that. Really loudly and animal, they get sixteen eighteen inches long. They're stab on Davis islands as well. They're establishing lakeland, Florida. And I guess that's an invasive species, too. So John is part of the problem that the animals come to Florida and they leave their natural predators behind. They really don't have any threats when they get there, and they just breed like crazy. Yeah. That's typically the case kind of depends on the size of the species, and where they are in the food chain, the, you know, some, the smaller things usually can be taken up by wading birds and things like that, or the native predators. But once you start getting into things that can grew really large Burmese, python, or some of these now monitors of which I've had one that was over five feet in really impressive animal. They do lack their native predators. And they are. Able to fill environmental niches that other animals or less adapted to doing, and then can capitalize on the parade that those predators. They're displacing, Emily tried bringing. In other animals to eat those animals, invasive animals. Like how has that worked out has been done in a lot of places where, you know, they're trying to get rid of say, rats, and they bring in Mongoose, and then the mongo's become a problem, and that's sort of a common thing on some of the islands. I'm not aware of any predatory animals that we've brought into the US to take care of invasive species, you know, that's a problem that has happened in Australia as well as other places, and can create issues for sure, will the most significant example, or the most horrifying I should say example is the cane toad both in Australia. And in south Florida, they were actually introduced to eat a beetle that they don't eat. They were originally called the, the marine. Towed, and they were sort of renamed the cane toad after a gentleman back in the thirties decided, it would be a good idea to put them in sugar cane fields in Australia in south Florida to deal with a invasive passed on sugar cane crops, and it just didn't work in the cane toads exploded in their population size and spread out geographically widely, and they occur, you know, all the way up north of Tampa here, even and of course, they're spreading across Australia, and having devastating effects over there to not only native wildlife, but people's pets as well. Because if got very toxic substance in their parotid glands that when dog or a cat grabs them or bites them, they will Zude this white latex, like substance, which is very toxic. And it can kill a medium, even a large sized dog. And so you see these things spreading through the landscape and you can almost tell where they are from from veterinary records. But it's not as big of a problem to native species here, but in Australia, the native monitor lizards, and snakes as well are in great trouble from these things, it's killing them, and there's

Florida John Humphrey Todd Campbell Australia Cape coral USDA university of Tampa Tampa Riverview Tampa Bay Robin Sesing Florida field station associate professor of biology south Florida Gainesville Parma Nile US Tampa Tessie
"robin sesing" Discussed on Florida Matters

Florida Matters

06:16 min | 3 years ago

"robin sesing" Discussed on Florida Matters

"This is Florida matters. I'm Robin Sesing ham. A new mayor of Tampa will be elected on April twenty third. The two remaining candidates, David stress and Jane castor, debated recently as the studios of W E you in Tampa on Friday, April fifth, we'll hear that debate on today's Florida matters. But first conversation with WSF USF Steve, newborn, who's been following this race. Hi steve. How're you doing Robin? Tell us how we got to this point. There was a big field of candidates running for Tampa mayor, the primary election pitted seven candidates, Jane cast the former police chief almost won the election outright. She nearly had the fifty percent plus one needed to win the election outright and David Strasbourg, whose name is on a lot of buildings here, including the performing arts center doesn't spend philanthropist entrepreneur. He came in second. He barely beat a couple of other candidates with about. About sixteen percent of the vote. So what are the major issues that the candidates have been talking about number one? And number two, I'm wondering if there were any issues that some of the other candidates were talking about that have kind of gotten dropped now that we're down to just two people. Right. There were so many candidates, seven candidates, they really had to create a niche for themselves. So some of these guess away of calling his peripheral topics came up during the primary, debates one of them was to for Morrison a businessman who came in last he put forth, the idea of having aerial gondolas built in the city plan would that be kind of the rooftop city called? It's very new urbanism. So obviously, that didn't come up, and one of the city council when it came in third place. Harry Cohen talked about climate change. You wouldn't think that on a local level that top of come up, but south Tampa is very low lying and rising sea levels are going to. Effect that peninsula I before anything else. So MacDill Air Force base is going to be affected. He mentioned raising the water and sewer pipes in that part of town as the sea level rises Ashby above water. Don't you much about that? So what we really been hearing about so far. The three main topics transportation which anybody who drives in this area at rush hour knows is close to gridlock. Affordable housing. The cost of housing has been rising exponentially in the city and the third topic is job creation, keeping the number of jobs coming into the city and reversing what has been a history of educated professionals, leaving say, college, and never come back. So reversing that pipeline. So what's been the mood of this race? Is it been pretty civil contentious? How would you describe clear, Robin? There's no love lost between these two David stress has been trailing pretty far in the polls, and he has. Taken the offensive, he's embarked on, what caster has decried as negative campaigning. He's taking her to task on, for instance, a statement that she made that crime was reduced in the city during her watch in the past twelve years, which includes more than her time as a police chief by seventy percent. He brought in so called experts to talk about that. And this is kind of set off a tete-a-tete between the two. He claims there false numbers. And she says they've gone through Florida Department of law enforcement, all sorts of official agencies. So that's one thing that has touched a raw nerve between the two, what criticism does she have of how she says that he doesn't have concrete answers when he's asked about the issues stresses come up with these campaign ads that have him, for instance, holding a broom saying is gonna sweep out the excess waste and fluff. He says he's gonna cut the city budget by ten percent. When you ask specifically, what he would cut. He said, well, when I go in office, we do an audit, and we find the fluff in waste. She's criticizing him for not having any specific answers to these questions. So the polls in the past have shown the Jane castor was way head. She was the clearcut favorite is that still the case and also what kind of turn out are they expecting? Castro has made a point of saying on the stump that only twenty percent of the people, one of every five voters voted in the primary, and she makes a point that this is a race from there and also a couple of city council races that affect people directly more directly than for president for governor for Senator, which always have bigger turnouts considers more of a buzz around that. So the thing is you can't really take the polls to heart this time because this more likely going to be less than that coming to the polls for the runoff. So whoever gets out the vote is going to have the clear advantage and stress has. A big money advantage. He's put several million dollars on money into this race. He's got a lot of ads. So it doesn't look like it's going to be such a clear cut outcome right now. That's W USF Steve, newborn, who's been covering the race for the mayor of Tampa, Steve. Thanks so much. Thank you Rohan, now, we'll hear the debate between Tampa mayoral candidates. Jane castor and David stress which took place at the studio of WVU public television on April fifth. The moderator is rob Laura of Florida this week. Tapa voters will choose their next mayor in the runoff election on Tuesday, April twenty third Albie asking number of questions, including, including several sent in on social media by members of the public. The candidates will also have a chance to ask each other question. And each closing statement to begin all ask each candidate a question. They'll have a minute to respond, if I think it answered needs a rebuttal, it will last thirty seconds, our first questions for both candidates, and we're going to start with Jane castor. And then David stressful answer to our streets are in gridlock during morning and after noon drive, tell us specifically what you would do in your first year in office to ease traffic congestion miss caster.

Jane castor Tampa David Strasbourg Robin Sesing Steve Florida MacDill Air Force Harry Cohen W E caster Morrison Ashby Rohan rob Laura Florida Department of law Albie WVU
"robin sesing" Discussed on Florida Matters

Florida Matters

05:31 min | 3 years ago

"robin sesing" Discussed on Florida Matters

"This Florida matters. I'm Robin Sesing ham alternative kinds of housing like shipping, containers or tiny houses are quickly getting more popular this week. We talk about whether they could help relieve some of the pressure from the affordable housing crunch. From the Donna studio at WSF public media. I'm Robin Sesing ham just before the new year. WSF produced a special report growing unaffordable, that looked at people here in Hillsborough county, who are finding it harder and harder to find a home. They can afford one of the questions that we wanna look at today is how do we think outside of that big box? What about tiny houses are vs or container homes here in the studio with us is Elizabeth strong associate professor at USF school of public affairs. Highlights Beth allow Mickey Jacobs, an architect with BG architects, and chairman of the Tampa downtown partnership, welcome. Mickey and Robert Cox is CEO of sun dog structures a maker of shipping container structures. Hi, robert. We're open. So Robert you make houses out of shipping containers. And not everybody's familiar with what that means. What that is. Can you describe it? Sure were us forty foot shipping containers that are eight feet wide, and we use the high cube containers that are nine six high. And so these are containers that are built overseas and filled with televisions and destined for stores and they take those containers, ship them to us. And then we have a team of welders and carpenters who take the containers apart in many ways, they cut out walls. They cut out windows and doors and those kinds of openings. And then we put them back together on site at Elizabeth Strom you and your work. I know you've looked a lot at urban planning and the arts and how that all relates so when the arts and culture, become more developed in an urban core than the downtown city becomes more desirable. Right. And then it becomes more expensive. So how do you see people like artists coping with that kind of a tension? Well. I think you raise a really interesting point when areas become more attractive, that's wonderful people wanna be there. But it also means that inevitably Lynn Costco up, and so you have issues of affordability and usually what happens is, as areas become more attractive than people who or no live there. Previously get pushed out into other areas. And so I think it's very important when we think about planning issues and think about places like the downtown to figure out how we're going to have diversity of population of people who can live there, whether they're artists, or just people who whose incomes aren't, great that we don't wanna have either ghettos, very poor people or areas that are exclusively for the very wealthy. I know Mickey Jacob, this is something that you think about in your role is the chairman of the Tampa downtown partnership. Tampa downtown partnership is working hard to make downtown Tampa more vibrant. But then there's a tension between development and inexpensive housing. We'll lose attention. Also with zoning requirements in the code requirements, too. What we're seeing right now is a push towards smaller unit. So micro unit apartments. We we actually my role as Tampa downtown partnership, we're looking at it from a philosophical standpoint in a planning standpoint, but my role at my firm is actually we're just doing a couple of projects right now. Let are micro unit projects downtown. One of them got killed by the city because of the parking requirements. So one of the challenges we have is that what you see is a unit. That's five hundred square feet to six hundred square feet is a very liveable unit. We can design those, and they're comfortable efficient and affordable, especially for young people. Whether it's artists whether service industry individuals, whether it's a young person, I hire of architecture school here at USF looking for ways that they can live in close to where they can work where they can walk and where the streetscape becomes living room so describe what micro unit is a studio apartment, what we would have gnarly studio apartment is at a condo or. Or is it a rental unit? What is most of my rental units? They're about, like I said, five hundred to six hundred square feet. They're very efficiently designed what you're seeing is units that have components in it that actually fold up become two different things. So you can fold up Murphy bed, but you can pull the bottom on the Murphy, bed out, and it becomes either your sofa or your dining room table. The storage is integral to it. So it's all based saving capacity items that make it very flexible to live in definitely see that appealing to someone young. Just data college. No pets. No children may be and has an accumulated a lot of stuff it works wonderfully. And we're seeing a variety of different people. We were looking at repurposing fairly abandoned downtown office building, twelve stories and redesigned it to accommodate micro units. And the, the first reservations online were extraordinary of's eighty. Percent reserved within a week. What we're seeing people really want to live where they work and accommodating, that people will give up space in order to have that experience of being in downtown environment

Tampa WSF Robert Cox Elizabeth Strom Robin Sesing chairman Florida USF school of public affairs Hillsborough county Mickey Jacob Mickey Lynn Costco USF BG architects associate professor Mickey Jacobs CEO Murphy Beth