9 Burst results for "Robin Ru Simmons"

"robin rue simmons" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:10 min | 3 months ago

"robin rue simmons" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Supporters include Amazon Studios presenting sound of metal Rizzo Med stars is a drummer who is challenged to accept his new world of silence after he abruptly loses his hearing. Sound of metal is streaming on prime video on the next Brian Lehrer show an exit interview with Joe Salvo, who just retired after a long career as New York City's chief demographer. Talk about who's come and gone from New York at different times, and we'll ask his very informed opinion about how the pandemic will change New York for the foreseeable future. Also, why some governors, air banding vaccine passports and some colleges are requiring them. Brian Lehrer show at 10 A.M. on W N. Y. C. You're listening to W N Y C. I'm Rebecca Rivera, and we're bringing you another hour of all things considered coming up then WR Marcie's Wednesday evening lineup begins at eight with the mop. Stories of healing, Hope and heart on 93.9 FM Am a 20. This is marketplace. I'm Amy Scott. The city of Evanston, Illinois, just outside Chicago recently became the first U. S City to approve a reparations program for its black residents. Focused on homeownership. The program will give eligible Evan Stone Ian's up to $25,000 for down payments, mortgage assistance or home improvement. The goal is to help close the racial wealth gap created by decades of housing discrimination. Alderman Robin Rue Simmons is the driving force behind this plan. She first proposed it back in 2019 welcome to the program. Thank you. I'm very happy to be here. One of the questions that comes up when we talk about reparations is, you know how do you determine who has suffered and who is quote deserving of reparations? How did you decide that question when it came to Evanston's program. So in our case, residents that lived here between 1919 1969 and are black. Have received an injury on behalf of the city of Evanston because they were limited to live in one particular part of the community on Bear. Direct descendants, of course, are injured because there was no opportunity to transfer down well that their elders were not able to access and then obviously those that have experienced Um direct discrimination housing discrimination because they're black will qualify. But we're starting with a tier system and those that were directly injured and qualified. That if they want to pass along their benefit to a direct descendant, that's the option that they have. And I thought that was important. So that if that elder is in a place in life where they are not owning, or have no intentions of owning a home at the stage in their life, they can at least pass that opportunity of well, um, down to their child or their grandchild. And why did you choose housing specifically as a way to address some of the wrongs that black Evan Stone ians hav have dealt with? Well, appropriately, the community prioritized housing reparations work is important that is led by the injured community. In this case, the black community. So through a Syriza's of public meetings with stakeholders and community members and 2019. We asked three simple questions. What forms of reparations? Would you like us to prioritize? How might we find it and who should qualify? And the consensus of that feedback was housing. And so we're moving forward with housing. We all know that it's the most likely path to building well. But in our case, the injury was so specific and targeted to the black community. It included housing and zoning policies from 1919 to 1969. That restricted the black community to living in one Corridor of our city, and that same corridor was intentionally disinvested in and disenfranchised, and so it stripped away opportunities for well. And limiting the area in which we could live in. And that's your war. The fifth Ward, right? That is my war. It's my where I was born and raised and the West end of the fifth Ward. I've raised my Children here. The black community has a $46,000 less of a household income on average, then our white friends and neighbors here in Evanston We have 13 years less life expectancy. We have an achievement gap in the opportunity divide and it was important that we do something tangible that we could measure. That was working in the direction of bridging our racial divide. The one alderman who voted against the program. Um, thought it was too restrictive that people should be given perhaps cash and decide how they want to spend it. What's your response to that? My immediate responses we have more work to do. This isn't a settlement we have on Lee allocated the 1st 4% of our program. Really What we should be doing is looking at how we can grow the fun. It's initially $10 million. We should be looking at. How do we grow that fund to $100 million in Evanston so that we can Really dig in deep and make sure that we are delivering a repair a tive initiative to the black residents of Evanston. Larger conversation about reparations has been in and out of the headlines for decades, a version of a bill that's now in the House. HR 40 was first proposed in 1989. You think this time is different when it comes to reparations at the federal level? It's absolutely different right now. There is more of heart. There's more of an appetite. It's unfortunate that it's taken social media and more racial terror and police terror and more financial devastation to acknowledge with some action, Uh, the anti blackness in this nation, But we're here now there is no more data or study that is needed. The information is right in your face. And at this moment in history, we are very, very near a day that we will see federal reparations. I believe, and then the work is very difficult. I'm speaking from experience in Evanston. It's taken us from 2000 and 19 until just a week ago to advance our first initiative. And so my encouragement to our federal leaders is that we begin the work. Now there's a lifetime. There's two lifetimes of work ahead of us and we begin the work now understanding that it's gonna be incremental. But acknowledging that it is necessary. It is justice. It's overdue and my hope is that the work will continue. Robin Ruth Simmons is alderman of the fifth Ward in the city of Evanston, Illinois. Thank you so much. Thank you..

Joe Salvo Amy Scott Robin Ruth Simmons 2019 New York 1989 Rebecca Rivera 13 years $10 million $46,000 $100 million 1919 10 A.M. 1969 Chicago Brian Lehrer 2000 Wednesday evening Robin Rue Simmons New York City
"robin rue simmons" Discussed on WLRN News

WLRN News

06:16 min | 3 months ago

"robin rue simmons" Discussed on WLRN News

"Or home improvement. The goal is to help close the racial wealth gap created by decades of housing discrimination. Alderman Robin Rue Simmons is the driving force behind this plan. She first proposed it back in 2019 welcome to the program. Thank you. I'm very happy to be here. One of the questions that comes up when we talk about reparations is, you know how do you determine who has suffered and who is quote deserving of reparations? How did you decide that question when it came to Evanston's program, So in our case, residents that lived here between 1919 in 1969 and are black. Have received an injury on behalf of the city of Evanston because they were limited to live in one particular part of the community on Bear. Direct descendants, of course, are injured because there was no opportunity to transfer down well that their elders were not able to access and then obviously those that have experienced Um direct discrimination housing discrimination because they're black will qualify. But we're starting with a tier system and those that were directly injured and qualified. That if they want to pass along their benefit to a direct descendant, that's the option that they have. And I thought that was important. So that if that elder is in a place in life where they are not owning, or have no intentions of owning a home at the stage in their life, they can at least pass that opportunity of well, um, down to their child or their grandchild. And why did you choose housing specifically as a way to address some of the wrongs that black Evan Stone ians hav have dealt with? Well, appropriately, the community prioritized housing reparations work is important that is led by the injured community. In this case, the black community. Through a syriza's of public meetings with stakeholders and community members and 2019. We asked three simple questions. What forms of reparations? Would you like us to prioritize? How might we find it and who should qualify? And the consensus of that feedback was housing. And so we're moving forward with housing. We all know that it's the most likely path to building well. But in our case, the injury was so specific and targeted to the black community. It included housing and zoning policies from 1919 to 1969. That restricted the black community to living in one Corridor of our city, and that same corridor was intentionally disinvested in and disenfranchised, and so it stripped away opportunities for well. And limiting the area in which we could live in. And that's your war. The fifth Ward, right? That is my war. It's my where I was born and raised and the West end of the fifth Ward. I've raised my Children here. The black community has a $46,000 less of a household income on average than our white friends and neighbors here in Evanston. We have 13 years less life expectancy. We have an achievement gap in the opportunity divide and it was important that we do something tangible that we could measure. That was working in the direction of bridging our racial divide. The one alderman who voted against the program. Um, thought it was too restrictive. That People should be given perhaps cash and decide how they want to spend it. What's your response to that? My immediate responses we have more work to do. This isn't a settlement. We have on Lee allocated the 1st 4% of our program. But really, what we should be doing is looking at how we can grow the fun. It's initially $10 million. We should be looking at. How do we grow that fund to $100 million in Evanston so that we can Really dig in deep and make sure that we are delivering a repair a tive initiative to the black residents of Evanston. The larger conversation about reparations has been in and out of the headlines for decades, a version of a bill that's now in the House. HR 40 was first proposed in 1989. You think this time is different when it comes to reparations at the federal level? It's absolutely different right now. There is more of heart. There's more of an appetite. It's unfortunate that it's taken social media and more racial terror and police terror and more financial devastation to acknowledge with some action, Uh, the anti blackness in this nation, But we're here now There is no more data or study that is needed. The information is right in your face. And at this moment in history, we are very, very near a day that we will see federal reparations I believe, and then the work is very difficult. I'm speaking from experience in Evanston. It's taken us from 2000 and 19 until just a week ago to advance our first initiative. And so my encouragement to our federal leaders is that we begin the work. Now there's a lifetime. There's two lifetimes of work ahead of us and we begin the work now understanding that it's going to be incremental. But acknowledging that it is necessary. It is justice. It's overdue and my hope is that the work will continue. Robin Ruth Simmons is alderman of the fifth Ward in the city of Evanston, Illinois. Thank you so much. Thank you. Yeah. Yeah. Nancy Marshall guns or was talking up the top of the show about when consumer spending might pick back up to pre pandemic levels..

2019 1989 Robin Ruth Simmons $10 million $100 million 13 years 1969 2000 $46,000 1919 Robin Rue Simmons Nancy Marshall Evanston, Illinois 1st 4% 19 first initiative Lee a week ago first Bear
"robin rue simmons" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:41 min | 3 months ago

"robin rue simmons" Discussed on KCRW

"Angeles This'll is MARKETPLACE. I'm Amy Scott. The city of Evanston, Illinois, just outside Chicago recently became the first U. S City to approve a reparations program for its black residents. Focused on homeownership. The program will give eligible Evan Stone Ian's up to $25,000 for down payments, mortgage assistance or home improvement. The goal is to help close the racial wealth gap created by decades of housing discrimination. Alderman Robin Rue Simmons is the driving force behind this plan. She first proposed it back in 2019 welcome to the program. Thank you. I'm very happy to be here. One of the questions that comes up when we talk about reparations is, you know how do you determine who has suffered and who is quote deserving of reparations? How did you decide that question when it came to Evanston's program. So in our case, residents that lived here between 1919 1969 and are black. Have received an injury on behalf of the city of Evanston because they were limited to live in one particular part of the community on Bear. Direct descendants, of course, are injured because there was no opportunity to transfer down well that their elders were not able to access and then obviously those that have experienced Um direct discrimination housing discrimination because they're black will qualify. But we're starting with a tier system and those that were directly injured and qualified. That if they want to pass along their benefit to a direct descendant, that's the option that they have. And I thought that was important. So that if that elder is in a place in life where they are not owning, or have no intentions of owning a home at the stage in their life, they can at least pass that opportunity of well, um, down to their child or their grandchild. And why did you choose housing specifically as a way to address some of the wrongs that black Evan Stone ians hav have dealt with? Well, appropriately, the community prioritized housing. Reparations work is important that is led by the injured community. In this case, the black community so through a syriza's of public meetings with stakeholders and community members and 2019, we asked three simple questions. What forms of reparations? Would you like us to prioritize? How might we find it and who should qualify? And the consensus of that feedback was housing. And so we're moving forward with housing. We all know that it's the most likely path to building well. But in our case, the injury was so specific and targeted to the black community. It included housing and zoning policies from 1919 to 1969 that restricted the black community to living in one Corridor of our city, and that same corridor was intentionally disinvested in and disenfranchised, and so it stripped away opportunities for well. And limiting the area in which we could live in. And that's your war. The fifth Ward, right? That is my war. It's my where I was born and raised and the West end of the fifth Ward. I've raised my Children here. The black community has a $46,000 less of a household income on average than our white friends and neighbors here in Evanston. We have 13 years less life expectancy. We have an achievement gap in the opportunity divide and it was important that we do something tangible that we could measure. That was working in the direction of bridging our racial divide. The one alderman who voted against the program thought was too restrictive. That People should be given perhaps cash and decide how they want to spend it. What's your response to that? My immediate responses we have more work to do. This isn't a settlement. We have on Lee allocated the 1st 4% of our program. But really, what we should be doing is looking at how we can grow the fun. It's initially $10 million. We should be looking at. How do we grow that fund to $100 million in Evanston so that we can Really dig in deep and make sure that we are delivering a repair a tive initiative to the black residents of Evanston. Larger conversation about reparations has been in and out of the headlines for decades, a version of a bill that's now in the House. HR 40 was first proposed in 1989. You think this time is different when it comes to reparations at the federal level? It's absolutely different right now There is more of heart. There's more of an appetite. It's unfortunate that it's taken social media and more racial terror and police, terror and more financial devastation, too. Acknowledge with some action, the anti blackness in this nation, But we're here now There is no more data or study that is needed. The information is right in your face. And at this moment in history, we are very, very near a day that we will see federal reparations. I believe And then the work is very difficult. I'm speaking from experience in Evanston. It's taken us from 2000 and 19 until just a week ago to advance our first initiative. And so my encouragement to our federal leaders is that we begin the work. Now there's a lifetime. There's two lifetimes of work ahead of us. And we begin the work now, understanding that is going to be incremental, but acknowledging that it is necessary. It is justice. It's overdue and my hope is that the work will continue. Robin Ruth Simmons is alderman of the fifth Ward in the city of Evanston, Illinois. Thank you so much. Thank you. Nancy Marshall guns or was talking up with the top of the show about when consumer spending might pick back up to pre pandemic levels. There's.

2019 Amy Scott 1989 Robin Ruth Simmons $10 million 13 years $46,000 1919 $100 million Chicago 1969 2000 Robin Rue Simmons 19 1st 4% Evan Stone Lee Nancy Marshall U. S first
"robin rue simmons" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

08:43 min | 4 months ago

"robin rue simmons" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Ray until you easy, Boston's news radio. Okay, Our number four coming up in a Tuesday night spent a pretty good show tonight. I think I hope you've enjoyed it. With first hour we talked about the delay for public schools around the state, including Boston. The Capital city. They wanted delay opening kindergarden to eighth grade. From April 5th, which is the mandate from the governor's office from the state Department of Education to April 26th. We had a very interesting hour if you didn't hear it, doctor a tool, Grover. Who's with the Association of American Medical College is an excellent guest. Hey, took questions. Andrea Lee, I think clarified a great deal about the whole covert. Vaccination system, the efficacy of the shots. Lot of good information. You know, If you miss that you could go tonight side on demand dot com and listen to it. And then last hour we had a whole bunch of folks calling in and giving their stories of either getting the shots or not getting the shots. The call of the hour had to be a new collar Davey from Mississippi. I still couldn't figure out that phone that That town. You're in there, Davey. But next time you call I'm going to write it down more carefully. Think you said it was grifting or something like that night? I must have misspelled it, but we'll get it. We'll figure it out, okay? Gonna talk about another town right now. Town that probably many of you have heard off Evanston, Illinois, evidence that Illinois is a suburb of Chicago. It is the home of Northwestern University. So for those of you here in New England You think about a city Evanston, Illinois. That's about 75,000 people. Um it is a city that's pretty diverse, about two thirds of the people, according to the census in 2010, or white. 18% at that time. Um Black African American 8% Asian 9%, Hispanic and 7 7.5% other combinations. Um, So it's Ah, It's a city It's looks like it's right on the lake Shore. Um so but I guess I guess has gone through some tough times. So Um, it is described By, um a lot of Well, I'm looking the article out of the Chicago Tribune, and that's the one I want to rely upon. Um this is not reparations per se when we think about reparations per se, with a capital, R. We think about the people who were saying that, um People can who can show that their descendants of slaves, um should be be compensated for what their forebears went through. And evidence that it's a little different. Um, ever sit alderman last night? Approved what is the first expenditures in the city and I'm quoting here from the Chicago Tribune Story City's landmark Municipal Reparations program, so the Chicago Tribune is calling it reparations. But it is to compensate black residents for codify discrimination. Officials. In the suburb of Evanston, Illinois. Chicago suburb say that this has been in the planning stages for a year and a half or since 2019 and it was designed to address discriminatory housing policies and practices. Faced by black residents and black residents alone. This'll a $10 million program, which Again. Evidence in Illinois approved in 2000 and 19, and it's going to be funded through to two sources to revenue streams. Marijuana sales tax revenue. This is a marijuana sales tax out there the locality for 3% all along with some donations. That was a vote of 81 on Monday, which established 400,000 housing Grant Housing grant program. This is the first expenditure of the $10 million program. Uh, the counselor. Who first proposed this program. Um Says that the portion of the program approved last night is only a first step. Um, simple is that, um, Her name is Robin. Ruth Simmons. And She she spoke yesterday. On MSNBC or last night, actually, at MSNBC. Rough play for me Cut 44. This is the alderman Robin Rue Simmons of Evanston, Illinois, who introduced this program. That is reparations like light. It was important because in our city we're diverse and we're welcoming. We have values include liberty and justice for all, including black residents, and the ordinary public policy that we had been doing well in Evanston, including Equity and inclusion had not been enough to bridge our racial divide, so it was important that we did something radically different than what we had done before. Says, essentially needed more than equity and inclusion. Now I would hope that any city in America, um provides for protection of all of its citizens. Again. This is a suburb of Chicago. Um She went on and cut 46 here to explain. Who qualifies for again this form of reparations. Cut 46. Please rob. So you actually if you are a resident in Evanston, Black between 1919 and 69. You actually do not have to prove housing discrimination or if you are a direct descendent, you do not have to prove housing discrimination by nature of your race and place in Evanston, you were racially discriminated. There were anti black housing policies on our cold. This is above and beyond Red line That was a federal policy. The city of Evanston, like every other city in America had its own. Policy that we enforce that stripped away wealth opportunities for black residents because of where we were restricted to live. Now, if you are not a legacy, resident or descendant, you will have to show housing discrimination. So it's interesting things too. Two ways you can qualify either incident you need to be, um Origins in any of the black, racial and ethnic groups in Africa, according to the memo. Um, And if you could do that, if you were a black resident in Evanston, Illinois, between 1919 1969. That's a 50 year span. And, of course, a lot of those folks. Uh, do we have descendants? Um, so if you were that person's direct descendant you qualify, applicants may also qualify at they've experienced housing discrimination. Due to the city's policies or practices after 1969 No. The resolution reads the local reparations restored of housing program that they do use the word reparations, okay? The local reparations Restorative housing program acknowledges the harm caused to black African American Evanston residents do to discriminatory housing policy and practices. And in action on the part of the city. The program again reading from the Chicago Tribune story. The program is a step toward revitalizing, preserving and stabilizing black African American owner occupied homes in Evanston. Increasing home ownership and building the wealth. Black African American residents building intergenerational equity Amongst black African American residents and improving the retention rate of black African American homeowners in the city of Evanston. Now under the program, the money is not a direct cash payment. The program actually provides housing help would be, I guess the best way to describe it. The many can be used reading from a different report now can be used to help with the home down payment. Or closely cost assistant within the city. Help for repairs, Help pay for repairs and improvements or modernizations oven Evanston property or help pay down mortgage principal interest or late penalties on evidence. Evanston property But again.

Andrea Lee Ruth Simmons New England 2010 $10 million Mississippi Robin Rue Simmons Robin April 5th Africa 3% 50 year America April 26th Chicago Monday Davey 2000 Grover Illinois
"robin rue simmons" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

04:52 min | 4 months ago

"robin rue simmons" Discussed on WGN Radio

"President Biden says the Senate should immediately pass to background check bills that the House approved earlier this month. I don't need to wait another minute. To take common sense steps. Will save the lives in the future and the urge my colleagues. In the House and Senate to act. The bills would help close loopholes in the background check system used before purchases of firearms. It's unclear whether the bills can make it through the evenly divided Senate given Republicans general opposition Restrictions on guns. And this discussion all comes following the shooting yesterday in Colorado, in which 10 people died after a shooter shot those 10 people at a grocery store in Boulder. Chicago's positivity rate is now 3.2% up from 2.9% last week. Chicago Department of Public Health Commissioner Dr Allison are, Woody says daily case counts are also up 23% from last week. I'm not concerned about the long term a Zilong as we continue to see good vaccine rollout and uptake, But I am very concerned about the short term here. Chicagoans ages 18 to 29 or driving the latest increase in cases. State representative was Shawn Ford has resigned from the board of trustees of Loreto Hospital who for how it handled vaccine distribution to people who are not yet eligible for the covert 19 shot. In a statement, Ford said quote I am very disappointed with the recent developments at the Loreto Hospital regarding its use of Corona virus vaccine and trust into the hospital. And quote. Ford said he submitted his resignation of the hospital's board chairman yesterday because he disagreed with how the reprimand of the hospital leadership was handled. He says he will continue to fight for the Austin community to Loreto Hospital executives were reprimanded for covert 19 vaccine events that have properly gave shots two people far from the Westside facility, including one held for workers at Trump Tower. Officials and Evans dinner, giving the green light to the initial payments of the city's first in the nation Reparations program, Alderman Robin Rue, Simmons says This is just the start. We all know that the road to repair and justice in the black community is going to be a generation of work. It's going to be many programs and initiatives and more funding. The City Council approved a plan last night to direct $400,000 from the reparations fund to a housing program that will award eligible individuals up to $25,000 eligible residents or those with ties to the city's black community. Between 1919 1969. The money can be used to help buy a home. Hey, a mortgage, A war for home improvements. The $10 Million Reparations fund is funded their marijuana sales tax revenue. Federal lawsuit that was filed by former Chicago public school teachers against the district backed in 2012 is finally going to trial lawsuit filed by a group of teachers who are mostly African American accused the district of racism is roughly 300 teachers and support staff were fired from 2012 to 2014 this part of the CPS turnaround model. Model was supposed to improve schools with low test scores and lower attendance rates and teachers were fired. Fired As a result, the lawsuit alleges that the police unfairly targeted black teachers and staff members. Jesse Sharkey, president of the Chicago Teachers Union, says that the union has been fighting this policy for years was no issue that motivated us more and that made us resentful and angry, but the way this school system ran in the issue of school turnarounds, robber Green, who previously worked at Westinghouse and CBS High schools, is one of the teachers involved in the lawsuit. He says that students of color benefit from teachers who look like them commitment toe students and vocational education. Was deeply rooted and me giving back to Ah GPS and CPS students of kids of my same race and I was really passionate about that. And unfortunately that those efforts were derailed. A trial date will be set on April 8th. Now. WGN Sports Kevin Powell as expected, Kyle Hendricks will get the ball when the Cubs begin the season against Pittsburgh. Ah, week from Thursday at Wrigley David Ross making it official today, Cubs and White Sox said to meet at Sloan Park in May. So this afternoon Kevin Lincoln and starts in that for the Blackhawks when they begin a six game home stand against the Florida Panthers. Chris Putin's pre game is at 6 30. John, Wait a minute, Try Murray with the call. At seven and see Double A woman's tournament continues today. With eight games. Northwestern, advancing to the second round will take on Louisville and the Tribune and Stadium reporting that to Paul is targeting longtime Kentucky assistant Kenny Pain. The next men's head basketball coach. I'm Kevin Powell double duty in sports before.

Kevin Lincoln Jesse Sharkey Kyle Hendricks Kenny Pain Chris Putin Shawn Ford Loreto Hospital Colorado $400,000 Boulder Florida Panthers 2.9% Blackhawks 2012 White Sox April 8th 3.2% 2014 10 people Kevin Powell
U.S. city to become first to pay reparations to Black residents

Anna Davlantes

00:52 sec | 4 months ago

U.S. city to become first to pay reparations to Black residents

"The green light to the initial payments of the city's first in the nation Reparations program, Alderman Robin Rue, Simmons says This is just the start. We all know that the road to repair and justice in the black community is going to be a generation of work. It's going to be many programs and initiatives and more funding. The City Council approved a plan last night to direct $400,000 from the reparations fund to a housing program that will award eligible individuals up to $25,000 eligible residents or those with ties to the city's black community. Between 1919 1969. The money can be used to help buy a home. Hey, a mortgage, A war for home improvements. The $10 Million Reparations fund is funded their marijuana sales tax revenue. Federal

Alderman Robin Rue Simmons City Council Million Reparations Fund
"robin rue simmons" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:48 min | 4 months ago

"robin rue simmons" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Store in Boulder, Colorado. Colorado Governor Jared Pulis now says the time is for grieving. But people cannot become numb to the pain because we simply can't let Must be accepted as anything close to normal occurrence. One of those killed yesterday was a police officer who was the father of seven. News is brought to you by direct buyers. Com FOOD Banks in Orange County say millions of dollars are needed to keep up with unemployment and underemployment needs for food. This year we were hit with a tsunami of need. Second Harvest Food Bank of OSI's Claudia Keller says food pantries were closing and pandemic restrictions cut staff. And changed everything about the way food banks used to operate. At one point, we were distributing three times the amount of food with about half the staff. Keller says. They need almost $4 million to keep up with 2021 projections together. Second Harvest and the OC Food bank have reported distributing £120 million of food during the pandemic. In Orange County, Corbin Carson, Calif. I knew California's expected to get the biggest chunk of money from a proposed plan to rebuild America's infrastructure. The initiative from President Biden could mean as much as $3 trillion to fix stuff and transform transportation systems. The autopsy report shows. One of the sons of singer Bobby Brown died from an overdose of booze, cocaine and fentanyl. Bobby Brown Jr was found dead in his home in Encino in November. He was 28. Suburb of Chicago, is set to become the first city in the country to pay reparations to black people. The plan for the first set of payments was approved last night in Evanston, where Robin Rue Simmons is a Councilwoman. We all know that the road to repair and justice in the black community is going to be a generation of work. Reparations fund is $10 million. It's paid for through taxes from legal pot sales,.

Bobby Brown Claudia Keller Encino Robin Rue Simmons $10 million Evanston Orange County £120 million 2021 Bobby Brown Jr Keller yesterday November OC Food bank This year 28 Jared Pulis OSI Boulder, Colorado millions of dollars
"robin rue simmons" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

06:20 min | 5 months ago

"robin rue simmons" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Becomes the largest state to end its mask mandate and plans to ease other restrictions. But in fact, it's going to get to the point very shortly, where there will be no restrictions. It's as if the pandemic never existed. We'll see what happens to Texas residents. Have talked many times about reparations for African Americans. And simplistic argument is slavery, African Americans about hearing sleigh as slaves. And, of course, that's beyond comprehension as to this particular group of Americans how they were treated. Therefore, we should pay reparations of some kind. Okay, that's an easy one reparations for slavery. Uh and, you know, African American saying, Listen, we deserve money for what happened to us and others are saying, Come on. When's the last time? You know when were you? Slave kind of thing, You know, although you know the United States has paid reparations. Speed reparations to the Japanese were interned during World War two under Franklin Roosevelt's order, I might add, and but they were paying. It was $20,000, a person on Lee to people who were in the interment camps. All right, so that's the point. Is reparations for people who were not harmed specifically by slavery and leading back to maybe the ancestors weren't slaves, but It gets a little bit deeper than that. And Evanston, Illinois, is the first American cities size city that's actually dealing with reparations, and it has to do with a City Council person who is a black woman eyes she's 1/5 Ward Alderman, Robin Rue Simmons, and she came up with this idea with this idea or asking for reparations, and it has to do with the way she was treated. It's the way African Americans were treated and have been, and this is where plenty of African Americans suffered from redlining. From being defacto segregated put in a position where they had to move in a certain area. Where they were moved or forced to move simply by the very act of where people live in areas of the city of which is far worse to live in In this case, where she grew up, was next to a sewage plant on one side, and on the other side, it was dirt ground that had not yet been developed. And then she'd visited Friend. Ah white friend and the streets were wider. The trees were bigger. The houses were better and she look around. See what's all this about? Well, it's It's not us. We really didn't do it. It's sort of just happened. Well, it sort of didn't just happen. It was specific as to what happened. And this is the argument that's being made. Forget about reparations for back then let's talk about reparation for what's happening now. Or what's happened recently redlining and then therefore how's home insurance is much more money and not getting the same benefits and then going to schools, which are less than because African Americans live in a given part of town, and or at least I'm not going to say force to buy in those areas. Because they're not. The law doesn't allow people to be discriminated against. You can't move in this neighborhood because you're black, but there are a lot of subtle ways of pushing people into neighborhoods. Some of it is voluntary. For example, you go to Glendale and you have the Armenian community. That's voluntary. No one's forcing that issue. You're gonna Westminster with Vietnam Vietnamese community That's voluntary, But the argument is that African Americans are It's a little different the way they treated actually a lot different. So what Evanston, Illinois, has done. With older woman even though they still call her alderman boy that's going to change isn't it is set up a $10 Million fund not to hand out money. But just to make it easier for black residents to buy for down payments for repairs to their home. That's the plan. The $10 million. So as we understands this systemic racism and we get into the subtleties of what that's about, you're going to find us getting into this subtleties of reparations. And it's not be quite as simple as just what you want money for being a slave. What do you want, And it was 18 65. When this whole reparations things started. To help African Americans not gaze, former slaves at 20 Acres and a mule. That's where it started. Then that was all shot to hell by Andrew Johnson, who became the president subsequent to Lincoln's assassination. Where they shut it down that you have Jim Crow because one of things about reconstruction well, I'll tell you the wrong guy died. Mean, Abraham Lincoln would never have let happen. What happened to former slaves? And that is another horrific chapter in American history, not only a part of slavery but also the way African Americans were treated, and we're talking right up to the civil rights era. And in many cases, many African Americans say it's still going on right now. Look at the police. What's going on here? Look at the housing look at the level of education, the schools the quality, so this is a topic that's going to get a lot. Of Attention and you're I think you're gonna see this happening, too. It's much like the black lives matter. Took it to a whole new level. I think you're gonna hear reparative You hear about representations to coming up handle on the news Late edition. Let's check in with Jennifer. Police.

Andrew Johnson Jim Crow $20,000 Jennifer Abraham Lincoln $10 million $10 Million Lincoln Texas Robin Rue Simmons Franklin Roosevelt World War two 20 Acres Westminster Glendale Lee Evanston, Illinois African American African Americans 18 65
"robin rue simmons" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:47 min | 1 year ago

"robin rue simmons" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is weekend edition from NPR news under the car scene of RO lawmakers in Evanston Illinois are going to be using the money from taxes on legalize marijuana to pay reparations to their black residents it's aimed at solving two problems the community is faced first African Americans have been disproportionately arrested for infractions involving marijuana possession and second black residents are being priced out of their homes the plan aims to help address both issues at once here to explain how is old woman Robin through Simmons who led the effort to get the plan approved she's on the line with us now from Evanston thanks for joining us thank you for having me what sparked the idea to sort of do this well we know the history here and America and it is not any different in our city of Evanston we still have the impact of red lining and Jim crow law and the black lives experience in Evanston today we have a large an unfortunate gap in well written in the education even life expectancy the fact that we have a forty six thousand dollar gap between census tract eighty ninety two which is the historically redline neighborhood that I live in and was born in and the average White House led me to pursue a very radical solution to a problem that we have not been able to stop reparations I'm sure I don't have to tell you that reparations is been very controversial it certainly is uncomfortable when we have to deal with our nation history and the history in our city which includes oppression and discrimination rape and kidnapping and other crimes against humanity that very uncomfortable so there has been opposition wine in even acknowledging those wrong and then I've had hate messages that include we have reparations already in the form of a link our section eight voucher and welfare and so I disagree with that completely and I think that anyone knows the history welfare understand that it was not established for the black community so you're gonna take the money raised in taxes on marijuana legal marijuana and then you're going to use that to fund this that's that's the plan yes understated Illinois Illinois legislation was passed that on January first we will have a recreational cannabis illegal here and we are going to take one hundred percent of the first ten million dollars of tax revenue from recreational marijuana sales tax to find I. reparation we're expecting several hundred thousand dollars a year revenue at this point and we should expect to find that ten million before ten years will these funds be targeting long term black residents or perhaps families have specifically been affected by arrestor detentions out well it's gonna impact all black residents we want to preserve our existing black residency would help us preserve our diversity in addition it will include bringing repair to families and returning citizens with a particular focus on those that have and been impacted by marijuana rack what percentage of marijuana related arrests are of African Americans data shows that in our city seventy one percent of marijuana arrests are in the black community and the problem there is we are a now declining sixteen percent of the community at the height of the black community we had around twenty four twenty five percent that was in the nineties and there's been a steady decline sent that then because of lack of affordability and housing predatory lending over as best cook county property taxes in the community and the ideas that somehow this money will be given to allow people to stay in their homes and and and the form of loans or or absolutely not absolutely not my intention is that this is the direct payment to residents that qualify we do need to think beyond homeownership and whether it is some level two support capacity building through direct payments for fun for technical training or other credentialing that could build capacity but I do want every black resident to have some way that they can qualify for this reparation regardless of their education homeownership added or even their income level all the women robin rue Simmons thank you so much thank you frozen.

NPR twenty four twenty five percen forty six thousand dollar hundred thousand dollars one hundred percent seventy one percent ten million dollars sixteen percent ten years