4 Burst results for "Robin Mckinley"

"robin mckinley" Discussed on Read Between the Lines

Read Between the Lines

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"robin mckinley" Discussed on Read Between the Lines

"The feed for this podcast. You can actually hear me listen. You can actually listen to me interviewing mercer. Mayer to. God's amazing. Thank you. She is so wonderful sheepshanks. Great. Yeah. So are there any writers that you think are similar to you writing is like you use similar phrases or stumbling that? Maybe Ellie. Blake, wrote frost blood, which is really cool book about a girl who has frost powers in a world full of people firepower. So she's a little bit similar I Love Stephanie Garbage Work I'm not sure I can compare myself to her herself is so so well written Mary visceral. You feel like you're there. So I love that I wish I could write as well as Mary Pearson Cause Deception. If you haven't read that one, it's got a really cool point of view twist So I would love love to be compared to them. That's great. So what made you want to be an author? Well. I grew up as a child who had asthma and when I was little, I would have to take a lot of medications one of which was like a big machine like a big breathing machine that had a mask, the Delaware way at administered missed medicine and so when I was doing that the machine was very loud. So it was really hard to like watch TV or really do much of anything My mom would reach me because when she would sit behind me, I could hear in my ear. And so when she would read to me, I wasn't a sick kid anymore you know I was Harry Potter under the stairs or a hobbit on an adventure or princess you know going after a dragon or anything like that and so I loved the adventure I loved the escape and I think even in today's world there's there's so much negativity in the world that I loved to create something. Where where people can go and they can't escape and I just have such an active imagination that I love sharing my stories with other people and I hope that they bring them joy and that they can enter into these stories and maybe see what my characters go through and come back to the world a little happier a little bit more prepared to face their obstacles in their own lives. I love that so much that is like what are the sweetest stories I've ever heard on? That is really amazing. D did You have any specific favorite books as a kid? Oh man I mean I loved Madeleine lingle's wrinkle in time. That was a big one anything by Robin McKinley She had like the outlaws a share would which I loved again made cabot grew up reading making habit all the time like sister of the traveling pants, all that good stuff was just. So important to me as Oh, like the giver a loved the Giver House. Another good one so so many books as you can tell, I spent a lot of time..

Ellie Mary Pearson Blake Giver House Madeleine lingle Robin McKinley mercer Mayer Harry Potter asthma cabot Delaware
"robin mckinley" Discussed on Read Between the Lines

Read Between the Lines

07:47 min | 1 year ago

"robin mckinley" Discussed on Read Between the Lines

"Between the lines book. PODCAST I'm your host Molly, south and today. I'm interviewing author Christina. I. How are You doing today? Pretty good? How about yourself? I'm doing alright, so can you tell me about some of the books that you've written so I've written a pretty wide variety of things. I wrote a seven-book urban fantasy series that was set in Chicago about agent of death, metal, and black and her popcorn, living gargoyles, diesel and. I wrote A. Sort of horror reimagining of Allison Wonderland There's three books in that series. Alice red. Queen, and actually looking glass will be out this week and I wrote lost boy, which is a origin story for captain. Hook. Girl in red, which supposed to elliptic Red Riding Hood I have a new book coming out this. October called the ghost tree which is. A horror novel accommodate horror novel, Mid Western town under a curse coa. Yeah, that sounds awesome like. Do you have any special rituals or anything? You do like when a new book gets released when it gets released, no a used to you know just be so nervous. When the especially the first couple books when they came out to like people read it. Will People like it? I think the more you is. What people's reading like your books? But the more you published sort of the calmer I think. You feel about really stay at least for me. You know I've written the book and I've sort of done my best in. It's out there and I hope that it finds its audience I. Hope that people enjoy it that they tell their friends in that their friends enjoy it, but like the limits of my control, and when the manuscript is done so Yeah, just Kinda like. It's like letting your child. Move Out of your house like by by the. Have a good life. Yeah, I've got a few questions kind of moving away from like talking about books that you have written and rob books that you just really like. Do. You have a favorite book. I mean it's hard to say one favor I think. Is a lot of books. I've loved I. think There's a lot of books that have influenced me the first book. The in Maimi really want to be a writer. Was The Lord of the Rings Vijay R Tolkien I read when I was twelve. I still reread it like once a year and watership down by Richard. Adams is a huge huge influence on me. The Blue Sword in here on the crown by Robin. McKinley both are which were the first books that I remember reading. That had what we would today. Call a strong female heroine. You know where they were independent and they didn't wait for the prince to save them. They saved themselves like they were the architects of their own story. As I got older anything by Angela. Carter definitely devoy Shirley Jackson like every horror lover. I've read pretty much everything Stephen King's in. Yeah a lot of books. From recent books, one of my absolute favorites by say recent like glass. Five ten years was the girl with all the gifts by Mercury. That one about. well. Sir. The the story kind of opens like this were this girl in a facility. She's locked up and every day. Men comes to get her to take her to a classroom. And every day she jokes she won't bite them, but they don't laugh. That sounds really good the. Eh That I don't really want to say too much about it because it's one of those books that the less you know, I think the more you enjoy it, yeah. Yeah I'm definitely going to have to read that one. I know I. Know that a lot on this show. 'cause like the book podcast I get so many recommendations. Oh. Yeah, and it's I mean if you're like me than like buying books and saving them to read at a later time is like a fulltime hobby. With me I'm I mostly get from. Get it from my library. I'm obsessed with my library of. Yeah there I do love receiving books like at Christmas every year. I get a whole bunch of books and everything. Yeah, when I was younger I didn't have as many books obviously, but now that I'm older i. I pretty much consider you know my free money to be book money so I. Buy a lot of books I. Don't always have time to read them. I, love watching that. Stack it bigger. Yes, so, do you find that when you read books like that? Do you find that it improves your writing? Does that help with it or not? I think that any any reading that you do is. is informative for your writing not necessarily in a Oh. This is you know I could take this or that? From you know the the way someone tells the story I don't think I don't think about it in and I really Pacific way like that like. Oh, I love the way this person structured the story or anything like that. It's more sort of informal subliminal where he just sort of. Sort of feeding your storytellers instinct by seeing the way that other people tell stories, and it's not just books either because I watch a lot, a lot of movies and I know that watching movies influenced the way that irate. Do. You feel like there's any movies in particular events you. Again like you know just so many films that I love the jaws is. Pretty much my number one movie into me it's. Kind of perfect film in terms of the way, the story structure in the characters, the way tension is built. There's so many elements in that film that come together and It's one of the things that that makes it extremely watchable for me. Yeah, that's great, so ova favourite book character, and also this can be one that you have written to. I feel like I tend not to pick my own books for favorite. Characters but Again like it's always like. Can I pick just one? I don't know You don't have to pick one. You could like top five. South by Yes, so for sure Harry crew from the Blue Sword. Obviously Frodo Baggins from Lord of the Rings. The nameless second Mrs. Dewinter from Rebecca. was that their top three otherwise? I'm going to be digging around and like my subconscious for. Like like comparing and contrasting every book. I've ever written in trying to decide how to rank them. Well your taste and books sounds very similar to mine, and so like for me would just be like an analysts in constant. Just yeah characters yeah, so. Do you have a book character? The most relate to I mean of what I've written probably. Basil small fat Gargoyles from Black Wings is most like me. Personality why? And his eating habits too. Is. He like a stone gargoyles. He's.

Blue Sword Alice red Molly Christina Chicago Maimi Stephen King McKinley Adams Angela Richard writer Carter Harry Mrs. Dewinter Shirley Jackson Rebecca.
"robin mckinley" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

13:07 min | 2 years ago

"robin mckinley" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"This is what book cooked you. I'm Shelley and thanks for listening on this week's episode I talked to the Franchesca whose latest book now entering comes out on October the first and we talk about what went into this book we also talk a little bit about her previous book to this one and her monsters role that drawing plays in in her life so listening so Francesca what book hooked you so so I think actually to their woods it was it was Harry Potter and the prisoner of asked Ban and then it was Robin McKinley hero in the sword and they both kind of did it around the same time. which was I think I was in third grade and Harry Potter got me in that way of like that was what told me that I could right so I was reading that book I got to the end of that book and spoiler for anybody? Who's never read it? What's wrong with you? At the end of that book. There's so many twists all in a row and it just blew my mind and I thought I can write like people a person wrote a wrote this book like a real person wrote this. I can write something like this. S. Two and so Harry Potter was kind of what got me started writing and then the hero and the crown is kind of what it was a book that just made me realize how deeply I could love books and to this day I still love that one. I read it like every couple the years in it it holds up so well and so I would imagine just based on what you just said that you grew up reading and really love books correct yes and at first I didn't. I didn't love reaping at first and I didn't in love books. my mom was the one that really wanted us to get into reading and so she would take us to the library we would do the summer reading program. and I just remember her having to take out books term because there was nothing that looked enticing and so like I didn't. I didn't enjoy reading until I think until she got me the secondary power book. I hadn't read the first one I didn't know what it was and she ordered me the second one out of the Scholastic Catalog Block and I read that book and I was like Oh wait this is fun I enjoy this and so from then on then I really started loving reading and and started looking in for more types of books and so I'm always curious then as you sort of grew up preteen teenage years was reading as important. Did you find as much joy sometimes during those teenage years it becomes comes a lot harder. 'cause you know social life and school becomes increased as far as taking up the amount of time. So what was your reading life like. I think I actually think a lot of the reading I did when I was a preteen and a teenager was just Harry Potter which is reread Harry Potter over and over again I've read twilight and I remember liking twilight until it wasn't cool to like twilight my life any more and then I hated twilight and now you know that's a whole that's a whole saga in itself but not make upon the fact that China is saga. It was mostly Harry Potter twilight for a little while I remember reading the Hunger Games in high school because I was at that point in my teenage years where I did a lot of things out spite and the hunger Games was like the big thing at the time and everybody was like Oh the third books coming out you got it so awesome and I was like yeah whatever it can't be that good and then I read the first book and like I ice. I read like two chapters of it and I was like Oh. This is really good. I really like this what happened and then I loved it. After that and I think through and through those years if I was reading something other than Harry Potter it was probably like initially spite read and then I ended up liking again and then where does writing then come into play for you so I I have been writing since I think probably since I was eight years old that was that was around when I got that first Harry Potter Book and I realized that like you know real people all right books I can do this. This is the thing and so I had always liked making stories and before for that I had drawn things because I've been drawings since I'd hold pencil can go I can right so I started writing and with the reading a lot of how I learned how to write was from Harry Potter obviously and then that spite reading came in because I think it was that in that way teenage like envy of just like why why why are these people doing well like I could do well to oh I should be famous so that was why spite read them and then I was like Oh wait. No this is much better than than what I'm writing. This is very good now. I see why this this is published so that's that's kind of how it figured in so so part of my writing when I was a teenager was I love doing this. I want to do this forever forever. I WANNA get better at it and part of it was I just want to be amazing and the best at everything and I'm going to show everybody what I can do and I think that's the slither in an me coming out real hard so what then were those kind of first attempts to to write. What types of stories were you creating? I was so another thing I really liked growing up with anime and so the stories a lot of the stories came up with when I was really little we're like just the most bonkers anime nonsense you can thank of and I mean pieces of him still exist so like in my second book allies on her monsters allies draws the web comic called monstrous and a question. I get asked a lot is how did you come up with monstrous see like how did you. How did you know that allies web? The comic was going to be how did you create old just for her and I was like Oh. I didn't create it for her. I've been writing that story since I was eight years old and the original idea for that that came from my best friend and I were like eight or nine years old and we were playing grand theft auto by city which we were probably too young to be playing and we would put cheat code thin and just get tanked and drive around and blow things up and and we call ourselves the rampage twins because we were super cool and my that like early idea was I'm going to write a story about these two characters called rampage twins who each have like different superpowers or whatever but it's going to be set in like this fantasy world and they're gonNA WANNA be creatures and airships and all this cool stuff and over the years a lot of that just got thrown out completely or you know like this Acilia. Let's get rid of that with brain missing and it just not molded and reshaped into monstrous e- which is now I mean I've had around four were almost almost twenty years. How long are and when I wrote Elisa it it was like okay? She's a creator of something and I need to give her something that she really really cares about will lead to I care about the most monstrous you see. I just gave that to her because then that would make her feelings real and so you you've been creating monster see for like you said twenty years now when were you first kind of throwing ended up on the Internet are really kind of sharing your stories on a regular uglier basis with people and maybe we're talking about Mantra sear me. We're just talking about your writing in general so I I think I mean the earliest ooh man I think one point I might have put like a chapter two of one the way earlier drafts of monster see on fiction press or something like that never put a whole lot of enough there. I did share it with my friends like in school. I carry around this one of those gigantic three inch binders and I was just print out the book which makes me cringe so hard now. Oh God the trees. How many trees did I kill but I printed the book? Put it in this binder in Iran passed around my friends and they would all read it so they've read like a red light to drafts of monstrous e I think and they read probably two or three drafts of what is now made you up because made you up. I kind of wrote monster see in May drew up at the same time like those are the two stories that I developed from the time I was like eight and up through college and when was it kind of one of the idea kind of strike you beyond just kind of creating something as an outlet crane to show your friends. When was it like this is something that I'm going to take serious to the point where I'm intending to publish this so I was fifteen? I remember exactly it's like there was eight years. Old In fifteen was a freshman in high school and I don't remember it might have been like a twilight thing that started off or maybe another Harry Potter thing but I had the the second revelation which was you don't have to be famous to get a book published and I realized that I didn't know how you you did that and I realized that you know if I'm going to be this upset at other people's stories. You know you can talk. All you want in some point. If you're going to be upset about it you gotta try to get yourself your own stuff published so I at that point I went on Google all Google it. How do you get about book published? I just remember it being like really overwhelming at first and I remember everybody like like when I told her when I told my parents like a okay you can do that but just you know. It's really hard to get a book published. You know you probably going to get rejected a lot. I just remember everybody saying that to me like just trying to like pad the the the eventual disappointment and like no no I get it I get it. I'm going to get rejected. I didn't really get it. I don't think anybody gets it until you're like. They're getting rejected but that was the I just remember. That has is fifteen. I decided I wanted to get published in. Everybody's in the reaction. Was Oh sure infants what you WANNA do we'll support you and what when you first start out fifteen. What were you going to be the author of what type of author you're going to be did you think at that point Sh- like through my teenage years I had the worst delusions of grandeur? I thought like my some of my favorite things to do is just like put my headphones on and just like sit outside just think about all the things that could possibly usually that's really nice for brainstorming books not so helpful. It's really good for like personal. you know envisioning your own personal future. I'm getting you're getting your ego pumped up but now so great when it comes to reality so when I was a teenager I was like I want to be you. You.

Harry Potter Robin McKinley Shelley Franchesca Francesca Ban theft China Google Iran eight years twenty years nine years three inch
"robin mckinley" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

13:10 min | 2 years ago

"robin mckinley" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"This is what book cooked you? I'm Brock Shelley, and thanks for listening on this episode, I'm happy to have Melinda low on the podcast. When does the author of many fabulous books? I what he's here today to talk about is her debut. Ash came out in two thousand nine it's now two thousand nineteen to ten years since the book was released. There's a new tenure anniversary edition of the book. This is a book that has been mentioned many times, by many authors on the podcast. So I was really excited to be able to talk to her about this book and the ten year legacy than it has. So listen. So Melinda, what book hooked you? Well, it was the secret in the old ways by Carolyn Keene. It was a Nancy drew book. I would I would say, I think it's the one that I think is the one that hooked me because it was the first non picture book that I read, although myself. So I was six years old. I remember nothing about the story and it took me like a month to read it on my own, but I felt so accomplished and I still have that copy of the book. So the rest of history. And so going from there. So, like, if that's kind of you're jumping point Nancy, drew from there like were books given to did you have to search out books where they something that you've got at school where you're going to library, what was, how were you getting books as a young child? Well, I was very lucky because my grandmother, who was also right, writer, really, instilled in me, a very deep love of stories and of reading from a very early age. So even though I, I talked about the ninsu drew novel as the first book that hooked me I was reading many books before then but they were all Ticha books with my grandmother. Or my parents read to me, I go everywhere, I used to be so cited when we would get those elastic book club pliers and entry school. You know, because I would get to pick like two books and they were so affordable. I mean, they still are so that, that's really one source where I was able to buy books and have them, which was really exciting, but I also loved going the library, I still do I think going to the library was one of my favorite things to do as a kid, and I have really fond memory. Stories of the Szekely going to the boulder public library and their children's room. I remember they had this giant like tunnel flash. Padded couch thing, very small. So it seemed huge me it was just so wonderful. I loved going there, I would get so many books. I still kind of feel like I'm getting away with something when I go marry come home with, like a stack. So, and so those early trips to library just reading general was there kind of other books that stay out, maybe like a series or a John or topic that you really kind of latched onto there when you were young. You know what's funny, is that I read all types of of I certainly love. Nancy, drew. I love mysteries. I read every single Nancy drew, I could I could find but I also really loved fantasy and fairy tales. I read Robin mckinlay's, novels from, maybe like fifth grade on. I loved her books. She did a lot of fairy tale retelling, and I really don't them. I also loved science fiction. I remember totally devouring these Robotech novels by Jack McKinney. They were not. They were like television series Tien novel. I never saw the actual series on television because back then there was no Netflix DVR. You just saw stuff when you saw it, and I could never find it on TV, but for some reason, I found the books and I, I. Hunted for them for years. I remember at libraries and bookstores trying to find everyone in the series. So, you know, I read I read a lot of stuff. I, I don't think I was very picky. I I love to read a lot of thing. And then when you grew up and more moved into your teenage years, you know, for some people, they're, they're reading lives change, just as a byproduct of business that occurs. Maybe that time was that true for you are our were booked still playing very important role during your teenage lessons. Oh no books were always very important. I never stopped reading. I mean there may have been a few years during college where I couldn't read it much. But I always read, I certainly always read. Yeah. And then was it around this time because of books plane, such important part of growing up and just your love story. At this time you're at eleven time re maybe even before, when did this kind of urge to create your own stories begin? Well that started very young age. I it's, it's, it's true. Actually, I don't remember ever not wanting to tell stories I have always wanted to go Dory's and some of my earliest memories are of sitting with my grandmother and making up stories about I had this little cloth bag full of many teddy bears. They're like handmade bragged, all there, and we would tell stories about them when I was very young and I started writing stories down. As soon as I learned how to write I still have quote unquote, books that I made like in first second grade. It's they're, they're pretty funny, but I yeah, I I've always been a writer, I've always wanted to tell stories and it's, it's something that I'm done my whole life actually although there, there was a time when I tried to not be a writer. This was after college. You know, I figured I thought I had to get a job, which is true. I did have to get a job. But for quite a while, I, I, I think for a good, you know, five to ten years, I lost touch with that part of me and those were difficult. Those are difficult years for me actually, it was, I was going through a lot of discoveries in my personal life. And I wasn't writing. It was a weird time so is always been better when I've been listening, so because you had this time when you weren't writing. Was was it a moment? Was it a book? Was it any type of vent that you can put your finger on? That's was maybe the turning point or the realization that you needed to be writing. It's not a single thing. I'm a lesbian. And in my college years and early twenties. I was dealing with coming out not only to my to myself to just to be out openly gay person, and it was a big. It was a struggle for me. And I was also trying to not be a writer. I was trying to have a career in academia at the time I was in grad school, and I was very unhappy and because of my unhappiness in attempting to not condemning I went I went back to therapy. I've had I've been, I've had clinical depression, a couple of times in my life. So I I had that in college. When I was first coming out, I had it again in grad school, and I knew I had to go back to everybody and I did, and it was through talking to my Serapis over a period of, you know, a couple of years, probably that I realized, I'm not cut out. For a career in academia, and I am gay. And I really wanna write stories. It was a very scary thing to really confront, you know, I feel like for me, my coming to terms with my sexual orientation and coming to terms with my desire to be a writer are very closely intertwined so no, it wasn't like a single moment. It was many, many years of, of working to get their speaking wide. You think they were they are so intertwined for you? I don't know. I think they're, they're just very core aspects of my identity. And when I was denying one, I was, it was just not it's not good to deny either one, and they kind of came together at that time in my life. In a way, that was inescapable. I really actually very grateful that I hated grad school, because it's force meter really look at what I wanted, you know, and I would not have I mean, probably something else would have been put in my past to force me to look at it. But that's what happened to me. And so, being unhappy in that time it gave me the opportunity to pursue something that whipping me happy. So when you went back to writing, what were you writing, what types of stories, John rea- topics, what did you end up kind of coming back to our starting off with? Well, so when I started writing, again, this is my mid to late twenties. And I hadn't really written since high school since I was in high school. And when I was in high school, I had written three linked fantasy novel. I never showed them to anyone except my grandmother, but I had written them. And so when I came back to writing, I decided to basically pick up where I left off though, I was gonna write a fantasy novel and at that time, I remember thinking, I wish that rugged McKinley, who had been one of my favorite writers had written a retelling of Cinderella because I love that very tale as a kid. And she never retold it the when I decided to start writing again. I decided, okay, I'm gonna write a retelling of Cinderella in the vein of Robin McKinley because she never wrote one. So I'm going to write the book that I wanted to read, and I also naively thought that because it was a retelling of Cinderella. I would know was going to happen. So I thought, oh well, I know the story, so I won't get bogged down and figuring out some plot because the novels I wrote in high school got incredibly complicated. I mean they were epic fantasies. And there's, there's a lot of complexity and like and plot going on those novels. So I wanted to write something more simple that I always wanted to read, and so that's why I chose to start off by writing a retelling of Cinderella. And so when you went about approaching this idea, what did you initially think was going to be, maybe you're sort of big kind of twist or new shine on the classic fairy tale. Well, because I start writing it actually when I was still in graduate school. And I was studying cultural anthropology. So I had gigantic university library, there started researching very tales and folklore about fairies and the thing that really drew me was the idea of the ferry as this kind of slightly. Malevolent trickster, not the Disney Bibi bobby's version, but more ferries from like Irish folklore who were kind of mysterious and maybe evil and they like to lure human beings to their death in the forest. So the fairy stories, very healthcare folklore is very dark, and I was was really intrigued by the fact that Cinderella gets all these gifts to go to the ball from the ferry. And so I decided that my trick. My my, my twist. Would be that the ferry and mice interro would not be the like happy little old lady. It would be a slightly malevolent, man, who was giving her these things, and she who was very luring to her, because, you know, they're all these stories about ferries, lure young girl into the woods to dance all.

writer Nancy grad school John rea Melinda Carolyn Keene Robin McKinley Brock Shelley Ash Jack McKinney Netflix boulder public library Disney Robin mckinlay Tien ten years six years ten year