9 Burst results for "Robin Mcbryde"

"robin mcbryde" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:40 min | 2 months ago

"robin mcbryde" Discussed on How I Built This

"Because you are. In a very, very desirable market and growing very fast and. You've got a really strong brand. Is there a world where you could see an exit like that? I can't call that. In this moment, I'm very attached to my name. I think I can never say Lake Norman Zebra me and Robin and said, here's a chick for five hundred, million dollars. We. Don't know what that feels. That could happen. You know I. I can't honestly sit here and say to you knowing that that's intergenerational wealth knowing just the basic principles of compounding interest at a very low interest rate of what that will do for the legacy of our children our grandchildren, our great great great, and also tropical. For the community that we want to support, you can't rule that out. I can't have it out but I think that we can probably safely say. I mean I think it's hard for us to envision one because our personal is not for sale. So that's a that's a little tricky, but also the brands that we create. Each of those brands has a very powerful. Message behind them and like Andrei don't that don't belong that don't belong to US necessarily we see ourselves as the stuarts the purpose behind them. So if any exit or any acquisition, you know there would have to be some very strange stringent agreements behind that. I don't know that we can really think of any large wine companies that will be. In a position to to acquire what we think those are worth that would be able to pull the mission behind each of those brands not saying that it would never would happen. But I would I would probably say it would be now or anytime soon. I can't stop thinking about. Your Dad and what he would think about all this. How you got to this place Because so much of the story is unbelievable. I mean you didn't know the other sister existed. And then. You know once you're both grown up you eventually meat and then you form this incredible bond. And now you've built this highly successful brand. I just have to imagine that that your dad if he was sitting here right now. He which speed blown away. Well quite quite honestly, and now I'm speaking as a sister who never actually got to know him at all but from what I know of him I, don't think that he would have expected anything less from US I think that he also dreamed very big. You know he came from a very, very small and I say small like five hundred people or something country town in Alabama moved himself to Hollywood and became a part of that scene and an actor and. Everything that was kind of wild going on in Hollywood in the seventies and eighties and You know my my my understanding of him and my interpretation of of him is that you know sky's the limit like you you can and should do you know whatever you set your mind sue. So in my mind and I've thought about that before my mind I. Think I. Don't think he'd be surprised I think that if he was in our lives, he would have expected that we've done at least what we've done. Yeah and I think I think the context of. Our family has family of. His generation you know. Camden Alabama. You know our grandparents, our aunties and uncles our father picked cotton thir- sharecroppers. And I know in their lifetime. Never thought that they would see a black president I know that. So like Robbins said I think you know he dreamed really big expected this of us, but I think the expectation also comes from all of our family. In terms of what they did during the sixties and the fifties and love the things that they fought four so that Robert and I do what we do today. They must be so proud of trust US anti enemy is very proud. You can't go to her house without her pulling out Zine and telling you let me tell you anybody who listens to knock challenge her about her nieces but it is very true in our you know our aunts and our data was the youngest of like twelve. I think. So it's a very, very long generations. You know they grew up in rural Alabama just outside of summer. So you know they did they walked the Edmund Pettus Bridge, they were involved in the civil You know demonstrations and movements, and we're not unaware of of how close we are. You know and how our roots are. So intertwined with you know all of this this history and that we're we're not far from where all of it started so. we're in we were in agriculture. Back in agriculture. Like the history of black people in America is grounded in in Agriculture Andre and I actually have a photo were able to go and visit the the plantation house where our great grandparents were enslaved and where our father was born in the back and in the small house in the back. And I think that you know like his journey in life to move on from a lot of that difficult history was for the purpose of on his children Andrea and I being able to do something like exactly what we're doing. How much of of this story and and the success of this business you attribute to just your hard work and your intelligence, and how much do you think has has to do with luck for St Robin. I was ten, ninety, nine percent of it is our hardworking intelligence. And then there's a small percentage that I think is what people might refer to as luck but I really think it is your ability to recognize opportunity and take advantage of it. Same thing I feel like it's It's hustle. It's hard work, but it's smart hard work. In it's being able to identify opportunities when when other people don't are maybe can't see those opportunities to see it. Yeah, and then I think in terms of luck I don't know if I believe in Luck I. Think I think you. You prepare yourself you're ready and then if if an opportunity presents itself, then you're the right person the right place of the right time. To stay ready. Yup Stay Ready. That's entree McBride John and her sister Robin mcbryde. By the way in addition to the McBride sisters, collection and Black Girl Magic Brand Robin Andrea have launched a third brand. It's a collection of four can't wines AROSA SAUVIGNON BLANC and a couple of spritzers. It's called Pecan and some of the money from sales goes back to a scholarship program for small businesses owned by black women. Robyn and Andre. Two of those winds are dedicated to their mothers and the other to. Their daughters. Thanks.

Robin Andrea US Alabama Hollywood Robin Edmund Pettus Bridge Lake Norman Zebra Robin mcbryde AROSA SAUVIGNON BLANC St Robin McBride Robyn stuarts Andrei president Robbins Camden America Robert
"robin mcbryde" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

08:24 min | 2 months ago

"robin mcbryde" Discussed on How I Built This

"Job and was married with three children and Andrea, was a college student at USC. I mean. Neither of you had a whole lot of start up cash if any did you Robyn did you I mean you had been working but you also family did you have any savings I mean not match you know it was kind of a nearly paycheck to paycheck. Already got married. We had recently purchased a home, but you know we have brand new twin babies and an older girl. So there wasn't a whole lot of cash available and under assuming given that you're on scholarship at USC in a college student, you probably were broke right I. Mean I got my scholarship checks in on. Where you could get a job and make money you know that was that was what I did. So the the the original idea was it sounds like what you guys settled on was let's just import wine and and Kinda put a label on it was that the initial idea. So we had this grand vision we felt like what was really critically important was that. Incredibly passionate about wine yes. Students of wine but we need to learn the business of wine and you know we could get this license in California, a federal import license that was like fifteen hundred dollars. It was like our total life savings and we could import other people's winds and we started by reaching out to two families in New Zealand, and then we could we could learn the business and we went to them and basically said, you know don't put all your eggs and basket. We think California could be a great market to grow your brands and your winds and we negotiated really long payment term so he could bring in the wine. Sell it. Click the cash, pay the light bill and then pay them back and then. As a part of the process was every harvest. We come back and you guys teach us how to make wine. And you Andrea ahead of some connections in new. Zealand 'cause you're from there and your family, your family farmers. Yeah. So when you first approach these wineries in New Zealand and they agreed to send you wine. How did that work like how many? How many bottles of wine did you initially by and then where did you go to sell them? So yeah so it was crazy. It was at the time at felt like it was an insanely huge amount of wine. In it was a palette which is. Fifty Four I. Like the the minimum of what you can put on a boat. But for us, that was just an insane an internet case of wine. There's twelve bottles. So right it just felt like a huge defeat to be able to get these licenses because you know the the sale of alcohol states is highly regulated. And it's very strict and so just the process of obtaining a license to import seemed and felt like such a huge rigorous process and then and then to convince people. You know to entrust in US and give US product and then to get on a boat and then and then bring it into the port of Long Beach at the time, and then put it into a federally bonded warehouse because you can't just like bring that to your house has to go into a bonded warehouse. And then at the point like, wow. Okay it's here. So we gotta go sell it. You know and then surely googling you know top restaurants in L. A. and San Francisco and Getting some samples from the warehouse and putting them in a bag and and literally just walking into restaurants are a so tell me how you did that like would you go with the two of you go or would you go separately? So specifically for. So at the time Andrea still in Los Angeles I'm in New Orleans still UC. Yes. Nearly Twenty one at that point I think like. Maybe. Twenty one yeah, barely legal. So So what we did and thank God we were so optimistic and so naive and in a sense that's kind of what saved our butts from a huge failed miles. Was that you know we didn't. We didn't play by the rules because we didn't know what you were right and so and because we didn't play by the rules, we actually you know unknowing, they gave ourselves some tremendous access to really great accounts. Because we we had a whole lot of confidence in no business experience who are doing all the wrong things. But what we would do is we would I would sit up and running California and know goal like top ten you know highest rated restaurants in Los Angeles, and then I would just like like the most naive like person in the world pick up the phone. And I see who is the wind buyer or someone gay or the wind director or whatever was going on in that restaurant. You know just really stock them be really creepy, and then I would find that phone number for them, and then I would just call call and and I don't mean like a one time that I would keep calling until I got to that person and I don't even know what you're supposed to say in those situations but I would just say like, hi, this is Robin mcbryde i. Had it's amazing wine from New Zealand. I think you're GONNA love it. It's GonNa. Be The love like Lincoln we come in and you know knowing what I know now that's ridiculous. But at the time I, think people were just sort of set a back like are are you serious? You're calling me on the phone you know talking about this and I just was really really I, and so we got an appointment and there is a certain protocol where your distributor goes in and takes you in and you set a. Right. You know this whole thing. To do we and we just didn't know that that's what you're supposed to do but. They would see us because we were so persistent because we didn't know we were doing the wrong thing did Andrea did your like imagine if you have a French accent and you go and you talk about the French wines, you're selling people kind of just psychologically think of you as may be legit. Did your New Zealand accent may be kind of help you know? No. Okay. Because this is the thing with wine is that it? When you think about the great wine regions historically in the world, they're usually and what we call the old world, which is your upright usually France and very aristocratic very formal. There's a process there's guardrails around who does want. You. Come from a place where you just don't know what you don't know It's startling people I. Think because there I think in their mind they think. How dare you like the audacity you know don't you know how this works in this industry type of sort of approach and when you think about the wind business on the wine making side on the ownership side even within the hiring of distributors, it's mostly older men. So I think what was startling was in why my accent and help me was because I was so young. I was a woman and I was a woman of color. At that time the wine industry was was a very close knit hosed off industry. With. A lot of deep tradition that we we respect. But at the same time not a lot of innovation, not a lot of disruption and so we looked very foreign. In these situations. What was the first restaurant client who who said Okay we'll buy a couple bottles. I can cite one in San Francisco that was a very it was a it was a learning moment for us, but ultimately became probably are I You know really notable account anyway where I I was doing my my cold calling routine.

New Zealand Andrea California Los Angeles USC San Francisco Robyn US Robin mcbryde Long Beach France director New Orleans
"robin mcbryde" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

05:32 min | 2 months ago

"robin mcbryde" Discussed on How I Built This

"Okay so I warned you last time this story is epic right and I am assuming you're here because you've already heard part one of this two part story how two half sisters who didn't know the other existed until both were grown up went onto launch one of the biggest black owned wine companies in the world. . But if you haven't heard part one, , please stop listening right now and go back one episode and your podcast queue to hear it. . As for the rest of you, , you've now had a few days to dry your eyes and recover from the first half of the story. . Which means we are at the business building part of what would eventually become the McBride Sisters Collection. . Now, , the thing about Andrea and Robin mcbryde is that despite both growing up in winemaking regions Robin in Monterey California, , Andrea in new. . Zealand neither sister had any real connection to the industry and neither had any real money to put towards a business. . They were also young women of color trying to break into an industry that's often been dominated by older mainly white men. . But now this matter they didn't care. . They knew that they both shared a love of wine and that they both had a deep and powerful desire to work together. . and. . There was one other thing. . They were motivated by mission they wanted to build a company that would make wine more accessible to disrupt and demystify the sometimes intimidating parts of wine culture. . Grape varietals had a tasted regional nuances. . Ratings even had a read labels. . And when they I dreamed up the idea of starting wine company Robin, , the older sister had been working at a corporate job and was married with three children and Andrea, , was a college student at USC. . I mean. . Neither of you had a whole lot of start up cash if any did you Robyn did you I mean you had been working but you also family did you have any savings I mean not match you know it was kind of a nearly paycheck to paycheck. . Already got married. . We had recently purchased a home, , but you know we have brand new twin babies and <hes> an older girl. . So there wasn't a whole lot of cash available and under assuming given that you're on scholarship at USC in a college student, , you probably were broke right I. . Mean I got my scholarship checks in on. . Where you could get a job and make money you know that was that was what I did. . So the the the original idea was it sounds like what you guys settled on was let's just import wine and and Kinda put a label on it was that the initial idea. . So we had this grand vision we felt like what was really critically important was that. . Incredibly passionate about wine yes. . Students of wine but we need to learn the business of wine and you know we could get this license in California, , a federal import license that was like fifteen hundred dollars. . It was like our total life savings and we could import other people's winds and we started by reaching out to two families in New Zealand, , and then we could we could learn the business and we went to them and basically said, , you know don't put all your eggs and basket. . We think California could be a great market to grow your brands and your winds and we negotiated really long payment term so he could bring in the wine. . Sell it. . Click the cash, , pay the light bill and then pay them back and then. . As a part of the process was every harvest. . We come back and you guys teach us how to make wine. . And you Andrea ahead of some connections in new. . Zealand 'cause you're from there and your family, , your family farmers. . Yeah. . So when you first approach these wineries in New Zealand and they agreed to send you wine. . How did that work like how many? ? How many bottles of wine did you initially by and then where did you go to sell them? ? So yeah so it was crazy. . It was at the time at felt like it was an insanely huge amount of wine. . In it was a palette which is. . Fifty Four I. . Like the the minimum of what you can put on a boat. . But for us, , that was just an insane an internet case of wine. . There's twelve bottles. . So right it just felt like a huge defeat to be able to get these licenses because you know the the sale of alcohol states is highly regulated. . And it's very strict and so just the process of obtaining a license to import seemed and felt like such a huge rigorous process and then and then to convince people. . You know to entrust in US and give US product and then to get on a boat and then and then bring it into the port of Long Beach at the time, , and then put it into a federally bonded warehouse because you can't just like bring that to your house has to go into

New Zealand Andrea California Los Angeles USC San Francisco Robyn US Robin mcbryde Long Beach France director New Orleans
Interview With Robin McBride and Andra McBride John

How I Built This

05:32 min | 2 months ago

Interview With Robin McBride and Andra McBride John

"Okay so I warned you last time this story is epic right and I am assuming you're here because you've already heard part one of this two part story how two half sisters who didn't know the other existed until both were grown up went onto launch one of the biggest black owned wine companies in the world. But if you haven't heard part one, please stop listening right now and go back one episode and your podcast queue to hear it. As for the rest of you, you've now had a few days to dry your eyes and recover from the first half of the story. Which means we are at the business building part of what would eventually become the McBride Sisters Collection. Now, the thing about Andrea and Robin mcbryde is that despite both growing up in winemaking regions Robin in Monterey California, Andrea in new. Zealand neither sister had any real connection to the industry and neither had any real money to put towards a business. They were also young women of color trying to break into an industry that's often been dominated by older mainly white men. But now this matter they didn't care. They knew that they both shared a love of wine and that they both had a deep and powerful desire to work together. and. There was one other thing. They were motivated by mission they wanted to build a company that would make wine more accessible to disrupt and demystify the sometimes intimidating parts of wine culture. Grape varietals had a tasted regional nuances. Ratings even had a read labels. And when they I dreamed up the idea of starting wine company Robin, the older sister had been working at a corporate job and was married with three children and Andrea, was a college student at USC. I mean. Neither of you had a whole lot of start up cash if any did you Robyn did you I mean you had been working but you also family did you have any savings I mean not match you know it was kind of a nearly paycheck to paycheck. Already got married. We had recently purchased a home, but you know we have brand new twin babies and an older girl. So there wasn't a whole lot of cash available and under assuming given that you're on scholarship at USC in a college student, you probably were broke right I. Mean I got my scholarship checks in on. Where you could get a job and make money you know that was that was what I did. So the the the original idea was it sounds like what you guys settled on was let's just import wine and and Kinda put a label on it was that the initial idea. So we had this grand vision we felt like what was really critically important was that. Incredibly passionate about wine yes. Students of wine but we need to learn the business of wine and you know we could get this license in California, a federal import license that was like fifteen hundred dollars. It was like our total life savings and we could import other people's winds and we started by reaching out to two families in New Zealand, and then we could we could learn the business and we went to them and basically said, you know don't put all your eggs and basket. We think California could be a great market to grow your brands and your winds and we negotiated really long payment term so he could bring in the wine. Sell it. Click the cash, pay the light bill and then pay them back and then. As a part of the process was every harvest. We come back and you guys teach us how to make wine. And you Andrea ahead of some connections in new. Zealand 'cause you're from there and your family, your family farmers. Yeah. So when you first approach these wineries in New Zealand and they agreed to send you wine. How did that work like how many? How many bottles of wine did you initially by and then where did you go to sell them? So yeah so it was crazy. It was at the time at felt like it was an insanely huge amount of wine. In it was a palette which is. Fifty Four I. Like the the minimum of what you can put on a boat. But for us, that was just an insane an internet case of wine. There's twelve bottles. So right it just felt like a huge defeat to be able to get these licenses because you know the the sale of alcohol states is highly regulated. And it's very strict and so just the process of obtaining a license to import seemed and felt like such a huge rigorous process and then and then to convince people. You know to entrust in US and give US product and then to get on a boat and then and then bring it into the port of Long Beach at the time, and then put it into a federally bonded warehouse because you can't just like bring that to your house has to go into

New Zealand Andrea California USC United States Mcbride Sisters Collection Robin Mcbryde Robin Robyn Monterey California Long Beach
"robin mcbryde" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

06:37 min | 3 months ago

"robin mcbryde" Discussed on How I Built This

"Rise in you're listening to how I built this from. NPR. Everyone, just a quick thanks to our sponsors who help make this podcast possible I two three M who's using science and innovation to help the world respond covid nineteen three M is on track to produce two billion respirators globally by the end of twenty twenty in addition three m also maximize production of other solutions including bio, Pharma filtration hand sanitizers, and disinfectants. More Three M. dot com slash co bid three m science applied life. Support for NPR and the following message come from our sponsor Sierra Nevada brewing company founder Ken Grossman shares why he thinks his company as a family and not just because his daughter and son help run the brewery we've been focused from our beginning trying to do the right thing. Our focuses to treat people fairly to produce great products to try to build a company to culture that sustaining but it's also a community family to learn more go to Sierra. Nevada dot. COM please drink responsibly. Thanks also to Earth. Class Mail Register Your Business with a virtual address from Earth Class Mail they can also digitize your postal mail so you can focus on more important things like your business visit. Earth Class Mail, dot com slash built for details. I'm Rodney Komar. This episode of louder than a riot. Bias against rap lyrics seal the fate of no limits mcphillips. Guy should be incarcerated and I know that his music got him incarcerated but they got the wrong guy. Listen. Now to the louder than Araya podcast from NPR? And just one more thing the how I built this book is now available. It's a great read a great gift for anyone looking for ideas, inspiration, wisdom, and encouragement to have the courage to put out an idea into the world. It's filled with a ton of stories you haven't heard and how some of the greatest entrepreneurs you know and respect started out he very bottom check out how I built this book available wherever you buy your books and please if you support what I do on the show, you can show that support by picking up. This the book and thanks. Welcome back to how I built this NPR. I'm guy rise. So it's the late nineteen, ninety s and Robin mcbryde has just received a letter that says her father died. and. That she has a sixteen year old half sister named. Who's been living on the opposite side of the world in New Zealand And the two of. Have never met. So in that moment Robin's life. BASICALLY TURNS UPSIDE, down? But very soon after receiving the letter, she picks up the phone and reaches out for the first time to her father's family. Are On answer the phone and bless her heart she was very excited that after all of their efforts for so many years that I was calling her and I think I. Didn't really get much information what I got was lot of shouting and screaming and celebration and I didn't really quite understand why at first. But that was because Andrea was him in Alabama She was with our car father's family visiting them for for the first time she came to visit for for the holidays. She was there when you received that letter in Atlanta she was so and again yeah. So I was. In Atlanta and Camden Alabama is probably half hour drive from from where I was sitting at that moment. So unlikely that the timing was what it was but well, our aunt was You know very excited that it happened when it did and she actually said hold on talk to your sister and I was very confused because my sister in New Zealand I thought I'd according to the letter but of course, Andrea was sitting in her house. So within a moment's notice I was I was on the phone with this this new sister that I didn't know I had her a few minutes. Andrea. Do you remember what I mean? The must've been such A. Strange even awkward conversation it was it was really surreal because I think from me even though I had known about Robin for. Four years I think In the context of. How I learned about her and are passing away. I had pushed off into this place in my brain where. I was just it wasn't a reality Robin What do you remember the phone conversation between the two of you? I, think I remember that I wasn't prepared for it. On top of that. She had very strong. Accents. So, when the phone was passed over to her and I was like excuse me who who is the son in a? Sandra and. It took a moment really try to figure out how we will be on the phone what we did have a brief conversation and. we made plans to meet a person. She was going to work the next day and I was GonNa meet today Yup. She was Combating York to go back to New Zealand, she was going to New York to meet some more of our dad's family a couple of our uncles and cousins that lived to new. York. A lot of our dad's family sort of migrated from the south to New York and so she had already had plans to go and meet them, and so I said well I I'll meet you there the next day. Wow, and were in New York where you GonNa meet. We made plans to meet in the most beautiful place think which was the Guardia Airport. So. Next Day you flood laguardia both of you and. What do you remember about seeing your sister for.

Robin mcbryde NPR New Zealand New York Andrea Sierra Nevada brewing company Sierra York Nevada Atlanta Rodney Komar Guardia Airport Ken Grossman founder Araya Camden Alabama Alabama Sandra
"robin mcbryde" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:59 min | 3 months ago

"robin mcbryde" Discussed on How I Built This

"I was with. My foster family. May and my brother. Ben. Were my foster brother we were watching TV cotton's after school and the phone rang and I was kind of like the closest one to the phone. So. I picked up the phone and at the time I, I really couldn't understand what the person was saying and I thought it was like one of our friends kind of like playing a trick on us. Remember the like the voice was like super deepen basie and and then I just heard the words Andrea it's Your Dad cer- Daddy. And you know. Pretty Emotional Time. To say the least and In our conversation he was just sort of telling me. where he'd been and that Hit he was so happy to found me and that. I hit this big sister and her name was Robin mcbryde. And the unfortunately as well that he had been diagnosed with cancer, but he was going to Beta. He said all that. One phone. Call. So you knew that you had a sister but. Didn't know how to find her. Correct yeah. It was. It was really surreal because when our dad I reached doubt. You know I think. Him being optimistic. I'm wanting to be cancer. You know that was just. Has Personality and. For me I I remember thinking like Oh. Here we go again and I remember going through with my mother having cancer and me being so young going to the hospital, her getting chemo all these things were dressed normal. You know there was no context until until after she passed away. So I was like Oh here we go again. and. Then I think because he wanted to be so positive and optimistic It got to a point where I said. Okay. Well, maybe he is going to beat this in. You know he got back in contact with me and during this period of time where. You writing litters were talking on the phone we're. Building. Our relationship up. And then I remember my foster mom calling me earned a saying hi Andrea your dead didn't want to tell you but he's actually really really sick and you need to go to. America right now. Sorry And he pasta. Why Before she arrived. Sorry. So it thanks ahead. Felt like. I had lost everybody that I really love the most. I mean at the same time Robin You're living in in Monterey. And you're totally unaware of your dad's conditional or worry was her. Or even the fact that dre existed. How did you find out about your sister? So you know from that point when our dad was able to make contact with Andrea. His family stepped in to help with efforts to try to find me. And you know between the point of our making contact with Andrea between the time they found me was. you know three or four years I guess that it took and I had actually moved from California from Monterey to Atlanta. I was working in Atlanta and evidently our father's family had started to look up through public records and whatever means necessary i. hear that there is an episode of. That helps them with some tips to how you locate somebody who you're not in contact with, and they started sending letters out to people that they could find with my name. They knew my name, your family had my birth announcement. So they had my full name, but still rob McBride I mean there must have been hundreds of Robin McBride's in America Yeah I'm not sure how many how many they actually sent letters to but. Eventually one arrived at my mom's. Back in Monterey. And what did that? What are that letter say yeah she she called me because she was a little. She was a little off guard because has a letter arrived from last name McBride in Alabama, which is where our dad was originally from and she fully was expecting a letter from him or his family. So she said I've I've got this letter and it stressed to you to me to open at. So I was like yeah absolutely and in the letter was written our aunt. Our Dad's sister who lives in Kempton. Alabama is. A little tiny place outside of Selma. And she introduced herself in the letter and said, we're reaching out to you and want to let you know that your father's passed away. At this point he had passed away in nineteen, Ninety six, the letter I got January of Nineteen, ninety nine and said that your your father's passed away and we want desperately to find you you have a little sister. Andrea and You know at the time she was sixteen years old and she she lives in. New Zealand and are desperately trying to find you connect the two of you. Who Sorry? I have little kids I get really. A Superhero action. By kids. I mean was that just totally shocking to you? It was absolutely shocking because I had not yet started my own search to find. Our Father and you know as a little girl who's missing father in her life I. Think you know there was Always a hope Benner dream you know somewhere that I would one day be able to meet my dad and come to fill that that gap. You know that's created by having you know a parent who's not there. So just reading that first line that he had already passed away you know sort of all at once it kind of. has very emotional and had to deal with the fact that I was. I was never going to know that person. He was never going to see me you know as a as a grown woman and that was really difficult to deal with sort of all at once but you know here was this other bidder. That, I have a sister. And so although the letters Stated that she was in new. Zealand. And so I was I wasn't even sure where New Zealand was exactly on the map so. I was a little. Concerned that might be difficult to to meet the sister but You know with that information, there's a phone number on the letter so. was like well, needs to just just suck it up and suck up all the emotions and sort of the disappointment in the reality of the situation with my father, but I need to call. Our family and you know learn about the sister. I. Just found out about and how we can potentially meet. When we come back in just a moment what it was like when they eventually. Did meet. Stay with US I'm Guy.

Andrea cancer Monterey New Zealand Robin mcbryde America Alabama basie Robin McBride rob McBride McBride Robin Atlanta Selma Benner California
"robin mcbryde" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:26 min | 3 months ago

"robin mcbryde" Discussed on How I Built This

"From NPR how I built this show back innovators, entrepreneurs, idealists, and the stories behind the movements they built. I'm guy rise and on the show today, how to sisters who grew up on opposite sides of the world discovered each other med for the first time, and then launched an idea that will grow into one of the biggest black-owned wine companies in the world. McBride sisters. It's possible. You've never heard of mcbride sisters wine and that you've never had one of their chardonnays or brute rose as or one of their blended reds and it's even possible. You don't drink wine at all. But I'm here to tell you none of this matters for the purposes of today's episode because even if all of the above applies to you, this story will change some of the things you might think about business about fate and destiny about overcoming incredible obstacles and mostly. About. Love. This story is so epic that we decided it needed to episodes. So this week you'll hear part one of how Sisters Andrea and Robin mcbryde built the McBride Sisters Wind Company, and next week you'll hear part to. I'll start with the basics. McBride sisters. Wine is now one of the largest black owned wind businesses in the world. There are roughly. Thousand winemakers in the US and McBride sisters wine is among the top two percent in terms of how much wine they produce per year you can find their wines at most major stores like target and Walmart. And they're also higher end. So about twenty bucks a bottle but still designed to be accessible especially, the people who might be intimidated by wine culture and this is the precise problem. Andrea and Robin said out to solve how to open up the sometimes intimidating world of wine appreciation to people normally shut out young people, people of Color women but also make the wine good enough to attract wine. Snobs. Robin Andrea actually founded their business in two thousand five. And they faced just about every barrier imaginable. They were young women of color with no immediate access to a winery no money no connections. But what they shared was a passion, a deep abiding passion for wine. Something else they shared. A bond that was forged in a unification. The two sisters were born nine years apart both have different mothers but share the same father and for most of their early lives neither sister new, the other even existed. But remarkably both women grew up in wine producing regions Andrea the younger sister grew up near Sauvignon Blanc vineyards in New Zealand well, almost seven thousand miles away for older sister robin was living in. Monterey California with her mom. My mom and our shared father a divorce when I was a baby and so it was only she is. So she never remarried. She didn't have any more children She really honestly didn't even very much. I was aware of anyway she hid it from me. I'm not sure and she didn't have a large family at all. She was an only child also so it was really just her and I together in the world you know we were really. Had a really strong bond and really quite dependent on each other and when you were growing up, you didn't have much contact with your dad right none at all. You know a little context. My mom wasn't thrilled with our father when they divorced and you know it was no accidents that they weren't in communication. It was something that she wasn't interested. In doing so for me from a really young age I was just always you know as a child who has a missing parents I was just always like you know where is he? What's going on? Why is it my dad or my life? You know I had a lot of questions from my mom And she was like, well, you know she always told me like you know he's probably noaa somewhere and she's like I don't want to have any communication with him. She's like. Grow Up and do your thing. Right. When you're eighteen, you know if you feel like you want to start a search to find him go ahead and do that, and so I'd always planned. It was always something that I wanted to do because I did want to figure out who this mysterious person was and hopefully have a chance to meet him. What kind of things were you interested in as a little girl? I was a really weird sort of child and I think part of that has to do with the fact that you know I didn't have like cousins around and we didn't have a larger family dynamics that was really kind of you know alone are little bit. But that had me outs exploring the world's a lot kind of on my own. So you know just really curious about nature and the environment and kind of more of that than people in socializing. Aspects of the world so kind of a little a little bit of a different child. Tim Murray feel when you're growing up I, mean. Obviously. There's you know in Salinas and Monterey in threatening areas. There's a strong Latino population when you were a kid at a field diverse or did it feel pretty homogeneous? Yeah. No, it absolutely was not diverse. And as a matter of fact, when I was in elementary school, I think I was the only non white child in the school for for a number of years. So quite homogeneous I would say, did you were you aware of that early on like were you did you feel different absolutely and you know kids are kids, right so they made sure that I do I was aware of that. pointed out how I was different and because I wasn't growing up with our father who is black I'm Biracial, my mother's of German, heritage. I was literally the only one. So it was quite confusing. I very much felt like an outsider I think in the community and. wasn't quite sure how to process it as a little girl. But very aware that I was different than literally everybody else around me when you. When you finished high school what did you decide to do? Did you. Did you want to college? Did you just go right into the workforce? Yeah. So actually I mean academia was always a challenge for me just in terms of the structure and the method of learning and by. A couple of years into high school I was just like this is this is not for me. I was a really bright child's, and I kind of felt like I can learn anything that I. Once without all of this rigmarole, I actually left high school early tested out early with there's a special test if you're too young to take a ged. So I wanted to go to school and I went to the local community college. I wasn't exactly sure what I wanted to do, but I really did love science. So I started taking some courses there, and then while I was.

McBride Robin Andrea McBride Sisters Wind Company Robin NPR Robin mcbryde Monterey California US Walmart Sauvignon Blanc Tim Murray New Zealand Salinas Monterey
Interview with Robin McBride and Andra McBride John

How I Built This

04:59 min | 3 months ago

Interview with Robin McBride and Andra McBride John

"It's possible. You've never heard of mcbride sisters wine and that you've never had one of their chardonnays or brute rose as or one of their blended reds and it's even possible. You don't drink wine at all. But I'm here to tell you none of this matters for the purposes of today's episode because even if all of the above applies to you, this story will change some of the things you might think about business about fate and destiny about overcoming incredible obstacles and mostly. About. Love. This story is so epic that we decided it needed to episodes. So this week you'll hear part one of how Sisters Andrea and Robin mcbryde built the McBride Sisters Wind Company, and next week you'll hear part to. I'll start with the basics. McBride sisters. Wine is now one of the largest black owned wind businesses in the world. There are roughly. Thousand winemakers in the US and McBride sisters wine is among the top two percent in terms of how much wine they produce per year you can find their wines at most major stores like target and Walmart. And they're also higher end. So about twenty bucks a bottle but still designed to be accessible especially, the people who might be intimidated by wine culture and this is the precise problem. Andrea and Robin said out to solve how to open up the sometimes intimidating world of wine appreciation to people normally shut out young people, people of Color women but also make the wine good enough to attract wine. Snobs. Robin Andrea actually founded their business in two thousand five. And they faced just about every barrier imaginable. They were young women of color with no immediate access to a winery no money no connections. But what they shared was a passion, a deep abiding passion for wine. Something else they shared. A bond that was forged in a unification. The two sisters were born nine years apart both have different mothers but share the same father and for most of their early lives neither sister new, the other even existed. But remarkably both women grew up in wine producing regions Andrea the younger sister grew up near Sauvignon Blanc vineyards in New Zealand well, almost seven thousand miles away for older sister robin was living in. Monterey California with her mom. My mom and our shared father a divorce when I was a baby and so it was only she is. So she never remarried. She didn't have any more children She really honestly didn't even very much. I was aware of anyway she hid it from me. I'm not sure and she didn't have a large family at all. She was an only child also so it was really just her and I together in the world you know we were really. Had a really strong bond and really quite dependent on each other and when you were growing up, you didn't have much contact with your dad right none at all. You know a little context. My mom wasn't thrilled with our father when they divorced and you know it was no accidents that they weren't in communication. It was something that she wasn't interested. In doing so for me from a really young age I was just always you know as a child who has a missing parents I was just always like you know where is he? What's going on? Why is it my dad or my life? You know I had a lot of questions from my mom And she was like, well, you know she always told me like you know he's probably noaa somewhere and she's like I don't want to have any communication with him. She's like. Grow Up and do your thing. Right. When you're eighteen, you know if you feel like you want to start a search to find him go ahead and do that, and so I'd always planned. It was always something that I wanted to do because I did want to figure out who this mysterious person was and hopefully have a chance to meet him. What kind of things were you interested in as a little girl? I was a really weird sort of child and I think part of that has to do with the fact that you know I didn't have like cousins around and we didn't have a larger family dynamics that was really kind of you know alone are little bit. But that had me outs exploring the world's a lot kind of on my own. So you know just really curious about nature and the environment and kind of more of that than people in socializing. Aspects of the world so kind of a little a little bit of a different

Robin Andrea United States Mcbride Mcbride Sisters Wind Company Robin Robin Mcbryde Monterey California Walmart Sauvignon Blanc New Zealand
"robin mcbryde" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"robin mcbryde" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Good luck from traffic leader KCBS KCBS, news time, six twenty Alaska. Senator Lisa Murkowski is the lone Republican who has vowed to vote against the confirmation of judge Brett Kavanagh to the US supreme court to talk more about this. We're joined on the KCBS ring central Newsline by KTV, a Alaska reporter, Rhonda McBride who hosts the weekly public affairs program frontiers. Tell us a little bit about the pressure. Lisa Murkowski was facing. We understand that even before the sexual assault allegations came up there were groups pressuring her to vote against a Brett Kavanagh's confirmation. Well enough to understand that. Alaska has an extremely high rate of sexual assault. It's three times the national average so one in three in Alaska. And of course, a lot of the sexual assaults in Alaska are disproportionately skewed towards Alaskan native women, we've had homicides unsolved homicides involving Alaskan native women and reciproc- hausky for years and years and years has heard this testimony. In person, the tears the grief, the inner generational trauma. That people have experienced from these high rates of assault. So I think, you know, deep wooded her is a true empathy for for what Alaska's population experiences. Beyond that issue, which of course is a major one for that constituency. Am I right bits Alaskan? Natives were also concerned about some rulings of judge Kavanagh's. That's right there are there are a number of tribal sovereignty issues. A number of court cases that are out there both in Alaska and nationally that there were concerns that that cavenaugh as a supreme court judge would Justice would rule against those. And and number of Alaskan native groups like the Alaska federation of natives is the largest one of the largest native groups in the country, not just Alaska came out against cavenaugh. So she has had pressure from many different fronts. Certainly on a nationally. It seemed like unknown what she was going to do until this morning when she voted against actually moving the nomination forward in Alaska were there any hints as to what she might do. Well, I think you know, Alaska is is is a very conservative state. And I think she was under a tremendous amount of pressure because she is a moderate in a state that is very red. And she's also a moderate in a country. That's you know in a in a congress. It's very read. So you know, she she had a lot of pressure. But I you know, I personally after having watched her and I've been a reporter in Alaska since nineteen eighty eight. You know, it doesn't really surprise me because she has had a history is dealing with a lot of difficult things. Perhaps one of the most was what her father Frank Murkowski. He was a US Senator he stepped down to become governor of Alaska and it created this huge firestorm. When he appointed Lisa Murkowski, his daughter to replace him as a US Senator and Alaskans were very angry about that. It took many years for the criticism to die down. And then you know, she was reelected, and then came her historic ride in campaign in twenty ten and that was when she was beaten in a Republican primary by Joe Miller who is a tea party candidate and Alaskan natives at that time played a major role in helping her would that right in Tampa. Here at that time. It seemed like mission impossible. So Lisa Murkowski has a long history of having to deal with difficult circumstances. Thanks so much for making some time for us very much. Appreciate it. Again. That is Robin mcbryde a reporter with KTV a in Alaska..

Alaska Senator Lisa Murkowski Alaska federation of natives US Brett Kavanagh Justice KCBS reporter assault Frank Murkowski Rhonda McBride Robin mcbryde reciproc- hausky Senator cavenaugh congress Joe Miller Tampa